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Written Answers

Volume 485: debated on Thursday 22 March 1951

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Written Answers To Questions

Thursday, 22nd March, 1951

Education

Sub-Normal Children, Kent

5.

asked the Minister of Education when the 138 educationally sub-normal children in the area of the Divisional Executive for north-west Kent now awaiting places in special schools can expect to be accommodated in the additional facilities to be provided in the development plan.

My right hon. Friend finds that owing to a misunderstanding the figure he gave my hon. Friend on 13th February related to a much wider area. The figure for the area of the North-Western Divisional Executive is 37. In Kent, as elsewhere, a long-term programme will be required to make good the large deficiency of accommodation for educationally sub-normal children, and in the present circumstances he cannot forecast when the needs of the North-Western Divisional area will be fully met.

Absent Pupils (Prosecutions)

6.

asked the Minister of Education if he will make some arrangements whereby children of people who regularly go hop-picking in Kent may continue their education near the hop fields, in view of the fact that fines are imposed on parents who keep their children away from school.

My right hon. Friend would refer the hon. Member to the last part of the reply which he gave on 8th February to my hon. Friend the Member for Faversham (Mr. P. Wells).

University Student Grants, Cardiff

7.

asked the Minister of Education what alteration is proposed by the Cardiff authority in the question of grants to university students.

No proposals for alterations have been submitted to my right hon. Friend.

Personal Cases

10.

asked the Minister of Education what arrangements are being made for the future education of Albert Dallas, aged 10 years, 15, Corsham Street, Hoxton, N.1, who was injured by a bomb in infancy and is now crippled, after spending some years in hospital, and who was excluded from the Rochelle School on 16th January, 1951, after being caned repeatedly.

My right hon. Friend is informed by the London County Council that this child was excluded from school owing to his difficult behaviour, and after reference to the school medical officer was sent for examination at a child guidance unit. As the result of the report received, the authority have arranged for a further examination in a few days' time before deciding what type of special educational treatment is likely to be most beneficial for him.

18.

asked the Minister of Education why the Somerset Education Authority have refused a grant to Miss Leila Walsh, Radstock, Somerset.

My right hon. Friend cannot say. This matter is entirely within the discretion of the local authority.

Junior School, Combe Hay

16.

asked the Minister of Education why he is proposing to close the Combe Hay County Junior School at Combe Hay, near Bath.

The hon. Member is misinformed. My right hon. Friend understands that the local education authority for Somerset have such a proposal under consideration, but they have not yet published notices of their intention under Section 13 of the Education Act, 1944. Such notices would be current for three months during which objections could be lodged with him.

Schoolchildren (Agricultural Employment)

asked the Minister of Education (1) for how many children in 1950 His Majesty's inspectors granted exemptions for employment in agriculture after they had already been exempted for 10 half-days;(2) what steps were taken in 1950 to ensure that children exempted from school to work in agriculture were suitably clad and shod, properly supervised at their work, and conveyed to work where necessary; and to what extent he received reports from His Majesty's inspectors on the non-fulfilment of these conditions of exemption.

In 1950, up to 20 half-day exemptions could be granted without His Majesty's inspector's approval. My right hon. Friend has no information of the number of exemptions authorised. The county agriculture executive committees and responsible local authorities were asked to supervise the arrangements for the children's welfare. My right hon. Friend has received no reports that the conditions of employment were not complied with.

Empire Settlement Act

24.

asked the Secretary of State for Commonwealth Relations if he will extend the Empire Settlement Act, 1937, for a further period after its expiry in May, 1952.

Trade And Commerce

Tinplate Exports

26.

asked the President of the Board of Trade why the amount of tinplate exported to Egypt and Spain in 1950 was greatly in excess of the amount exported to those countries in 1949.

Exports to Spain in 1950 were, in fact, lower than they had been in 1949. There is a traditional trade in tinplate with Egypt. Variations from year to year arise from a number of causes including increases in requirements and expectations of improved supply.

asked the President of the Board of Trade what was the tonnage of tinplate due to be shipped to the Argentine under the agreement beginning 1st July last, and tied to clothing food imports; what was the tonnage of free imports; what were the shipments in each class up to the latest convenient date; and what are the shipments contemplated for the last quarter of the contract year.

Seven thousand five hundred tons of tinplate were allocated to Argentina in each of the third and fourth quarters of 1950 and the first quarter of 1951. A total of 7,363 tons was allocated as "tied" tinplate in the fourth quarter of 1950 and the first quarter of 1951: to this can be added some of the 7,500 tons allocated to Argentina in the third quarter of 1950 when arrangements were somewhat different. Four thousand five hundred tons of tinplate have been allocated for the second quarter of 1951; of this quantity 500 tons are "tied." Shipments of tinplate of all kinds to Argentina between 1st July, 1950, and 28th February, 1951, the latest date for which figures have been published, amounted to 22,240 tons.

Children's Coats (Price)

27.

asked the President of the Board of Trade why the price of a utility top-coat for a child of two to three years of age is £5 or thereabouts; and what investigation has been, or is to be, undertaken to see whether the high price of children's utility coats bears a proper relation to the costs of manufacture.

The maximum retail selling prices for utility overcoats of sizes 18 in. to 22 in. range from £2 13s. 7d. to £5 7s. 8d. according to the quality of cloth. These prices are based on an examination of manufacturers' costs and trading results by the accountant adviser to the Board of Trade and take into account subsequent increases in prices of the cloths from which the garments are made. Distributors' margins on clothing and textiles are kept under review in the light of detailed information as to operating expenses.

Fertilisers

31.

asked the President of the Board of Trade whether he is aware that, as 39 per cent. of the sulphuric acid consumed by industry is used for the production of superphosphates and sulphate of ammonia, the shortage of sulphur will result in a shortage of fertilisers; and what steps he is taking to ensure that there is an adequate supply of fertilisers available to carry out the home food production plan.

I regret that our production of superphosphate has had to be reduced owing to the cut in exports of sulphur from the United States of America. As regards the second part of the Question, I would refer the hon. Member to the answer given to my hon. Friend the Member for Faversham (Mr. P. Wells) on 6th March.

Resale Price Maintenance

28.

asked the President of the Board of Trade what action he intends to take with regard to the resale price maintenance to lower the cost of living.

I expect to be able to make a statement on the subject of resale price maintenance fairly soon.

Superphosphates

33.

asked the President of the Board of Trade what steps he is taking to ensure adequate supplies of superphosphates in the near future.

I would refer the hon. Member to the answer given on 6th March to my hon. Friend the Member for Faversham (Mr. P. Wells).

Silverware (Exports)

41.

asked the President of the Board of Trade whether he will issue licences to use zinc and copper in the manufacture of silverware for export to Eire on the same criteria as licences for export to sterling Commonwealth countries.

No. Our export drive to sterling Commonwealth countries arises mainly from balance of payments considerations which do not apply in the case of the Irish Republic.

42.

asked the President of the Board of Trade if he will make arrangements for the supply of scarce metals for the silverware industry to enable Sheffield firms to complete their important orders for work for the Festival of Britain; and whether licences will be issued by his regional officers for this purpose.

Until 1st July, manufacturers are free to use stocks of partly fabricated copper and zinc, which I assume are the scarce metals referred to. In view, however, of the serious scarcity of these metals, I cannot give any general undertaking to try to divert supplies of metal to firms who have orders for the Festival of Britain. If, however, the hon. Member will let me have details of any cases he has in mind. I will have them looked into.

Bristol Rovers Football Club, Ltd

62.

asked the President of the Board of Trade what steps he proposes to take to see that the recommendations made by the inspector appointed by him to investigate the affairs of the Bristol Rovers Football Club, Limited, are carried out.

I understand that the applicants for the investigation intend to bring certain proposals before the company at an extraordinary general meeting summoned for the purpose, and I propose to await the outcome of the meeting before considering what further action it would be appropriate for me to take.

Sulphur Supplies

63.

asked the President of the Board of Trade what restrictions have been imposed on the purchase of sulphur to conserve dollar expenditure since devaluation.

At no time have there been any limitations. Dollars have been available for import of sulphur without restriction both prior to and since devaluation of sterling. The only factors affecting supply have been the limits imposed by the United States on the amounts available for export.

asked the President of the Board of Trade how much sulphur has been used in tyre manufacture in 1950; and what proportion of this sulphur came from the United States of America.

4,180 tons of sulphur were used directly in tyre manufacture in 1950. In addition, it is estimated that a further 14,000 tons of sulphur were used for the domestic production of the rayon type fabric supplied to the tyre industry in that year. All this sulphur came from the United States of America.

Food Imports

asked the President of the Board of Trade if he will issue a table showing the total importations of

IMPORTS OF FOODSTUFFS INCLUDING BEVERAGES INTO THE UNITED KINGDOM
——Unit of Quantity19391950
Quantity£Quantity£
Grain and flourCwt.188,259,19055,446,208114,609,350159,765,369
Feedingstuffs for animalsTon1,677,4608,935,947748,56516,071,636
Cattle, for foodNumber705,8079,821,045437,28719,374,533
MeatCwt.31,285,30293,297,46725,287,003195,968,853
ButterCwt.8,736,96748,424,4226,705,84090,356,692
CheeseCwt.2,845,4258,868,5443,080,29527,593,837
Eggs in shell—poultryThousand dozen283,27812,832,916167,61821,515,330
Fresh fruit and vegetablesCwt.39,251,03935,010,84931,093,62296,990,849
Raw cocoaCwt.2,576,8503,024,0512,606,84326,725,563
Cocoa preparationsCwt.32,85889,273914,98010,230,089
Coffee, not kiln-dried, roasted or ground.Cwt.591,7721,939,434797,74310,963,707
TeaThousand lb.411,32124,407,578368,60857,394,143
Fish, fresh, chilled or frozenCwt.1,952,6033,206,9412,010,7227,490,773
RaisinsCwt.1,474,4502,329,4691,565,7695,172,038
Unrefined sugarCwt.41,704,95821,793,86242,355,48680,342,524
All other food and beveragesValue55,341,567133,262,408
TotalValue384,769,573959,218,344

Tyre Exports, China

asked the President of the Board of Trade what exports of rubber tyres to China he licensed in the three months before the outbreak of war in Korea and since that outbreak.

Export licences are not at present required except for certain specialised types of rubber tyres for military vehicles and aircraft. No licences to export these types to China have been issued either in the three months before the outbreak of hostilities in Korea or since.

Rayon Yarn Exports

asked the President of the Board of Trade what the exports of singles rayon filament yarn were in February, 1951, compared with the previous month and with exports in 1950.

Exports of singles rayon filament yarn in February were 1,987,000 lb. The figure for January was 2,537,000 lb.—not 891,000 lb. which I

food during 1939 and 1950, divided into any detailed classifications available.

The following is the table:regret having given in answer to a supplementary question by the hon. Member for Clitheroe (Mr. Fort) on 1st March. Exports in 1950 were 24,439,000 lb.

River Board, West Hartlepool

49.

asked the Minister of Agriculture what representations he has received from the West Hartlepool County Borough Council about the alleged unfair incidence of operation of the River Boards Act, 1948; and what action he proposes to take to remove the cause of the representations.

I would refer my hon. Friend to the reply given by my right hon. Friend the Minister of Local Government and Planning on 20th March.

Forestry Commission (Produce)

50.

asked the Minister of Agriculture how far his regulations permit farmers to buy forestry produce on wholesale terms from the Forestry Commission.

Wholesale prices for forestry produce sold by the Forestry Commission are charged only to timber traders. Sales to farmers are at retail prices. If however the farmer calls for timber at the forest, and does his own haulage, he is charged the free-on-lorry wholesale price plus 25 per cent., and this is of course considerably lower than the delivered rate.

Kew Gardens (Admission Fee)

51.

asked the Minister of Agriculture why the fee for admission to the Royal Botanical Gardens, Kew, is to be raised to 3d. on 1st April.

The admission fee to the Royal Botanical Gardens, Kew, was raised from 1d. to 3d. because of the increased cost of running the Gardens in recent years and the general need to reduce Government expenditure.

Vegetable Acreage, Cornwall

asked the Minister of Agriculture when he last gave directions, or advice, to the Cornwall Agricultural Executive Committee as to the land to be devoted to new potatoes and broccoli; and what were the acreages.

Growers of early potatoes in the south-west are encouraged to plant them on land which can be cleared in time for marketing by mid-June; apart from this, no directions or advice have been given to the Cornwall Committee about the land to be devoted to early potatoes. Cropping targets for broccoli were last issued in 1949, when the target for Cornwall was 11,100 acres. Since then county target acreages for vegetables have been discontinued.

National Finance

Goods And Prices (Regulation)

60.

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer if he will make a statement on his intentions in regard to the introduction of the Bill indicated in the Gracious Speech to make available safeguards and powers to regulate production, distribution and consumption and to control prices.

Bbc Investment Programme

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer what capital sum the British Broadcasting Corporation were permitted by the Government to spend in each of the financial years 1946 to 1951 inclusive.

The information is not available for years before 1949, when the limits fixed were not financial. The investment programmes for 1949 and 1950 were laid down for calendar, and not financial, years, and were published in the Economic Surveys for 1949 and 1950. The B.B.C. investment programme for 1949 was £1.6 million, the programme for 1950 was £1.7 million.

Gambia Poultry Scheme (Dollar Expenditure)

asked the Financial Secretary to the Treasury on what date, and for what amount, he authorised the Colonial Development Corporation to spend dollars on the Gambian egg project in excess of the amount announced by him on 26th April, 1950.

The expenditure of 35,088 dollars in excess of the figure announced on 26th April, 1950, was incurred on the purchase of spare parts which were needed in order to keep the original dollar equipment in working order, and was covered by authority granted in July, 1950.

Economic Survey 1951 (Publication)

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer when he expects to publish the Economic Survey for 1951.

Government Departments

Passes

61.

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer if he will state in what Government Departments the pass system of entry and exit still obtains; and what are the reasons which necessitate its retention.

The pass system is only retained in offices where there is a continuing and extensive volume of secret work. Lists of these offices are not available centrally, and I do not consider that any useful purpose would be served by collecting and publishing the information.

Sickness Benefits

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer what are the regulations laid down for the claiming of sickness benefit by civil servants; to what extent they are able to receive benefit in addition to their full salary; and to what extent their salary is reduced pro rata.

Civil servants who wish to claim sickness benefit may do so in the same way as any other insured person. If they do claim benefit, their sick pay is adjusted to ensure that sick pay plus benefit does not exceed ordinary pay. If a civil servant undertakes not to claim sickness benefit, he receives unabated sick pay.

Uno (Full Employment Resolution)

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer to what extent the Government has adopted a full employment standard as proposed in the resolution of the Economic and Social Council of the United Nations in August last.

The Government's decision is being conveyed to the Secretary-General of the United Nations in the following terms:

"It is the firm policy of His Majesty's Government to keep unemployment at the lowest level compatible with the avoidance of inflation. The experience of the last few years has shown a level of about 2 per cent. at the seasonal peak.
However, in adopting a standard which shall represent the international "full-employment" obligation of the United Kingdom, it is necessary to consider the possibility that factors arising outside the United Kingdom, such as a widespread fall in the demand for United Kingdom exports or a shortage of raw materials obtained from abroad, might make it impossible, for a time to keep unemployment at the low levels of recent years. All possible counter measures would be set in train but they might take time to become effective. Furthermore, the danger of provoking inflation in such a situation would be more acute than in the case of unemployment caused by a decline in internal demand.
The Government has therefore decided to make a small allowance for the factors mentioned in paragraph 2 above and to express the full employment standard of the United Kingdom as a level of unemployment of 3 per cent. at the seasonal peak.
It must be stressed that the choice of this standard does not mean that the Government would allow unemployment to reach 3 per cent. before taking vigorous counter action. It will be a continuing objective of the Government's policy to counter any unfavourable trend in employment and to take special measures to deal with those areas in which unemployment has persisted at a comparatively high level. For that purpose, the Government will take from time to time whatever measures are appropriate, having regard to the causes of the unemployment and to the overall economic situation. In the event of severe difficulties arising in the sphere of foreign trade it is possible that even a level of 3 per cent. unemployment might be exceeded for short periods; but the Government would make every effort to avoid falling short of the obligation it has imposed on itself.
The figure of 3 per cent. represents the maximum number of persons registered as unemployed on a given day in any month of the year, expressed as a percentage of the total number of employees. It applies of course to the United Kingdom as a whole and does not preclude the possibility that in particular areas the percentage of unemployment might exceed 3 per cent."
A similar communication is being sent to the Secretary-General of the Council of Europe arising out of the recommendation of the Consultative Assembly on this subject on 26th August, 1950.

Czech Refugees (Visas)

65.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department on what grounds he has given permission to Dr. Kaatochvil to settle in Britain.

I would refer my hon. Friend to the reply I gave to the hon. Member for Cambridge (Mr. Kerr) on 19th March.

Cruelty To Wild Animals (Report)

66.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department when it is proposed to publish the report of the inquiry into cruelty to wild animals.

I have not yet received the report but I understand that it is likely to be submitted before the end of next month.

Civil Defence

Shelter Survey (Consultants)

67.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department how soon London local authorities will be informed whether they have his authority to employ consultants to assist with the second stage of the shelter survey called for in Civil Defence Circular No. 48/1950; and how they are to obtain the other additional staff required to complete this survey by the stated date.

I regret that I am not at present in a position to make any statement.

Amateur Transmitting Stations

72.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether he will make use of the amateur transmitting stations in this country for the purposes of communications for Civil Defence on the lines recently agreed in the United States of America.

The use of the radio for Civil Defence purposes is being studied, but I cannot at present say what use, if any, would be made of amateur transmitting stations.

Recruitment, Kent

73.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many people have already recruited for Civil Defence in Kent; and what is the required number.

The strength at the end of February was 5,000: the provisional establishment is 17,000.

Shop Closing Hours (Report)

68.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether, following representations which have been made to him, he proposes to give effect to the recommendations of the Gowers Committee in their Interim Report on Shop Closing Hours and extend the number of Sundays on which local authorities of holiday resorts may by order permit shops to be opened for the purpose of any of the transactions specified in the Seventh Schedule of the Shops Act, 1950.

This will be fully considered when the time comes to introduce legislation to amend the Shops Act, but for the present I am not in a position to make any statement.

Off-Licences, West Riding

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department the number of applications for each of the past 10 years made to the West Riding of Yorkshire confirming authority for the confirmation of the grant of spirits off-licences which had been made by local brewster sessions within the West Riding; how many of such applications for confirmation were granted in each of such years; and what was the date of the last one.

The following table gives the information requested for the years 1941–50 inclusive:

YearNumber of applications for confirmationNumber confirmed
194111
19421Nil
1943NilNil
194411
1945NilNil
19463Nil
194771
19483Nil
194951
19507Nil
The date of the last confirmation was 25th April, 1949.

House Of Commons (Quorum)

74.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether, in view of the desirability of enabling both parties to be fully represented in debate, he will move an amendment to the Standing Orders increasing the quorum of a sitting of the House of Commons from 40 to 200.

Betting (Report)

69.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department when the Report of the Royal Commission on Betting and Gambling will be published.

The Report was presented to Parliament yesterday and will be published as soon as possible after the Easter Recess.

Prisoners' Aid Societies (Committee)

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether he will review the arrangements for reestablishing men and women released from prison to the care of discharged prisoners' aid societies.

Yes. After consultation with the National Association of Discharged Prisoners' Aid Societies, I have decided to appoint a joint committee of representatives of that Association and of the Prison Commissioners, under an independent chairman, to review the functions and finance of the Discharged Prisoners' Aid Societies, and of the National Association of Discharged Prisoners' Aid Societies in so far as it acts in the capacity of an aid society, and in particular to consider and make recommendations as to—

  • (1) the parts to be played by the Societies and by the State respectively, in the reestablishment and welfare of discharged prisoners;
  • (2) the question of extending provision for after-care in suitable cases, and the methods of making any such provision;
  • (3) the financial requirements of the work, and the principles which should govern the division of the cost as between the State and private benevolence; and
  • (4) any changes that may be required in organisation and staffing, whether of the Aid Societies or in the prisons, for the more effective prosecution of the work.
  • Sir Alexander Maxwell has accepted my invitation to be chairman of the Committee.

    National Health Service

    Medical Auxiliaries (Report)

    75.

    asked the Minister of Health when he expects to receive the report of the Departmental Committee on Medical Auxiliaries, under the chairmanship of Mr. Zachary Cope; and whether he intends to publish this report when received.

    My right hon. Friend has already received the reports, which are to be published early in April.

    Spectacles

    76.

    asked the Minister of Health what is the average period which elapses between an order being given for a person to be fitted with bi-focal glasses and their delivery; and what are the outstanding orders for the whole country as at the most recent convenient date.

    Precise information in this form is not available; but broadly speaking, abnormal arrears have now been eliminated.

    Hospital Admissions

    77.

    asked the Minister of Health whether he is aware of the difficulty experienced by medical practitioners in obtaining admission to hospital for the chronic sick and that many deaths have resulted directly from the failure to obtain hospital accommodation for such persons; and if he will make a statement on the position.

    I know that over the country as a whole there is a serious shortage of beds for the chronic sick. This can be finally cured only by the provision of additional beds, but my right hon. Friend is meanwhile considering a number of measures which he hopes will alleviate the position.

    78.

    asked the Minister of Health if he will make a statement on the result of his meeting with a deputation representing 20,000 doctors, on 15th March, concerning the shortage of beds for emergency cases.

    Not yet. These discussions are still going on and are proceeding satisfactorily.

    Gum Massagers

    79.

    asked the Minister of Health if he will take steps to ensure for the use of dental patients an adequate supply of non-splintering wooden medicated gum massagers.

    My right hon. Friend is not aware of any shortage of these articles.

    Health Centres

    80.

    asked the Minister of Health what instructions have been issued on the subject of the organisation of health centres.

    I am sending the hon. Member copies of circulars issued to all local health authorities. Any detailed guidance required has so far been given on an individual basis to the local health authority concerned with a particular project.

    Dental Fees

    81.

    asked the Minister of Health whether he will give details showing how the various fees included in the total amount of £43,048,000, which was payable to dentists during the financial year 1949–50 were divided between fees for extractions, provision of new dentures, dental examinations, and dental conservative treatment, respectively.

    Full information in this detail is not available. But, on the basis of a sample, it is estimated that the total cost may be divided as follows:

    • Examinations, 5 per cent.
    • Extractions, 6 per cent.
    • Dentures, 61 per cent.
    • Conservative work, 28 per cent.

    Drugs

    83.

    asked the Minister of Health whether, in view of the growing shortage of drugs containing sulphur and of certain medical supplies, such as cotton wool, bandages, gauze and lint, he will ask all doctors engaged in providing general medical services under the National Health Service Act, 1946, to exercise all possible economy in prescribing these items.

    My right hon. Friend will be pleased to consider the hon. Member's suggestion.

    Opticians (Remuneration)

    82.

    asked the Minister of Health whether he will give details showing how the £22,725,000 payable during the financial year 1949–50 for the testing of sight and the supply of optical appliances was divided as between fees for sight-testing, fees for dispensing optical appliances and the cost of supplying optical appliances, respectively.

    Fees for testing of sight accounted for £4,719,847 out of the total of £21,733,620 paid in the financial year 1949–50. Separate figures are not available for dispensing fees and cost of supplying appliances; the estimated apportionment is £8,800,000 and £8,200,000 respectively.

    Pneumoconiosis Rehabilitation Centre, Cardiff

    asked the Minister of Health on what date it was planned to establish a rehabilitation centre for miners suffering from pneumoconiosis near the pneumoconiosis research unit at Llandough Hospital, Cardiff; how many cases it will be able to take at the same time; and whether he will give an estimate of the date by which completion may be expected.

    In November, 1950, it was decided to establish this centre which is planned to take 50 patients. It is not possible at this stage to say when completion may be expected.

    Vaccine Lymph

    asked the Minister of Health how many animals, of each category, were used in 1950 for the supply of vaccine lymph or any other form of inocculation, injection or immunisation.

    Spa, Harrogate (Fees)

    asked the Minister of Health whether he is aware that Harrogate is cutting spa fees to private patients as a result of the influx of National Health patients who have brought prosperity to that spa; and what information he has as to how far other spas have similarly benefited by the health service.

    I am aware that the regional hospital board concerned has contractual arrangements with the authorities responsible for the Harrogate spa and that similar arrangements have been made elsewhere, where reasonable terms can be secured and the treatment is regarded as medically valuable; but the general jurisdiction and management of spas is outside my control.

    Handicapped Children (Accommodation)

    asked the Minister of Health how many places in residential institutions in each of his Department's regions there were for epileptic children in 1939 and at the latest convenient date.

    I will communicate shortly with my hon. Friend giving him such information as is available.

    asked the Minister of Health how many places in residential institutions in each of his Department's regions there were for ineducable mentally defective children in 1939 and at the latest convenient date.

    The figures asked for are not readily available in the form asked for, and I will write to my hon. Friend as soon as possible.

    Smallpox, Brighton

    asked the Minister of Health for how long the Royal Air Force officer who took smallpox to Brighton was ill before he was taken to the smallpox isolation hospital on 28th December; and how long was he in the Dartford Isolation Hospital.

    My information is that the officer suffered from illness not then diagnosed as smallpox from 29th November to 11th December. He consented to go to hospital for clinical study on 28th December and left on 5th January.

    Western Union Countries (Reciprocity)

    asked the Minister of Health when and why negotiations being conducted in 1950 with Belgium, France and Luxembourg for reciprocity of health service benefits broke down.

    There have been no such negotiations, apart from the Convention providing for medical assistance to indigent persons in the Western Union countries which awaits ratification by France and Luxembourg.

    Convalescent Home, Withernsea

    asked the Minister of Health whether a decision has yet been reached about the future use and administration of the Hull and East Riding Convalescent Home, Withernsea.

    Yes; on 12th March I approved in principle the proposal made by the Leeds Regional Hospital Board, to reorganise the home so as to provide accommodation for chronic sick patients.

    Telephone Service, House Of Commons

    85.

    asked the Postmaster-General whether he will now state if he will provide small fixed washable writing plaques in the telephone kiosks of the House of Commons and in a few positions in other parts of the country, including Newport, as an experiment; and what the cost per unit of such plaques would be.

    My right hon. Friend regrets that he cannot adopt this suggestion for the reasons given in his recent letter to my hon. Friend. Paper writing pads, however, are being fitted in the telephone cabinets available to Members in the House.

    Food Supplies

    Pigs

    86.

    asked the Minister of Food whether he is aware of the practice of leaving pigs uncovered throughout the night after delivery to the curers and slaughterers; and, in view of the suffering so caused, what action he is taking to bring this practice to an end.

    My information is that this practice is not adopted either at bacon factories or Government slaughterhouses, but if my hon. Friend will let me have details of any specific case which he has in mind I will have inquiries made.

    Beef Sausages

    87.

    asked the Minister of Food if he is aware that the reference to 40 per cent. as the minimum meat content of beef sausages in the Explanatory Note to Statutory Instrument, 1951, No. 314, does not correspond with the figures contained in the Order; and what correction he proposes to make.

    Canned Fish

    88.

    asked the Minister of Food why the canned fish allocation for periods 12 and 13, commencing 25th March, 1951, includes Danish, Dutch, Irish and Swedish brisling, but no Portuguese, French or other sardines; why retailers are required to accept for each 100 units 23 tins of salmon and 27 tins of brisling; and why he declines to release other canned fish now in stock.

    It has been found a convenient arrangement, for consumers as much as for traders, to issue the various kinds of canned fish in rotation rather than to release small quantities of each kind at one time. Sardines were included in the previous allocation and will be included in the next one. Retailers are not required to accept all or any part of an allocation offered by the Ministry.

    Home-Produced Foods

    asked the Minister of Food if he will give approximate estimates, in terms of weight and value, of the proportion of food consumed in the United Kingdom which is grown at home.

    The value of United Kingdom gross agricultural output of foodstuffs in the year June, 1949-May, 1950, was £882 million, and the value of imports of food, feedingstuffs and drink in the year ended June, 1950 at c.i.f. prices was £1,077 million.No satisfactory method has, however, been found of making a direct comparison between these figures. For example, imported and home produced foods are not all valued at the same stage of manufacture or processing. Thus the import figures include the import price of butter, cheese and milk products, whereas the home agricultural output includes only the value of the milk contained in the corresponding home products.Again, the value of imported oilseeds would have to be apportioned between oils and fats for human consumption, oils and fats for industrial purposes, and oil-cake for animal feed which forms part of the costs of home produced meat and milk. For such reasons as these little reliance could be placed on any direct comparison between the value of imports and home production because of the large number of arbitrary assumptions that would be involved.It would be even more misleading to make a comparison on the basis of total weight, which would entail, for example, the comparison of tons of tea with tons of potatoes. The following table, however, shows for the main foods which are home produced, the proportion by weight derived from home production in 1950:

    Percentage (by weight) Home produced
    Wheat and flour (as wheat equivalent)29
    Oils and fats (crude oil equivalent) (a) (b)13
    Sugar (refined value)22
    Carcase meat and offal52
    Total meat (product weight)48
    Bacon and ham (including canned)46
    Fish (including canned and shell fish)86
    Butter7
    Cheese26
    Condensed milk84
    Dried milk (whole and skimmed)54
    Shell eggs76
    Milk for human consumption as liquid100
    Potatoes for human consumption98
    (a) Includes oils and fats for non-food use.
    (b) Marine oils produced by British whale fisheries and British landings of fish are counted as home production.

    Foreign Honey

    asked the Minister of Agriculture whether he will control the importation of foreign honey at such times as the supply of domestic honey is sufficient for the market.

    I have been asked to reply. There is already a duty on imports of foreign honey, and I do not think that it would be in the general interest to place any further restriction on these imports, which, together with imports from the Commonwealth, meet a real demand from people who cannot afford to pay the higher prices commanded by home-produced honey.

    Egg Allocations, London

    asked the Minister of Food how many eggs were supplied on each ration book in the districts of Chelsea and Westminster, respectively, for the week ended 17th and 18th March, 1951p; and what was the corresponding allowance for the week ended 18th and 19th March, 1950.

    For the week ended 17th-18th March, 1951, two eggs per ration book were allocated to wholesalers in London for distribution to retailers, and during the week ended 18th-19th March, 1950, the allocation was four eggs per book. I could not say without extensive inquiries what allocations were actually on sale in the shops in Chelsea and Westminster in the two weeks. As the hon. Member may be aware, allocations of eggs do vary as between one district and another at a particular time but the total distribution is equalised over a period.

    Meat (Examination)

    asked the Minister of Food what evidence he has received of meat from diseased animals being sold on the ration; and whether he will give an estimate of the amount.

    I have received no evidence of this sort. Very careful examination of meat is made by competent officers of the local authority in whose district the meat is distributed.

    Mexican Canned Beef

    asked the Minister of Food whether he will arrange for Mexican canned beef, bought from the United States of America for £478,000, to be analysed before being put on sale to the public, owing to the fact that foot and mouth disease was prevalent in Mexico when the beef was canned.

    It is the routine practice of my Department to check that all bulk purchased canned meats have been properly processed by subjecting samples to bacteriological examination. Foot and mouth virus will not survive proper processing. Moreover, as I stated in my reply to the hon. Member for Dorset, North (Mr. Crouch), yesterday, the cattle from which this commodity was prepared were inspected both before and after slaughter by officers of the United States Department of Agriculture and found free from disease.

    Mincemeat

    asked the Minister of Food why a mixture of currants, sultanas and sugar is on sale to the public at 2s. a lb., in view of the fact that these ingre- dients, mixed together in equal proportions, should cost about 10½d. a lb. at current prices; why sugar is allowed for this mixture; and how much sugar is allocated for this purpose.

    These mixtures have been imported under the open general licence for mincemeat which is not price-controlled. No sugar is allocated by my Department for the manufacture of dry mixtures of this kind. The definition of mincemeat in the open general licence was amended on 1st February so as to exclude this product, and sales will cease as soon as existing stocks and quantities which importers contracted for before that date have been disposed of.

    Housing

    Millfield Estate, Faversham

    89.

    asked the Minister of Local Government and Planning if he is aware that annoyance is being caused to tenants of the Faversham Borough Council's Millfield housing estate, by leaking window surrounds, due to defective bitumen safes used on the recommendation of his Department after permission to use lead safes had been refused; and if he will now discontinue the use of this material on future schemes.

    The bitumen felt used for window safes on this housing estate which has been found to be unsatisfactory has been almost entirely replaced. Bitumen felt is widely used for this purpose and, when of good quality and properly fixed is satisfactory.

    Non-Local Applicants, Faversham

    90.

    asked the Minister of Local Government and Planning what pressure he applied to influence the Faversham Borough Council to let houses to non-local applicants.

    Bilston

    asked the Minister of Local Government and Planning the allocated figure of permitted housebuilding given to the Borough of Bilston in the years 1947, 1948, 1949 and 1950; and if he will give the number of houses actually built in the borough in each of these years.

    Numbers under construction at the beginning of each year were 109, 292, 68 and 280, respectively; the additional numbers allocated were nil, 308, 300 and 116; the numbers completed were 102, 370, 85 and 287.

    Limb-Fitting Facilities, Leicester

    91.

    asked the Minister of Pensions whether he has given further consideration to the need of Leicester for a limb-fitting centre in that city; and whether it is now possible for him to give a decision.

    Yes. I have decided to provide limb-fitting facilities in the City of Leicester as soon as possible.

    Royal Navy

    Shore Patrols, Sheerness

    92.

    asked the Parliamentary Secretary to the Admiralty if a naval picket can be detailed to patrol the streets when crews go ashore at Sheerness, in view of the disturbances which have occurred there for some time past.

    A naval shore patrol is landed at Sheerness whenever crews go ashore in large numbers. As far as I know there have not been any disturbances which make it necessary to strengthen the patrol.

    Short-Service Commissions (Gratuities)

    asked the Parliamentary Secretary to the Admiralty by what amount gratuities, payable to officers on termination of short-service commissions, are being increased in respect of their compulsory retention in the service; and whether the gratuity for the original commission is payable at the end thereof, or whether it is being withheld until the end of the additional period of service.

    With regard to the first part of the Question, I would refer the hon. and gallant Member to the reply given by my right hon. Friend the Minister of Defence to a Question addressed to him by the hon. Member for Lewisham, West (Mr. H. Price), yesterday. The gratuity is payable at the end of the original commission.

    Ministry Of Supply

    Iron And Steel Prices Order

    93.

    asked the Minister of Supply why copies of deposited schedules 91 to 95, inclusive, to the Iron and Steel Prices Order 1951, were laid before the House of Commons in dummy form on 20th February, although certified by an Under-Secretary of his Department to be correct copies; whether these five schedules are included in the 97 deposited schedules defined in the Order; and what do they contain.

    Steel Supplies

    asked the Minister of Supply whether, in view of the present dislocation of steel supplies, he will introduce a system of rationed allocations to ensure that essential needs have priority.

    Possible arrangements to ensure that essential needs for steel are met are at present being examined.

    Tanganyika (Ex-German Settlers)

    94.

    asked the Secretary of State for the Colonies whether he will make a statement on the position of ex-German settlers in Tanganyika, and, in particular, how many have been deported and expropriated without individual trial.

    1,352 interned Germans were repatriated in the first nine months of the war, and 728 after the end of the war. These figures include wives and families. In 1946, an ad hoc Committee under the Chairmanship of the Attorney-General inquired into the cases of all Germans still remaining in internment, and those considered to be politically and otherwise unobjectionable were permitted to remain in Tanganyika. Altogether about 750 Germans were permitted so to remain and to retain their property.

    British Somaliland (Famine)

    asked the Secretary of State for the Colonies whether he will make a statement on the famine in British Somaliland; and what measures are being taken to deal with the suffering.

    The present famine in the eastern part of Somaliland Protectorate has resulted from the failure of both spring and autumn rains in 1950. The people of this area are nomadic and after the failure of the spring rains most of them migrated with their flocks to summer grazing areas further south. The old people and children who were unable to face the journey were left behind with a certain amount of stock. By September many of them were near starvation and Government relief was initiated.The failure of the autumn rains made the position much worse and large-scale relief measures were essential. Camps were set up at Erigavo, Berbera and Burao: the total number of people in these camps on 7th March was 9,173, mainly women and children and old people. Rations were issued free and collecting centres established to transport destitute people from outlying districts. Able-bodied men were employed on public works. Expenditure of £50,000 on famine relief measures has been authorised and efforts have been made with some success to stimulate voluntary aid.Most of the tribes have had to stay in the southern grazing areas and have suffered heavy losses of stock. It is impossible yet to forecast the extent of these losses but the position should become clearer in April or May when the effect of the spring rains can be judged and future Government policy will be considered in the light of the position at that time.

    Nigeria (Palm Oil Mills)

    asked the Secretary of State for the Colonies how many pioneer palm oil mills have been established in Nigeria; how much of the cost has been incurred by the Department of Commerce and Industries; how many of the mills have been transferred to private enterprise; and on what terms.

    A year ago there were 12 pioneer oil palm mills in operation in Nigeria, seven of which were operated by the Department of Commerce and Industries, two by private individuals, and three by the Cameroons Development Corporation. A further nine mills were under construction, six to be operated by the Department of Commerce and Industries and three for private owners.The contract of sale to private owners includes a clause providing for the continued supervision of the mill by the Department of Commerce and Industries and making it obligatory on the owner of the mill to carry out such repairs and maintenance as may be recommended by the inspecting staff. The scheme for the establishment of these mills is financed from the funds of regional development boards and regional production development boards. I have asked the Governor for further information and will write to my hon. Friend when it is received.

    Colonial Civil Service (Delegation)

    asked the Secretary of State for the Colonies why he has refused to receive the delegation from the Colonial Civil Service Association.

    I am at present considering a request made to me by the European Civil Service Association of Malaya that I should receive a deputation, and I will communicate my decision very shortly.

    West Africa (Trade Unions)

    asked the Secretary of State for the Colonies what progress has been made in the development of trade unions in West African Colonies; and how many were represented recently at the conference of free trade unions at Doula in French West Africa.

    Latest available figures show that there are 226 registered trade unions in the British West African territories, with a total membership of about 155,000. One hundred of these unions were represented at the recent trade union conference organised by the International Confederation of Free Trade Unions held at Doula in the French Cameroons between 5th and 7th March.

    Kenya (Civil Servants' Allowances)

    asked the Secretary of State for the Colonies the recommendations in the minority report of the Select Committee appointed to make recommendations on cost-of-living allowances for civil servants in Kenya; and whether he will give the signatories of the minority report.

    The minority report of the Select Committee on cost-of-living allowances, which was signed by Messrs. T. R. L. Preston and C. G. Usher, recommended:

  • (a) an inquiry into various methods by which long-term relief might be afforded, including income-tax relief (by means of increased allowances), the reduction of rent, and the provision of transport, canteen and residential mess facilities;
  • (b) an inquiry into the possibility of a special regional cost-of-living allowance in respect of places where the cost of living is higher than elsewhere in the territory;
  • (c) as an interim measure, the adoption of temporary allowances on the following scale:
  • (i) Salaries not exceeding £150—flat rate of 25 per cent.;
  • (ii) Salaries exceeding £150 as follows:
  • SalaryS.M.M1.M2.
    ££££
    £200 or less30506575
    £25035557080
    £30040607585
    £40050708595
    £500608095105
    £6007090105115
    £70080100115125
    £80080110115135
    £90080120135145
    £1,00080120135155
    £1,10080120135165
    £1,200 or more.80120135175
    Notes.—S = Single person.
    M = Married, without children (or widower, or widow with one child).
    M1 = Married, with one child.
    M2 = Married, with more than one child.

    Old Age Pensioners

    95.

    asked the Minister of National Insurance the number of old age pensioners who, at the last convenient date, were deferring their retirement.

    I would refer the hon. Member to the reply given to the hon. Member for Clitheroe on 19th February, 1951, a copy of which I am sending him.

    China (Seized British Vessel)

    96.

    asked the Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs whether he is aware that the British m.v. "Lady Wolmer" has been seized by the Chinese Nationalist authorities, and her four British officers detained; and what steps His Majesty's Government have taken to secure the release of this ship.

    Yes. The ship, which was chartered to Chinese interests, was taken to Keelung in Formosa on 15th March. A full report is awaited from His Majesty's Consul at Tamsui on action taken.

    Scotland (National Congress Resolution)

    97.

    asked the Secretary of State for Scotland whether he has considered the resolution, a copy of which has been sent to him, passed at a meeting of the Scottish National Congress at its meeting in Glasgow on Saturday, 17th March, containing a pledge by that conference to protect those Scots who refuse to be conscripted by an English Government; and what action His Majesty's Government now proposed to take.

    I am not clear what the resolution referred to means and I do not propose to take any action in regard to it.

    Employment

    Dock Labour Scheme, Scotland

    asked the Minister of Labour what representations he has received for the amendment of the existing Dock Labour Scheme in relation to ports in the North of Scotland.

    Apart from a local proposal transmitted by the hon. Member to my predecessor to bring the port of Lerwick within the scheme, and a suggested amendment of the definition of dock labour at the port of Aberdeen, no representations have been received for the amendment of the existing Dock Labour Scheme in relation to ports in the North of Scotland.

    Order No 1305

    asked the Minister of Labour whether he has any statement to make about the continuance or modification of Order No. 1305.

    Fuel Supplies (Rural Areas)

    asked the Minister of Fuel and Power if he will take steps to ensure that householders in rural areas receive adequate supplies of coke and anthracite, in view of the fact that many of them who are without gas or electricity and rely on this type of fuel for cooking and heating, have been unable to obtain supplies since early in January.

    The demand for coke and anthracite has greatly increased during the past few months, and although supplies have also increased, it has been impossible to meet the full requirements of all consumers during the winter. I am not, however, aware of any instances of householders who depend wholly on coke or anthracite for cooking and heating being left entirely without supplies. Local machinery already exists for giving priority where necessary to this type of consumer, and, if there is difficulty over supplies, the householder should get into touch with his local fuel overseer.

    British Army

    Married Officers, Germany

    asked the Secretary of State for War if he is aware that officers serving in Germany who are separated from their wives receive no points allocation for their separation, and that, as a result, if they subsequently are transferred to a foreign station, they are at the bottom of the list for permission to bring out their wives; and if he will take steps to remove this hardship.

    This is not normally so. If the hon. Member would let me have details of the case he has in mind, I will have inquiries made and write to him.

    Naafi, Korea (Prices)

    asked the Secretary of State for War what are the prices to the soldier in Korea, respectively, of the items of which he has been informed, stocked and to be stocked by the Navy, Army and Air Force Institutes.

    Following is the information:

    Items already stocked By N.A.A.F.I.Prices
    Cigarettes, Players type.packets of 2011d.
    Tobaccopackets of 2 0z.1s. 7d. to 3s. 0d.
    Biscuits½ lb.2s. 0d. and 2s. 1d.
    Chocolatenominal 2 0z.6d.
    Sockspair5s. 6d. and 6s. 2d.
    Handkerchiefseach1s. 1½d. and 1s. 8d.
    Toilet soaptablet7d.to 9d.
    Razor setseach1s. 3d. to 4s. 9d.
    Razor bladeseach1d. to 4d.
    Brushes, naileach11d. and 1s. 1½d.
    Brushes, shavingeach3s. 0d. to 10s. 4d.
    Brushes, tootheach10d. to 1s. 5d.
    Fountain penseach3s. 6d.
    9s. 0d.
    13s. 6d.
    Mirrors, metal and glass.each1s. 5d.
    Cigarette lighterseach19s. 6d.
    Flintseach4½d.
    Wickseach1d.
    Pipeseach2s. 8d.
    4s. 5d.
    10s. 5d.
    16s. 8d.
    Hair cream, Brylcreem.1s. 10d.
    Vaseline Hair Tonic1s. 10d.
    Items which will be stocked as early as possiblePrices
    Condensed milk—
    unsweetenedper tin1s. 3d.
    sweetenedper tin1s. 6d.
    Paper backed bookseach1s. 6d.
    Nail scissorspair2s. 6d. and 4s. 3d.
    Nail clipperspair1s. 1d.
    Combs in caseseach10½d. to 2s. 4d.
    Toilet soap Containers.each8d.
    Ball point penseach3s. 0d. to 3s. 8d.
    Ball point pen refillseach11½d. to 1s. 3½d.
    Penkniveseach3s. 0d. to 10s. 8d.
    Cigarette caseseach12s. 7d. and 14s. 10d.
    Tobacco pouches, nylon.each1s. 9½d.
    Sun glassespair3s. 7d.
    Torcheseach4s. 7d.
    Torch batterieseach6d.
    Walletseach7s. 6d.
    Spirit flasks, 6 oz., leather covered.each32s. 0d.
    Notecaseseach8s. 0d. and 14s. 0d.
    Key caseseach2s. 8½d. and 5s. 9d.
    Vacuum flaskseach7s. 0d.

    Royal Air Force

    Airman's Death, Weeton (Inquiry Report)

    asked the Secretary of State for Air whether he will institute an inquiry into the circumstances which led to the death of 2503875 A.C.2 Raymond Lewis at the Royal Air Force Station at Weeton, Lancashire, on 13th February, particulars of which have been sent to him.

    pursuant to his reply [OFFICIAL REPORT, 21st March, 1951; Vol. 485, c. 2408] circulated the following information:

    On the morning of Tuesday, 6th February, 1951, Aircraftman Lewis reported sick complaining of a sore throat and difficulty in swallowing. The Medical Officer prescribed treatment and placed him on light duties for four days. Aircraftman Lewis was given a form telling him to see the Medical Officer again on the morning of Saturday, 10th February. On each of the subsequent four days Aircraftman Lewis reported to the Medical Inspection Room for treatment and attended lectures.
    Despite the instruction to see the Medical Officer again Aircraftman Lewis did not report sick on the normal sick parade on the morning of 10th February and paraded with his comrades for training. During the morning, however, he complained to his N.C.O. that he felt unwell and, although he said he did not feel ill enough to report sick, he was ordered to do so by the N.C.O.
    At Sick Quarters the normal sick parade had been completed and Aircraftman Lewis was seen by a medical orderly. He said he felt fit apart from weakness about the knees, and did not feel ill enough to want the Medical Officer. He was advised to return to his hut and to go to bed, and to send for the medical orderly if he felt worse.
    On Sunday, 11th February, Aircraftman Lewis remained in bed until 11.00 hours. He later complained to his companions in the hut that he felt ill and told them that he intended to report sick next morning. At approximately 14.00 hours two of his companions reported to the Senior N.C.O. in charge of the Flight that Aircraftman Lewis was ill and the N.C.O., finding him lying on top of his bed fully clothed, immediately informed Sick Quarters. An ambulance was sent at once and he was removed to hospital where the medical officer found that he had all the symptoms of advanced pneumonia. Continuous treatment was given which at first resulted in some slight improvement but at approximately 19.00 hours in spite of every care the patient became rapidly worse and died at 19.30 hours. No criticism or blame can be attached to any person on the strength of R.A.F. Station, Weeton.

    Printing Order (Cancellation)

    asked the Secretary of State for Air on what date the order for boxing programmes, given to a Brighton printer in January, was cancelled.

    Ex-Miners (Release)

    asked the Secretary of State for Air which categories of National Service airmen are eligible for release as ex-miners.

    Those National Service airmen who transfer to regular engagements of three years or more.

    Building Licences (Hotels)

    asked the Minister of Works the number of licences granted during the last 12 months for the building of new hotels and the total value of these licences.

    Three licences to a total value of £124,000 have been granted during the last 12 months for the building of new hotels.

    Roads

    Construction And Repair Grants

    asked the Minister of Transport the total amount of money which he has recommended for loan sanction to the Treasury for the purposes of road construction and road repair by local authorities during the past 12 months; and what proportion of this sum represents proposed expenditure on new plant for roadmaking.

    During the 12 months ended 28th February last the Treasury were recommended to sanction borrowing by local authorities for the purposes of road construction and road repair to a total amount of £1,897,421, of which £124,709 related to new plant. The sum recommended in respect of road construction and repair was about 40 per cent. of the total cost of the works, the remainder being met by grants from the Road Fund. No grants are made towards the cost of new plant.

    Wales

    asked the Minister of Transport the total amount paid for highway maintenance and for new roads in Wales in the financial year 1949–50 and in the current financial year.

    The expenditure approved for the maintenance and minor improvement of trunk roads, and the total grants from the Road Fund in respect of similar work on classified roads in Wales are as follows:

    YearTrunk Roads ExpenditureClassified Roads in Counties*
    Total Estimated ExpenditureGrant Proportion
    £££
    1949/50776,0002,348,5031,424,566
    1950/51670,0002,139,0011,285,704
    * Expenditure on the maintenance and minor improvement of classified roads in County Boroughs and of unclassified roads generally is not eligible for grant.
    The estimated total cost of schemes of major improvement and new construction approved for commencement on trunk and classified roads in each of the two years in question is as follows:

    YearTrunk Roads ExpenditureClassified Roads
    Estimated ExpenditureGrant
    £££
    1949/5095,395552,973365,756
    1950/51110,128284,327196,879
    I have no figures of expenditure on such work on unclassified roads in the years in question, apart from the estimated cost of schemes approved for grant under the Distribution of Industry Act, 1945, as given below:

    YearEstimated CostGrant
    ££
    1949/504,9362,715
    1950/5124,12114,764

    Docks And Harbours (Charges)

    asked the Minister of Transport whether he will give the names of the dock and harbour authorities who have applied to him since 1st January, 1946, under Defence Regulation 56, for authority to increase dues and charges levied by them; and whether he will give the result of such applications, indicating the increases authorised in each case.

    The following statement shows the names of the dock and harbour authorities who have applied to me since 1st January, 1946, under Defence Regulation 56, for authority to increase dues and charges levied by them. Where an order was made authorising the increases applied for, wholly or in part, the reference to the order is given. In other cases, the application was refused or not pursued or is still under consideration. In view of the number and variety of the charges involved and the varying percentages often applied to different charges, it is not practicable to indicate in the statement the increases authorised in each case, but I am sending the hon. Member copies of all the Increase of Charges Orders mentioned.

    Year and Name of Authority

    1946

    Southern Railway Company—Southampton Dock: S.R. & O. 1946 No. 697.

    Workington Harbour and Dock Board: S.R. & O. 1946 No. 767.

    Railway Companies in respect of undertakings listed in schedule to Order: S.R. & O. 1946 No. 846.

    Seaham Harbour Dock Company: S.R. & O. 1946 No. 883.

    Great Yarmouth Port and Haven Commission: S.R. & O. 1946 No. 1142.

    Granton Harbour, Ltd.: S.R. & O. 1946 No. 1207.

    London & North Eastern Railway Company—Silloth Dock: S.R. & O. 1946 No. 1426.

    Gillingham Borough Council: S.R. & O. 1946 No. 1427.

    Milford Docks Company: S.R. & O. 1946 No. 1474.

    Berwick Harbour Commission: S.R. & O. 1946 No. 1695.

    Humber Conservancy Board: S.R. & O. 1946 No. 1762.

    Llanelly Harbour Trust: S.R. & O. 1946 No. 1952.

    London, Midland & Scottish Railway Company—Garston Docks: S.R. & O. 1946 No. 2128.

    Aire and Calder Navigation—Goole Docks: S.R. & O. 1946 No. 2180.

    Leith Docks Commission: S.R. & O. 1947 No. 376.

    Sutton Harbour Improvement Company: S.R & O. 1947 No. 459.

    Exmouth Docks Company: S.R. & O. 1947 No. 681.

    Clyde Navigation Trust: S.R. & O. 1947 No. 932.

    Caernarvon Harbour Trust: S.R. & O. 1947 No. 1028.

    Railway Companies in respect of undertakings listed in schedule to Order: S.R. & O. 1947 No. 2014.

    King's Lynn Docks and Railway Company: S.R. & O. 1947 No. 2070.

    Leith Docks Commission: Refused.

    Portsmouth Corporation: Refused.

    1947

    Mersey Docks and Harbour Board: S.R. & O. 1947 No. 849.

    Boston Corporation: S.R. & O. 1947 No. 1140.

    Southampton Harbour Board: S.R. & O. 1947 No. 1495.

    Ramsgate Corporation: S.R. & O. 1947 No. 1711.

    Saint Mawes Pier and Harbour Company: S.R. & O. 1947 No. 1788.

    Bridgwater Corporation: S.R. & O. 1947 No. 1909.

    London, Midland & Scottish Railway Company-Garston Docks: S.R. & O. 1947 No. 2223.

    London & North Eastern Railway Company—Silloth Dock: S.R. & O. 1947 No. 2235.

    Preston Corporation—Ribble Navigation: S.R. & O. 1947 No. 2478.

    Montrose Harbour Trust: S.I. 1948 No. 371.

    Southern Railway Company for Padstow Harbour Commission: S.I. 1948 No. 1017. Sandwich Port & Haven Commission: S.I. 1948 No. 2337.

    Scarborough Corporation: S.I. 1949 No. 13. Aire & Calder Navigation—Goole Docks: Refused.

    1948

    Penzance Corporation: S.I. 1948 No. 1039.

    Ramsgate Corporation: S.I. 1948 No. 1079.

    Port of London Authority: S.I. 1948 No. 1187.

    Littlehampton Harbour Board: S.I 1948 No. 1870.

    Boston Corporation: S.I. 1948 No. 2438.

    Southend-on-Sea Corporation—Bell Whalf. S.I. 1948 No. 2594.

    Dundee Harbour Trust: S.I. 1949 No. 933.

    Colchester Corporation: S.I. 1949 No. 957.

    Wisbech Corporation: S.I. 1949 No. 1138.

    Cattewater Commission: S.I. 1949 No. 1688.

    Hartlepool Port & Harbour Commission: S.I. 1949 No. 1710.

    Greenock Port & Harbour Trust: S.I. 1949 No. 1995.

    1949

    Saint Ives Corporation: S.I. 1950 No 587.

    Tenby Corporation: Not pursued.

    Dundee Harbour Trust: Refused.

    1950

    Milford Docks Company: S.I. 1950 No. 1030.

    Torquay Corporation: S.I. 1950 No. 1984.

    Littlehampton Harbour Board: S.I. 1951 No. 226.

    Maryport Harbour Commission: S.1. 1951 No. 279.

    Boston Corporation: Under consideration.

    Dundee Harbour Trust: Under consideration.

    Duchy of Cornwall—St. Mary's Pier, Scilly Isles: Not pursued.

    Cowes Harbour Commission: Further information awaited.

    Llanelly Harbour Trust: Under consideration.

    1951

    British Transport Commission for Padstow Harbour Commission: Under consideration.