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Burton-On-Trent

Volume 885: debated on Tuesday 28 January 1975

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asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science (1) what is the estimated total cost of the proposals for the reorganisation of secondary education in Burton-on-Trent; and what are the estimated costs for each main element of the proposed reorganisation;(2) what examination he made of the financial resources available to Burton-on-Trent in considering the proposals for the reorganisation of secondary education there; and what information was supplied to him as to the sources from which funds will be drawn and the amounts from each source;(3) what problems of suitability of existing secondary school buildings in Burton-on-Trent it is anticipated will arise under the proposed reorganisation of secondary education; and how is it proposed that such difficulties will be solved.

The proposals envisage the utilisation of existing facilities, and little difficulty is expected to arise with respect to the suitability of buildings. A small amount of additional accommodation will be required at the Hillside School which, together with necessary adaptations to other premises, will be financed by the Staffordshire Education Authority from its minor works resources. Use of these does not require specific approval by my right hon. Friend for the particular sums involved.

asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science what element, if any, there will be of schooling upon split sites in the proposal for the reorganisation of secondary education in Burton-on-Trent; and, in, so far as any such element is to be of short duration, to what extent that is to be subject to any future housing development.

The enlarged and reorganised voluntary controlled school will function in three sets of buildings on a single campus. The premises of the Dovecliffe and Horninglow Schools which are to form a proposed new school are about half a mile apart. It is understood that in the view of the Staffordshire authority requirements for additional places in this area may in due course justify two separate schools. The enlarged Paget School will include initially the Anglesey buildings a mile or so away but the authority intends to enlarge the buildings on the main site when resources permit.

asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science what changes in the present system of providing single-sex schools will be required by the proposal to reorganise secondary education in Burton-on-Trent.

The present single-sex schools are the boys' grammar school and the girls' high school. The grammar school is to be enlarged as a mixed comprehensive school incorporating the premises of the high school which is to be closed.

asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science what changes in the present system of providing Roman Catholic schooling only for children whose parents wish them to have it is required by the proposal to reorganise secondary education in Burton-on-Trent.

None. Co-operation is envisaged at sixth form level between the reorganised Hillside School and the Robert Sutton Roman Catholic Comprehensive School.

asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science what is the current staff to pupil ratio in the three Burton grammar schools and in the non-grammar secondary schools in Burton-on-Trent.

In January 1974 the pupil-teacher ratio in the three grammar schools averaged 15·6 and in the non-grammar schools 18·9.

asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science whether the numbers of staff will be increased in the secondary education catchment area as a result of the proposal to reorganise secondary education in Burton-on-Trent; and what will be the ratio of pupils to staff under these proposals.

asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science what representations he has received for and against the proposals for the reorganisation of secondary education in Burton-on-Trent to date; and how many parents and ratepayers have signified their approval and disapproval of the proposed reorganisation, respectively.

Four petitions and letters from two groups of teachers, two groups of local government electors, one individual and one group of schoolgirls were received objecting to the proposals, and one letter supporting them. It is not possible to say how many of the signatures were those of parents or ratepayers, and many people signed more than one of the petitions.