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Commons Chamber

Volume 65: debated on Tuesday 21 July 1914

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House Of Commons

Tuesday, 21st July, 1914.

The House met at a Quarter before Three of the clock, Mr. SPEAKER in the Chair.

Private Business

Whitwell and District Gas Bill [ Lords],

To be read the third time To-morrow.

Liverpool United Gaslight Company Bill [ Lords],

As amended, to be considered To-morrow.

Wesleyan and General Assurance Society Bill [ Lords] (by Order),

Third Reading deferred till Friday.

Oxford and District Tramways Bill (by Order),

Third Reading deferred till To-morrow, at a quarter-past Eight of the clock.

Skegness Urban District Council Bill [ Lords] (by Order),

Consideration, as amended, deferred till To-morrow.

North Eastern Railway Bill [ Lords] (by Order),

Consideration, as amended, deferred till To-morrow.

Great Central Railway (Pension Fund) Bill [ Lords] (by Order),

Second Reading deferred till To-morrow.

Great Northern Railway Bill [ Lords] (by Order),

Order read for resuming adjourned debate on Amendment to the Question ( 30th June), "That the Bill be now read a second time."

Which Amendment was to leave out the word "now," and at the end of the Question to add the words "upon this day three months."—[ Mr. Wardle.]

Question again proposed, "That the word 'now' stand part of the Question."

I desire, in withdrawing my Amendment, to make a short statement. It is true that the company have received a deputation, but the men have not received all the satisfaction which we think they ought to have. There are still one or two points outstanding, namely, the question of the annual general meeting of the members of the fund, and the question of a secret ballot. There is also dissatisfaction with regard to the representation which has been given. But as the company have made some advance on their previous position, and as at some future time there will be an opportunity of raising these questions, I desire to withdraw the Amendment.

Amendment, by leave, withdrawn.

Main Question again proposed.

Question put, and agreed to.

Bill read a second time, and committed.

Mersey Docks and Harbour Board Bill [ Lords] (by Order),

Second Reading deferred till To-morrow.

Local Government Provisional Order (No. 23) Bill,

Third Reading deferred till To-morrow.

Clyde Navigation Order Confirmation Bill,

Second Reading deferred till To-morrow.

Belgian Nationality (Miscellaneous, No 5, 1914)

Copy presented of Dispatch from His Majesty's Minister at Brussels enclosing a Copy of the Belgian Law of 26th May, 1914, respecting Belgian Nationality [by Command]; to lie upon the Table.

Board Of Education

Copy presented of Regulations under which Grants to Schools for Mothers in England and Wales will be made by the Board of Education during the year ending on the 31st March, 1915 [by Command]; to lie upon the Table.

Greenwich Hospital And Travers' Foundation

Copy presented of Statement of the estimated Income and Expenditure of Greenwich Hospital and Travers' Foundation for the year 1914–15 [by Act]; to lie upon the Table, and to be printed. [No. 372.]

Oral Answers To Questions

Asia Minor

1.

asked the Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs, what information he can give as to the pillaging of the farm of His Majesty's Vice-Consul at Aivali by Turks; whether the Vice-Consul had warned His Majesty's Consul at Smyrna that an attack might be expected; what cause for the attack has been alleged by the Turkish Government; and what demand for reparation His Majesty's Government has made?

I am expecting a full report on the matter. His Majesty's Consul-General in Smyrna has received assurances from the Vali that. Mr. Eliopoulo will be compensated for any loss incurred by him.

2.

asked the Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs whether his attention has been called to the fact that between 31st May and 13th June Turkish bands attacked the Greek population of Phocea; that many were massacred; that some escaped on board an English steamer, while others took refuge in the house of a French archæologist, M. Sartiaux, and that old men and women were tortured by amputation; and whether His Majesty's Consul at Smyrna is assisting in the work of relief?

I learn from His Majesty's Consul-General at Smyrna that such an attack was made on the 12th ultimo, in circumstances of barbarity. Many refugees were saved through the protection afforded them by Monsieur Sartiaux and his companions, and others were towed over to Mitylene by an English launch. I have no information as to any special measures of relief.

3.

asked the Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs whether, he will publish the reports of His Majesty's Consuls and also of the dragoman of His Majesty's Embassy at Constantinople on the recent atrocities committed against Greeks in Asia Minor; and, if not, whether he will state the reasons which militate against publication?

I am unwilling to publish such reports for very similar reasons to those I gave the hon. Member in my reply of the 18th June respecting civil and religious liberty in the annexed territories. Recent occurrences in Asia Minor do not, I am glad to think, represent a normal state of affairs, and if the reports which deal with them were made public, I should, in justice, feel obliged to take a like course in regard to reports dealing with maltreatment of Moslems in the territories recently annexed from Turkey. I am doubtful whether any useful purpose would be served by giving official publicity to a state of affairs which is, I trust, temporary, and in regard to which it is impossible to strike a balance of culpability.

Would not the knowledge that reports of this kind were to be published act as a deterrent in future in all these cases? Will the right hon. Gentleman consider that point?

My impression is that at the present moment the net result of publishing these reports would be to give great offence to four or five different foreign States, and not do much good.

Armenia

4.

asked the Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs, if he will give the location of the Consulates and Vice-Consulates of Great Britain, France, Germany, and Russia in the vila-yets affected by the reform scheme for Armenia?

The hon. Member will find lists of the Consular posts in question in the Almanack de Gotha, pp. 1183, 1184, and 1186, and further particulars as to His Majesty's Consular Representatives in the Foreign Office list. There are copies of both publications in the Library.

Portuguese West Africa (Rev J S Bowskill's Arrest)

5.

asked the Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs whether he has received the Report of Mr. Hill, the British Consul sent to make investigations at San Salvador, into the events connected with the arrest of Mr. Bowskill; and whether he will issue the Report as a White Paper at the earliest possible date?

The Report has been printed for consideration, and as soon as I have read it I will say whether it can be laid.

Persia

6.

asked the Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs whether he is able to explain how the authority of the Government of Persia can be maintained, especially in the South, while the Persian Treasury remains empty; whether he will say if the British and Russian Governments are prepared now to advance money to meet the pressing needs of the Persian Government; and, if so, on what security?

I would refer the hon. and gallant Member to my remarks on the subject of Persia on the 29th ultimo—to be found in column 113 of the Parliamentary Debates of that day. I cannot usefully add anything to them at this juncture. They state the extent to which His Majesty's Government propose to advance money.

Is the right hon. Gentleman aware of the position on the Bagdad-Kermanshah road, where £120,000 worth of British goods are held up owing to the unrest in the country, while Russian goods from the North flow in uninterruptedly?

That is not in connection with my hon. Friend's question; but as a matter of fact, that particular point has been brought to my notice, and some days ago I made the facts known to the Russian Government. I pointed out that in the interests of the "open door" for trade the Russian Consul at Kermanshah ought to be instructed to give support to the Persian Governor-General in measures to keep the road open, and the Russian Government have promised to send such instructions.

7.

asked the Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs, whether, in view of the fact that the Persian Treasury has stopped payment to all Persian officials as well as to the Swedish gendarmerie, he has taken measures to ensure the maintenance of order in the territories where the Anglo-Persia Oil Company hold concessions; and whether he has satisfied himself that the Bakhtiari chiefs and the sheikh of Mohammera can protect the company's works and pipe-line without the help of the Persian Government in the districts dominated by those chiefs?

His Majesty's Government are ready to advance funds for the payment of the gendarmerie, which I trust will enable that force to maintain order in Fars and Kerman. In reply to the second part of the question, I see no reason to apprehend danger to the company's works.

Supposing these wild tribes are ineffectual in maintaining the works of the company, is the only other resource to have troops from India?

I think it is impossible to discuss various hypothetical contingencies. I can only contemplae the most probable contingencies, and I would reply to my hon. Friend by saying that I think the most probable contingency is that, supposing the tribes in question feel that it is to their interest to keep order and see that the pipe-line is not interfered with, no measures on our part will be necessary.

is my right hon. Friend aware of the agitation which has now started in the Russian Press against the Anglo-Persian oil arrangement altogether?

I dealt with that point expressly in the speech which I made a short time ago in the House. I can only say that the agitation in the Russian Press is not likely to have any influence whatever on the conduct of the tribesmen.

Is there not every reason to believe that the tribes highly appreciate this industry, which will put so much money into their pockets?

I have already stated what I consider to be the most likely hypothesis, and if that should be so no measures will be necessary.

Do the Russian Government regard this contract as being in conformity with the Anglo-Russian Agreement with regard to Persia?

I must ask for notice of that. I have already answered one question very fully without notice, and I must ask for notice of further questions.

8.

asked the Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs, whether he is in a position to report the result of his recent communications with the Russian Foreign Office upon the existing state of affairs in Persia, and upon matters which have lately arisen in connection with the Anglo-Russian Convention of 1907; and whether he will state the latest date when Russia's determination to preserve the independence of Persia was officially reaffirmed by Russia?

I will give the present state of the communications about the collection of taxes in Persia in reply to the next question on the Paper. I cannot make any more definite statement of a general character than I have made previously on the Foreign Office Vote. The independence and integrity of Persia as explained by me on the Foreign Office Vote the other day has been on both sides the basis of all conversations, whether this year or previously, and the Russian Government have repeatedly disclaimed any intention of annexing any part of Persian territory.

Can the right hon. Gentleman say how long these communications are likely to last, and whether he will be able to make any statement in regard to this matter before the end of this Session?

The communications, I think, are likely to last as long as Persia is in an unsettled state.

9.

asked the Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs whether he has official information to the effect that Russia insists upon the supervision of taxation in the Northern Provinces of Persia by the Russian Consular authorities; whether Russia has decided that the revenues of Azerbaijan are to be paid into the Russian bank; and, if so, has he protested, or does he intend to protest, against either or both of those measures as an infringement of the Anglo-Persian Convention of 1907?

The question of the collection of taxes in Persia by Russian officials was brought by us to the notice of the Russian Government last month, and a reply has been received to the effect that the collection of taxes by Russian Consuls has occurred in the case of Russian subjects and Russian protected persons, and that these revenues have been paid into the Russian bank, but that an account is kept of all sums collected by Russian Consuls and nothing is taken from the Persian Treasury.

Has the right hon. Gentleman any information as to the sum of £42,000, said to have been impounded by the Russian bank, which was to pay the police and the gendarmerie?

12.

asked whether any representations have yet been made to the Russian Government with regard to the collection and appropriation of taxes in Azerbaijan by Russian officials; and whether the financial administration of that province is now entirely in the hands of Russia?

I have repeatedly stated that this is one of the questions in connection with Persia that I have brought to the notice of the Russian Government; the extent to which financial administration in that province is in the hands of Russian officials will appear from my answer already given to question No. 9.

13.

asked whether any reply has been sent by His Majesty's Government or the Russian Government to the Memorandum handed to the British and Russian representative at Teheran by the Persian Government in June last?

I can only answer for the British Government. So far as concerns them the answer is in the negative. There is no object in our making a reply to the Persian Government on a Memorandum which, although a copy was communicated to His Majesty's Government, was addressed by them to the Russian Government.

China (Standard Oil Company)

10.

asked the Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs whether the Standard Oil Company, under its agreement with the Chinese Government, has a monopoly extending over all China for a year, or whether it can operate only in the province of Shansi?

By the terms of the agreement the Standard Oil Company have acquired certain rights in the provinces of Shensi and Chihli. The agreement contains no reference to the province of Shansi. It confers no monopoly over the whole of China, but it does contain a provision by which the Chinese Government is precluded from giving before February next any concession to other foreigners for petroleum bearing properties in China. This, of course, does not affect any prior concessions which may have been granted by the Chinese Government.

Anglo-Portuguese Treaty

11.

asked whether any progress has been made in the negotiations for the conclusion of an Anglo-Portuguese treaty of commerce?

His Majesty's Government have good reason to believe that these protracted negotiations have reached a final stage, and that they may soon be brought to a conclusion.

India

Architecture

14.

asked the Under-Secretary of State for India whether he is aware that formerly the instruction in architectural design given in Indian engineering colleges was limited to copying diagrams of the classic orders of Europe, while Indian architecture was ignored entirely, and that this qualification in architecture was held to enable assistant engineers of district boards to design buildings for municipalities; and whether these conditions as to training and qualifications of engineers doing architectural work still prevail in any part of India?

In the two engineering colleges where instruction in architectural design is given, namely, the Thomason College at Roorkee and the Sibpur College, it is not limited in the manner suggested. The Secretary of State has received from the Government of India some details as to the instruction actually given, and I shall be glad to show them to the hon. Member. I should add that assistant engineers of district boards are not ordinarily entrusted with the designs of buildings of any importance.

Secretary Of State's Council

16.

asked whether it is the intention of the Government to introduce a Bill into this House with the object of reforming the Secretary of State's Council; and, if so, whether the Bill will include the placing of the salaries of the Secretary and Under-Secretary of State for India on the Estimates which have to be annually voted by this House?

Will the suggestion in the latter part of the question be adequately considered by the Government as to the placing of the salaries of the Secretary and Under-Secretary upon the Estimates?

That is a matter that would require legislation, which is not being considered.

Are we to understand that the Secretary of State does not contemplate taking any action to meet the situation which has been created by the rejection of the Indian Council's Bill?

I do not think I said that; what I did say was, that the answer to the question was in the negative.

Service Bounty

17.

asked what has been the result of the offer of a bounty of 250 rupees a man to prolong his Colour service for two years?

I would refer the hon. Member to the reply given to the hon. Member for South Birmingham on the 16th instant.

Is the hon. Gentleman conscious of the fact that that reply did not give any information, and, in consequence, I have put this question?

Police Responsibilities

18.

asked whether the Secretary of State is aware that the work of police officers in India has increased during the last ten years owing to the spread of sedition, which has added to their responsibilities; if so, what action he proposes to take; whether the Secretary of State is aware that, if no present action is taken in regard to their grievances and the recommendations of the Public Services Commission are to be awaited and considered by the Government of India and by himself, at least five years and probably more will elapse before anything can be done to remove such grievances; and will he call for an immediate report in view of the urgency of the matter?

There has no doubt been some increase in recent years in the special responsibilities of the Indian police, as in those of the Indian Civil Service. The Secretary of State is not prepared to act in advance of the recommendations of the Royal Commission on the Indian Public Services, and anticipates that these will be considered and dealt with well before the date mentioned by the hon. Member.

Enlistment Of Coolies

19.

asked when the Government of India proposes to pass into law the Bill to penalise the enlistment of coolies?

I presume that the hon. Member refers to a Bill which may be introduced in the Assam Legislative Council. The administrative expediency of its provisions is at present under the Secretary of State's consideration.

Progress Of Education

21.

asked the Under-Secretary of State for India if he can give the figures showing the proportion of passes to candidates in the various university examinations, in continuation of the figures given in paragraph 98 of the Fifth Quinquennial Review of the Progress of Education in India [Cd. 4635]?

Before the hon. Gentleman replies, may I ask how or why the Noble Lord has received in advance a copy of this Quinquennial Report which other Members of the House have not been able to get?

I think I can reply to that. I do not think the Noble Lord has received the Report; he has received the Fifth, not the Sixth. The Noble Lord will find a statistical statement on the subject in the Sixh Quinquennial Review of the Progress of Education in India, which will shortly be in the hands of Members.

If the Quinquennial Report has not yet been published, cannot the hon. Gentleman give me an answer to my question before it is published?

I can give the Noble Lord the figures, and shall be glad to do so, but they are not strictly in continuation of the figures in the last Report.

Students In Arts Colleges

22.

asked for the figures of the number of students in arts colleges in India; and how many of these are living in collegiate buildings?

The Noble Lord will find these figures in the Sixth Quinquennial Review of the Progress of Education in India, Supplemental Tables, Nos. 44 and 45. The numbers are 28,196 and 8,518 respectively.

Post Office

Imperial Wireless Chain

20.

asked what has been the cause of the delay in acquiring sites in India for Imperial wireless stations?

The delay is due to the site originally selected at Bangalore having proved to be unsuitable owing to the decision to establish direct communication between India and Egypt instead of East Africa, to which reference was made in the reply given by the Postmaster-General on the 16th inst to a question by the hon. and gallant Member for Central Finsbury. Another site has been provisionally selected, and is at present under examination by experts representing the Government of India and the Marconi Company.

Wages And Conditions Of Employment (Committee)

75.

asked the Postmaster-General whether, as the Report of the Norton Committee is referred to in paragraph 268 of the Holt Report, the whole of which is to be considered by the Special Committee appointed for that purpose, he will suspend further transfers of work from sorting clerks to postmen until the issue of the Report of that Committee?

My right hon. Friend had already decided that while maintaining the small number of transfers which had been made no new cases should be authorised.

East St Pancras (Representation)

24.

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer whether the hon. Member for East St. Pancras has made application for the office of the Chiltern Hundreds?

Will the right hon. Gentleman inquire as to whether the application has been lodged with the local Radical association?

Death Duties

25.

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer whether his attention has been called to the fact that his Department in Scotland charge, on the death of a husband, Death Duties on gifts made to a wife many years before the death of her husband, whereas in England they charge duty on such gifts made only within three years; is he aware that dissatisfaction exists in Scotland with this inequality; and will he see it remedied in this Budget?

I would point out to my hon. Friend that the law of Scotland gives a husband power to revoke at any time a donation made by him to his wife. In view of this power, the donation forms part of the property of which the husband is at the time of his death competent to dispose within the meaning of the Finance Act, 1894, and is thus chargeable with Estate Duty on his death. In England, Wales and Ireland a revocable donation would also be chargeable with Estate Duty on the death of the donor, and accordingly I see no reason for initiating legislation in the matter.

Does the right hon. Gentleman mean to say that there is no possibility of giving a gift to a wife in Scotland without paying Death Duties on it; if so, ought that not to be altered very promptly?

Small Holdings (Scotland)

27 and 29.

asked the Secretary for Scotland (1) what compensation is being paid to Lady Cathcart in South Uist for the creation of small holdings on her estate; whether compensation is being paid because the geese shooting is the rarest and most attractive sport in the island; whether this is the same island from which the crofters were driven to America to make room for sheep; whether geese have now supplanted sheep; and whether the Board of Agriculture in these circumstances propose to disturb the geese by placing small holders upon the land; and (2) whether his attention has been called to the proposal to award Lady Gordon Cathcart £500 for loss through prospective increase in school rates owing to the possibility of additional school accommodation being required for the children of the occupants of small holdings newly created in South Uist; and whether he proposes to introduce legislation to provide a fund to relieve rate- payers elsewhere of the same necessity, particularly as the birth rate in Scotland is on the increase?

In the case referred to the Arbiter has not yet issued his final award, but has issued his proposed findings. The total amount of compensation which he proposes to award to Lady Gordon Cathcart is £13,049. The rental of the two farms taken, exclusive of sporting rental, was £580. The total includes £400 in respect of seaware and tangle; £2,600 for damage to the geese and duck and other shootings; £1,000 for damage to fishings; £500 is awarded for "Loss through prospective serious increase in school rates owing to necessity for building additional school accommodation." The Board of Agriculture have represented that this latter is not competent, and have asked the Arbiter to state a special case for reference to the Court of Session. They have also taken exception to the amount awarded for the shootings and fishings. It appears from the Award that there will be no loss of annual revenue, but, on the contrary, after allowing interest on the sums to be paid for buildings, there will be a substantial margin, for which the Arbiter allows £1,274; but a sum of £4,523 is awarded for depreciation of selling value due to the creation of small holdings on the estate. This is in addition to the award for damage to sporting rights.

Will the right hon. Gentleman use all his influence to get the Scottish Smallholders (Amendment) Bill put through so as to avoid these unnecessary payments?

Is the right hon. Gentleman aware that the statements in the question that the crofters were driven from this island is untrue; whether he does not know—everybody else does!—that these crofters were voluntarily offered concessions in Canada by Lady Cathcart, were financed by her, and succeeded and prospered there, and were very grateful for what she did, and that is a gross broach of the privileges of this House to put such a statement on paper?

Those facts are not stated in the question, and I must have notice.

Does it not state in the question that the crofters were driven out?

May I ask whether the scenes of the disturbances of small holders, mentioned by the hon. Member for East Edinburgh, are due to the same cause as those mentioned in the last sentences of the question?

30.

asked the Secretary for Scotland whether the Board of Agriculture for Scotland has adopted plans for three standard types of cottage which are to be built by them upon small holdings; and, if so, whether No. 1, the smallest of these, consists of a large kitchen with a bed recess, a front room with a bed recess, a small back bedroom, and a scullery with pantry; whether this plan was submitted to him for approval before it was adopted by the Board; and whether he is satisfied that it carries out the requirements of modern sanitation and public health?

The answer to the first part of the question is in the affirmative. The answer to the second part is that provision is made for a recess in the kitchen and also in the front room, but that these recesses may or may not be used for beds, and in any event are open to the ceiling and have satisfied the local authorities concerned. The cottage is designed for people of small means in country districts who presently live in dwellings which are inferior both in sanitation and accommodation. As to the third part of the question, the answer is in the negative, but I have no reason to think that these dwellings, which have satisfied the public health authority, fail to carry out the requirements referred to.

Is it not intended that these recesses should be used as bedrooms in these cottages, and, if so, will these plans be referred for examination by somebody who will take the medical side of the question into account?

They satisfied the public health by-laws and the public health authorities. I dare say they are intended for that purpose. I am inclined to agree with my hon. Friend it is not a good purpose, but they are not the old recesses that used to be called box-beds.

Does my right hon. Friend agree with the suggestion in the question, and, if so, cannot he use his influence to see that those plans are altered so as to meet the highest requirements of modern science and not the older practice which prevailed in Scotland for many years?

Does the right hon. Gentleman not consider recesses for beds absolutely out of date, and will he ask the Local Government Board to see that there are new methods for new buildings?

Would it not be to the public advantage if there was at the Local Government Board for Scotland a man who had been through a sanitary engineering and architectural course?

We have, of course, officials who have the necessary technical experience. I would point out that these recesses are not the same as the old recesses to which my hon. Friend referred.

National Insurance Act

Approved Societies (Valuation)

23.

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer, respecting approved societies with less than 5,000 members, what is their position with regard to valuation in cases where they have been unable to join with other small societies to reach the number named in the National Insurance Act?

I would refer my hon. Friend to the reply given on the 7th July to the hon. Member for North-West Manchester.

Medical Attendance

44.

asked the hon. Member for St. George's-in-the-East, as representing the Insurance Commissioners, whether he is aware that Miss Ruby Holt, of 191, Church Gardens, Ealing, made and forwarded an application on 1st June last to make her own arrangements for medical attendance, which application was refused; whether he is aware that the patient has been attended by Dr. Bennett, of Ealing, who has been the medical attendant of every member of her family for many years past, and in particular has attended the applicant since her childhood; for what reason and under and in pursuance of what Regulation has Miss Holt's request been refused?

The circumstances of the application are in substance as stated. As I have already said in a previous reply to the hon. Member, the discretion to allow such applications for special arrangements rests in each case with the insurance committee.

Does the hon. Member not think that in a case of this sort the application ought to be granted without question or discussion?

Very well. If the discretion is with the committee, ought it not to be exercised in a case such as is raised in the question?

I have no doubt the committee will act in accordance with the instructions given to the committee by the decision of this House.

57.

asked the hon. Member for St. George's-in-the-East whether he will state the reason why the Middlesex insurance committee has neglected to pay Dr. J. Chambré, of South Ealing, the agreed sum payable for his attendance upon twenty-nine insured persons, being members of the District Railway staff resident in Ealing in respect to the year 1913; whether such attendance was given in pursuance of an arrangement made between the committee and Dr. Chambré; and whether full particulars of the claim have been before the insurance committee for some months past?

The insured persons in question had been permitted by the insurance committee to make their own arrangements with the doctor referred to, and, as the hon. Member has already been informed, the dividends payable out of the Special Arrangements Fund to persons making their own arrangements could not be calculated until the accounts of all such persons had been received.

Board Of Trade Inspector (Disputed Statements)

62.

asked the President of the Board of Trade if, owing to the uncorroborated and disputed statements made by a Board of Trade inspector, the Bristol magistrates on 9th July last dismissed a summons taken out against an employer by the Board of Trade under Part II. of the National Insurance Act; and, if so, what steps are being taken to ascertain if this inspector gave false evidence?

I assume the hon. Member refers to the case of the Llewellin Machine Company, who were recently convicted and fined for failure to pay contributions under Part II. of the Act. The summons which had been taken out at the same time against the company for making false representations with a view to avoiding such payment was dismissed by the magistrates, with the following comment (as reported):—

"With regard to the summons under Section 101, we do not think that the evidence of. Mr. Bayliss is corroborated sufficiently to find defendant guilty, seeing that the Act provides imprisonment in the first instance for this offence. Consequently, the magistrates must have corroborative evidence of the statement on which they are called upon to act."
I am not aware that there is any ground for the suggestion that the inspecting officer in question gave false evidence.

Insurance Commission (Ireland)

68.

asked the Financial Secretary to the Treasury the number of assistant clerks, new class, employed in the National Health Insurance Commission (Ireland), the number who entered the class by competitive examination and by promotion from un-established classes, respectively, together with the number promoted to the rank of supervising assistant clerks from both these classes?

Forty-seven of the fifty-one officers in the class referred to at present employed by the Irish Insurance Commissioners, and three of the five who have been promoted to supervising posts, entered the class by competitive examination.

Crown Lands, North Wales

36.

asked the President of the Board of Agriculture whether he has received any resolutions from the Carnarvonshire County Council dealing with the action of the Government as landlord of certain Crown lands in North Wales; what action he proposes to take; and whether the same Carnarvonshire County Council last autumn passed a resolution distraining for rent against two county council tenants on small holdings who were unable to pay up some small arrears without delay?

With regard to the first part of the question, a copy of a resolution of the Carnarvonshire County Council has been received at the Office of Woods, but I do not propose to take any action on it. I have no knowledge of the resolution referred to in the latter part of the question.

Madryn Estate, Carnarvonshire (Small Holdings)

37.

asked the President of the Board of Agriculture whether the Carnarvonshire County Council purchased the Madryn estate for the creation of small holdings; whether the number of holdings on the Madryn estate has only increased from forty-two to forty-eight since the county council be came the landlord; and whether the rents were reduced in no single case, but were raised considerably in some cases?

The answer to the first part of the question is in the affirmative, and according to my information the answer to the second and third parts is in the negative. I expect to receive shortly a detailed report upon the small holdings on the Madryn estate, and I will then communicate further with the hon. Gentleman.

Housing Bill

38.

asked the President of the Board of Agriculture if, under the Government Housing Bill, police con stables will be regarded as Government employés, and houses be built for them?

Police constables are not Government employés for the purposes of Clause 2 of the Bill, but there is no reason why they should not occupy houses provided under Clause 1 in agricultural districts.

Crown Forests (Wood For Post Office Purposes)

39.

asked the President of the Board of Agriculture whether his attention has been drawn to the Post Office statement that private enterprise in this country has failed to supply sufficient wood for Post Office purposes; whether he is aware that the Post Office said that the wood chiefly required by that Department is easily grown in the United Kingdom; and whether, in face of these facts, he is prepared to provide land and grow wood for Post Office purposes on State land?

The answer to the first and second parts of the question is in the affirmative. In the management of the Crown forests the requirements of the Post Office will be kept in view, and the Board will also take steps to call the attention of other owners of forests to the statement recently published on behalf of that Department.

Can the right hon. Gentleman give any idea of how many years he thinks it will take to grow this wood?

That does not arise out of the question, but there is no reason why timber at present growing and matured should not be sold to the Post Office.

Ocean Island

40.

asked the Secretary of State for the Colonies if he will say what is the official explanation of the fact that in Sir E. im Thurn's report on the maladministration of Ocean Island there is no evidence or assertion that evidence had been obtained or sought from Natives or from Europeans friendly to them or from any person but representatives of the Pacific Phosphate Company and the accused. Mr. Campbell; and, if any independent inquiry has been held into the complaints made by the islanders and on their behalf, will he give a reference to the result?

Sir E. im Thurn's report of 1906 did not relate in any way to the affairs of Ocean Island, or the Pacific Phosphate Company, but to alleged maladministration on other islands of the Gilbert and Ellice Islands Protectorate.

41.

asked the Secretary of State for the Colonies whether the charges of maladministration of Ocean Island, which Sir E. im Thurn was sent to investigate, included numerous charges against. Mr. Cogswell of having flogged named natives to the point of death; why neither of those natives nor the Europeans who reported the facts were examined; and whether he is aware that. Mr. Cogswell had previously been in the service of the Pacific Island Company?

I cannot find that any specific charges against. Mr. Cogswell were included amongst the matters referred to Sir E. im Thurn for inquiry. I do not know whether. Mr. Cogswell was employed by the Pacific Islands Company before he entered the service of the Gilbert and Ellice Islands Government in 1901. He retired from that service in 1910.

Can the right hon. Gentleman say for what purposes if not for flogging the Colonial Office officials in Ocean Island keep in their equipment a cat-o'-nine-tails?

42.

asked the Secretary of State for the Colonies if he will give the House the terms of the indenture under which native labourers work for the Pacific Phosphate Company on Ocean Island?

A copy of the present form of indenture will be placed in the Library of the House.

43.

asked the Secretary of State for the Colonies if the concession of the monopoly of Guano phosphate on Ocean Island to the Pacific Phosphate Company was not obtained by misrepresentation and was fair to the islanders, will he say on what grounds the concession was revised and on what evidence or in formation other than that of the company the royalty was doubled?

I have nothing to add to the reply to the hon. Member's question of 7th July, in which I stated that the terms were revised in consequence of a report from the Assistant to the High Commissioner for the Western Pacific.

Wireless Installation, St Kilda

28.

asked the Secretary for Scotland whether the wireless installation at St. Kilda is out of use; whether the Postmaster-General is prepared to seek the authority of the Treasury for taking it over subject to a guarantee to cover the whole net cost for ten years; and whether there is any likelihood of the Board of Agriculture, in carrying out the work of the late Congested Districts Board, guaranteeing this amount or, alternatively, the Highlands and Islands Medical Committee?

I am informed by the Postmaster-General that the facts are as stated in the first two portions of the question. The Highlands and Islands Medical Service Board are maintaining a nurse in the island, and they do not consider that any further part of their funds should be applied towards the cost of the wireless installation. The Board of Agriculture are not prepared to give, the guarantee in question.

Is it not the case that the Board of Agriculture are now continuing the work of the Congested Districts Board, and is it not the case that the Congested Districts Board gave advances for similar purposes, though not for wireless?

Edinburgh Distress Committee

31.

asked the Secretary for Scotland whether he is prepared to intro duce legislation on the lines of the memorial sent to him by the Edinburgh distress committee?

The memorial to which my hon. Friend refers raises wide and controversial issues, and I am not prepared to introduce legislation on the subject at present.

Docs my right hon. Friend propose to get a Report from the Local Government Board?

Scottish Education Department

32.

asked the Secretary for Scotland, with reference to the memorial presented to him signed by the large majority of Scottish Members asking for the transference of the Scottish Education Department to Edinburgh, if it was openly admitted at the time that certain signatures were carried over from a former memorial; and if no exception to the importance of those signatures was made by him at the time the memorial was presented?

It is undoubtedly the case that certain signatures appended to the first memorial and subsequently transferred to the second, were afterwards repudiated by the Members concerned, but, as I have already stated in a previous answer, I think it is not necessary now to revive the controversy as to the precise number of Members supporting the proposal.

Did it not contain the signatures of two of the right hon. Gentleman's colleagues—the hon. Member for Berwick-shire and one of the Scottish Whips?

Some hon. Members said their signatures were appended without their authority.

Is not the last answer one of those half truths which is worse than no truth?

Scottish Bills

33.

asked the Lord Advocate when he intends to take the Second Reading of the following Scottish Bills: The Entails (Scotland) Bill, the Feudal Casualties (Scotland) Bill, and the Burgh Registers (Scotland) Bill; and if it is intended to pass these Bills in this Session of Parliament?

As regards the first two of the Bills mentioned by my hon. Friend, I would refer him to the statement made by the Prime Minister on Friday last. As regards the third of these Bills, namely, the Burgh Registers (Scotland) Bill, it is not my intention to proceed with that measure this Session.

Lord Advocate's Office (Royal Arms)

35.

asked the Lord Advocate, whether his attention has been called to the irregular use of the Royal Arms by his office; whether such use is in contravention of the Royal Proclamation of 1801; and whether he proposes to continue the use of the Scottish quarterings?

The answer to the first part of my hon. Friend's question is in the negative. The quarterings used on the notepaper in my office, in point of fact, follow the quarterings used on what is generally referred to a" the Scottish Great Seal. It has not hitherto been suggested that the die is in contravention of the Royal Proclamation, and I see no reason for the alteration suggested. I shall be glad, however, to consider any representation on the subject by my hon. Friend.

Is it not a fact that quarterings follow those of the Great Seal? Can my right hon. Friend suggest why the flag which is used in Scotland should not also follow the quarterings of the Great Seal?

That is a very different question, and raises quite distinct issues from those raised in the question on the Paper, namely, whether the quarterings upon my note paper are in contravention of the Proclamation of 1801.

Income Tax

45.

asked the Prime Minister when the Committee to in quire into the arrangements with regard to Income Tax will be appointed; if steps will be taken to expedite the investigations of the Committee so as to give effect to their recommendations with the least possible delay; and if the terms of reference to the Committee will be submitted to the House for confirmation?

As regards the first part of the question, the matter is still under consideration, but there will be no avoidable delay. As regards the second part. I have no doubt that the investigations will be conducted as expeditiously as possible. I see no necessity for the submission of the terms of reference to the House; I have already indicated what their scope will be.

Will the terms of reference be sufficiently broad to enable the Members of the Committee to consider all questions relevant to the Income Tax?

Elementary School Teachers (Superannuation) Act, 1898

46.

asked the Prime Minister whether his attention has been called to the position of teachers who re tired under the Elementary School Teachers (Superannuation) Act, 1898, before 1st April, 1912; and whether, as it is stated that legislation would be required to deal with their case, it is pro posed to introduce a measure for this purpose?

The answer to the first part of the question is in the affirmative. With regard to the second part, I am not in a position to make any statement.

Are we to understand that nothing can be done to deal with these cases of hardship in spite of the fact that representations have been made from all sides of the House?

Gold Coinage

47.

asked the First Lord of the Treasury whether, in future, on the issue of all gold coinage he will cause the value to be placed on every coin?

The suggestion of the hon. Member is one which has been discussed on many previous occasions, but it would appear that both the sovereign and the half-sovereign are so well known throughout the world as to render it unnecessary that their value should be specifically indicated on their face. It would be difficult to provide for any such indication without detriment to the artistic character of the existing designs.

San Francisco Exhibition

49.

asked the Prime Minister whether any fund is available out of which men of science invited to read papers or to take part in the discussions at the conferences in connection with the World's Exhibition at San Francisco, and who are unable to defray the entire expense of the journey, may receive some assistance; and whether assistance of this character is being given by foreign Governments?

No special fund is available for the purpose suggested by the hon. Member. As regards the last part of the question, I am not aware of any such assistance being given by foreign Governments. If conferences, to the expenses of which His Majesty's Government usually contribute, are held at San Francisco during the Exhibition, the usual assistance will be given.

Will the Prime Minister say from what fund the £10,000 is being given to the Sir Ernest Shackleton Expedition?

Members Of Parliament (Attendance)

50.

asked the First Lord of the Treasury whether, having regard to the Act of 6 Henry VIII., c. 16, enacting that no Member of Parliament shall absent himself from attendance therein except he have licence of the Speaker and the Commons, and the same licence be entered on record in the Book of the Clerk of the Parliament appointed for the Commons House kept for that purpose and deprived of their wages, he proposes to take any steps to cause the law to be observed or to repeal the Act?

I am not aware that there is any precedent in recent years for the enforcement of the law referred to as regards attendance in the House of Commons. The matter does not appear to be one in which the Government are called upon to take any action.

Does the right hon. Gentleman realise that the circumstances are altered owing to payment of Members?

Is the right hon. Gentleman aware that the hon. Member for East-bourne was absent from 424 Divisions—

I beg to give notice that I shall raise this question on the Adjournment to-night.

Local Government Board Vote

51.

asked the Prime Minister whether he will give another opportunity for discussion of the Local Government Board Vote?

I am afraid there will not be another opportunity to consider this Vote owing to the number of Votes not yet discussed.

Is the Prime Minister aware that the last time the Vote was under consideration the hon. Member for Chatham (Mr. Hohler) made a very violent attack upon the finance of the Borough of West Ham, to which I should like to have an opportunity of replying?

The hon. Member will have an opportunity on the Appropriation Bill.

British Army

Fusilier Regiments (Colours)

53.

asked the Secretary of State for War whether, seeing that two regiments have now been allowed to add to their Colours the name of a battle which took place 150 years ago, he can give any approximate date at which the Fusilier regiments will be allowed to add the name of the Relief of Mafeking to their Colours?

The question of the "Relief of Mafeking" amongst the honorary distinctions to be awarded for the South African war was thoroughly considered at the time and the Army Council do not now see their way to reopen the matter.

Recruits

54.

asked the Secretary of State for War why, seeing that establishments of the Regular Army, Home and Colonial, in 1908–9 were 169,114, and for 1914–15 are 168,500, making only 873 fewer to-day than in 1908–9, it was lately laid down that our annual requirements for recruits are now 34,700 for the whole Army against 37,700 in 1907; and why we need 3,000 fewer recruits to-day than six years ago for practically identical establishments?

I agree with the hon. and gallant Member that the establishments of 1907 and of to-day may be taken for the purposes of this comparison, as practically identical, but I must not be taken as endorsing the aggregates he gives for the years 1908–9 and 1914–15, which are fallacious, inasmuch as they exclude the Indian establishments, and they include officers. The difference between the figures 34,700 and 37,700 is to be accounted for by the improvement in waste in recent years, and by the alteration in terms of service in the direction of lengthening the term and thus reducing the number of recruits required

Queen Alexandra's Imperial Military Nursing Service

55.

asked whether there is an ample supply of applicants to fill staff nursing vacancies in Queen Alexandra's Imperial Military Nursing Service?

Rifle Ammunition

56.

asked the Under-Secretary of State for War how many rounds of rifle ammunition per head are now available for use by the Regular Army, the Territorial Force, and the National Reserve?

Can the right hon. Gentleman give me any indication as to what ammunition is served out to members of the National Reserve?

Royal Navy

Armed Merchant Vessels

58.

asked the First Lord of the Admiralty, if he will show that any other Power and, if so, what Power has adopted the policy of arming mercantile ships for use in the event of war?

I must refer my hon. Friend to the statement made by the First Lord on this subject when introducing the Navy Estimates on the 26th March, 1913.

59.

asked the First Lord of the Admiralty whether his policy of arming merchant vessels for possible use in war time has been followed by any pre tests, official or otherwise, on the part of any other Powers?

61.

asked the President of the Board of Trade whether he has information to show that in the case of cargoes carried in merchantmen armed by the British Admiralty higher or lower rates are required for insurance on cargoes carried in such armed merchantmen; and, if so, whether the higher or lower rates apply to ordinary or to war risks?

I am informed that up to the present time there has been no difference between the insurance rates on cargoes carried in merchant vessels armed by the Admiralty and those on cargoes carried in unarmed vessels. It is impossible to say whether there would be any difference in war time in rates on armed and unarmed merchantmen, as the rates would be dependent on a number of conditions that cannot now be foreseen.

Awards Of British Courts

63.

asked when the Government propose to introduce the measure for rendering the awards of British Courts enforceable to all parts of the British Empire, based on the result of the inquiry made by the Colonial Office as to the views of the Colonial Governments on the subject?

A draft Bill has been prepared, and it is proposed to send it to the Governments of the self-governing Dominions in order to elicit their views with regard to its provisions.

64.

asked whether the resolutions passed at the recent Congress of International Chambers of Commerce, re commending action on the part of the French Government to convene an Inter national Diplomatic Congress to deal with the subject of the enforcement of awards of British Courts, has been considered by his Department; and, if so, with what result?

I understand that the resolution to which my hon. Friend refers had in view the summoning by the executive of the International Congress of Chambers of Commerce of an assembly of business men and legal experts to prepare a draft Convention concerning arbitration in commercial cases which might afterwards form the subject of a Diplomatic Conference to be convened by the French Government. The next step, therefore, apparently rests with the committee of the Congress of Chambers of Commerce.

Labour Exchanges

65.

asked the President of the Board of Trade whether the rooms of Labour Exchanges are avail able for use by trades councils; and, if not, whether he will make arrangements for these bodies to hold their meetings at Labour Exchanges where there are suit able rooms?

Under Regulation 8 (1) of the General Regulations for Labour Exchanges, accommodation within the premises of a Labour Exchange can be granted only for such purposes and on such terms and conditions as the Advisory Trade Committee of the district may approve. In some cases, but not in all, the Advisory Trade Committees concerned have approved of the Grant of accommodation to trades and labour councils. Under the Regulations the Board of Trade are bound by the decisions of the Advisory Committees in this matter.

May I ask if the Advisory Committees are aware that they have this power?

Motor Traction Traffic

66.

asked the President of the Local Government Board if he will consider the advisability of compelling motor traction engines to carry reflecting glasses on the off-side, so that the men in charge may be able to see any traffic coming up behind which is desirous of passing; and whether his attention has been called to the nuisance caused by this obstruction of traffic, especially in country roads?

I have received a few representations on this subject, but I am advised that it is doubtful whether the advantage to be derived from the use of reflecting glasses on these vehicles would be such as to justify their compulsory requirement. The point, however, is one which will be referred for consideration to the Technical Committee on the law and the regulations relating to heavy motor cars and traction engines which is about to be appointed.

Does the right hon. Gentleman think that they are not much use on account of the expense to the owner or because they would be of no practical value?

The question is a very technical one, and I cannot very well answer that question.

Will the right hon. Gentleman take into consideration the advisability of having some means of communication from the rear of these big trolleys to the man in front?

Land Purchase (Ireland)

70.

asked the Financial Secretary to the Treasury if his attention has been called to the address of Lord Chief Baron Pallas to the grand jury at Mayo Assizes on the 16th instant, in which he said that while upwards of two-thirds of the county, in which land purchase was completed, was in a most satisfactory condition, a state of great unrest and agitation prevailed in the remainder of the county owing to delays in the purchase of congested estates, and that steps should be taken with the assistance of the Treasury to enable the Congested Districts Board to carry out their duties under the Land Acts, as otherwise they would never have peace in the county; has he received a copy of the resolution subsequently passed by the grand jury expressing concurrence with the Lord Chief Baron's remarks, stating that the delay in land purchase is due to the failure of the Treasury to provide the necessary funds, and earnestly requesting the Treasury to provide such funds; and whether the Treasury intend to comply with this request, so that the discontented people may no longer be deprived of the relief and benefits intended for them by the Land Act of 1909?

79.

asked the Chief Secretary for Ireland if his attention has been directed to the address of the Lord Chief Baron to the grand jury at the opening of the Mayo Assizes at Castlebar on the 15th instant, wherein his lordship, reviewing the condition of the county, stated that he was informed by the county inspector of police that, as regards two-thirds of its area, the county compared favourably with any other county in Ireland, but that, as regards less than one-third, there was considerable unrest, due to the backward condition of land purchase in these parts; whether he is aware that his lordship said that these people see their neighbours in comparative plenty and pleasure, enjoying ownership, whilst they remained tenants in misery and poverty, and added that, so long as these contrasts continued, they would never have peace in the county; and whether, seeing that the grand jury subsequently by resolution unanimously endorsed the statement of his lordship and made representations to the Irish Government and to the Treasury on the subject, urging the completion of land purchase in the interests of peace and good relations between landowners and tenants, he will say what steps he proposes taking to have immediate effect given to these recommendations?

88.

asked the Chief Secretary for Ireland if he has read a report of the address delivered by Lord Chief Baron Pallas to the grand jury at Mayo Assizes on the 15th instant, in which he said that unrest and agitation prevailed in about a third of the county owing to financial delays on the part of the Congested Districts Board in the purchase of congested estates and suggesting that, in the interest of the peace of the county, steps should be taken to enable the Congested Districts Board to carry out all their duties in reference to the tenants on such estates; has he received a copy of the resolution passed subsequently by the grand jury expressing concurrence with the Lord Chief Baron's remarks, stating that the delay in financing completed and pending sales is due to the failure of the Treasury to provide the funds required for land purchase, and earnestly requesting the Treasury to provide such funds so that sales may be completed; why the Treasury refuse to advance the funds necessary to complete sales under the Land Act of 1909; and what steps the Government propose to take in the matter?

My right hon. Friend has asked me to answer this question, and I will answer it with the similar questions, No. 79 and 88. I have seen the newspaper report referred to, and I have received a copy of the resolutions passed by the grand jury of county Mayo. The Congested Districts Board have definitely purchased and have concluded binding agreements for the purchase of 247 estates in Mayo. The area of these estates is 822,103 acres, and the purchase price £3,218,280. It is obvious that in transactions of such magnitude and affecting such a large number of estates considerable time must be occupied in the necessary valuation surveys, negotiations, and the other proceedings inevitable in the transfer of ownership of land. The Board is making all possible exertions to carry out the purchase of estates in county Mayo, and the delay caused by legal difficulties and procedure, as well as by the necessary proceedings I have just referred to, is much greater than any delay occasioned by financial difficulties, which I hope may be surmounted. It is only fair to state that on no occasion whatever has the Treasury refused to issue stock necessary to complete sales under the Land Act of 1909.

May I ask the right hon. Gentleman whether he has received any representations from the Mayo grand jury, as representing the landlords of the county of Mayo, that they are prepared to accept the principle of compulsion with regard to purchase and sale of estates in lieu of being paid in cash?

No, I have not received any such representations, but I have no doubt that they are quite willing to be paid in cash.

Will the right hon. Gentleman say whether something will be done for the loyal parts of the country in regard to land purchase?

80.

asked the Chief Secretary for Ireland whether he still expects to get his Irish Land Bill passed this Session; if not, whether the obstacles he is unable to surmount are on the tenants' side or on that of the landlords; and what the intentions of the Government now are with regard to this problem, the urgency of which he has repeatedly acknowledged?

I regret that in the absence of any general agreement it has not been found possible to proceed with this Bill this Session. I am not prepared to say who is responsible for the fact that an agreement has not yet been arrived at, but I hope that an arrangement may be come to between the parties in time to enable the Bill to be reintroduced next Session.

Cannot the right hon. Gentleman say with whom he was negotiating and whether the tenants or any one on their behalf interposed any obstacle whatever to the Bill?

No, Sir, I cannot. All I can say is that an agreement has not been arrived at.

81.

asked whether the Congested Districts Board have made an offer for the purchase of the estate of Mr. Francis C. Garvey, Murrisk Abbey, county Mayo; and, if so, with what result?

The Congested Districts Board have made an offer for the purchase of the estate referred to which has not so far been accepted. Negotiations have been postponed pending settlement of questions raised by the Land Commission.

82.

asked what steps the Congested Districts Board have taken to acquire the congested estate of Lord Vaux, in Mayo county?

The Congested Districts Board have had the estate referred to valued, and they have decided to make an offer for purchase which will be issued as soon as practicable.

83.

asked what progress has been made by the Congested Districts Board in the proceedings or negotiations for purchase of the estate of. Mr. Patrick O'Dowd, J. P., in West Mayo?

The Congested Districts Board have had this estate valued, and they have decided to make an offer for purchase which will be issued as soon as practicable.

84.

asked what progress had been made in the negotiations for purchase by the Congested Districts Board of the congested estates of Mrs. Pike and the trustees of the Achill Mission, in Achill, county Mayo?

The Congested Districts Board have decided to make offers for the purchase of the estates referred to, and they will be issued as soon as practicable.

85.

asked whether Mrs. Agnes M'Donnell has accepted the offer of the Congested Districts Board for the purchase of her estate in Achill, county Mayo; and, if not, will the Board take immediate steps to acquire this congested estate compulsorily?

The Congested Districts Board have not yet issued an offer for the purchase of this property.

Civil Service

71.

asked the Home Secretary whether Sir Charles Bruce addressed a petition to the Crown praying for relief from the cause of delay in submitting evidence on the security of tenure of Civil Servants to the Royal Commission; if so, when such petition was received and the terms thereof; by whom the matter was dealt with; and when a reply was sent thereto?

Sir Charles Bruce, on the 8th of January last, forwarded to me a petition to His Majesty, but I do not find in it any reference to the submission of evidence to the Royal Commission on the Civil Service. The petition was received in the Home Office on the 10th of January, was submitted to the King, and was, on the 22nd of January, referred by His Majesty's command to the Board of Education to be dealt with. I understand from my right hon. Friend the President of the Board of Education that a reply was sent to Sir Charles Bruce on the 6th of March. In view of the answer given by my right hon. Friend yesterday to the hon. Member, I do not think it would be proper for me to state the contents of the petition.

Suffragist Prisoner (Miss Grace Roe)

72.

asked the Home Secretary whether Miss Grace Roe is the only suffrage prisoner who has been refused release on bail pending trial, forcibly fed prior to trial, and not released after the period of hunger strike after which other prisoners are released; and what the reasons are for this exceptional treatment of her?

The answer is in the negative. There has been no exceptional treatment as suggested in the case of Miss Roe.