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Written Answers

Volume 885: debated on Wednesday 5 February 1975

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Written Answers To Questions

Wednesday 5th February 1975

Environment

Lorries (Jack-Knifing)

5.

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment what progress the Transport and Road Research Laboratory has made with its trials on anti-jack-knifing equipment for articulated lorries; and whether he will make a statement.

The field tests of anti-jack-knifing equipment for articulated lorries have been completed, and preparation of the report is well advanced. I expect to receive the report shortly.

Railways (Capital Investment)

24.

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment what estimate he has made of the capital investment to be expended by British Rail in 1975; and what were the comparable totals five and 10 years previously respectively.

£187 million and £125 million for 1975 and 1970 respectively, The 1965 figure was £221 million, but this is not comparable since it provided for not only a much larger rail network but also for activities since transferred to other bodies.

Bed And Breakfast Accommodation

25.

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment whether he will make proposals designed to reduce the amount of expenditure on bed and breakfast accommodation in 1975.

I am considering a number of initiatives to get empty and under-used housing into use, in order to reduce homelessness and housing stress generally, and propose to issue further advice about more satisfactory provision for the homeless, in consultation with my right hon. Friends the Secretaries of State for Social Services and for Wales.

Empty Housing

26.

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment how many local authority properties have been empty on 1st January for the last five years.

The Department's relets surveys showed less than 1 per cent. of local authority dwellings vacant and available for letting at the end of each of the years 1970 to 1973. The figure for end-1974 is not yet available.

Improvement Grants

27.

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment whether he is satisfied with the present level of authorised improvement grants.

The number of grant approvals declined during the second and third quarters of 1974, but I hope that it will increase now that the Housing Act 1974 is in force, and that greater emphasis will be placed on improving the worst of our housing stock than has been the case to date.

Local Government Expenditure

28.

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment what response he has had to his circular on local government expenditure dated 23rd December 1974.

A number of local authorities have sought detailed technical guidance in interpreting the circular. The general indications are that authorities are seeking to moderate the rate of growth of their services as the circular advises.

30.

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment what progress has been made with regard to the voluntary monitoring system for local government expenditure.

There is no system for monitoring the expenditure of individual authorities but the Department's Circular No. 171/74 gave specific guidance to local authorities on the way in which they could secure reductions in the rate of growth of their services. Local authorities have found this useful.

Local Government Staffing

29.

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment if he will make a statement giving the latest position on staffing in local government.

The total staff employed by local authorities in England and Wales numbered 2,440,000 at June 1974, the latest date for which information is available. A system for watching staff numbers in future is now being discussed with representatives of local government.

South-East England (Structure Plans)

31.

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment what effect the cancellation of the Channel Tunnel will have on the structure plans for Kent and the South East.

This is a matter for the county councils, which prepare the structure plans, to consider in the first instance.

Homeless Persons

32.

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment whether he will start an investigation into the possibility of producing a national figure for the homeless.

A new system has been introduced for collecting statistics about homeless people who approach local authorities for help. This will provide more useful information than has been available before. But the different circumstances in which people become homeless, and the variety of the agencies they may or may not approach for help would make it impracticable to obtain a reliable national figure of homelessness.

49.

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment what progress he has made in his discussions with Shelter and authorities concerned with homelessness about the use of properties at present standing empty.

I propose to issue further guidance to local authorities on dealing with the problems of the homeless as soon as possible. I am also examining ways in which to bring more empty dwellings into use. In the course of examining these matters I have met representatives of Campaign for the Homeless and Rootless, Shelter and other bodies and will be meeting representatives of local authorities.

Railways (Electrification)

33.

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment how many miles of electrified railways there are in Wales and England respectively.

Channel Ports (Road Access)

34.

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment what proposals he has to improve road access to the Channel ports as a result of the recent decision on the Channel Tunnel.

As my right hon. Friend said on 20th January, we are reviewing the implications of the decision for current road plans.

Ports (Nationalisation)

35.

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment when he intends to introduce legislation to nationalise the ports; and if he will make a statement.

I would refer the hon. Member to the reply which my right hon. Friend gave on 15th January to the hon. Member for Christchurch and Lymington (Mr. Adley).—[Vol. 884, c. 432–3.]

Rural Transport

36.

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment what are the Government's plans for improving rural transport; and if he will make a statement.

55.

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment what progress he has made in his discussions with the bus industry and with local authority associations about transport problems in rural areas as mentioned in his reply of 26th November 1974 (Official Report, c. 153).

Following earlier discussions with both sides of the industry, my hon. Friend met representatives of local authority associations yesterday. There is general recognition of the need to secure improvements in rural transport but I am not yet in a position to announce specific proposals.

Motor Vehicles (Accidents)

37.

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment whether he knows the accident rate per car mile by make of car; and if so, by this standard, what is the most dangerous car.

Transport Expenditure

38.

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment what further cuts he expects to make in transport expenditure; and if he will make a statement.

The White Paper on Public Expenditure, Cmnd. 5879, published on 30th January, sets out the Government's plans for public expenditure on transport over the next five years.

Local Authority Mortgage Interest

39.

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment how many local authorities have announced increases to above 11 per cent. in their mortgage interest rates; how many home owners are affected; and if he will now bring forward proposals to prevent those increases from taking place.

On the first part of the Question, I would refer the hon. Member to the answer given to my hon. Friend the Member for Southampton, Itchen (Mr. Mitchell) on 23rd January.—[Vol. 884, c. 498]. I have no figures of the number of house-owners affected.As to the last part of the Question, I refer the hon. Member to the answer given to my hon. Friend the Member for Bolton, West (Mrs. Taylor) on 27th January.—[Vol. 885,

43–4].

Home Purchase Assistance (Harrow)

40.

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment what further representations he has received from the London borough of Harrow on plans for a home purchase assistance scheme since his reply to the hon. Member for Harrow, East on 31st December 1974.

District Auditors (Surcharge Powers)

42.

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment if he will seek to amend Section 228 of the Local Government Act 1933 so as to take away from the district auditor the power to surcharge councillors.

My right hon. Friend has no proposals to amend the operation of this section in respect of accounts for periods up to the end of last March, except to give effect to the statement my right hon. Friend made on 6th November.

M55 Motorway Link

43.

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment if he will make a statement about the progress of the construction of the M55 motorway link.

This scheme has been delayed owing to bad weather over a prolonged period and shortage of materials due to the three-day week. I shall inform the hon. Member of the firm completion date as soon as this has been agreed between the contractor and the engineer.

Building Industry

44.

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment when he will make a statement on the condition of the building industry.

The Government have taken a number of measures to help the construction industry face its problems. In particular, I would refer the hon. Member to the various initiatives on private sector housebuilding announced by my right hon. Friend the Secretary of State in answer to my hon. Friend the Member for Bolton, West (Mrs. Taylor) on 27th January.—[Vol. 885, c. 43–4.] An additional £120 million of public expenditure for construction generally was announced last September. I shall continue to keep a close watch on the situation.

Bricks

45.

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment how many bricks are now in stock; what redundancies have occurred within the brick industry; and whether he will make a statement.

The provisional figure for brick stocks at the end of 1974 is 909 million. 3,521 redundancies in brick-making were notified to the Employment Service Agency in 1974. The Government have taken a number of measures to help the brick industry. In particular, I remind my hon. Friend of the various initiatives on private sector housebuilding announced by my right hon. Friend the Secretary of State in answer to my hon. Friend the Member for Bolton, West (Mrs. Taylor) on 27th January.

Building Societies (Mortgage Repayments)

46.

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment if he will seek in his present discussions with the building societies to establish rules and guidelines for helping people who, due to unforeseen economic circumstances, are having difficulties with their mortgage repayments.

Building societies have a long tradition of giving sympathetic treatment to people in difficulty with their mortgage repayments.

Highway Code

47.

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment what recent representations he has received from the Automobile Association on the subject of the Highway Code.

Motorway Lighting

50.

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment if he will define Her Majesty's Government's policy on the lighting of motorways.

The present policy is to provide lighting only on those sections of motorways with special hazards for drivers.

Scotland

Freight Charges

88.

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland if he will make proposals for mitigating the hardship caused by further rises in freight charges to the Scottish Islands.

As I told the right hon. Member on 27th November—[Vol. 882, c. 160–1.]—I am reviewing the question of financial support for shipping services to the islands and hope to make a statement in the near future.

Motorways

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland how many miles of motorway are in the various stages of planning in Scotland.

Some 55 miles of motorway are in various stages of preparation prior to the start of work.

Rates

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland if he will list the average rate rises in Scotland over each of the last 10 years.

Total income from rates—other than domestic water rates—and the domestic element of rate support grants in each year, and the percentage increase over the previous year, were as follows:

£ millionPercentage increase
1965–66117·79·1
1966–67138·417·6
1967–68143·73·8
1968–69159·310·9
1969–70177·611·5
1970–71207·516·8
1971–72234·613·1
1972–73251·57·2
1973–74279·211·0
1974–75 (estimate)330·018·2

Highlands And Islands Development Board

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland whether the Highlands and Islands Development Board will continue to retain its current powers and area of operation after the creation of a Scottish Development Agency.

I would refer the hon. Member to paragraph 18 of my consultative document on the Scottish Development Agency, a copy of which is available in the Library. This makes it clear that the special responsibilities of the Highlands and Islands Development Board will continue unchanged after the establishment of the agency and that it is the Government's intention to ensure by administrative means that there is no unnecessary or undesirable overlap or duplication of effort between the two bodies.

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland what powers the HIDB has to purchase land compulsorily; and how often it has used these powers.

Under Section 4 of the Highlands and Islands Development (Scotland) Act 1965 the Highlands and Islands Development Board may acquire land compulsorily if so authorised by the Secretary of State. These powers have not so far been used.

School Leavers

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland what is his estimate of the number of pupils who will leave school at summer this year; and how many are expected to leave at Christmas.

65,000 pupils are expected to leave at the end of the summer term in 1975 and 14,400 at Christmas. In addition, about 3,000 are expected to leave either this month or at the end of this term, giving a total of 82,400 for the calendar year.

Ministerial Visits

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland how many industrial visits he has undertaken since March 1974.

Five, not including engagements with broader purposes but having industrial relevance.

Local Government Debt

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland what is the total capital debt of Scottish local authorities at the nearest convenient date; and what estimate he makes of the cost in servicing this debt.

At 15th May 1974 the total was £2,740 million, including £1,734 million on trading accounts and housing revenue accounts. No estimate of total loan charges has been made, but for the purpose of the Rate Support Grant (Scotland) Order 1975 I estimated that £162 million of loan charges would fall to be met from rate funds in the 12 months commencing 16th May 1975.

Schools Designation Scheme

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland what progress is being made on the schools designation scheme.

Negotiations about a third designation scheme are currently taking place in the Scottish Teachers Salaries Committee.

Islands (Land Ownership)

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland if he will establish a committee of inquiry to consider the problems created for people living on the islands of Scotland when all or a substantial part of an island is held in the ownership of a single individual or organisation.

Hill Farming

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland what is the financial benefit likely to be received by the United Kingdom as a result of the EEC directive on hill farming areas; and what Scotland's percentage share will be.

The net financial benefit to the United Kingdom depends on the incidence of actual expenditure under the directive in each of the member States, the rate of FEOGA contribution and the rate of United Kingdom contribution to the EEC budget. On the basis of the Commission's proposals, which have still to be approved by the Council of Ministers, on the areas to be aided and the rate of FEOGA refund on compensatory allowances, the United Kingdom would receive about 29 per cent. of the total FEOGA contributions provisionally estimated by the Commission over the next three years.The FEOGA contribution over this period towards eligible United Kingdom expenditure is estimated at some £20 million to £25 million per annum, of which about £10 million would be related to eligible expenditure in Scotland.

Foreign And Commonwealth Affairs

South-West Africa

89.

asked the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs whether, in view of the statement made by the United Nations Commissioner for South West Africa that the United Nations Organisation was intending to seize uranium, copper and other minerals exported from that territory to member countries of the OECD, he will issue appropriate instructions to the United Kingdom's permanent representative at the United Nations to oppose any such action.

We have, at New York, explicitly reserved our position over the United Nations Council for Namibia's decree. We shall play our part in the international community to help bring self-determination to Namibia, but have made clear our opposition in the absence of a determination under Chapter VII of the United Nations Charter to measures which are in the nature of sanctions.

Cyprus

asked the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs whether, since his reply dated 19th December to the hon. Member for Newcastle-upon-Tyne, East (Mr. Thomas) and his reply to the hon. Member for Cheadle on 15th January, he can now inform the House of the progress he has been able to make with his representations to the Governments of Turkey and Cyprus for compensation for loss, damages and personal injuries suffered by the British subjects on the island of Cyprus.

I would refer the hon. Member to the reply which I gave to the hon. Member for Louth (Mr. Brotherton) on 29th January 1975.—[Vol. 883, c. 367–8.]

European Economic Community

asked the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what arrangements have been made through his Department or otherwise for Ministries and Departments of State to consult officials in the European Commission on day-to-day matters of ministerial responsibility.

The United Kingdom Permanent Representative to the European Community and his staff maintain contact with officials of the European Commission over the whole range of Community policies. In addition officials from Whitehall Departments attend a wide variety of meetings organised by the Commission—working groups, management and regulation committees, etc.—whenever necessary to deal with the day-to-day implementation of Community policies.

Employment

Construction Workers

90.

asked the Secretary of State for Employment what the latest figures are for the number of unemployed construction workers; and what percentage is concentrated in the private house building sector.

At 11th November 1974, 111,709 of those unemployed in Great Britain last worked in construction. The figures for a small number of offices are estimated. The statistics do not identify the percentage who were in the private house building sector. Owing to industrial action at local offices of the Employment Service Agency, comparable figures for later dates are not available.

Cotton

asked the Secretary of State for Employment how many workers are currently employed on a full-time basis in the cotton textile industry; and what was the comparative figure for one year previously.

In November 1974 the estimated number of employees in employment in spinning and weaving of cotton, flax, linen and man-made fibres—Minimum List Headings 412 and 413 of the Standard Industrial Classification—in Great Britain was 104,700, compared with 109,100 in November 1973. The estimates are subject to revision. They do not indicate how many were employed on a full-time basis, but at June 1973, the latest date for which census of employment results are available, out of 117,400 employees in employment, 89,300 were recorded as full-time employees. Some information is also available about short-time working in the industry. In the week ending 16th November 1974, about 6,700 operatives were stood off or working short-time, compared with about 100 in the corresponding week in 1973.

Disabled Persons

asked the Secretary of State for Employment how many employers in the area covered by the Small Heath and Washwood Heath employment offices are not employing the 3 per cent. quota of registered disabled persons.

The last annual inquiry, in May 1974, indicated that 186 employers with quota obligations were not employing their 3 per cent. quota.

asked the Secretary of State for Employment (1) how many registered disabled persons are registered as unemployed at Department of Employment offices covering the city of Birmingham;(2) How many registered disabled persons are registered as unemployed at the Department of Employment offices in Small Heath and Washwood Heath.

The information required, in relation to September 1974, is given below. Because of industrial action complete information is not available for later dates:

Aston230
Birmingham97
Handsworth121
Selly Oak301
Small Heath253
Washwood Heath153
Sutton Coldfield56

Industrial Injuries Advisory Council

asked the Secretary of State for Employment how many times the Industrial Injuries Advisory Council met in 1973 and 1974.

asked the Secretary of State for Employment how many industrial diseases have been under scrutiny by the Industrial Injuries Advisory Council, apart from industrial deafness, over the last three years.

I have been asked to reply.The following diseases, apart from industrial deafness, have been under formal consideration by the council since the beginning of 1972:

  • Acro-osteolysis;
  • Acrylamide Poisoning;
  • Brucellosis;
  • Cancer of the epithelial lining of the urethra;
  • Lung cancer in chromates workers;
  • Nasal cancer in boot and shoe workers;
  • Pneumoconiosis and Byssinosis;
  • Vibration Syndrome;
  • Viral Hepatitis.

The council has also informally kept under review developments relating to other industrial diseases and suspected industrial diseases.

asked the Secretary of State for Employment how many sub-committee meetings of the Industrial Injuries Advisory Council have been held in 1973–74; and for what purpose.

I have been asked to reply.Meetings have been held as follows:

Meetings
Subject19731974
Pneumoconiosis and Byssinosis3
Industrial Deafness3
Lung Cancer in Chromates Workers2
Vibration Syndrome6
Totals86

Motor Vehicles And Components

asked the Secretary of State for Employment what are the numbers of people currently employed in the car industry and the numbers indirectly employed by the industry in the manufacturing of components.

At November 1974 the estimated number of employees in employment in Great Britain in motor vehicle manufacturing—Minimum List Heading 381 of the Standard Industrial Classification—was 493,800. This minimum list heading includes the manufacture of some parts and accessories made of metal. Those employed in the manufacture of electrical equipment and of parts made of asbestos, glass, rubber or plastics are appropriate to other headings and are not identified separately.

Industrial Diseases

asked the Secretary of State for Employment how many industrial diseases have been prescribed, apart from industrial deafness, over the period 1973–74.

I have been asked to reply.Since the beginning of 1973 cancer of the epithelial lining of the urethra has been added to the schedule of prescribed diseases, and the prescription of byssinosis has been widened by the inclusion of spinners, winders and beamers, the abolition of the "permanent" disablement condition and a reduction in the required qualifying period of employment in the industry from 10 years to five years.

Industry

Waste Paper

91.

asked the Secretary of State for Industry if he will make a statement about his discussions with the paper industries and with the local authorities and charitable organisations involved in waste paper collection about the implications for recycling of the current low prices for waste paper.

The Advisory Group on Waste Paper Recycling upon which the paper industries and local authorities are represented has had three meetings and expects to produce an interim report in three or four months' time. In the meantime I have made it clear that I am prepared to consider urgently any interim scheme of assistance for the industry to promote increased stockpiling which falls within the provisions of current legislation under Section 8 of the Industry Act 1972. So far I have received no such application from the industry.

Textiles (Departmental Purchases)

asked the Secretary of State for Industry if he will instruct his Department to purchase all future textile requirements from British manufacturers.

The Department's requirements will continue to be met principally through intermediate suppliers such as the Department of the Environment's Property Services Agency and the Post Office, but I am assured that the major proportion is of British origin.

Vehicles

asked the Secretary of State for Industry (1) if, in his policy towards the motor industry, he will take account of the concern among British car workers about the lack of accountability of multi-national companies to the British car industry;(2) if he will take steps designed to make multinational companies in the motor industry accountable for manpower and planning of United Kingdom plant by obliging them to give advance warning to the United Kingdom Government of any proposed cutback investment policy within the United Kingdom and the division of labour between design and engineering and assembly.

The system of planning agreements and the information provisions in the Industry Bill are designed to secure this for large companies.

Chrysler Corporation

asked the Secretary of State for Industry if he will specify the assurances given to the British Government by the Chrysler Corporation on its acquisition of Rootes Limited, which are of continuing effect; and if he will state which of them have been, and are at the present time being, observed.

The undertakings were as follows:

  • (i) Chrysler will not initiate any action to impair either the home or overseas operations or the management and direction of Rootes as a British company in its relations with the Government, labour, its British shareholders, and the public.
  • (ii) Chrysler undertakes to maintain a majority of British Directors on the Board of Rootes.
  • (iii) Chrysler confirms the plans of expansion covering development work at various factories and especially at Linwood in Scotland where the major development will take place and where it is planned to increase employment by several thousands; these plans are essential if Rootes is to remain competitive, achieve its proper share of exports and return to reasonable profitability.
  • (iv) Chrysler plans to achieve a progressive increase in the export of Rootes products without restriction to all practicable markets and to continue to make available its full international organisation for this purpose. They note that, in the view of Her Majesty's Government, the test of the fulfilment of this undertaking would be that the export percentage of the products of the Rootes Group should be at least as high as the average for the British motor vehicle industry as a whole.
  • (v) Chrysler will nominate a Rootes Director (British) to each of the Boards of Simca SA and Chrysler International SA; and it is understood that a Simca Director (French) will be nominated to the Board of Rootes.
  • (vi) Chrysler confirms its intention to leave at least 15 per cent. of the entire equity capital (Ordinary, "A" Ordinary and Preferred Ordinary) in the hands of shareholders other than Chrysler, provided that in calculating this 15 per cent. Chrysler may take into account any shares held by the Industrial Reorganisation Corporation (IRC) or put by IRC to Chrysler (in accordance with undertaking (vii) below).
  • (vii) Provided that Chrysler acquires preferred ordinary shares in excess of its rights entitlement of £6,263,686 nominal, it will make available to IRC at par up to £1,512,228 nominal of such excess; i.e. up to 15 per cent. of the total Preferred Ordinary Shares, of £10,081,519 on condition that IRC participate to the same percentage in Chrysler's undertaking to subscribe up to £10,000,000 Unsecured Loan Stock. IRC will have the right on 1st January 1972 to put these securities to Chrysler at par plus any accrued but unpaid dividend or interest.
  • (viii) IRC will have the right to nominate one Director on Rootes Board as long as it owns all the securities mentioned in Undertaking (vii) above.
  • Undertakings (i) to (v) continue to have effect. The other three undertakings originally related to the participation of the IRC in Chrysler UK. The IRC's assets, rights and liabilities were transferred to the Government by virtue of the Industry Act 1971. The Government exercised the right expressed in undertaking (vii) realising the former IRC investment in January 1972. Undertakings (vii) and (viii) then ceased to have effect. Subsequently in December 1972 Chrysler was released from undertaking (vi).I have written to the President of the Chrysler Corporation for an assessment of the present position.

    Concorde

    asked the Secretary of State for Industry what is his estimate of the cost of producing Concorde aircraft (a) being currently built and (b) which might be built in response to further orders requiring the authorisation of further production.

    The estimated cost, net of sales receipts, to the United Kingdom Government of the production of 16 Concorde aircraft, and support of the authorised programme up to 1978–79, is given on pages 34–5 of the recent White Paper on Public Expenditure (Cmnd 5879) and amounts in total to £142·4 million at 1974 survey prices. Estimates of the comparable cost to the French Government are not available at present. The cost of any further production would depend on the number of additional aircraft and the rate at which they were produced.

    asked the Secretary of State for Industry if he will make a statement on the progress of Concorde towards passenger-carrying service.

    As my hon. Friend the Minister of State, Department of Industry, said in reply to the hon. Member for Christchurch and Lymington (Mr. Adley) on 27th January, the manufacturers are pressing ahead with the authorised programme for the development of the entry into service version and the production of 16 aircraft with the objective of enabling commercial services to start at the earliest practicable date.

    asked the Secretary of State for Industry how many man-hours are currently being worked by the staff of his Department on matters concerned with the Concorde programme.

    Some 2,040 man-hours per week are currently being worked by staff of my Department engaged full-time on matters directly concerned with the Concorde programme. In addition, a substantial amount of work is done by staff of the Ministry of Defence Procurement Executive on the administration of the Concorde contracts and on the monitoring of the Olympus 593 engine programme.

    asked the Secretary of State for Industry what is the total cost of the Concorde programme up to the present date in current terms and in terms of the value of the £ sterling at the inception of the programme; and what part of that total cost is being met by the United Kingdom taxpayer.

    Expenditure in the United Kingdom and France on the Concorde development programme to the end of 1974 is estimated at £866 million at current prices, equivalent to £504 million at 1962 prices. This expenditure was incurred almost exactly equally in the two countries. British expenditure to the same date on production, capital assistance, intramural and ancillary work on Concorde is estimated at £176 million at current prices, equivalent to £86 million at 1962 prices. No precise estimate of equivalent French costs is available, but their magnitude is understood to be similar.The eventual net cost to the United Kingdom taxpayer will depend on the number of aircraft sold.

    asked the Secretary of State for Industry if it is his intention to authorise further production of Concorde aircraft.

    Any decision on the authorisation of further Concorde production would need to be taken jointly by the British and French Governments in the light of circumstances prevailing at the time and especially the market prospects.

    Factory Employment (Young People)

    asked the Secretary of State for Industry what plans he has to set up further factories specially to employ younger people, such as the Kirkby waste paper reclamation factory, in areas of high youth unemployment.

    Our factories are not built specifically to aid the employment of younger people but in order to provide general employment opportunities. Applications for tenancies of Government factories are treated on their merits.

    Workers' Co-Operatives

    asked the Secretary of State for Industry how he will be fulfilling the undertaking given to the House on 23rd January by the Under-Secretary of State for Industry to provide access to a complete answer on all the Questions that have been raised in the House about accountability of co-operatives.

    My hon. Friend explained that the answers to some of the points raised by the hon. Member could only be given when the constitutions of the co-operatives to which the hon. Member had referred were settled. I shall be glad to answer further questions when further details of the constitutions are available.

    Kirkby Manufacturing And Engineering Company

    asked the Secretary of State for Industry why he has not made his Department a prior or pari passu creditor in the event of the Kirkby Manufacturing and Engineering Company Limited going into liquidation.

    The Government considered that a grant on the terms which were decided would provide the co-operative with the best prospects of success.

    asked the Secretary of State for Industry whether he has required that all full-time workers at the Kirkby Manufacturing and Engineering Company Limited should be able to purchase shares in the company.

    Questions of the ownership and transfer of shares will be covered by the constitution of the co-operative now being drawn up.

    asked the Secretary of State for Industry whether a legal constraint on the transfer of the shares in the Kirkby Manufacturing and Engineering Company Limited held by Mr. J. Spriggs and Mr. R. Jenkins is currently in being.

    asked the Secretary of State for Industry whether he will publish the constitution of the workers' co-operative at Kirkby when it is finalised.

    I expect that the co-operative will make available details of its constitution when it is finalised.

    asked the Secretary of State for Industry what price was paid by Mr. J. Spriggs and Mr. R. Jenkins for the shares they own in the Kirkby Manufacturing and Engineering Company Ltd.; and what is the estimated value of each share today.

    Two shares were issued to Mr. Spriggs and Mr. Jenkins at par. The shares will not be traded, and it is not, therefore, possible to speak in terms of a market value.

    asked the Secretary of State for Industry what financial criteria have been agreed to by the work force at Kirkby Manufacturing and Engineering Limited in accepting loans from Her Majesty's Government.

    No loans are being made to Kirkby Manufacturing and Engineering Ltd. Assistance is taking the form of a grant of up to £3·9 million, on terms which are described in the statement laid before the House on 20th December 1974.

    Computers

    asked the Secretary of State for Industry where in the future, in accordance with Government policy, a computer system of 1 Atlas Power or greater is purchased from ICL by central Government or by a nationalised industry, and it is not the cheapest, if he will instruct that the excess cost be carried on the Vote of the Department of Industry, and make arrangements for it to be reimbursed to the Department or nationalised industry concerned.

    , pursuant to his reply [Official Report, 28th January 1975; Vol. 885, c. 144], gave the following information:

    Holding by farm sizeHoldings by tenure and farm size
    Holding size group (acres)Distribution based on total area size groupHoldings wholly tenantedHoldings with more than 50 per cent. of their area tenantedHoldings with less than 50 per cent. of their area tenanted*
    Under 5094,88724,3207,46211,216
    50–149¾64,87820,3396,56511,087
    150–299¾31,56610,0253,6006,290
    300–499¾12,4693,9091,8172,752
    500–699¾4,2571,280801977
    700–999¾2,473768511580
    1,000–1,999¾1,838555373411
    2,000 and over3931456591
    212,76161,34121,19433,404
    * Excludes holdings which are wholly owner-occupied.
    † Total area of the holding includes crops and grass, rough grazings and woodland ancillary to farming and other land used for agriculture.

    Milk

    asked the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food what is, for each month since September 1974, the quantity of milk that has been imported for manufacturing purposes; and from

    No. Where, in accordance with Government policy, computers are purchased by single tender from ICL, the question of allocating excess costs, if any, could not arise. It would not be appropriate to lay down general rules for the occasional cases where a different procedure is adopted.

    Agriculture, Fisheries And Food

    Farms

    asked the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food if he will give the most recent figures to show the number of farms under 50 acres, 50–100, 100–200, 200,300, 300–400, 400–500, 500–600, 600–700, 700–800, 800–900, 900–1,000, 1,000–1,200, 1,200–1,400, 1,400–1,600, 1,600–2,000, 2,000–2,500, 2,500–3,000 and above 3,000 acres in England and Wales; and if he will show separately in each case the number that are tenanted.

    Information is not available in the degree of detail requested. The figures set out below relate to England and Wales in June 1973 and show the number of holdings wholly tenanted, those more than 50 per cent. tenanted and those less than 50 per cent. tenanted by size and type of tenure.which countries these supplies have been obtained.

    There have been no imports of milk for manufacturing purposes into Great Britain and only small quantities have been imported into Northern Ireland from the Irish Republic.

    Sheep Scab

    asked the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food how many outbreaks of sheep scab were confirmed in Wales in 1974, 1964 and 1954, respectively.

    One case was confirmed in Clwyd in 1974. No cases were confirmed in Wales in 1964 or 1954.

    Civil Service

    European Economic Community

    asked the Minister for the Civil Service what are the approximate numbers of additional posts created or made necessary in each of the principal Departments of State related to Great Britain's membership of the Common Market.

    Membership of the EEC has affected a wide range of work in most major Government Departments. It would not, therefore, be meaningful to attempt to identify separately the numbers of posts involved.

    Ministerial Correspondence (Costs)

    asked the Minister for the Civil Service what is the cost of sending hon. Members a photocopy of a ministerial reply; and what is the cost of sending a carbon copy of a ministerial reply, respectively.

    Although there is evidence that very small numbers of carbon copies can be produced more cheaply than photocopies the difference is very small.Procedures and facilities differ between one Minister's office and another; copying cost is not, therefore, the controlling factor in providing hon. Members with copies of a ministerial reply. Factors such as the speed of reply are equally important.

    Defence

    Engineering Establishments

    asked the Secretary of State for Defence what savings to public funds he hopes to achieve through his proposals to reorganise and move SRDE Mudeford to Malvern and RRE Pershore and part of Malvern to Farnborough and Bedford.

    The transfer of work from SRDE Christchurch to RRE Malvern and RRE Pershore and the transfer of work from RRE Malvern and RRE Pershore to RAE Farnborough and Bedford will contribute towards overall savings from the first stage of rationalisation of R and D establishments now estimated at about £1·6 million a year.

    Northern Ireland

    asked the Secretary of State for Defence what were the individual amounts in the eight cases where compensation has been paid for damage caused by interrogation in depth in Northern Ireland; and by what means and in what House of Commons documents parliamentary authority has been or will be sought for each payment.

    Individual amounts paid as compensation in connection with interrogation in depth in Northern Ireland are as follows:

    £
    Mr. J. P. Auld16,000
    Mr. J. Clarke12,500
    Mr. M. J. Donnelly11,250
    Mr. P. McClean14,000
    Mr. G. McKerr10,000
    Mr. P. McNally11,250
    Mr. M. J. Montgomery500
    Mr. P. Shivers15,000
    All payments arising from judicial proceedings are included within departmental funds voted by Parliament. Such payments are not presented individually to Parliament.

    Raf Brawdy

    asked the Secretary of State for Defence why RAF Brawdy was not included in his recent list of major employing defence establishments in Wales.

    The criterion I used for defining a major defence establishment in my reply to the hon. Member for Caernarvon (Mr. Wigley) on 15th January—[Vol. 884, c. 178.]—was one employing more than 250 civilians and Service men, RAF Brawdy does not meet this criterion.

    Air-Sea Rescue

    asked the Secretary of State for Defence how many RAF sea launches used for the search and rescue of pilots are available to the service; where they are stationed; and how often they have been used in sea rescues in each of the years since 1970.

    In the United Kingdom 18 Royal Air Force marine craft can be called on in emergency for air-sea rescue operations although not established primarily for that purpose. They are based at Alness, Bridlington, Plymouth, Tenby and Holyhead. Overseas, there are 11 marine craft, based at Gibraltar, Malta, Cyprus and Gan. At each of these locations one craft is allocated specifically for air-sea rescue and the remainder can be made available in emergency.Since 1970, the number of occasions in which Royal Air Force marine craft have been involved in marine rescue operations is as follows:

    United Kingdom
    197017
    197117
    19728
    197312
    19748
    Overseas
    19705
    19717
    19726
    19736
    19742

    Education And Science

    Student Grants (Parental Means Test)

    asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science what would be the estimated cost of abolition of the parental means test for students' grants if the child allowance for income tax were ended for children in full-time higher education at the same time.

    The net cost of abolishing the parental contribution, if the child income tax allowance were at the same time withdrawn for students in full-time education, is estimated to be in the region of £10 million to £20 million for Great Britain in the current year, depending on the basis on which the allowance was withdrawn. An estimate for students in higher education alone is not readily available.

    Social Science Research Council

    asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science what financial support has been given to the Social Science Research Council in the years 1973 and 1974, respectively.

    The total of the Social Science Research Council's grant-in-aid for 1972–73 was £5,097,000 and for 1973–74 was £5,576,000. Approved Estimates for 1974–75 total £6,767,000, and a further £275,000 is being requested in a Spring Supplementary Estimate.

    asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science what proportion of the resources made available to the Social Science Research Council by his Department in 1974 has been allocated to research grants and projects designed to promote education for a multiracial society.

    Social Science Research Council research grants current in 1973–74 and 1974–75, concerned to further our understanding of aspects of ethnic relations, totalled £115,640. This sum represents 2 per cent. of all the council's research grants current in those years. In addition the budget of the council's Research Unit on Ethnic Relations in these two years was £69,480 and £102,500 (estimated) respectively. I am asking the officers of the council to write to my hon. Friend with further details.

    Youth Service

    asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science when he intends to undertake a review of the youth service.

    I am about to arrange consultations with statutory and voluntary youth service interests and with representative young people about the present and future needs of younger citizens and the rôle of the youth service in a changing society.

    Mentally Handicapped Persons

    asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science whether any local authority has yet reached the target of providing 2·4 places per 1,000 population in the age group 15 to 64 years for mentally handicapped adults in adult training centres, suggested in the White Paper "Better Services for the Mentally Handicapped"; and how many have reached the interim target of 1·5 places per 1,000 population.

    I have been asked to reply.The White Paper envisaged that a 15-to-20-year programme would be needed before this interim target could be achieved nationally, though some local authorities could be expected to reach it earlier. By 31st March 1974, 34 of the former local authorities had reached the target of 1·5 per 1,000 population, and three of these had also achieved the target of 2·4 places per 1,000 suggested for the long-term future. No figures are yet available for the new local authorities.

    asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science whether there is any evidence that playgroups run or supported financially by local authorities in England and Wales encourage the admission of handicapped children.

    I have been asked to reply.No precise figures are available, but a number of authorities support playgroups which cater either for handicapped children or for mixed groups of handicapped and normal children.

    Teachers Of Mentally Handicapped

    asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science how many teachers qualified for the Training Council for Teachers of the Mentally Handicapped's Diploma in the academic years 1970–71, 1971–72, 1972–73 and 1973–74 respectively; and how many are at present taking the current course.

    I have been asked to reply.The Training Council for Teachers of the Mentally Handicapped was originally responsible for the training of staff working in establishments for both children and adults. In consequence of the decision to transfer responsibility for the education of mentally handicapped children to the Department of Education and Science from April 1971, training for the teachers of these children has now been integrated into the general pattern of teacher training. The training Council for Teachers of the Mentally Handicapped did, however, continue after 1971 to issue some diplomas for work with children.The figures for the numbers of diplomas issued in the academic years up to 1973–74 are as follows:

    1970–711971–721972–731973–74
    Diplomas for work with adults220218254307
    Diplomas for work with children2852181286
    As from 1st October 1974 responsibility for the development of training for staff employed in day centres for adults was taken over by the Central Council for Education and Training in Social Work. The central council is continuing for the present to issue the qualifications formerly issued by the Training Council for Teachers of the Mentally Handicapped in its own name, and at the latest count there were 407 students on the current diploma courses.

    Energy

    Oil Companies (Quarterly Returns)

    asked the Secretary of State for Energy whether the quarterly returns from oil companies are sent to the Scottish or London offices of the Offshore Supplies Office; and which office is responsible for their analysis.

    The quarterly returns are sent to the headquarters of the Offshore Supplies Office in Glasgow, which is also responsible for their analysis.

    asked the Secretary of State for Energy if he will publish an analysis or abstract of quarterly or annual returns submitted by oil companies licensed for offshore operations, omitting confidential commercial information if necessary.

    When the oil companies' returns to the Offshore Supplies Office for the last quarter of 1974 have been analysed I shall arrange for an abstract covering the year as a whole to be placed in the Library.

    asked the Secretary of State for Energy if he will publish the quarterly returns submitted by oil companies licensed for offshore operations.

    No. These returns contain a good deal of commercially confidential information.

    asked the Secretary of State for Energy (1) what proposals he or the Offshore Supplies Office has for increasing the number of Scottish firms engaged in oil activity in Scotland;(2) what efforts have been made by the Offshore Supplies Office to meet the needs of Scotland and other development areas; and if he will make a statement.

    The entire effort of the Offshore Supplies Office, working with the Scottish, Welsh and English regional offices of the Department of Industry, is directed to promoting the opportunities for British firms to supply the offshore oil and gas market. It was in recognition of the particular importance of the market for Scottish firms that the headquarters of the Offshore Supplies Office was moved to Glasgow last year. The full range of regional assistance under the Industry Act is available to firms in the assisted areas.

    asked the Secretary of State for Energy what steps the Offshore Supplies Office is taking to ensure continuity of employment in platform construction yards after the anticipated five to 15 years' operation.

    In the long term it is hoped that the encouragement provided by the Offshore Supplies Office and the expertise developed by firms through their involvement in North Sea work will enable them to compete successfully in the worldwide offshore market when the North Sea commitment starts to diminish. The Offshore Supplies Office is, of course, ready to advise a platform contractor on diversification into other offshore activities should this prove feasible and appropriate.

    Textiles (Departmental Purchases)

    asked the Secretary of State for Energy (1) what is the total value of textile goods purchased by his Department during the past 12 months;

    (2) what percentage of textile goods, over the last 12 months, has been purchased from British manufacturers by his Department;

    (3) if he will instruct his Department to purchase all future textile requirements from British manufacturers.

    My Department's very limited requirement for textile goods is obtained through other Departments and no purchase orders are placed, or are likely to be placed, direct with manufacturers.

    Double Summer Time

    asked the Secretary of State for Energy if he will consider the fuel saving which would occur if double summer time were introduced in this country.

    I do not consider that such a change would have any significant effect on fuel saving.

    Offshore Supplies Office

    asked the Secretary of State for Energy how many audit engineers are employed by the Offshore Supplies Office; and in which offices they are based.

    There are 12 audit engineers employed in the Offshore Supplies Office, 10 of whom are based in London and two in Glasgow.

    asked the Secretary of State for Energy how many monitoring engineers are employed by the Offshore Supplies Office; and in which offices they are based.

    There are four monitoring engineers in the Offshore Supplies Office, three of whom are based in Glasgow and one in London.

    Burmah Oil (Bp Shares)

    asked the Secretary of State for Energy what discussions he has had with the Bank of England concerning the disposal of BP shares acquired from Burmah Oil; and if he will make a statement.

    There is nothing which I could usefully add at this stage to what I told the House on 15th January.

    Sghwr Power Stations

    asked the Secretary of State for Energy when he proposes to give consent for the construction of steam generating heavy water reactor power stations.

    I have today granted consent under Section 2 of the Electric Lighting Act 1909, together with deemed planning permission for a steam generating heavy water reactor nuclear generating station on the Sizewell B site in Suffolk. My right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Scotland, has given his consent to an SGHWR station at Torness, East Lothian. These consents will enable any necessary site work to be undertaken in preparation for the construction of the stations, but before work can start on the nuclear installations themselves the boards must also obtain nuclear site licences from the Health and Safety Executive.

    Home Department

    Pakistani Immigrants

    asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what is the average waiting time for immigrants applying for British citizenship under the Pakistan Act to have their applications dealt with.

    To work out an average time would be difficult. Applications are dealt with in the order in which they were received. Those now being examined were received about seven months ago.

    Police (Rifles)

    asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what reasons have been given to him by the five police forces which have rejected the new 7·62 mm rifles bought by the Home Office; and if he is satisfied that these rifles are not too powerful for their pur-purpose.

    The choice of firearms for emergency use by each police force is a matter for the chief officer. The majority of forces have acquired rifles which were recommended following a review carried out in consultation with chief officers of police. These weapons are modified versions of the standard Army target rifle, fitted with a telescope sight and using standard military ammunition. I am satisfied that they are no more powerful than is necessary to provide sufficient accuracy at the ranges which may be required.

    National Finance

    Development Gains Tax

    asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer what has been the yield of the development gains tax up to the latest convenient date; and what has been the cost of collection.

    I would refer the hon. Gentleman to the replies I gave on 9th December 1974 to the hon. Member for Melton (Mr. Latham).—[Vol. 883, c. 42–3.]

    Betting (Expenditure)

    asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer what was the average expenditure per head of population on betting and gambling in 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973 and 1974, respectively.

    Following is the information:

    EXPENDITURE PER HEAD OF HOME POPULATION ON BETTING AND GAMING
    1970£5½
    1971£6½
    1972£7
    1973£8
    1974not available
    The basis for the estimates of total expenditure are described in "National Accounts Statistics: Sources and Methods", HMSO 1968. The expenditure estimates have been divided by the mid-year estimates of the home population of the United Kingdom.

    Chilean Debt

    asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer whether he has yet reached agreement on a timetable for talks concerned with the rescheduling of the Chilean debt; and, if so, when these talks are to begin.

    The United Kingdom and other creditors have been invited to attend talks in March to consider Chile's request for the rescheduling of her debt. Our response to this invitation is under consideration.

    asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer what proportion of the Chilean debt is owned by Government and private debtors in Chile to the Export Credits Guarantee Department.

    Precise figures are not available, but it is estimated that virtually all Chile's total outstanding debt to the United Kingdom has been insured by the Export Credits Guarantee Department.

    IDENTIFIABLE PUBLIC EXPENDITURE PER HEAD OF HOME POPULATION
    1969–701970–711971–721972–731973–74
    £££££
    Scotland335364403460524
    Wales295316359401442

    "Labour Market"

    asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer if he will stop describing the employment, training and industrial relations services as the "labour market".

    My right hon. Friend, of course, recognises that these services deal with problems which are of the first importance in human as well as in economic terms.

    Companies (Foreign Shareholdings)

    asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer whether he will take steps to extend the current restrictions on the acquisition of block shareholdings in British companies by foreign States so as to enable him effectively to prevent any Arab State or group of Arab States or their nominees from obtaining a holding of more than 10 per cent. in a British company without Treasury consent.

    Our present exchange control rules require special permission to be sought from the Bank of England for any foreign investor to acquire 10 per cent. or more of the voting rights in a British company. We keep their effectiveness under review; and authorised depositaries were reminded last month of their importance. We have taken steps to see that Arab States are aware of our inward investment rules.

    Public Expenditure

    asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer what is the identifiable public expenditure per head of population in Scotland, Wales and each of the eight English regions which are served by regional economic planning councils; and what were the figures for each of the past five years.

    The following table shows identifiable public expenditure per head in Scotland and Wales in the years 1969–70 to 1973–74. Corresponding estimates are not available for the English regions:

    District Valuer's Office (Knowsley)

    asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer if he will take action to increase the staff at the district valuer's office so that appeals against Knowsley Metropolitan Borough Council lodged in 1973 can be heard as soon as possible.

    , pursuant to his reply [Official Report, 29th January 1975; Vol. 885, c. 182.], gave the following information:My hon. Friend will be aware of the general shortage of professional valuers, but the level of staffing of the district valuer's office at St. Helens is comparable to that of other offices in the region, and there do not appear to be any substantial delays in that office in dealing with rating appeals relating to the Knowsley Metropolitan Borough Council area which could be attributed to staff shortages. If my hon. Friend has a particular case in mind, perhaps he will write to me.

    Petrol Prices

    asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer what proportion of the national average weekly wage in France, West Germany, Italy, Belgium, the Netherlands and Great Britain, respectively, is represented by the cost of 10 gallons of petrol at the price currently prevailing in that country.

    I have been asked to reply.Although current information on petrol prices is available for the countries requested, up-to-date data on average weekly wages are not available from international sources. It is, therefore, not possible to make the necessary calculations.The following table sets out the current cost of 10 gallons of petrol in each of the countries mentioned:

    TYPICAL PRICE OF 10 GALLONS OF MOTOR SPIRIT
    Regular gradePremium grade
    ££
    France7·48·0
    West Germany6·67·2
    Italy8·69·0
    Belgium7·47·7
    Netherlands7·47·6
    Great Britain7·17·3

    Post Office (Investment)

    asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer why the proposed increase in Post Office investment between 1976–77 and 1977–78 and between 1977–78 and 1978–79, respectively, in Public Expenditure to 1978–79 is in each case limited to £5 million.

    I have been asked to reply.This rate of growth is consistent with the forecast of demand for Post Office services.

    Overseas Development

    Disaster Funds

    asked the Minister of Overseas Development what has been the United Kingdom contributions to specific disaster funds, in each case broken down under each individual disaster.

    Since March 1974 the following United Kingdom Government contributions have been made to immediate disaster needs in developing countries:

    Ethiopia drought: Relief and rehabilitation measures, £0·5 million, together with a contribution towards EEC food aid to Ethiopia.
    Drought situation in Sahel region of West Africa: Contributions of £0·5 million to the FAO Sahelian Trust Fund; special contribution of £3·5 million to the EEC food aid programme; bilateral food aid to the value of £0·16 million and £0·345 million for transport and other assistance.
    Bangladesh floods: A cash contribution of £5,000. Charter of aircraft and provision of medical supplies: cost £33,500. In addition Bangladesh is receiving considerable food and financial aid.
    Cyprus: A medically-equipped Land Rover ambulance; transport costs of relief supplies provided by British Voluntary Societies cost £10,000; contribution to International Committee of the Red Cross £50,000; contribution to appeal from the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees—£500,000.
    Burma floods: A cash contribution of £8.700.
    Philippines floods: A cash contribution of £2,083.
    Honduras hurricane: Provision of supplies and dispatch of British Army contingent from Belize; dispatch of two Royal Navy frigates carrying relief supplies to the Bay Islands—estimated total cost £23,000. Help is also being given for rehabilitation and reconstruction.
    Sudan floods: Two sorties of RAF Hercules aircraft to help with transport of food supplies—cost £10,000.
    Somalia drought: 120 butyl water carriers; two charter aircraft carrying 18 tons of milk powder and 17·5 tons of wheat flour—cost £50,500.
    Kenya: 2·5 million doses anti-cholera vaccine; five portable vaccinating machines—cost £20,400.
    Pakistan earthquake: A cash contribution of £10,000; tents, camp beds, blankets and medical supplies—cost £61,000.

    Northern Ireland

    Terrorists

    asked the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland how many persons with addresses in Londonderry city are at present serving prison sentences for terrorist offences.

    There is no ready definition of what is or is not a terrorist offence. There are, however, 103 persons with home addresses in Londonderry city at present serving prison sentences following conviction on charges relating to murder and the use of firearms or explosives.

    Prices And Consumer Protection

    Postal And Telephone Charges

    asked the Secretary of State for Prices and Consumer Protection what would be the effect on the cost of living of the implementation of each of the proposed increases in postal charges and telephone charges now under consideration, taking them (a) individually and (b) as a whole.

    I have been asked to reply.I refer the hon. Gentleman to the answer I gave to the hon. Member for Newham, North-West (Mr. Lewis) on 16th January.—[Vol. 884, c.

    162.] Taken separately, the effect on the retail price index of the proposed postal increases is 0·14 per cent., and of the proposed telecommunications increases 0·25 per cent.

    Trade

    Newspapers (Shareholdings)

    asked the Secretary of State for Trade whether he will take steps to prevent any Arab State or

    Algeria Per cent.Libya Per cent.Nigeria Per cent.Kuwait Per cent.Saudi Arabia Per cent.Iran Per cent.
    United Kingdom
    Annual average increase 1970–7332·136·915·50·619·237·7
    Annual average increase 1970–7433·525·817·412·634·942·3
    Increase January-September 1973/January-September 197443·9-11·45·939·488·440·8
    United States
    Annual average increase 1970–7337·5-0·27·724·146·433·2
    Increase January-September 1973/January-September 197499·76·058·454·590·588·7
    Japan
    Annual average increase 1970–7335·652·130·920·963·039·5
    Increase January-September 1973/January-September 1974199·0136·766·559·147·7100·3
    German Federal Republic
    Annual average increase 1970–7346·766·126·918·724·730·8
    Increase January-September 1973/January-September 197439·294·648·2116·4121·252·3
    Sweden
    Annual average increase 1970–7349·765·321·327·140·128·2
    Increase January-September 1973/January-September 197441·2171·751·7111·3137·560·4
    France
    Annual average increase 1970–7310·367·354·2-0·118·544·9
    Increase January-August 1973/January-August 197444·699·822·619·8141·213·3
    Denmark
    Annual average increase 1970–7350·727·923·29·624·623·3
    Increase January-September 1973/January-September 1974-18·866·730·7132·884·0116·0
    Italy
    Annual average increase 1970–7323·850·217·914·831·028·9
    Increase January-September 1973/January-September 197467·594·693·468·395·960·3

    group of Arab States or their nominees from obtaining a majority shareholding in any British national or local newspaper.

    Such an inward investment proposal would require special permission and applications would be considered on their merits.

    Oil-Producing Countries

    asked the Secretary of State for Trade what has been the increase in the volume and value of United Kingdom exports to individual OPEC countries over the past four years; and how the United Kingdom performance rates with that of the United States of America, Japan, West Germany, Sweden, France, Denmark, and Italy.

    No information is available on the increase in the volume of exports; the following table shows the increases in the dollar value of exports:

    Iraq Per cent.

    Qatar Per cent.

    United Arab Emirates Per cent.

    Indonesia Per cent.

    Ecuador Per cent.

    Venezuela Per cent.

    United Kingdom

    Annual average increase 1970–735·238·527·241·720·05·9
    Annual average increase 1970–7425·230·440·140·217·39·8
    Increase January-September 1973/January-September 197482·0-12·364·136·6-12·521·9

    United States

    Annual average increase 1970–7336·0

    *

    35·018·611·010·8
    Increase January-September 1973/January-September 1974475·194·3122·323·589·562·0

    Japan

    Annual average increase 1970–7345·4

    *

    63·741·918·316·4
    Increase January-September 1973/January-September 1974721·7126·496·761·489·087·1

    German Federal Republic

    Annual average increase 1970–7330·843·8

    *

    28·821·825·6
    Increase January-September 1973/January-September 1974436·687·7190·275·880·84·0

    Sweden

    Annual average increase 1970–734·444·283·144·227·627·5
    Increase January-September 1973/January-September 1974122·925·096·339·241·0-26·3

    France

    Annual average increase 1970–7333·451·8

    *

    48·532·227·5
    Increase January-August 1973/January-August 1974147·7-11·0-26·7110·9155·339·4

    Denmark

    Annual average increase 1970–73-5·5125·7123·723·7-12·623·2
    Increase January-September 1973/January-September 1974164·817·6103·097·1185·7-26·5

    Italy

    Annual average increase 1970–7327·544·2

    *

    7·723·915·8
    Increase January-September 1973/January-September 1974182·9143·3148·8157·863·281·3

    * Not available for 1970 and 1971.

    Source: I.M.F. Direction of Trade.

    Eec Countries

    asked the Secretary of State for Trade what was the net direct outward investment financed by a net outflow of funds from the United Kingdom for property development, manufacturing industry and other purposes, respectively, to each of the Common Market countries each year since 1960 to the latest convenient date.

    I regret that this information is not available. The only information available on the financing of that part of direct investment abroad involving cash transactions relates to all non-sterling countries and is shown in Table 47 of the "United Kingdom Balance of Payments 1963–73". This shows that finance for direct investment abroad may be obtained in a number of ways which do not directly affect United Kingdom reserves and sterling liabilities.

    asked the Secretary of State for Trade (1) what is the direct inflow of funds arising from profits from British investments in property development, manufacturing industry and other purposes, respectively, in each of the Common Market countries, each year since 1960 to the latest convenient date;(2) what is the amount invested in each of the Common Market countries in property development, manufacturing industry and other purposes, respectively, derived from profits arising from British investment in each of those countries each year since 1960 to the latest convenient date.

    The information available is given in the following table. It relates to investment from unremitted profits and to remitted profits for net outward direct investment, excluding oil. Branch profits, whether remitted or not, are included in remitted profits. The information has been compiled from the annual overseas transactions inquiry of the Department of Industry:

    NET OUTWARD DIRECT INVESTMENT*: UNREMITTED PROFITS AND REMITTED PROFITS†
    £ million
    1960196119621963196419651966196719681969197019711972
    Belgium and Luxembourg:
    Unremitted profits-0·3-0·30·60·1-5·7-2·00·81·612·413·15·311·715·7
    Manufacturing industries10·911·32·28·710·5
    All other industries†1·51·83·13·05·2
    Remitted profits1·01·72·82·93·13·03·02·53·44·99·94·610·7
    Manufacturing industries0·80·66·61·84·4
    All other industries‡2·64·33·32·86·3
    Denmark:
    Unremitted profits0·10·1-0·30·2-0·2-0·30·4-0·1-0·30·60·22·0
    Manufacturing industries-0·1-0·10·3-0·20·4
    All other industries‡-0·20·30·41·6
    Remitted profits0·30·30·30·40·20·10·30·30·20·20·30·70·7
    Manufacturing industries0·10·10·20·4
    All other industries‡0·20·10·20·50·3
    France:
    Unremitted profits0·51·2-0·22·72·81·33·22·66·07·610·812·620·6
    Manufacturing industries1·32·84·34·611·0
    All other industries‡4·74·86·58·09·6
    Remitted profits1·71·92·12·51·62·12·13·44·34·68·18·613·6
    Manufacturing industries2·52·84·23·97·8
    All other industries‡1·81·83·34·75·8
    Irish Republic:
    Unremitted profits1·03·03·63·34·06·33·04·16·06·85·911·811·1
    Manufacturing industries4·55·66·09·310·0
    All other industries‡1·51·2-0·12·51·1
    Remitted profits6·26·36·27·34·74·06·16·36·98·48·17·910·5
    Manufacturing industries3·64·00·84·36·3
    All other industries‡3·34·47·33·64·2

    £ million

    1960

    1961

    1962

    1963

    1964

    1965

    1966

    1967

    1968

    1969

    1970

    1971

    1972

    Italy:
    Unremitted profits-0·50·1-1·9-2·2-3·1-0·51·22·91·61·83·7
    Manufacturing industries0·61·72·51·83·8
    All other industries‡0·61·2-0·9-0·1
    Remitted profits0·71·31·51·21·71·51·71·92·43·65·53·47·4
    Manufacturing industries2·23·02·82·73·7
    All other industries‡0·20·62·70·73·7
    Netherlands:
    Unremitted profits0·71·41·11·25·21·91·01·86·89·817·315·224·4
    Manufacturing industries2·08·213·77·319·9
    All other industries‡4·81·63·67·94·5
    Remitted profits0·90·91·00·7-4·30·81·00·70·50·53·56·29·5
    Manufacturing industries0·70·13·12·67·8
    All other industries‡-0·20·40·43·61·7
    Federal Republic of Germany:
    Unremitted profits3·87·27·75·90·34·73·11·117·221·312·016·610·8
    Manufacturing industries15·117·113·013·03·3
    All other industries‡2·14·2-1·03·67·5
    Remitted profits6·74·44·86·011·36·49·49·110·815·026·722·832·4
    Manufacturing industries7·29·613·916·020·8
    All other industries3·65·412·86·811·6

    * Excluding oil and before 1963 insurance.

    † Includes branch profits whether remitted to the United Kingdom or not.
    ‡ Property owning and managing was distinguished separately for the first time in 1972.
    The figures (in £ millions) for investment from unremitted profits are:
    Belgium and Luxembourg 0·3; France -0·2; Irish Republic 0·1; Netherlands 0·1; and for remitted profits:
    Irish Republic 0·2; Netherlands 0·1.
    The figures for investment from unremitted profits and for remitted profits for other countries are nil.

    asked the Secretary of State for Trade what was the increase in British exports to other members of the EEC between 1972 and 1974.

    Wales

    Education (Gwent)

    asked the Secretary of State for Wales what finances will be made available to Gwent County Council to facilitate the structural extensions and improvements at educational establishments necessary for the introduction of comprehensive secondary education in that part of the constituency of the hon. Member for Bedwellty not yet covered by a comprehensive education system.

    Building work costing some £2 million has already been programmed to improve the secondary schools of the Sirhowy and Western Valley. I am also considering with my right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Education and Science a bid from the Gwent authority for a capital allocation to extend the Cross Keys College of Further Education to facilitate the introduction of comprehensive education in the area. A decision on this matter will be announced shortly.

    Roads