Skip to main content

Written Answers

Volume 641: debated on Monday 5 June 1961

The text on this page has been created from Hansard archive content, it may contain typographical errors.

Written Answers To Questions

Monday, 5th June, 1961

Ministry Of Aviation

Exports

1.

asked the Minister of Aviation if he will state the total value of British aviation exports including air frames, aero engines, and electronics for the last available year and the com parable figures for 1938, 1950 and 1955.

Aviation electronics are not seperately distinguished in the Trade Accounts and their value can only be estimated from manufacturers' returns. I estimate that in 1960 the total exports of aircraft, aero-engines, parts and airborne radio and radar equipment amounted to £143 million. The corresponding figures for 1938, 1950 and 1955 are estimated at £4·5 million, £34·5 million and £65·7 million, respectively.

Helicopters

2.

asked the Minister of Aviation whether he will make a further statement about the future development of the Rotodyne; and what plans he has approved for helicopter services by British European Airways.

I have nothing to add to the reply given to the hon. Member on 6th March last about the Rotodyne. As regards helicopter services, my Department and British European Airways are investigating several interim possibilities.

Air Safety Regulations (Investigations)

asked the Minister of Aviation if he is aware that delays in investigations prevented legal proceedings from being taken in the case of the Southall air disaster; and if he will ensure that no similar delays occur in the investigations now being carried out by his Department into the alleged infringement of air safety regulations by Falcon Airways.

No. The investigations by my Department following the Southall air disaster did not prevent decisions being taken whether or not to institute legal proceedings. These decisions were taken on the facts disclosed and proceedings would have been instituted if it had been thought necessary or desirable in the public interest. The investigations were conducted with all proper speed and determination on this as on other occasions, and will be so conducted on any future occasions.

Supersonic Airliner

asked the Minister of Aviation to what extent the Paris International Air Show has assisted the development of a supersonic airliner by this country.

The French Government were asked some time ago if they wished to explore further with us the possibilities of collaboration on this project. They undertook to reply when they had received and considered the studies being prepared by their own manufacturers. We are still waiting for this.

Ministry Of Health

Hearing Aids (Development)

24.

asked the Minister of Health what progress has been made in the development of a transistor type deaf aid with bone conduction earpiece.

Medical Laboratory Technicians

27.

asked the Minister of Health what representations he has had from medical laboratory technicians regarding salaries and recruitment; and whether he will make a statement.

The Staff Side of the appropriate Whitley Council gave notice last December of certain proposals which they elaborated in March. These are being considered by the Management Side.

Infectious Diseases (Notification Fee)

asked the Minister of Health, whether he is aware that the fee payable to doctors for the notification of infectious diseases under Section 145 of the Public Health Act, 1936, is limited to a maximum of 2s. 6d.; and whether, in view of the fact that the value of money has been more than halved since 1936, he will take steps forthwith to provide for an increase to a maximum of at least 5s.

Smallpox (Deaths)

asked the Minister of Health how many deaths from smallpox were registered in 1960; and what were the ages of those concerned.

Vaccination (Deaths)

asked the Minister of Health how many deaths from vaccination, vaccinia, post vaccinal encephalitis, or any other results of vaccination were registered in 1960; and What were the ages of the victims.

Five; two aged 4 months, one aged 5 months, one aged 10 months and one aged 40.

Gibraltar (Spanish Workers)

31.

asked the Lord Privy Seal what representations he has made to the Spanish Government about the continued refusal of new permits for Spanish workers to work daily in Gibraltar; and whether he will include this subject in talks with the Spanish Government on trade or other matters.

Although my noble Friend's visit to Spain was not an occasion for negotiations, the opportunity was taken to discuss subjects of common concern to our two countries, including that of Gibraltar.

Council Of Europe Recommendation (Africa)

39.

asked the Lord Privy Seal if his attention has been drawn to Recommendation 279 of the Consultative Assembly of the Council of Europe on Technical Assistance for Africa; and what action has been taken on it by Her Majesty's Government's representative and the Committee of Ministers' Deputies.

I understand that Recommendation 279 has not yet been discussed by the Committee of Ministers' Deputies.

Passports

44.

asked the Lord Privy Seal what restriction he places on the issue of passports in respect of the British-born children of former Hungarian citizens, resident in the United Kingdom, who wish to return to Hungary.

These children are treated in exactly the same way as other British children and are normally granted passport facilities.

United States (Foreign Secretary's Visit)

50.

asked the Lord Privy Seal what are the reasons for the visit of the Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs to the United States of America.

Some time ago my noble Friend accepted two invitations to speak to United States audiences on British foreign policy and the international situation. He decided to combine acceptance of them with talks with the United Nations authorities in New York and the United States Government in Washington about the problems which are likely to face our two countries and the United Nations later in the year.

German Military Bases, United Kingdom (Soviet Memorandum)

52.

asked the Lord Privy Seal what was Her Majesty's Government's reply to the Soviet Government's protest against the decision to permit Wehrmacht bases in Great Britain; and if he will make a statement.

A formal reply will be made to the protest very shortly. I told the Soviet Ambassador, when he delivered his memorandum on the subject, that the matters of which he complained were part of the co-operative arrangements between allies in the North Atlantic Treaty Organisation; that they could in no sense be described as indicating British support for a policy of German revanchism; and that the Soviet fears were thus unjustified.

European Economic Community

56.

asked the Lord Privy Seal what communications he has received from Sweden and Austria in relation to the proposal that Great Britain should join the Common Market.

We are in close consultation with the other members of the European Free Trade Association about the relationship between members of the Association and the European Economic Community. Details of these exchanges are confidential.

South Kasai

57.

asked the Lord Privy Seal what information he has received from the United Nations concerning the present situation in South Kasai; and whether the United Nations have informed him of their intention to replace those forces under the United Nations command who were recently withdrawn from the area.

Accurate information on the situation in South Kasai is scarce but I gather that bands of South Kasai troops who, following the withdrawal of Ghanaian United Nations troops, were attempting to extend their activities outside the present South Kasai territory have since been withdrawn within that territory. We have not received any information to substantiate reports which were current recently that there was general and major disorder in the area. The answer to the second part of the hon. Gentleman's Question is Yes.

Fishery Limits

58.

asked the Lord Privy Seal, in view of the incident of the trawler "Red Crusader", what new approaches he has made to the Danish and other Governments affected for a reconsideration of fishing limits and the methods of their enforcement.

69.

asked the Lord Privy Seal what consultations have taken place with the Danish Government, and what agreements have been reached, concerning the methods employed to enforce fishing limits.

asked the Lord Privy Seal whether he will give details of current fishing limits agreements between the British Government and foreign Governments, and the dates when the agreements are due to expire.

With the Union of the Soviet Socialist Republics, granting the right to United Kingdom-registered fishing boats to operate up to a limit of three sea miles off the Soviet coast in certain areas of the Barents Sea.

With Denmark, whereby Her Majesty' Government agree to the exclusion of United Kingdom-registered fishing vessels from a six-mile limit off the coast of the Faroes, and seasonally, from certain types of fishing in three specified areas between the six-and twelve-mile limits.

With Iceland, whereby Her Majesty's Government undertake to observe a twelve-mile fishing zone around that country. During specified seasons United Kingdom-registered vessels are, until March, 1964, permitted to fish in certain areas between the six-and twelve-mile limits.

With Norway, whereby Her Majesty's Government agree to the exclusion of United Kingdom-registered vessels from fishing within a zone of six miles wide from the Norwegian coast. Until the 31st of October, 1970, the Norwegian Government will not object to United Kingdom vessels continuing to fish within the zone between the six- and twelve-mile limits, after which date Her Majesty's Government agree to their exclusion from that zone.

In addition, the United Kingdom is a party to the North Sea Convention of 1882 (Belgium Denmark, France, Germany and the Netherlands) laying down three-mile fishery limits as between the signatories, and the Anglo-Danish Agreement of 1925, granting the United Kingdom free access to the East Greenland coast.

None of these agreements provides for a definite date of expiry.

Those with Iceland and Norway both remain in force indefinitely and contain no provisions for denunciation.

The North Sea Convention can be denounced on a year's notice to be given on the 15th of May in any year. Otherwise it also continues in force indefinitely.

The Soviet agreement took effect from the 12th of March, 1957, for a period of five years in the first instance.

The Anglo-Danish Agreement on the Faroes remains in force until the conclusion of a general convention regulating the breadth of the territorial sea and fishery limits but provides that after the 27th of April, 1962, it is terminable on one year's notice by either party.

The Anglo-Danish Agreement of 1925 also remains in force indefinitely.

Angola

60.

asked the Lord Privy Seal if he will instruct Her Majesty's Government's representatives on the Security Council to support the request of the forty States for a special meeting of the Security Council to consider the situation in Angola.

The Security Council is already seized of the question of the situation in Angola. I understand it will be meeting on 6th of June to discuss this matter further.

Polaris Submarine Base, Holy Loch

61.

asked the Lord Privy Seal whether the Foreign Secretary's recent discussions with the Government of the United States of America have included the subject of the Polaris base in the Holy Loch.

I am not clear to what recent discussions the hon. Lady refers. Her Majesty's Government are in regular touch with the United States Government about all matters of common interest.

Germany (Armaments)

64.

asked the Lord Privy Seal if he will publish as a White Paper a record of the discussions in Western European Union on the subject of raising the limits on German armaments.

No. The proceedings of the Western European Union Council are confidential.

Employment

Women Bakery Workers (Hours Of Work)

71.

asked the Minister of Labour if he is aware that women bakery workers may be called upon to work a sixty-hour week for eight weeks in any year; and if he will introduce legislation to end this anachronism.

This provision fixes the upper limit of permitted hours of work to enable the industry to deal with occasional short periods of seasonal pressure such as Christmas or Easter. My right hon. Friend has no proposals for altering it.

Ionising Radiations (Sealed Sources) Regulations

asked the Minister of Labour on what date the Ionising Radiations (Sealed Sources) Regulations, 1961, will come into operation.

I hope to be able to make the Regulations in the course of the Summer. The main body of the Regulations will come into operation six months after they are made.

asked the Minister of Labour what steps he is taking to recruit specialised officers to the factory inspectorate, or to train existing factory inspectors, to enforce the new Regulations dealing with ionising radiations.

A number of specialist inspectors are already available to advise on problems relating to the use of ionising radiations. Arrangements have been made for members of the General Inspectorate to attend special courses in radiological protection and so far ninety-four have attended these courses.

asked the Minister of Labour what steps he is taking to promote the training of foremen, supervisors and shop stewards, in the industries concerned so that they will be familiar with the requirements of the new Regulations dealing with ionising radiations.

Factory occupiers will be responsible for ensuring that their staff are familiar with the requirements of the Regulations when made. The Regulations will require appropriate instruction to be given to persons exposed to ionising radiations about the hazards involved and the precautions to be observed. The Factory Inspectorate will give advice and information to occupiers as necessary.

asked the Minister of Labour whether he is arranging courses of instruction for works doctors and sick bay staff in the relevant industries so that they will be familiar with the new Regulations dealing with ionising regulations.

Factory occupiers will be responsible for ensuring that their staff are familiar with the requirements of the Regulations when made. The Factory Inspectorate will give advice and information to occupiers as necessary but I do not propose to organise courses of instruction. Where works doctors are appointed by the chief inspector to carry out duties under the Regulations, they will receive a memorandum of guidance.

asked the Minister of Labour when he expects to be ready to issue regulations on the protection of workers concerned with unsealed sources of ionising radiations.

A preliminary draft of such regulations was published in April and interested parties were asked to comment by 31st July. Further progress will depend on the extent of the consultations which may then be required.

Agriculture, Fisheries And Food

Foot-And-Mouth Disease, Wales

72.

asked the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food if he will give details of the financial loss incurred by farmers in Wales due to foot-and-mouth disease since 1st January, 1961; and what is the amount of compensation which has been paid to them.

Since 1st January, 1961, there have been 33 outbreaks of foot-and-mouth disease in Wales, involving the slaughter of 2,190 cattle, 3,872 sheep and 3,095 pigs. Total compensation payable for the slaughter of these animals is about £223,000. Compensation is not payable in respect of consequential losses, and it is not possible to estimate the extent of such losses.

Wharves, River Hull

73.

asked the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food if he will state the number of wharves on the River Hull which com ply with the requirements of the Corporation 1925 Act but were over- topped on 20th March, 1961; and what steps are to be taken by the Hull and East Yorkshire River Board to ensure these wharves being built up to provide the necessary freeboard to prevent further overtopping and flooding.

I understand that no complaints have been received that wharves built up to the 1925 Act level were overtopped on 20th March, 1961. The difficulties arose from seepage and overtopping of wharves which had not been built up to the 1925 level.

74.

asked the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food whether the survey of the wharves on the River Hull has been completed; if he will state the number of defective wharves whose owners have been in formed that defects and deficiencies should be made good; and what is the number of comprehensive proposals submitted to his Department by the Hull and East Yorkshire River Board.

I am informed that it will be at least three months before the City Engineer's survey is completed but that as each section is finished opportunity will be taken to serve any necessary notices on wharf owners.The River Board proposes to await completion of the survey before preparing further schemes relating to the River Hull within the City boundary.

Trawlers (Naval Protection)

76.

asked the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food what request he has made for additional naval protection for trawlers fishing near Danish territorial waters.

Salmon Rivers

75.

asked the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food if he is aware of the concern of the River Tweed Commissioners and other interested bodies in Great Britain of the danger to salmon rivers through sea fishing activities in and off the estuaries of these rivers; and if he can now state what action Her Majesty's Government are taking in this matter.

The River Tweed Commissioners and other bodies concerned with salmon fishing have expressed apprehension as to the effect which such sea fishing may have on salmon rivers. My right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Scotland and I have the matter under close review.

Government Information Services

Africa (Bbc Broadcasts)

78.

asked the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster what arrangements he is making to expand the British Broadcasting Corporation's transmissions to Africa.

I have been asked to reply.The Government and the B.B.C. are in agreement that, apart from minor adjustments, the first consideration is not to expand the already large output to Africa but to make it more easily audible. We are discussing how this can be done.

Pensions And National Insurance

Sick Persons (Examination)

79.

asked the Minister of Pensions and National Insurance what is the code of ailments and recovery period used by his Department in determining when to refer sick persons to the regional medical officer of health for examination.

I have nothing to add to the reply I gave to the hon. Member on 10th May.

War Widows (Children's Allowances)

82.

asked the Minister of Pensions and National Insurance when the allowances for the education of children of war widows were last reviewed; what is the present maximum rate of the allowance; and why the allowance has not been increased to meet the increased costs at schools, including public schools.

Very recently, with the result that the maximum rate was increased from £80 to £120 per annum as from the beginning of April.

National Insurance Fund (Contribution Income)

83.

asked the Minister of Pensions and National Insurance what is the estimated contribution to the National Insurance Fund, exclusive of National Health Service contributions, of the Treasury, employers, self-employed persons, non-employed persons, and employees, respectively, for 1961–62.

The following table gives the desired information:

ESTIMATED CONTRIBUTION INCOME* OF THE NATIONAL INSURANCE FUND 1961–62
Source of contribution.£ million.
Exchequer189
Employers471·5
Self-employed persons37
Non-employed persons5
Employees420·5
* It is estimated that the Fund will, in addition, receive interest income of £50 million.

Retirement Pensions (National Assistance Allowances)

84.

asked the Minister of Pensions and National Insurance what was the number of retirement pensioners receiving supplementary allowances from the National Assistance Board at the latest convenient date; and what was the number of persons of pensionable age who are continuing in employment.

At 28th March, 1961, 1,079,000 retirement pensioners were receiving supplementary allowances from the National Assistance Board. Some of the grants provided for the requirements of a household with more than one pensioner. I understand from my right hon. Friend the Minister of Labour that at the end of May, 1960, there were about 970,000 persons of pensionable age who were in employment.

Doctors (Unemployment Benefit)

asked the Minister of Pensions and National Insurance how many doctors were in receipt of unemployment benefit at the latest convenient date.

I am informed by my right hon. Friend the Minister of Labour that on 1st June, 1961, there were thirty doctors on the Professional and Executive Register in receipt of unemployment benefit.

Ministry Of Power

Steel Industry

85.

asked the Minister of Power if he will make a statement on the present position and prospects of the steel industry.

I would refer the hon. Member to the recently published Special Report of the Iron and Steel Board and to its Annual Report for 1960, which should be available towards the end of the month.

Methane

86.

asked the Minister of Power if he will estimate the effect on coal consumption in the United Kingdom that would follow the import of Saharan gas, up to 1,000 million cubic feet per year, as agreed upon in Paris on 26th May by the Gas Council and the French producer companies.

I cannot yet give an estimate of the possible overall effect. Imported methane would displace some coal gas. It would also supplant some oil for gas making and, as an enriching gas, enhance the value of lean gases produced from coal. An estimate based on the theoretical coal equivalent of a given amount of methane could therefore be misleading.

Employees (Trade Union Membership)

asked the Minister of Power what general directions he has given to the boards of nationalised industries for which he is responsible with regard to membership by their employees of appropriate trade unions.

Telephone Service

Police Headquarters, Leeds (New Switchboard)

88.

asked the Postmaster-General if, in view of the need to maintain the greatest possible efficiency at Leeds City Police Headquarters, he will give priority to the installation of a new telephone switchboard there.

Yes. My right hon. Friend is most anxious to help in any way he can. I am sending the hon. Lady a copy of a letter he has recently sent to the Town Clerk of Leeds.

Mr Frederick Beezley

asked the Attorney-General if he is aware that Mr. Frederick Beezley, who, whilst an officer of his Department, was concerned in the investigation of the alleged infringements of the air safety regulations by Independent Air Travel Limited, and was responsible for a deliberate delay in the investigations in order to make it impossible to take legal action against the company, is now a director of Falcon Airways Limited of which the managing director is the same man who was managing director of Independent Air Travel Limited at the time of the inquiry; and if he will now refer the activities of Mr. Beezley in this matter to the Director of Public Prosecutions with a view to the institution of proceedings against him.

No. The hon. Member has made a very serious allegation against Mr. Beezley, but he has produced no evidence to support it and I am satisfied that it is in fact completely without foundation. Mr. Beezley has never been an officer of my Department; at the material time he was on the staff of the Director of Public Prosecutions, but he was not concerned at any stage with the investigation of the alleged infringements of the air safety regulations by Independent Air Travel Limited and he was not responsible in any way for the manner in which those investigations were carried out. There was in fact no delay in carrying out the investigations, which, as was made clear during the debate in this House on 20th July, 1959, were completed in time to permit the institution of criminal proceedings if that course had been thought desirable in the public interest.

Gambia

Conference, Bathurst

asked the Secretary of State for the Colonies what recommendations were made by the recent official conference in Bathurst regarding the constitutional progress of Gambia; and when he expects to announce his decision on the recommendations.

A local conference was held at which there was an exchange of views on constitutional matters. The Governor is sending me his considered advice on the views expressed and I would prefer to wait until I have this advice.

NORTHERN RHODESIA
(a) ASSISTANCE UNDER COLONIAL DEVELOPMENT AND WELFARE ACTS
Grants and loans approved and total issues made between 1st April, 1953 and 31st March, 1961 (Figures represent grants except where otherwise indicated)
U.K. Financial YearTotal issues on all projects (including those approved prior to 1953) during yearAmount of Grant or loan approved during yearProject
££
1953–54684,5247,000*Development of health services
8,380*Nutrition and health schemes
15,500Community Development Centre
363,427African housing
153,000African Peasant Fanning (Loan)
14,450Aeronautical telecommunications
500*Forestry research
1954–55545,570800Aerial survey
1,250Provision of mobile bookshop
243*List of trees and plants
1955–56174,2056,167Housing for forestry survey staff
32,770Rhodes-Livingstone Institute
1956–5798,45852,400Agricultural Research Services
18,711Fisheries Research Organization
1957–58nil5,496*Development of health services
1958–59298,672350,000Buildings for African education
209,600Development of communications
100,000Additions to rural hospitals
100,000Development of African schools
4,722*Agricultural Research Services
1,050Linguistic study
310Influence of Christian Missions study
1959–60390,808384,000Construction of roads
1960–61245,11434,800Employment exchanges
69,600African Agriculture
512,560African Education
3,288Ethnographic study
1,525Infestation of stored products research
2,437,3512,451,549
NOTE: * Supplementary Grant.

Rhodesia And Nyasaland

Grants And Loans

asked the Secretary of State for the Colonies what grants and loans have been made by the Exchequer or by Government agencies to the Northern Rhodesian and Nyasaland Governments, respectively, in each year since 1953.

NYASALAND
(a) ASSISTANCE UNDER COLONIAL DEVELOPMENT AND WELFARE ACTS
Grants approved and total issues made between 1st April, 1953 and 31st March, 1961
U.K. Financial YearTotal issues on all projects (including those approved prior to 1953) during yearAmount of GrantProject
££
1953–54576,287187,563

*Road Development programme

10,716

*Geological Survey

1,450

*Reconstruction of Zomba Mental Hospital

40,000

*Construction of housing for African employees

31,305

*Education Department

800

*Forestry Depot at Blantyre

7,400Veterinary Training Centre
17,000Construction of Trade School
71,000Road making plant
5,467Leprosy Survey
37,000Agricultural Training Centre
184,210Road Construction Organisation
1,350Mobile Book Shop
4,024

*Agricultural Research Station

1954–55384,828324,080

*Housing for African employees

18,000

*Aeronautical telecommunication services

5,407

*Afforestation, Mudi Dam

1,660

*Forestry Depot at Blantyre

22,700Rice growing survey
88,000Waterborne sewerage in African residential areas
91,370Timber Utilization
17,780Silvicultural Research
1955–56882,17223,142Rural Water Supplies
80,000African housing
140,000Acquisition of land for African settlement
55,000Construction of forest roads
140,000Educational development
48,000European housing
40,000Provision of Welfare centre
473,050Road improvements
1956–57290,02438,790Construction of dipping tanks
1,080Water supply for Silvicultural Station
79,473Agricultural Research Station
1,579

*Fisheries Research Organisation

9,022Fisheries Research Organisation
14,487Cotton Pest research
270Water supply to Silvicultural Station
1957–58503,1601,774

*Rice growing survey

145,800

*Waterborne sewerage in African areas

34,200Acquisition of land for African settlement
25,000African housing Estates
10,335Carbonatite investigations
55,800Acquisition of land for African settlement
18,395

*Agricultural Research Station

1958–59291,52752,439Vipya Forestry Operations
35,526Mineral investigation section of Geological Survey
45,400African housing estates
80,750Teacher Training Centre
2,340Rabies control
20,000Survey of iron ore deposits
4,846 *

*Silvicultural research

7,220Coffee disease investigation

U.K. Financial YearTotal issues on all projects (including those approved prior to 1953) during yearAmount of GrantProject
££
1959–60321,40450,441

* Mineral investigation section of Geological Survey

29,750

*Teacher training centre

175,576Road development, 1958–60
76,500Girls' secondary school
18,750Farm institute at Makanga
187,317Development of public land
90,000Reconstruction of Chole-Cherome road
1,200Research in monazite ore
900,000Blantyre/Limbe water supply improvement
20,153

*Cotton pest research

3,797

*Coffee disease investigation

1960–611,090,836247,500Chileka-Matope road
11,869Carbonatite research
50,400Road Link
257,957African education
17,180School accommodation
18,319Cholo water supply
9,360Rabies control
26,100African travellers' rest house
60,964Playing fields
224,421African land re-organisation
8,577Mingoli estate purchase
8,170Dipping tanks
8,550Boluka Water Supply
21,675Water development
9,180Coffee research
18,870Ecological survey
62,645Agricultural Research Station
4,340,2385,467,221
NOTE: * Supplementary Grant.

(b) ASSISTANCE UNDER COLONIAL SERVICES VOTE
Grants and Loans approved and issues made between 1st April, 1953 and 31st March, 1961
U.K. Financial YearIssuesAmount approvedProject
££
1953–5414,67014,670Interest and sinking fund payments on Stock—Grant
1959–60725,0001,735,000Emergency expenditure—Grant in aid
275,000568,000—Loan
1,014,6702,317,670

(c) ASSISTANCE BY COLONIAL DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION
Capital Sanctions and Issues between 1st April, 1953 and 31st March, 1961
ProjectCapital SanctionIssues by U.K. Financial Years
1953–541956–571957–581958–591960–61Total 1953–61
£££££££
Kasungu Tobacco Estates (first issue made in 1950).415,0007,50016,00023,500
Mudi River Water Board1,300,000
(approved March, 1960). African Housing1,000,000400,000600,0001,000,000
Vipya Tung Estate (first issue made in 1949).1,000,00040,00050,00010,00050,00050,000200,000
3,715,00040,00050,000417,500650,00066,0001,223,500

Education

Training Colleges (Places)

asked the Minister of Education (1) if he will state the number of boys and girls in the Dearne Valley constituency area who have been unable to obtain a place in a teachers' training college for the years 1958, 1959, 1960, and 1961 to date;(2) if he will state the number of boys and girls in the West Riding County Council area who have been unable to obtain a place in a teachers' training college for the years 1958, 1959, 1960, and 1961 to date.

Cyprus

English Schools

asked the Secretary of State for Commonwealth Relations whether, in view of the important rôle which the three English schools in Cyprus play in the life of the community, Her Majesty's Government intend to provide further financial support for them when the current grants expire in 1962; and if he will make a statement.

Yes. Her Majesty's Government are well aware of the excellent work being done by these schools. Their contribution in the educational field in Cyprus in indeed unique.

I am happy to be able to inform the House that the Government have decided to continue their aid to the schools for a further period of five years. For the academic year 1962–63 they propose to make available aid up to a maximum of £50,000. The precise manner in which this will be applied will be a matter for detailed negotiation between the British High Commissioner in Cyprus and the school boards.

It is our hope that, with this assurance of aid, the schools will be able to plan with renewed confidence for the future. I have no doubt that the very special rôle they have to play in the lives of the communities in Cyprus will meet with a sympathetic response from voluntary bodies and societies.

National Finance

Building Societies (Profits Tax)

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer what was the total product of Profits Tax from building societies during the fiscal year 1960–61; and what is the estimated revenue for 1961–62 assuming the increased rate of 15 per cent.

The yield of Profits Tax from the building societies in the fiscal year 1960–61 is estimated at about £2 million. The estimated yield in the current year, 1961–62, is about £3 million. The proposed increase in the rate of tax from 12½ per cent. to 15 per cent. will have no appreciable effect on the yield this year.

Medical School (Students)

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer if he will state the number of students entering medical schools in each year for the last eight years.

Figues up to 1953 are not available. Figures for the last seven years supplied by the University Grants Committee are as follows:

19542,609
19552,700
19562,441
19572,497
19582,353
19592,472
19602,580

Home Department

Police Headquarters, Leeds (New Switchboard)

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department why he advised the Leeds Police in 1960 to con-

IMPORTS INTO THE UNITED KINGDOM OF NEW CARS (INCLUDING TAXIS)
ASSEMBLED AND UNASSEMBLED
195619571958
No.£No.£No.£
Total Imports7,0032,468,2698,9083,112,74311,0403,988,455
Imports from—
Canada10082,659152138,142205196,160
Sweden52,65841,8065431,001
Germany, Western4,0981,337,5654,5601,588,7995,5552,082,227
France1,887484,7932,955793,1394,1011,106,058
Italy533188,0581,047371,015824274,733
United States264310,154149184,264199238,249
19591960
No.£No.£
Total Imports27,0648,952,47657,39319,164,279
Imports from—
Canada330339,243448453,770
Sweden458263,539413225,831
Germany, Western8,2232,854,87912,9974,819,552
France14,4134,114,78438,25711,651,451
Italy3,042934,9374,4751,423,583
United States270324,857324423,059

sider renting rather than buying a telephone switchboard at Police Headquarters, Leeds.

While making it clear that the matter was one for its decision, I invited the police authority to consider the possibility of renting a switchboard since this course might have certain financial advantages. The police authority, accepting this view, decided to proceed on the basis of rental rather than of purchase.

Trade And Commerce

Cars (Imports)

asked the President of the Board of Trade what was the value and number of cars imported into the United Kingdom in the last five years indicating the principal countries of origin.

British Army

Service Vehicles (Accidents)

asked the Secretary of State for War if he will state the number of accidents involving injury and loss of

YearTotal number of accidentsNumber of accidents involving personal injuries (included in Column 2)Troops
KilledInjured (including all minor personal injuries)
(1)(2)(3)(4)
1956–579,8441,387231,027
1957–588,7391,12615819
1958–599,1621,23116636
1959–608,6711,10421839
1960–617,7191,02410554
TOTALS44,1355,872853,875

asked the Secretary of State for War if he will state the number of accidents involving injury and loss of life to troops who have been conveyed in Service vehicles abroad during each of the past five years, specifyng the numbers killed and injured.

Records are held centrally only of the total number of accidents of all categories. These are as follows:

1956–5714,144
1957–5813,724
1958–5912,604
1959–6011,215
1960–619,776
Total61,463

asked the Secretary of State for War if he is satisfied with the present regulations governing the use of Service vehicles when carrying Service personnel; and, in view of the number of accidents taking place involving loss of life and injuries, if he will inquire into what further can be done to lessen the number of accidents.

life when troops have been conveyed in Service vehicles in this country during each of the past five years, specifying the numbers of killed and injured.

Yes. Rules for the control and use of W.D. transport are full and comprehensive. Every Army driver has to carry the Highway Code and a copy of "Standing Orders for Drivers of Mechanical Vehicles and Motorcycles", a simple and firm set of rules with which the driver is bound to comply.Courses run for driving instructors at the Army M.T. School pay careful attention to the safety aspect; and in addition Army drivers are encouraged to take part in safety driving competitions. Careful and continuous watch is kept on accident trends and any common fault is put right as soon as possible.

asked the Secretary of State for War if he will state the cost of the Service vehicles that have been involved in accidents, and consequently damaged, over the past five years.