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Written Answers

Volume 649: debated on Monday 13 November 1961

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Written Answers To Questions

Monday, 13th November, 1961

Pensions And National Insurance

Retirement Pensions

3.

asked the Minister of Pensions and National Insurance how many recipients in the United Kingdom of old-age pensions have gone to the Colonies; and if the increases of pensions granted in this country are given to those who emigrated before the increases in pensions were granted here.

There are about 1,400 people in the Colonies, Protectorates and Trust Territories who are drawing retirement pensions from this country. Those who are living in Malta receive their pensions under our Reciprocal Agreement with Malta at the rates which are current in this country. The others receive their pensions at the rates which were current when they first qualified for them or when they ceased to be resident in this country, whichever was the later.

10S Widows

4.

asked the Minister of Pensions and National Insurance how much it would cost to pay the full rate of widow's pension to those who now only receive 10s. per week.

National Assistance Act, 1948 (Section 7 (3))

7.

asked the Minister of Pensions and National Insurance whether he is aware of the hardship caused because, under Section 7 (3) of the National Assistance Act, 1948, a married woman who is not living under her husband's roof ceases to be a member of the same household as her husband, whereas under Section 42 of the Act a man is liable for his wife's maintenance whether she is living under the same roof or not, and in the event of failure to provide it and assistance being given under the Act, an offence is committed; and if he will introduce amending legislation.

No. But if the hon. Member will let me know the details of any case he has in mind, I will ask the National Assistance Board to make inquiries.

Ministry Of Power

Methane

20.

asked the Minister of Power to what extent consumers of gas in the Midlands and the north will benefit from the cheaper gas derived from imported liquid methane.

Methane supplies will enter the areas of the two Midlands Boards and the North Western Board. The Scottish, Northern and North Eastern Boards are not directly touched by the scheme as submitted to me.

23.

asked the Minister of Power whether the tankers, already authorised to be built by the Gas Council, will be constructed in shipyards in the United Kingdom; and whether the contracts for their construction have been agreed.

My right hon. Friend understands that contracts will shortly be closed for the construction of one tanker at Barrow and one at Belfast.

Electricity Boards (Command Paper 1337)

asked the Minister of Power what discussion he has had with the electricity authorities and boards in England and Wales on the implementation of the policies set out in Command Paper 1337 on the Financial and Economic Obligations of the Nationalised Industries; and if he will make a statement.

Discussions are still going on. When these have been completed the financial objectives set for the Electricity Boards in England and Wales will be announced.

Gas Council (Command Paper 1337)

asked the Minister of Power what discussions he has had with the Gas Council on the implementation of the policies set out in Command Paper 1337 on the Financial and Economic Obligations of the Nationalised Industries; and if he will make a statement.

Discussions are still going on. When these have been completed, the financial objectives set for the Gas Boards will be announced.

Coal

Collieries (Closure)

asked the Minister of Power (1) if he will list the collieries in the present general plan of closures which are destined to close in the next five years, and the reasons why(2) why he has approved a general plan of increased closure of collieries at a time of increased demand of all forms of fuel in this country and Europe; and whether he will halt all such closures for the time being.

Decisions about the closure of collieries are the responsibility of the National Coal Board by whom they are discussed in detail with the unions concerned in the divisions. Experience has shown that it is not possible to make accurate long-range forecasts about the future of individual collieries. The Board's plans provide for the replacement of worked-out and uneconomic capacity by new and more efficient collieries. The continuation of this process is essential to the industry's prosperity.

Lurgi Process (Study Group)

asked the Minister of Power when he hopes to be able to reveal the outcome of the discussions between the

Orange JuiceCod Liver OilVitamin A and D TabletsNational Dried Milk
(bottles)(bottles)(packets)(tins)
September, 19611,1521221592,026
September, 19603,3144514232,355

Russian Ships, United Kingdom Ports (Radioactivity)

36.

asked the Minister of Health What consultations his Department have had with a view to testing Russian ships visiting the United Kingdom for radioactive fall-out since the

Gas Council and the National Coal Board on the question of the economics of gasifying coal on a large scale by the Lurgi process.

The Gas Council and the National Coal Board have set up a joint study group to look into this matter. I attach importance to the early completion of the group's report, but I think it will be some months before it is available. The group is not only engaged in discussions, but has undertaken a detailed technical and economic study of the Lurgi process.

High-Cost Production

asked the Minister of Power what general directions he intends to give regarding the high-cost areas within the coal-mining industry.

None. The National Coal Board is already giving full consideration to the problems which arise from high-cost production.

Ministry Of Health

Welfare Foods, Oldham

28.

asked the Minister of Health if he will state the volume of sales of welfare foods in Oldham for September, 1961, and September, 1960; and what he proposes to do to reverse the decreasing distribution of these essential foods for children.

The figures are given below. I have no reason to doubt that intake of these foods is generally adequate.exploding of the 50 megaton bomb; how many ships have been tested; what have been the results; and whether he will make a statement.

This is a matter for port health authorities, to wham all necessary advice and assistance is available. They do not make returns to me, but in the two cases known to me the results have been negative.

Hearing Aids

44.

asked the Minister of Health if he will take steps to provide through the National Health Service a more efficient deaf aid than those at present supplied, in view of the improvements which have taken place in these instruments.

The Medresco aids are continually being improved and a more powerful instrument has recently been added to the range.

General Practitioner (Member's Letter)

45.

asked the Minister of Health whether he will give the name of the doctor who for ten years took fees of 10s. a week from an elderly widow on National Assistance, who was a National Health Service patient in the Dorset Area, details of which case have been sent to him by the hon. Member for West Ham, North.

Poliomyelitis, Hull

47.

asked the Minister of Health what assistance was given by his Department to the health authorities at Kingston-upon-Hull to enable them to deal effectively with the recent outbreak of poliomyelitis.

The vaccine was supplied immediately the council requested it and all necessary medical and technical advice was placed at their disposal.

Poliomyelitis Vaccine, Stockton-On-Tees

asked the Minister of Health why supplies of polio vaccine can be obtained on prescription from chemists whereas no supplies are available to doctors in Stockton-on-Tees; and what action he is taking to increase supplies of this vaccine to doctors to enable progress to be made with the anti-polio campaign.

Additional supplies have been made available for County Durham. Vaccine may be obtained from chemists on a doctor's prescription for the vaccination of individuals outside the priority classes, but the quantity so supplied is negligible.

Mental Health Services (Expenditure)

asked the Minister of Health if he will give the total expenditure on all mental health and mental deficiency services in the year 1960–61.

So far as the cost of these services can be separately identified, I estimate it at around£100 million.

Hospitals

Accident Centre, South-West Region

39 and 40.

asked the Minister of Health (1) whether, in view of the increase in the number of patients on the waiting list of the Corsham and Frenchay Hospital Group, Bristol, due to the continuous intake of accident cases mainly requiring plastic surgery treatment, he will now state when the proposed new accident centre for the region will be commenced;(2) whether the proposed new accident centre for the south-west region will be based on the present unit at Frenchay Hospital, Bristol.

I must ask the hon. Member to await the statement on hospital development foreshadowed in the Gracious Speech.

Crossways Hospital, Cowbridge

43.

asked the Minister of Health if he will give the number of Cardiff and district children who are patients in the Crossways Hospital, Cow-bridge; and what plans the regional hospital board has for these children in the future.

Hospital Building, Eastern Region

48.

asked the Minister of Health when he intends to publish his ten-year plan for hospitals in the area of the Eastern Region Hospital Board.

Fireworks (Casualties)

asked the Minister of Health how many persons were treated in hospital on 4th and 5th November as a result of burns or other injuries caused by fireworks; and how many were detained longer than twenty-four hours for treatment in hospital.

Hospital authorities were asked for returns and I will send the figures to the hon. Member when complete.

Consultants (Merit Awards)

asked the Minister of Health if he will state the number of consultants in each specialty and the relative numbers of A-plus, A, B and C merit awards at 31st December, 1960, together with comparable figures for 1959.

Employment

Foreign Workers, Agriculture And Horticulture (Accommodation)

52.

asked the Minister of Labour if he will ensure that hostel accommodation for foreign workers in agriculture and horticulture is inspected before permits to engage them are granted.

This is already the practice whenever there is doubt about the standard of accommodation offered.

Disabled Workers, Newcastle-Under-Lyme

53.

asked the Minister of Labour what steps have been taken in the last few years to find suitable work for disabled persons in Newcastle-under-Lyme; and what action his Department is now taking to expand opportunities for employment for the disabled.

My disablement resettlement officers have taken every opportunity of finding suitable employment for disabled persons. In fact, the number of unemployed disabled people has fallen from 148 in October, 1960, to 129 in October this year.

Employees' Organisations (Tuc Affiliation)

asked the Minister of Labour if he will supply a list of registered employees' organisations which are not affiliated to the Trades Union Congress, the total membership of these organisations, and the latest individual membership figures for the largest of these organisations.

A list of employees' organisations registered under the Trade Union Acts which are not affiliated to the Trades Union Congress is given below. The total membership of these organisations is about 530,000. The latest individual membership figures of the largest of these organisations, the Electrical Trades Union, is about 243,000.

List Of Employees' Organisations Registered Under The Trade Union Acts, 1871 To 1940 Which Are Not Affiliated To The Trades Union Congress

Grimsby Trawler Officers' Guild.

Hull Trawler Officers' Guild.

Aberdeen Skippers' and Mates' Association.

Milford Haven Amalgamated Steam Trawlers Engineers' and Firemens' Union.

Amalgamated Central Association of Colliery Overmen, Deputies and Shotfirers.

British Association of Colliery Management.

Affiliated Area Associations of the National Association of Colliery Overmen, Deputies and Shotfirers:

  • Cannock Chase and South Staffordshire*.
  • Cumberland*.
  • Durham*.
  • Forest of Dean*.
  • Leicestershire*.
  • Midland*.
  • North Staffordshire*.
  • Northumberland*.
  • North Western*.
  • Yorkshire*.
  • Scottish*.
  • South Wales and Monmouthshire Master Hauliers and Traffic Foremen's Association.

Affiliated Associations of the Federation of Trade Unions of Salt Workers, Alkali Workers, Mechanics and General Labourers:

Stoke Prior Salt Makers', Mechanics' and General Labourers' Association* .

Winsford Salt Makers' Association* .

North of Ireland Bakers, Confectioners and Allied Workers' Union.

Amalgamated Society of Bobbin, Carriage, Comb and Dropper Makers.

Amalgamated Society of Spring Makers, Tool Makers and Grinders.

* Not themselves affiliated to the T.U.C., but the national body to which these are affiliated, is both registered and affiliated to the T.U.C.

Amalgamated Society of Wool-Comb, Hackle and Gill Makers.

Association of Radio and Electronic Engineers.

Association of Supervising Electrical Engineers.

Card Dressers' Society.

Electrical Trades Union†.

Electrical and Mechanical Instrument Makers' Association.

Engineering Ins pectors' Association.

National Reed and Heald Makers' and Reed Wire Polishers' Union.

National Association of Tool Makers.

Paper Mould and Dandy Roll Makers' Union.

Admiralty Civil Servant's Association, Plymouth.

Chatham Dockyard and District Civil Servants' Association.

Union of Admiralty Employees.

Aeronautical Engineers' Association.

File Grinders' Trade Society (Sheffield).

Society of Shoe Rivet and Wire Nail Makers.

Penworkers' Federation.

Walsall Lock and Key Smiths' Male and Female Trade Society.

National Engineers' Association.

Textile Officials' Association.

Affiliated Area Associations of the National Association of Card, Blowing and Ring Room Operatives:

  • Bolton and District*.
  • Bury and Districts*.
  • Hyde and District*.
  • Oldham*.
  • Rochdale*.
  • South East Lancashire*.

Affiliated Area Associations of the Amalgamated Association of Operative Cotton Spinners and Twiners:

  • Bolton and surrounding Districts‡
  • Stockport District‡.

Affiliated Area Associations of the General Union of Associations of Loom Over-lookers:

  • Chorley and District‡.
  • Oldham‡.
  • United Association of Power Loom Over-lookers (Rochdale)‡.

General Union of Lancashire and Yorkshire Warp Dressers' Associations:

Manchester and District Association of Preparatory Workers.

Nelson and District Association of Preparatory Workers.

Burnley and District Tape Sizers' Protective Society.

Nelson, Colne and District Tape Sizers' Protective Society.

* Not themselves affiliated to the T.U.C., but the national body to which these are affiliated, is both registered and affiliated to the T.U.C.

† Affiliated to the Scottish T.U.C.

‡ Not themselves affiliated to the T.U.C., but the national body to which these are affiliated, is both registered and affiliated to the T.U.C.

Preston and District Tape Sizers' Association. Amalgamated Tape Sizers' Friendly Protection Society.

Affiliated Area Associations of the Amalgamated Association of Beamers, Twisters and Drawers ( Hand and Machine) :

  • Burnley and District*.
  • Colne and District*.
  • Manchester*.

Bolton and District Engine Attendants' and Firemen's Trade Union.

Affiliated Area Associations of the Amalgamated Weavers' Association:—

  • Ashton-under-Lyne and District*.
  • Bury, Radcliffe and District*.

Macclesfield Hand Loom Weavers' Association.

  • Loom Overlookers Trade Union.

Portadown, Banbridge and District Textile Workers' Trade Union.

Affiliated Area Associations of the Yorkshire Association of Power Loom Over-lookers:—

  • Bradford and District*.
  • Huddersfield and Dewsbury*.
  • Leeds and District*.

Pattern Weavers' Society.

Forfar Factory Workers' Union†.

Kirriemuir Factory Workers' Union.

Scottish Carpet Trade and Factory Workers' Union†.

United Wool Shawl, Fall and Antimacassar Trade Union of Hucknall and District.

Northern Carpet Trades Union.

Halifax and District Carpet Power Loom Tuners' Association.

National Union of Elastic Web Weavers, Braid Hands and Small Wares Fabric Workers.

Lurgan Hemmers', Veiners' and General Workers' Trade Union.

Amalgamated Union of Block Printers of Great Britain and Ireland.

Guild of Calico Printers', Bleachers', Dyers' and Finishers' Foremen.

Manchester Warehouse Employees' Association (Piece Goods).

Hinckley and District Hosiery Warehousemen's Association.

Manchester Hydraulic Packers' Society.

National Society of Journeymen, Curriers and Leather Workers.

Spen Valley and District Curriers' and Strapmakers' Union.

London Foremen Tailors' Mutual Association.

Supervisory Staffs Federation of the Glove Industry.

Pressed Glassmakers' Society of Great Britain.

National Trade Union of Coopers.*

Manchester, Salford and District Society of Brewers' and General Coopers.*

Philanthropic Society of Journeymen Coopers of Burton-on-Trent and Vicinity.*

North Western Packing Case, Box Makers' and General Woodworkers' Society.

Wall Paper Block Printers' Trade Union. London Society of Music Engravers.

Map and Chart Engravers' Association.

Pattern Card Makers' Society.

* Affiliated to a national body which is not registered but is affiliated to the T.U.C.

† Affiliated to the Scottish T.U.C.

Teston Independent Society of Cricket Ball Makers.

London Jewel Case Makers' Trade Protection Society.

Letter Cutters' Association (Monumental and Architectural).

Scottish Slaters' Tilers', Roofers' and Cement Workers' Society.†

Scottish Plasterers' Union.†

Birkenhead Operative House and Ship Painters' Society.

Liverpool and Vicinity Operative Painters' Old Society.

Southport, Birkdale and Vicinity Operative House Painters' Association.

National Tile, Faience and Mosaic Fixers' Society.

Scottish Operative Glaziers' Society.

British Gas Staff Association.

Association of Electrical Housecraft Advisors.

Electricity Boards Legal Society.

National Union of Water Works Employees.

Union of Railway Signalmen.

Ulster Transport and Allied Operatives' Union.

Amalgamated Society of Foremen Lightermen of the River Thames.

Tugmen's Guild.

Hull Stevedores' Mutual Aid Society.

North-East Coast Tug-Boatmen's Association.

Scottish Transport and General Workers' Union.†

National Federation of Sub-Postmasters.

National Guild of Telephonists.

Telecommunications Technicians Association.

Western Union Cable Employees' (European Division) Association.

Co-operative Branch Managers' and Overseers' Union.

National Amalgamated Union of Vintners' and Allied Trades Assistants.

Manchester Abattoirs Meat Workers' Association.

North of Ireland Operative Butchers' and Allied Workers' Association.

North of Ireland Slaughtering Contractors' Association.

Association of Assistant Superintendents (Royal London Mutual Insurance Society Limited).

  • Britannic Assurance Chief Office Staff Association.
  • National Association of Liverpool Victoria Managers.
  • Association of Superintendents and Assistant Superintendents of the Blackburn Assurance Company Limited.‡
  • Britannic Field Staff Association.‡
  • Liverpool Victoria Workers' Union.‡
  • London and Manchester Staff Union.‡
  • National Pearl Federation.‡
  • National Union of Pearl Agents.‡
  • Prudential Staff Union.‡
  • Refuge Field Staff Association.‡
  • Royal Liver Employees' Union.‡
  • Royal London Staff Association.‡

† Affiliated to the Scottish T.U.C.

‡ Not themselves affiliated to the T.U.C., but the national body to which these are affiliated, is both registered and affiliated to the T.U.C.

Pearl Unions Federation.

Prudential District Managers' Association. Royal Liver District Managers' Association in co-operation with the Association of Irish District Managers.

London Schoolkeepers' Association.

National Association of Youth Leaders and Organisers.

General Dental Practitioners' Association.

National Ambulance Services Association.

National Federation of Hospital Officers.

Speech Therapists Professional Association.

Scottish Chiropodists' Association.

British Association of Chemists.

British Council Staff Association.

National Union of Atomic Workers.

N.U.A.W. Organisaters' Association.

Registered Pharmacists' Union.

Association of B.B.C. Engineers.

Association of Broadcasting Staff.

Guild of British Broadcasting Corporation Technical Staff.

Society of Cinema Managers of Great Britain and Ireland (Amalgamated).

Television and Screen Writers' Guild.

Northern Ireland Musicians' Association.

Scottish Football Players' Union.

Scottish Junior Football Players' Union.

National Union of Club Stewards.

United Federation of Hotel Managers and Club Stewards of Great Britain.

Northumberland and Durham Club Stewards' Association.

Yorkshire Federation of Club Stewards.

Welsh Union of Club Stewards.

Pianoforte Tuners' Association.

Federation of Civil Service Professional and Technical Staffs.

Association of Government Supervisors and Radio Officers.

Guild of Public Health Inspectors.

National Association of Fire Officers.

Productive Manufacturing Industry

asked the Minister of Labour if he will state the latest figures of the numbers engaged in productive manufacturing industry, and, of those, an estimate of the actual numbers engaged on the production side, as distinct from the clerical, administrative and servicing aspects of the processes concerned.

There were 8,860,000 employees in manufacturing industry at the end of September, 1961, of whom it is estimated 6,970,000 were operatives and 1,890,000 were administrative, technical and clerical workers. Further information is given on page 9 of the January, 1961, issue of the Ministry of Labour Gazette.

East Germany (Travel Documents)

56.

asked the Lord Privy Seal why the members and officials of the East German football club Vorwaerts have been refused permission by Her Majesty's Government to make the journey to arrange and play a football match at Ibrox Park, Glasgow.

In accordance with decisions of the three Western Powers, supported by their North Atlantic Allies, the necessary travel documents for this purpose would not be issued by the Allied Travel Office in Berlin. In the absence of an acceptable travel document, visas cannot be granted.

asked the Lord Privy Seal if he will give the number of British subjects who have informed him that they have been prevented by the East German Government from entering East Germany and East Berlin during the last 12 months.

British subjects are under no obligation to inform Her Majesty's Government that their movements have been impeded in this way and none have done so.

Agriculture, Fisheries And Food

British Trawlers, Prohibited Fishing Grounds (Prosecutions)

58.

asked the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food how many arrests and prosecutions of British trawlers for fishing in prohibited fishing grounds have taken place during the last six months, indicating where any such prosecutions occurred, and with what results, respectively.

There have been six arrests leading to five prosecutions, four of which took place in Iceland and one in the Farces. All resulted in convictions.

Nature Conservancy

59.

asked the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food what new steps he is taking to ensure that the fullest use of his Department's resources is made in assisting the work of the Nature Conservancy, in accordance with the recommendation of the 6th Report of the Estimates Committee of last Session.

My officials have had preliminary consultations with the Nature Conservancy and the Department of Agriculture and Fisheries for Scotland. The Ministry's reply to the Sixth Report from the Estimates Committee will be presented to them soon, and it would not be appropriate for me to anticipate it further.

European Economic Community (Negotiations)

60.

asked the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food whether he will make a statement regarding his working arrangements for consulting with the farming industry during the negotiations with the European Economic Community.

Consultations during these negotiations must necessarily be on a confidential basis but I am in touch with landowner, farmer and worker interests and can assure the hon. Member that they will continue to be kept in touch as the negotiations develop.

Eggs

61.

asked the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food what proportion of the total egg production in the United Kingdom he estimates is sold through licensed packing stations.

It is estimated that over the year about 60 per cent. of total production is sold through licensed packing stations. In proportion to commercial production the figure might be in the region of 70 per cent.

Potato Board Acreage Levies (Public Inquiry)

asked the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food how many objections he has received to the Potato Board's proposals to increase the acreage levies; and when he is holding an inquiry into the objections.

Eight thousand five hundred and twelve objections and representations have been received. They were mainly in the same form and related to the proposed increases in acreage levies.Having considered the nature of the objections I have decided, in conjunction with the Secretary of State for Scotland, to hold a public inquiry in accordance with the Agricultural Marketing Act, 1958. The date and other arrangements will be announced in due course.

Fowl Pest

asked the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food what was the sum paid out in compensation and expenses in dealing with fowl pest in 1960–61.

In the financial year 1960–61£3,434,000 was paid in compensation and£472,000 for expenses in dealing with outbreaks of fowl pest.

Home Department

Immigrants

62.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what estimate he made when introducing legislation of the desirable top limit to annual migration from the Commonwealth at the present time.

The number of immigrants to be allowed in would vary from time to time according to Her Majesty's Government's assessment of the current situation in this country. An estimate on the lines suggested by the hon. Member would not, therefore, have been appropriate.

Bookmakers' Permits And Betting Office Licences

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will state the number of bookmakers' permits and the number of betting office licences that have been granted for the Metropolitan Police district and for such other areas in Great Britain for which the information is conveniently available.

The numbers of permits and licences in force on 1st June in each county and county borough are given in a report to Parliament which is to be published on 21st November in accordance with Section 10 of the Betting and Gaming Act, 1960.

Fireworks And Bonfires (Fires)

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many fires to which the fire brigades were called on 4th and 5th November were caused by bonfires or fireworks.

It will be some time before figures are available for the country as a whole. In the County of London the numbers of fires known to have been caused by fireworks and bonfires were, on 4th November, 58, and on 5th November, 15.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what was the estimated damage caused by fires on November 4th and 5th; and how this compares with average daily fire damage.

Fireworks, Metropolitan Police District (Charges)

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department the number of persons charged with offences relating to fireworks on November 4th and 5th in the Metropolitan Police district.

379. This total includes a number of charges of unlawful conduct such as obstructing the police, obstructing the footway and assaults on the police at places where fireworks were being discharged. In addition, 78 persons, among them a number of juveniles, were reported for summonses.

Oil-Fired Heating Installations (Fires)

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many fires were caused in England and Wales during 1960 by defective oil-fired heating systems; what was the cost of such damage; and what was the number of casualties.

There were 148 fires in oil-fired heating installations in England and Wales during 1960, but it is not possible to say how many were caused by defects in the installations themselves. I have no information about the cost of damage. There were not fatal casualties.

Prisoners (Psychiatric Treatment)

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department in which prisons psychiatric treatment is available on a continuing basis; how many qualified psychiatrists, in whole-time equivalents, are employed in the prison service; and how many prisoners are receiving regular psychiatric treatment.

At present nine visiting psychiatrists are treating 171 inmates at 23 sessions in each week at Wormwood Scrubs, Wakefield, Holloway and Pentonville prisons and at Feltham borstal. In addition, psychiatric treatment is provided by prison medical officers, many of whom hold psychiatric qualifications. The whole-time equivalent is not ascertainable.

Grendon Underwood Psychiatric Prison

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department when he expects Grendon Underwood psychiatric prison to be completed; how many prisoners it will accommodate; what is the proposed establishment of psychiatric and medical ancillary staff; and what staff have been appointed to date.

The establishment is expected to receive its first inmates early in June, 1962. The numbers will be built up gradually to a maximum of 300 men and 25 women.The head of the establishment, who will be a principal medical officer of the prison medical service and will be known as the Medical Superintendent, has been selected and will take up his appointment shortly before the establishment opens. The complement of other medical and ancillary staff has not yet been settled.

Nuclear Attack

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will now indicate the estimated number of civilian survivors in the event of this country being subjected to a full-scale nuclear attack.

The number of survivors would depend on so many variable factors that no worthwhile estimate can be given.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will indicate, in the light of known evidence, the period of time the civilian population will be subject to danger from possible nuclear fall-out contamination in the event of this country being subjected to a full-scale nuclear attack.

The extent and duration of the hazard from fall-out after nuclear attack would depend on the number and size of weapons used, where they fell, the height of burst and the wind and weather conditions. The Home Office pamphlets "Nuclear Weapons" and "Radioactive Fall-Out: Provisional Scheme of Public Control" give information about danger levels, the rate at which radiation decays and protective measures.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department the estimated number of deep air raid shelters required to ensure safety for the civilian population in the event of this country being subjected to a full-scale nuclear attack.

No estimate has been made. Provision on a nation-wide scale of deep shelter would not be feasible.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will indicate what items of equipment will be required by the civilian population to ensure safety from contamination from nuclear fall-out in the event of this country being subjected to a full-scale nuclear attack; and if he will now take steps for a distribution of such equipment to the general public.

The measures described in the official publications "The Hydrogen Bomb" and "Nuclear Weapons" do not require the issue of special equipment to members of the public.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what plans he has made to ensure that persons contaminated by nuclear fall-out will not endanger the safety of uncontaminated persons in the event of this country being subjected to a full-scale nuclear attack.

Guidance is given in the Home Office pamphlet "Nuclear Weapons" on the removal of contamination from the skin and clothing. But the danger to others from a person contaminated with radioactive fall-out is a relatively minor one compared with the danger of radiation from surrounding fall-out.

The West Indies

Jamaica (Unemployment)

63.

asked the Secretary of State for the Colonies what estimate he has made of the present total of unemployed in Jamaica.

I have not made any estimate. Unemployment is a matter within the competence of the Jamaica Government which is self-governing in this sphere.

Windward And Leeward Islands

asked the Secretary of State for the Colonies whether he is prepared, in principle, to give special financial guarantees in respect of the Windward and Leeward Islands in order to encourage Trinidad to lead a smaller West Indies Federation.

It is intended that early in 1962 discussions will be held to consider various constitutional questions arising from Jamaica's expressed desire to leave the Federation. I do not propose to enter into any commitments, financial or otherwise, in advance of these discussions.

Local Government

Water Supply, Manchester And Salford (Radioactivity)

64.

asked the Minister of Housing and Local Government and Minister for Welsh Affairs, if he will state the extent of the recent increase of radioactivity in the drinking water supply of Manchester and Salford; and if increases have been notified in other areas.

It is not expected that the recent nuclear weapon tests will bring about any appreciable deposition of long-lived radioactive material on the United Kingdom for several months. Preliminary tests for iodine-131 have not yet shown any measureable amount in Manchester and Salford drinking water or in the other supplies which have been sampled, but tests are continuing.

West Sussex (Development Plan)

asked the Minister or Housing and Local Government and Minister for Welsh Affairs if he has studied the Minister of Transport's proposals for improving the A.27 trunk road between Brighton and Lancing, and the plans for an alternative motorway north of this existing trunk road; and how these projects affect his overall plan for the development of West Sussex in the next fifty years.

I understand that my right hon. Friend the Minister of Transport has no immediate proposals for improving the A.27 trunk road between Brighton and Lancing beyond the small widening scheme now in progress at Shoreham-by-Sea. I assume that the plans for an alternative motorway to the north are those put forward by local residents which my right hon. Friend is now considering. Until it is decided that such a motorway is needed it would be premature to consider what effect it can have on the development plan for West Sussex.

Water Supplies (Emergency Arrangements)

asked the Minister of Housing and Local Government and Minister for Welsh Affairs if he has completed his plans to ensure an adequate supply of uncontaminated water for the surviving civilian population in the event of this country being subjected to a full-scale nuclear attack; and if he will make a statement.

Under the plans which have been made for maintaining public water supplies in the event of a nuclear attack emergency equipment for carting water and for bringing alternative sources into use has been stockpiled. Further equipment is being obtained under the revised civil defence programme announced in the White Paper Report on Defence 1961.

Civil Defence (Evacuation Plans)

asked the Minister of Housing and Local Government and Minister for Welsh Affairs what arrangements he has made for the evacuation of all civilians and for women and children from known danger areas in the event of nuclear attack; what arrangements have been made for their accommodation in the receiving areas; what is his estimate of the number of persons involved; and if he will state the areas considered to be known danger areas.

As my predecessor informed the House on 30th March, 1961, in reply to the right hon. Member for Derby, South (Mr. P. Noel-Baker), a comprehensive review of evacuation policy is being carried out. Discussions on the subject have been held with the local authority associations and I am giving further consideration to the problem in the light of the views expressed during these discussions.

Trade And Commerce

Export Guarantees Act (Section 2)

65.

asked the President of the Board of Trade what is the amount of the outstanding current liabilities incurred under Section 2 of the Export Guarantees Act; and in what countries they are incurred.

The amount is£211 million.As my right hon. Friend will be aware, some further information in respect of these liabilities was given in the debate on the Export Guarantees Bill on Friday last.It is not the practice to disclose the Department's credit insurance liabilities on individual markets, but a list of Section 3 economic assistance loans was given in reply to Questions by the hon. Member for Haltemprice (Mr. Wall) on 26th and 27th July last. Since then a£2 million loan for earthquake relief for Chile has been signed.

Royal Navy

Toome Airfield

asked the Civil Lord of the Admiralty when he proposes to complete the derequisitioning of Toome Airfield.

This former airfield was owned, not requisitioned, by the Admiralty. Its disposal is nearly complete.A small built-up portion has been transferred to the Northern Ireland Ministry of Commerce at their request. Contracts for the resale to thirty-five former owners of the whole of the remainder have now been exchanged. It is expected that the necessary legal conveyances will be completed within approximately three months.

Cigarette Company (Advertising Films)

asked the Civil Lord of the Admiralty why he gave permission for Royal Navy minesweepers to be shown at work in a film advertising a certain brand of cigarettes.

These advertising films depict routine naval activities; the film company is not provided with special facilities. The film in question was made several years ago, since when the practice has been changed. By agreement with the company, films made since the end of 1959 do not depict the R.N. officers and ratings smoking the brand of cigarettes in question.

Ministry Of Aviation

Airways Corporations (Command Paper 1337)

asked the Minister of Aviation what discussion he has had with British European Airways and British Overseas Airways Corporation on the implementation of the policies set out in Command Paper 1337 on the Financial and Economic Obligations of the Nationalised Industries; and if he will make a statement.

Preliminary discussions with both Airways Corporations are in progress.

Aircraft (Radioactive Contamination)

asked the Minister of Aviation whether, in view of the need to protect the health of all persons involved in the use and servicing of the aircraft operated by the British Overseas Airways Corporation and British European Airways, he will give a general direction to the Corporations to investigate the extent to which their aircraft have been contaminated by radiation in the atmosphere as a result of the recent series of Russian nuclear tests.

The Air Corporations are fully aware of the problem of possible radioactive contamination and already have the necessary steps in hand for monitoring aircraft—in co-operation with the Radiological Protection Service—and for decontamination of any found to be affected.

Shoreham Aerodrome (New Road Bridge)

asked the Minister of Aviation if he has studied the plans for the proposed new fly-over bridge on trunk road A.27 over the River Adur at Shoreham-by-Sea; how this bridge will affect the use of Shoreham Airport; and if he will consult with the Minister of Transport, with a view to ensuring that the bridge will be sited sufficiently far to the north of the existing toll bridge so as to present no danger to aircraft approaching the airfield from a north-easterly direction.

My right hon. Friend the Minister of Transport is aware of our concern at the serious effect on the use of Shoreham aerodrome of building the bridge on the line that was tentatively suggested last year. We await my right hon. Friend's amended proposals.

Independent Airlines (Aircraft Registration)

asked the Minister of Aviation to what extent independent airlines are making it their practice to register their aircraft overseas so as not to be subject to the regulations and safety standards operative in the United Kingdom; and what steps he proposes to take to ensure that aircraft so registered are still required to comply with these regulations.

There is no evidence to suggest that British operators are adopting this practice. Were they to do so the national authorities concerned would be consulted and, if necessary, permission to operate into this country would be withheld.

Acts Of Parliament (Numbering And Citation)

asked the Attorney-General if he will propose to the Statute Law Committee an alteration in the present system of numbering and citation of Acts of Parliament so that each Act is allotted a chapter and number in a series beginning with the first Act passed in each calendar year and ending with the last Act passed during the same year.

National Finance

Public Works Loan Board (Interest Rates)

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer whether he will make a statement about the rates of interest charged to local authorities borrowing from the Public Works Loan Board.

A Treasury Minute made on 8th November, 1961, provides that loans advanced to local authorities by the Public Works Loan Board on and after 11th November until further notice shall carry the following rates of interest:

  • Loans for not more than 5 years, 6⅞per cent.
  • Loans for more than 5 years but not more than 15 years, 6⅞per cent.
  • Loans for more than 15 years but not more than 30 years, 6¾per cent.
  • Loans for more than 30 years, 6¾per cent.

Scotland

Legal Aid Scheme

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland following the Report of the Law Society of Scotland on the Legal Aid Scheme for the year ended 31st March, 1961, what reply he proposes to make to the representations he has received in favour of extending the Legal Aid Scheme to criminal cases.

I am considering the report of the Guthrie Committee on legal aid in criminal proceedings and I am in touch with the Law Society of Scotland on this matter, but I am not yet in a position to make a statement.

Fishing Industry (Catches, North Sea)

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland if he is aware of the decline in the catches of North Sea haddock; and what steps he is taking to ascertain the cause of this decline and to deal with the problem in view of its effect upon the Scottish fishing industry.

Yes. Our researches show that the decline in catches is principally due to the fact that during the last three years natural recruitment to the fishable stocks has been less than in the immediately preceding years. In course of time we shall, I hope, know more about the factors controlling natural recruitment but mean time I fear I cannot influence the course of nature.

Maternity Hospital, Bellshill

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland on what date he approved the erection of the new maternity hospital at Bellshill; when building work commenced; when it will be ready for occupation; what is the estimated cost; and how many beds it will provide.

The first tenders for the site works at this hospital were approved in July, 1957, and the site preparation which involved extensive piling, began in August 1957. Work on the main structure began in November, 1958. The Western Regional Hospital Board expects that the hospital will be ready for occupation in May 1962. The present estimate of cost is including equipment£830,000. The hospital will contain 132 beds, and 27 cots for sick and premature infants.

Transport

Traffic Flow, London

asked the Minister of Transport if he will introduce an electric computer to help work out the flow of traffic in London.

An electric computer will be used to analyse data on traffic flow for the comprehensive survey of London's traffic now being made by consultants on behalf of my Department and the London County Council.I am also investigating, with the Road Research Laboratory, the possibility of using a computer for the continuous processing of traffic data to permit the coordinated control of traffic over large areas.

Roads

A27 Trunk Road (Improvements)

asked the Minister of Transport what is the cost of the present improvement works which are proceeding on the A.27 trunk road at Shoreham-by-Sea, and which are shown on the relevant plans as the first stage of these improvements; and what second and subsequent stages of these improvements he envisages.

Approximately£37,000. I hope later on to extend this improvement westwards for a distance of some 400 yards, at an estimated cost of£20,000.

asked the Minister of Transport what is the estimated cost of the compulsory acquisition of land necessary to complete the improvements along the A.27 trunk road between Brighton and Lancing.

The only additional improvements now planned are the westward extension of the present improvement of Upper Shoreham Road and a small scheme at Portslade. The land required is already in my possession.

Adur Bridge, Old Shoreham

asked the Minister of Transport if he is aware that if Scheme A, B, or C, for the Adur Bridge is approved, the vibration and noise from the proposed 90 feet wide dual carriageway bridge approach, sited within 65 yards of St. Nicholas Church, will seriously damage this 1,000 years old church in Old Shoreham; and if he will direct that the bridge line shall come no nearer than 350 yards north of the church.

I have not yet reached any conclusion about the site for a new bridge. But I can assure my hon. and gallant Friend that I fully appreciate the need to avoid damage to St. Nicholas Church.No final decision can be made until my proposals have been advertised as a draft Order under the Highways Act, 1959, and any objections have been considered.

Motorways

asked the Minister of Transport if he will state, giving the mileage in respect of each, those motorways or lengths of motorways for which no line had yet been proposed, a draft scheme had been published, a scheme had been made, tenders had been invited, a contract had been placed, those which were under construction, and those which were in use, respectively, as at 31st October.

Following is the information requested:

Motorways in use
Miles
London-Birmingham73¾
Preston By-pass
Lancaster By-pass11½
Ross Spur20½
Maidstone By-pass
Maidenhead By-pass6
Doncaster By-pass15
Stretford-Eccles By-pass
(Classified Motorway built by Lancashire County Council)
Motorways under construction
Birmingham-Preston78½
Birmingham-Bristol (Lydiate Ash to Twyning)28
Stevenage By-pass
Medway Motor Road25
London-South Wales
Chiswick to Langley Part I2
Slough By-pass5
Severn Bridge (foundation)
Contract placed
Darlington By-pass (Bridges)
Tenders invited
None
Scheme made
Miles
Preston-Lancaster13
London-Yorkshire Part II (Crick to Doncaster)86
Darlington-Barton By-pass10
London-South Wales
Chiswick-Langley12
Severn Bridge and Approaches
Newport By-pass
Port Talbot By-pass
Midland Links Dunston to Castle Bromwich26
Draft Scheme published
Sheffield-Leeds Spur34
Durham Motorway21
Hendon Motorway (Page Street to Brockley4
London-South Wales Tormarton to Almondsbury11½
High Wycombe By-pass13
Midland Links
Lydiate Ash to Great Barr16
Castle Bromwich to Catthorpe29
Line not yet publishedApproximate Lengths
Miles
Lancaster-Penrith36
Penrith By-pass6
Penrith-Carlisle20
Lancashire-Yorkshire Motorway50
Birmingham-Bristol (Twyning to East Brent)68
London-South Wales
Maidenhead to Tormarton80
Crick to Newport9
London-Birmingham
Aldenham-Brockley4
London-Crawley25
London-Basingstoke34
London-Bishop's Stortford32
Baldock By-pass6
Ditton By-pass5

British Army

Garrison, Gilbraltar (Somerset And Cornwall Light Infantry)

asked the Secretary of State for War what complaints he has received concerning the accommodation provided for the 1st Battalion of the Somerset and Cornwall Light Infantry garrison, stationed at Gibraltar; and whether he is satisfied that there is an adequate fresh water supply and individual locker accommodation for each soldier.

AwardsBenefits
First World WarSecond World War
Victoria CrossAs from 1st August, 1959, all holders of Victoria Cross receive a special pension of£100 a year.
Other Ranks only
Military CrossA gratuity of£20 on promotion to a commission or on discharge, with an additional gratuity of£20 for each bar, or 6d. a day addition to any pension awarded.
Military MedalNo monetary award.As for Distinguished Conduct Medal.
Meritorious Service Medal.If awarded for gallant conduct deemed to merit additional pension, an addition of 6d. a day to pension.Not awarded for gallant conduct.
Distinguished Service MedalNo monetary award.As for Distinguished Conduct Medal.
Distinguished Flying Medal.Not introduced.Army other rank recipients — as for Distinguished Conduct Medal.
Conspicuous Gallantry Medal (Flying).Not introduced.Army other rank recipients — as for Distinguished Conduct Medal.
Conspicuous Gallantry Medal (Naval).Chief Petty Officers, Petty Officers and equivalent ranks in Royal Marines — an annuity of up to£20 (£10 usually paid).Army other rank recipients — as for Distinguished Conduct Medal.
Ratings and ranks below Petty Officer — a gratuity of£20 on promotion to a commission or on discharge.

I have received no complaints. It is generally recognised that these old barracks are not up to modern standards. Work on their replacement is due to begin next year. I understand that there has been a general shortage of fresh water in Gibraltar, but that the supply has now been restored. Every man now has a locker to himself.

asked the Secretary of State for War how many bug-infested mattresses provided for the use of the men of the 1st Battalion of the Somerset and Cornwall Light Infantry garrison, Gibraltar, have had to be destroyed.

None; some had to be cleaned. The unit has now been issued with new foam mattresses.

Awards For Gallantry (Gratuities)

asked the Secretary of State for War what awards for gallantry in the field of military service, conferred during each of the last two world wars, qualify for a gratuitous payment; and what is the amount of such gratuity in each respective case.