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Messengers

Volume 154: debated on Tuesday 30 May 1922

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73.

asked the Financial Secretary to the Treasury how many messengers are employed in the Civil Service in an established capacity: how many in an unestablished capacity; how' many are ex-service men; how many are non-service men; how many women and girls are employed as messengers; and how many ex-service messengers, showing percentage of disabled, have been discharged from Government Departments during the last 12 months?

Exact information on all the points referred to in the question could only be obtained by a disproportionate expenditure of time and labour, but I am making inquiries and. sill communicate to the hon. Member figures showing broadly the position. I should, however, like to take this opportunity of stating that the classes of adult messenger (established and unestablished) are almost entirely composed of ex-service men.

74.

asked the Financial Secretary to the Treasury why unestablished messengers in the Civil Service do not receive sick pay the same as in the case of established messengers when they are employed on identically the same class of work; and what is the basic rate of salary paid to both established and unestablished messengers in the Civil Service?

Sick leave Regulations applicable to unestablished classes of Government employés are generally different from those applicable to established classes. I cannot accept the suggestion that unestablished messengers are employed on identically the same class of work. The established men are normally employed on superior duties. The basic rates of salary (i.e., exclusive of bonus) in London are 27s. rising to 32s. a week for the unestablished grade (or 55s. 4d. to 65s. 7d. a week in all), and 290 rising to £130 (or £184 10s. to £244 11s. in all) for the established grade.

Is it not a fact that temporary clerks in the Civil Service are paid sick pay, and why should unestablished messengers, the lowest paid class in the Civil Service, not be given sick pay?

I am afraid that in regard to questions between one class and another I must ask for notice. It is rather a detailed matter.

Is it not a fact that the unestablished messengers are the lowest paid class in the Civil Service, and the only class which is not given sick pay?