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Notice Of Resolution

Volume 229: debated on Thursday 4 May 1876

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I beg, Sir, to give Notice that on the earliest opportunity afforded to me I purpose submitting to the House the following Resolution:—

"That, having regard to the declaration made by Her Majesty's Ministers during the progress of the Royal Titles Act through Parliament, this House is of opinion that the Proclamation issued by virtue of that Act does not make adequate provision for restraining and preventing the use of the title of Empress in relation to the internal affairs of Her Majesty's dominions other than India."

I think it may be convenient that I should state that it is my intention to place this Notice formally on the Paper for to-morrow, as an Amendment on the Motion for going into Committee of Supply, in the hope that the right hon. Gentleman at the head of the Government and my noble Friend (the Marquess of Hartington) may be able to make arrangements for this Motion being brought on at the earliest convenient time.

There is no occasion whatever for postponing until to-morrow a settlement of the point that has been raised by the hon. and learned Gentleman. He has given Notice of what is, in my opinion, not merely a Vote of Censure upon the Government, but one which involves a want of confidence altogether. I think, therefore, it would be for the convenience of the House on both sides—with, of course, due regard to the general circumstances which attend sudden Motions of this kind—that we should at once fix a day, and an early one, for the consideration of the Motion. I will, therefore, place this day week at the disposal of the hon. and learned Gentleman, and I trust he will be able in the meantime to consult his Friends on the subject.

gave Notice that to-morrow evening he would ask the hon. and learned Gentleman the Member for Taunton whether it was his intention to divide the House upon the Motion of which he had given Notice? It would be in the recollection of the House that on the occasion of the third reading of the Royal Titles Bill—["Order."]

The hon. Gentleman may give Notice that he intends to put a Question, but he cannot state his reasons for putting that Question.