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Written Answers

Volume 885: debated on Thursday 6 February 1975

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Written Answers To Questions

Thursday 6th February 1975

Agriculture Fisheries And Food

Sheep

43.

asked the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food whether, in view of the findings of an Australian research team that sheep can be successfully fed on a diet consisting of 60 per cent. of old Government documents, he has any plans to use this method of recycling paper.

Investigations into the feeding of ruminants with waste paper have been conducted here as well as in other countries including Australia. They have shown that whilst waste paper can be of some limited use as a source of energy its nutritional value is very variable and, because of its unpredictable effects on the animals, farmers cannot be recommended to use it for feed.

asked the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food how many outbreaks of sheep scab were confirmed in Great Britain in 1974 and corresponding figures for the last 10 years.

During 1974, 17 outbreaks of sheep scab were confirmed in Great Britain. These appear to have been linked with the 42 outbreaks confirmed in 1973. No other outbreaks occurred in the last 10 years.

asked the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food if he has any plans to introduce compulsory dipping of sheep in Wales.

All outbreaks of sheep scab in Wales have been on enclosed land, and general compulsory dipping throughout Wales has not been considered necessary. Individual dipping notices have been served on the infected farms and on all premises containing sheep in the vicinity of those farms.

Wheat

asked the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food whether any levies have been imposed upon wheat imported into the United Kingdom in 1975.

Since 9th January 1975, when offer prices for wheat from third countries fell below the Community threshold price, import levies have been in force. However, in the United Kingdom these have been more than offset by the application of accession compensatory amounts and monetary compensatory amounts.

Calf Subsidy

asked the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food why it is now necessary to give the actual date of birth when claiming calf subsidy instead of accepting the former principle of giving the month only.

The appropriate rate of subsidy depends on the birth date of the calf. As there are now three different rates of subsidy in force the actual birth date of each calf is needed to determine the correct rate payable.

Eggs

asked the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food whether he has any evidence of improper overlabelling of cartons of eggs imported from France in the last three months.

A small proportion, about 5 per cent., of the cases of eggs imported from France in the three months ending 31st January 1975 and inspected under the marketing standards regulations were regraded. The cases were relabelled to show the revised quality or weight grading, and the decision to regrade was reported to the French authorities. In all cases the other requirements of the regulations were found to be fully complied with.

asked the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food what proportion of eggs imported from France in the last three months has been inspected by his Department.

Both home-produced and imported eggs are inspected on a sample basis to ensure compliance with the EEC regulations concerning marketing standards for eggs. Approximately 10 per cent. of the eggs imported from France in the three months ending 31st January 1975 were subjected to these checks.

National Finance

Eec Subsidies

44.

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer whether it is the policy of Her Majesty's Government to scale down the take-up of EEC subsidies to the United Kingdom pending the outcome of the renegotiations.

No. The Government's policy is to take full advantage of grants and loans available from the Community.

Oil Costs (Ditchley Park Discussions)

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer if he will publish a summary of discussions held at Ditchley Park over the weekend 1st-2nd February concerning the impact of the oil crisis on the Western financial system and the British balance of payments.

No, I do not think this would be appropriate. These discussions took the form of a review of current financial and economic questions with particular reference to problems arising out of the financial surpluses of the oil-producing countries. They provided an opportunity for a wide group of politicians, academics, business men and bankers to exchange views on the approach to these questions. Discussions under the auspices of the Ditchley Foundation take place on the understanding that they will be entirely informal. These were useful and constructive but did not seek to reach decisions.

Special Commissioners Of Income Tax

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer (1) from whom the Special Commissioners of Income Tax are appointed; and in what manner;(2) what are the necessary qualifications for the Special Commissioners of Income Tax;(3) from whom the Clerk to the Special Commissioners of Income Tax is appointed; in what manner; and what are the necessary qualifications.

Special Commissioners are appointed under Section 4 of the Taxes Management Act 1970 by the Treasury and an account of all appointments is laid before Parliament within 20 days of any appointment.The Taxes Management Act requires no particular qualifications for appointment. In accordance with the recommendation of the Royal Commission 1920 (Cmnd. 615, paragraph 360), endorsed by the Royal Commission 1955 (Cmnd. 9474, paragraph 968), Special Commissioners are appointed from practising barristers, solicitors, chartered or incorporated accountants of not less than 10 years' standing and civil servants with considerable Inland Revenue experience, the latter not to exceed one-half of the total number.The Clerk to the Special Commissioners is an officer of the Inland Revenue provided by the board. No particular qualifications are required as he is not required to advise the commissioners on questions of law and is concerned only with the administrative arrangements for hearings.

Capital Transfer Tax

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer what would be the appropriate figures in columns 2, 3 and 4 of the first table in the Financial Secretary's Written Answer of 27th January to the hon. Member for St. Marylebone (Mr. Baker), assuming that the asset transferred had been held for 25 years, that, over that period, there had been a 10 per cent. per annum rate of inflation and the value of the asset had remained unchanged in real terms, and that "tax paid" in column 2 and "tax payable" in columns 3 and 4 referred to the total of capital transfer tax and capital gains tax.

Unemployment Benefit

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer what is his estimate of the annual cost to national funds in the payment of benefits to 100,000, 500,000 and 1 million unemployed persons.

I have been asked to reply.I assume that my hon. Friend is referring to unemployment benefit and supplementary allowances.

The cost of unemployment benefit in 1975–76, on the assumption that the seasonally-adjusted number of unemployed excluding school leavers, adult students and the temporarily stopped is 650,000, is estimated to be £308 million at the rates of benefit due to come into force in April 1975. If the number of unemployed were 750,000, it is estimated that the additional cost would be £60 million. The additional cost for each additional 100,000 unemployed thereafter would gradually increase so that an additional 500,000 would result in an additional cost of £330 million, and an additional 1 million would probably cost an additional £700 million. There would also be a substantial loss of contribution income to the National Insurance Fund.

It is difficult to estimate the additional cost of supplementary allowances in 1975–76 but this could be of the order of £25 million for the first additional 100,000 unemployed, £105 million for 500,000 and £190 million for 1 million.

Foreign And Commonwealth Affairs

Luxembourg Compromise Arrangement

45.

asked the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what matters are now not subject to the new Luxembourg disagreement procedure, as set out in paragraph 6 of the official communiqué of the Heads of State meeting of 10th December last, which would have justified non-agreement prior to this change of arrangement.

Member States are free to maintain their positions regarding the Luxembourg compromise. Each Government will decide for themselves which matters involve important national interests.

Mr Ghayth Nabib Armanazi

46.

asked the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs whether he will reconsider the granting of diplomatic credential to Mr. Ghayth Nabib Armanazi in view of his activities on behalf of a terrorist organisation when last in Great Britain.

Ministerial Appointments

asked the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs if he will list those bodies for which he is responsible which either receive public funds or to which he makes appointments.

I am responsible for the expediture of public funds on all those bodies listed in the Supply Estimates 1974–75 Class II (Overseas Services) under Votes 1, 3 and 4.I make appointments to the following bodies for most of which I have no direct responsibility:

  • The Universities of China Committee.
  • The Imperial War Museum.
  • The Southern Rhodesia (Higher Authority for Power) Order 1970.
  • The Advisory Committee on Rhodesian Travel Restrictions.
  • The Secretary of State's unofficial Advisory Group on UN Affairs.
  • Commonwealth Telecommunications Council.
  • Imperial Cancer Research Fund.
  • Royal Commonwealth Society for the Blind.
  • Lloyd (English School (Cairo)) Trust.
  • Marshall Scholarship Commission.
  • School of Oriental and African Studies.
  • University College of Wales Aberystwyth: Wilson Chair of International Politics Advisory Board.
  • Advisory Panel on Arms Control and Disarmament.
  • Great Britain, East European Centre.
  • The Commonwealth Foundation.
  • The Commonwealth Institute.
  • The British Council.

Employment

Social Contract

47.

asked the Secretary of State for Employment what representations he has received concerning amendments to the social contract.

48.

asked the Secretary of State for Employment what representations he has received concerning changes in the terms of the social contract.

49.

asked the Secretary of State for Employment what representations he has received about amendments to the social contract.

asked the Secretary of State for Employment what representations he has received in favour of amendments to the social contract.

I would refer the hon. Gentleman to the reply which my right hon. Friend gave to the hon. Member for Conway (Mr. Roberts) on 4th February.—[Vol. 885, c. 460.]

Wales

asked the Secretary of State for Employment how many workers in Wales are now on short-time.

Currently there are 4,720 workers known to my Department to be on short-time working in Wales.

Manpower Services Commission (Scotland)

asked the Secretary of State for Employment if he will constitute a Scottish Manpower Services Commission.

This is a matter to be considered along with other trade, industry and employment functions in the context of the devolution exercise.

Unemployed Persons

asked the Secretary of State for Employment if he will publish in the Official Report (a) the percentage of the labour force in each standard region including Northern Ireland, (b) the percentage of all unemployed in each standard region, and (c) the percentage of long-term unemployed in each standard region—defined as unemployed for six months or more—for the last year available, and for each year since 1964.

The table in cols. 601–2 shows the available information. The proportions of the civilian labour force are for June each year and the most recent figures are for June 1973. Proportions of the total unemployed and proportions of those unemployed for more than 26 weeks are shown for October each year. Owing to industrial action at local offices of the Employment Service Agency, the normal analyses by length of time unemployed are not available for January 1975 and the most recent figures are for October 1974.

asked the Secretary of State for Employment if he will publish in the Official Report the number of persons registered unemployed for six months or more as a percentage of (a) all unemployed and (b) all employees for each standard region, including Northern Ireland, for the latest year available, and for each year since 1964.

Owing to industrial action at local offices of the Employment Service Agency, the normal quarterly figures analysed by length of time unemployed are not available for January 1975 and the most recent statistics are for October 1974. The information for October each year is given in cols. 603–4.

PERCENTAGE REGIONAL SHARES OF THE LABOUR FORCE AND THE UNEMPLOYED
The figures in column (a) relate to the civilian labour force, those in column (b) to the total unemployed and those in column (c) to those unemployed for more than 26 weeks.
(per cent.)

1965

1966

1967

1968

1969

(a)(b)(c)(a)(b)(c)(a)(b)(c)(a)(b)(c)(a)(1)(b)(c)
(A)(B)
South East33·322·416·033·421·714·633·422·717·733·621·416·733·633·421·115·0
East Anglia2·62·62·42·22·62·02·02·72·01·92·82·82·01·9
South West5·86·45·95·97·06·95·95·86·15·95·96·05·95·96·46·3
West Midlands9·74·83·89·85·84·19·78·27·59·77·57·39·79·77·16·6
East Midlands5·93·74·16·04·34·46·14·24·66·04·65·06·06·04·65·5
Yorkshire and Humberside8·76·55·98·76·76·08·67·66·78·69·09·08·68·69·29·5
North West12·613·313·312·612·211·412·512·711·712·512·211·412·412·512·511·4
North5·59·511·45·59·111·25·59·510·65·510·912·35·55·510·613·6
Wales4·37·98·34·38·09·04·37·08·24·36·77·74·24·26·97·8
Scotland9·117·321·69·015·320·19·014·116·79·013·515·69·09·113·515·0
Northern Ireland2·38·19·72·37·510·02·36·48·12·36·27·02·32·36·17·3

(per cent.)

1970

1971

1972

1973

1974(3)

(a)(b)(c)(a)(2)(b)(c)(a)(b)(c)(a)(b)(c)(b)(c)
(A)(B)
South East33·320·114·533·332·818·713·532·818·413·732·618·715·019·415·2
East Anglia2·82·22·02·82·82·42·32·91·91·92·92·01·92·22·1
South West6·06·15·96·16·25·65·56·35·25·06·45·75·57·06·2
West Midlands9·77·76·99·79·88·98·19·79·19·19·77·77·7(8·1)(7·9)
(4)(4)
East Midlands6·15·16·26·06·14·95·86·14·85·46·24·75·45·45·6
Yorkshire and Humberside8·69·29·88·58·59·710·38·59·410·08·58·99·28·68·8
North West12·313·012·212·312·314·513·812·216·016·412·116·016·615·816·4
North5·69·712·65·65·69·310·95·69·510·65·610·011·19·611·1
Wales4·35·97·04·34·55·66·04·55·65·64·55·95·86·26·3
Scotland9·115·216·59·09·115·418·08·115·717·39·115·216·512·914·9
Northern Ireland2·35·76·42·32·34·95·72·34·54·92·35·25·34·85·5
(1) For 1969 column (a), the figures at (B) include improved information about the regional distribution of employees in the distributive trades.
(2) For columns (a), the estimates for 1971 (A) and earlier dates include estimates of employees based on counts of National Insurance Cards From 1971 (B) they include estimates of employees in employment from the annual censuses of employment.
(3) The figures for 1974 relate to revised regions which differ slightly from those previously in use.
(4) Because of industrial action at some offices precise information about the numbers unemployed in the West Midlands is not available and the proportions of unemployed have been estimated.

UNEMPLOYED FOR OVER 26 WEEKS AS A PERCENTAGE (a) ALL UNEMPLOYED AND (b) ALL EMPLOYEES, INCLUDING THE UNEMPLOYED
(per cent.)

October 1965

October 1966

October 1967

October 1968

October 1969

(a)(b)(a)(b)(a)(b)(a)(b)(a)(b)
South East19·30·214·70·221·50·323·10·420·90·3
East Anglia20·10·327·30·528·50·528·50·5
South West24·90·421·40·429·10·730·00·828·70·8
West Midlands21·50·115·50·225·40·528·40·527·60·5
East Midlands29·50·322·40·330·50·532·20·635·10·7
Yorkshire and Humberside24·30·319·60·324·10·529·40·730·30·8
North West27·10·420·50·325·60·627·70·726·70·7
North32·40·826·90·730·81·333·41·637·51·7
Wales28·60·824·70·832·41·333·81·333·21·3
Scotland33·80·928·90·832·81·234·01·232·61·2
Northern Ireland32·61·829·01·735·42·533·32·335·22·4

(per cent.)

October 1970

October 1971

October 1972

October 1973

October 1974(1)

(a)(b)(a)(b)(a)(b)(a)(b)(a)(b)
South East21·60·321·20·527·50·631·90·425·30·4
East Anglia27·70·628·00·936·60·938·80·631·20·7
South West29·00·828·41·035·51·138·10·828·90·9
West Midlands26·80·526·60·937·21·339·80·7Not available—see note (2)
East Midlands36·70·834·31·041·71·244·80·834·00·8
Yorkshire and Humberside32·10·931·21·339·51·641·21·033·30·9
North West28·20·827·91·237·91·841·11·333·41·2
North39·01·734·52·141·22·544·01·837·41·8
Wales35·51·331·81·537·01·738·61·232·61·3
Scotland32·51·434·32·140·72·543·21·737·21·5
Northern Ireland33·42·334·32·840·23·040·52·237·02·3
(1) The figures for October 1974 relate to revised regions which differ slightly from those previously in use.
(2) Because of industrial action at some offices information about the numbers unemployed in the West Midlands is not available.

Wages

asked the Secretary of State for Employment if he will publish in the Official Report details showing the average wages received in each of the regions of the United Kingdom.

Manual men (aged 21 and over)Non-manual men (aged 21 and over)All men (aged 21 and over)Manual women (aged 18 and over)Non-manual women (aged 18 and over)All women (aged 18 and over)
England:££££££
South East44·8059·1051·5024·7031·3029·70
Greater London45·9063·2054·9026·1033·6031·90
Remainder of South East43·8053·7047·9023·4028·5027·00
East Anglia41·5050·7044·6022·7026·2025·00
South West40·8051·2044·9022·9026·8025·70
West Midlands45·5051·7047·5023·8027·4026·00
East Midlands42·4049·7044·7023·3027·1025·60
Yorkshire and Humberside42·9050·1045·1022·0026·5024·80
North West43·1052·3046·4023·4026·9025·60
North43·6052·0046·2023·2026·7025·50
Scotland42·9051·8046·0023·4027·0025·70
Wales43·7051·9046·2022·6027·3025·70
Northern Ireland38·5050·7042·7021·2027·9025·50
These estimates are subject to sampling error and are given to the nearest 10p.

Hull

asked the Secretary of State for Employment what is the latest estimate of the number of unemployed in the Hull travel-to-work area; and what is the estimate of the number of unfilled vacancies, skilled and unskilled, for males and females in the same area.

At November 1974, 7,704 people were unemployed in the Hull travel-to-work area. In the same month 1,292 unfilled vacancies were held at employment offices and 270 at careers offices. It should be noted that vacancy statistics relate only to vacancies notified to employment offices or careers offices and are not a measure of total vacancies. A detailed analysis of the vacancy figures for November is not available but an occupational analysis of the September data relating to employment offices is given in the following table.Owing to industrial action at local offices of the Employment Service Agency, totals of the unemployed and notified vacancies for dates later than November 1974, and the normal occupational analysis for December 1974, are not available.

The following estimates of average gross weekly earnings are taken from the New Earnings Surveys in Great Britain and in Northern Ireland. They relate to April 1974 and to full-time employees whose pay for the survey reference period was not affected by absence.

NOTIFIED UNFILLED VACANCIES AT EMPLOYMENT OFFICES IN THE HULL TRAVEL-TO-WORK AREA: SEPTEMBER 1974
MalesFemales
Managerial (general management)4
Professional and related supporting management and administration99
Professional and related in education, welfare and health926
Literary, artistic and sports4
Professional and related in science, engineering, technology and similar fields951
Managerial (excluding general management)756
Clerical and related75192
Selling6884
Security and protective service4
Catering, cleaning, hairdressing and other personal service46219
Farming, fishing and related76
Materials processing (excluding metal) (hides, textiles, chemicals, food, drink and tobacco, wood, paper and board, rubber and plastics)2712
Making and repairing (excluding metal and electrical) (glass, ceramics, printing, paper products, clothing, footwear, woodworking, rubber and plastics)2131
Processing making, repairing and related (metal and electrical) (iron, steel and other metals, engineering (including installation and maintenance), vehicles and shipbuilding)130
Painting, repetitive assembling, product inspecting, packaging and related2022
Construction, mining and related not identified elsewhere22
Transport operating, materials moving and storing and related351
Miscellaneous5244
Total793644
The figures do no include vacancies held at Careers Offices.

Newspaper Conference (Prime Minister's Speech)

Q8.

asked the Prime Minister if he will place in the Library a copy of his public speech at the Newspaper Conference in London on 20th January on the EEC.

Q16.

asked the Prime Minister if he will place in the Library a copy of his speech on EEC matters to the Newspaper Conference in London on 20th January.

Q17.

asked the Prime Minister if he will place in the Library a copy of his speech on the EEC to the Newspaper Conference on 20th January.

Local Authority Associations

Q10.

asked the Prime Minister if he will seek to arrange a meeting between himself and the leaders of the local authority associations.

I have no plans for any such meeting at present, but my ministerial colleagues are, of course, regularly in touch with the local authority associations on matters of common concern.

Prime Minister (Overseas Visit)

Q7.

My right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs and I will be visiting the Soviet Union from 13th to 17th February.

President Ford (Talks)

Q9.

asked the Prime Minister if he will make a statement on his discussions with President Ford.

I refer the hon. Member to the reply which I gave to the hon. Member for Banbury (Mr. Marten) on 4th February.

Labour Relations

Q11.

asked the Prime Minister whether he will seek to arrange a meeting with representatives of workers who are not members of trade unions.

Q12.

asked the Prime Minister whether he will seek to meet representatives of workers who are not members of trade unions.

I have no plans to do so, but the Government are, of course, always ready to consider representations from any quarter.

Balloting Procedures

Q13.

asked the Prime Minister if he will transfer responsibility for policy on balloting procedures to himself.

Scottish Tuc (Talks)

Q14.

asked the Prime Minister if he will make a statement on his recent talks with the Scottish TUC.

I have had no recent talks with the Scottish Trades Union Congress, but I shall be meeting it in Scotland on 27th and 28th February to discuss a range of matters connected with the Scottish economy.

Transport Vehicles

Q15.

asked the Prime Minister if he is satisfied with the co-ordination between the Secretaries of State for Industry and the Environment in the area of transport policies so far as the availability of vehicles is concerned.

Yes. The supply of buses is primarily a matter for individual bus operators and manufacturers, but both Departments jointly keep the situation under review.

Cardiff

Q18.

asked the Prime Minister if he will pay an official visit to Cardiff at an early date.

I have no immediate plans to do so, but I hope to visit Cardiff on 15th March.

Home Department

Picketing

4.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether he will introduce legislation to extend the right to picket to non-industrial situations.

Immigration

7.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether he will make a statement on future immigration, particularly from the Indo-Pakistan subcontinent, and from East Africa.

38.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether he will make a statement on the likely scale of immigration from the Indian subcontinent and from East Africa this year and in the foreseeable future as compared with the past year.

It has never been the practice to give estimates of future immigration since any estimate may well be falsified by subsequent changes in a wide variety of factors. So far as the Indian subcontinent is concerned, the admission of heads of families is strictly limited by the work permit scheme, and our main commitment is to dependants of men already settled here. As to the United Kingdom passport holders in East Africa, there is a specific Question later on the Order Paper.

British Broadcasting Corporation

20.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will direct the British Broadcasting Corporation to publish in its annual report a statement showing how far it is its policy to have an executive producer, a producer and a director on every show; by how much its staff has increased since 1973; and how many persons are paid by it sums in excess of £5,000 per annum whilst doing no work.

No. My right hon. Friend would not use his powers to give directions of this sort unless there were substantial indications that the situation was unsatisfactory. There is no evidence of this. The BBC informs us that the increase in full-time staff between 1st April 1973 and 31st March 1974 was 32.

Fraud Squad

21.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what plans there are for strengthening the Fraud Squad of the Metropolitan Police.

The strength of the Metropolitan and City Police Company Fraud Squad is kept under continual review and is altered from time to time in the light of circumstances, including other demands on the police.

Prisoners' Families (Visits)

22.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether he will arrange that when families of prisoners are on supplementary benefit they should receive reimbursement of travelling fares to the prison for each visit which the prison governor will allow, instead of for only one visit every 28 days.

Several possible extensions of the assisted visits scheme, including the one mentioned by my hon. Friend, have been under consideration, but it is unlikely that they can be implemented in the near future.

Solitary Confinement

23.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many men were held in solitary confinement in prisons in England and Wales during January 1975; and what was the maximum period of such punishment.

I regret that information relating to the number awarded cellular confinement following disciplinary proceedings is not readily available. I shall make arrangements for it to be collected and will be getting in touch with my hon. Friend about the form which will be most appropriate for his purposes.

British Citizens (Passport Control)

24.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what restrictions are placed on a British citizen of the United Kingdom who has adaquate means of identification who wishes to leave and re-enter the United Kingdom without a passport.

There is no power to impose restrictions, whether on arrival or departure, on a passenger who is exempt from immigration control and who satisfies the immigration officer of this.

Shrewsbury

25.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will pay an official visit to Shrewsbury.

Police (Recruitment)

27.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what measures are currently being taken to increase police recruiting in England and Wales.

In order to improve the attractiveness of the police service to well-qualified young people, the Police Advisory Board has recently agreed that the minimum age of recruitment should be reduced to 18½. I intend to bring this into effect on 1st July. During the next few weeks the national recruiting campaign, which is continuing at a high level, will draw particular attention to this change.

Police (Foot Patrols)

28.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department to what extent police foot patrols operate in the outer London suburbs.

All the divisions covering the outer areas of the Metropolitan Police District are policed in accordance with the unit beat policing system. Under this, constables often live in the area for which they are responsible and they get to know the community well. They patrol on foot and are supported by panda cars, the drivers of which sometimes patrol on foot. There are also other uniform and plain clothes foot patrols.

Juvenile Offenders

29.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will introduce new measures to deal with juvenile delinquency in view of the fact that in 1969 juveniles were responsible for 23·7 per cent. of indictable offences and in 1973 for 24·6 per cent.

I would refer my hon. Friend to the reply given on 24th January to a Question by the hon. Member for Rochdale (Mr. Smith).—[Vol. 884, c. 511.] I am studying the effectiveness of measures at present available to deal with juvenile delinquency.

British Women (Children's Nationality)

30.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department when he anticipates introducing legislation covering the rights of British women over the nationality of their children.

The question of nationality by descent is among those being considered in the review of nationality law. I cannot say when the review will be completed, or anticipate its conclusions.

Milton Keynes (Television Station)

31.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will take steps to establish a public service experimental local television station at Milton Keynes.

The Milton Keynes Development Corporation has held discussions with the Home Office in which the Post Office has also been involved. I hope that there will be a satisfactory outcome.

Conspiracy Laws

32.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what representations he has received asking him to seek to amend the conspiracy laws; what replies he has sent; and if he will make a statement.

I have received a number of representations on this matter, and have explained that the law of conspiracy is under review by the Law Commission. I am considering whether any changes in the law are desirable before that review is completed.

Marriage Guidance Council (Grants)

33.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what grants he has made to the Marriage Guidance Council.

These grants are fixed, in advance, for a three-year period. In the period 1st April 1972–31st March 1975 the National Marriage Guidance Council has received a grant of £130,000 a year. The rate of grant for the period 1975–78 is at present under review.

Excluded Persons

34.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many of those excluded under the Prevention of Terrorism Act have been resident in the United Kingdom for more than five years.

Of the 15 people currently subject to orders excluding them from Great Britain 10 had been resident in Great Britain for more than five years. Of the 10 people currently subject to orders excluding them from the United Kingdom, seven had been resident in the United Kingdom for more than five years.

Mr Ghayth Nabib Armanazi

39.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what representation he has received concerning the re-entry to Great Britain of Mr. Ghayth Nabib Armanazi.

In authorising a visa for Mr. Armanazi's entry to the United Kingdom in June I took into account all the information available, including representations made on his behalf.

Illegal Immigrants

35.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many of those illegal immigrants who have applied for amnesty and been refused have now been deported or are awaiting deportation.

Up to 24th January six of the applicants found ineligible to benefit from my right hon. Friend's announcement on 11th April had been removed from the country. In addition, 23 of those who had arrived at ports and claimed the benefit of the announcement were refused leave to enter.

Sex Discrimination

36.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will make a statement on the conclusions he has drawn from his examination of sex discrimination legislation in other countries.

There are differences of approach among the countries which have anti-discrimination legislation, many of which reflect differences in legal background. I am considering what lessons to draw from experience abroad, and in particular from my recent examination of practice in the United States.

Public Buildings (Terrorist Attacks)

37.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether he is satisfied with the arrangements made for the guarding of public buildings and installations against possible terrorist attacks.

Those responsible for the security of public buildings are well aware of the need for adequate precautions, and appropriate arrangements are made.

Truancy (Lambeth)

41.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department on whose authority recent statements on truancy in Lambeth were made by the police in Lambeth to the Press; whether the statements were made after consultation with the local education authority; and if he is satisfied with their accuracy.

The Commissioner of Police of the Metropolis informs us that he is not aware of such statements. Information about truancy which has recently been quoted in the Press as coming from the Metropolitan Police was supplied by them to the Inner London Education Authority at the request of one of the authority's officers. We have no reason to doubt its accuracy.

Fire Precautions Act 1971

40.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what estimate has been made of the total cost to property owners and leaseholders in England and Wales of implementing the provisions of the Fire Precautions Act 1971.

Since the duty of compliance with the Act normally rests upon the occupier of the premises, who may, or may not, be the owner or leaseholder, and the cost of implementation will depend both on the rate at which classes of premises are designated and on their existing standard of fire protection, no such estimate can be made.

Bookmakers

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether he will seek to amend Section 19 of the Betting, Gaming and Lotteries Act 1963 to prevent bookmakers from owning racecourses.

My right hon. Friend is not satisfied that such an amendment of the law is called for.

Detective Superintendents And Inspectors

42.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what is the average take-home pay with allowances etc. of a detective superintendent and of a detective inspector in the Metropolitan Police force.

A recent Police Council survey showed that in May 1974

19731974
Number of tickets cancelledPercentage of totalNumber of tickets cancelledPercentage of total
Afghanistan1060·2420·1
Algeria1160·21490·3
Argentine Republic4661·07801·5
Australia390·1930·2
Austria370·1310·1
Bahrain2010·4950·2
Bangladesh2140·44090·8
Barbados4911·04580·9
Belgium2930·62700·5
Bolivia280·1850·2
Botswana55
Brazil4120·84930·9
Bulgaria6571·39251·8
Burma1130·22230·4
Cameroon4180·92890·5
Canada2310·52890·5

average gross earnings, including allowances and, in the case of the inspector, overtime, were £5,170 for a detective superintendent and £5,571 for a detective inspector. These figures do not take account of the general pay increase to the police in September 1974, threshold payments and an increase in London allowance, all of which apply to both ranks.

Diplomatic Missions (Parking Offences)

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what sum remains unpaid for parking fines incurred by those with diplomatic immunity in the United Kingdom during each of the last five years for which records are available; and how much and what proportion is owed by each mission accredited to the Court of St. James's.

The available information is given in the following table, compiled from police records, which gives particulars by country, or international organisation, of the number of cancellations of fixed penalty notices on grounds of diplomatic immunity in 1973 and 1974. In each case the amount of the fixed penalty specified in the notice was £2, but there is no question of sums owed in respect of cancelled notices, since the cancellation of a penalty notice on grounds of diplomatic immunity necessarily involves the cancellation of any debt which would otherwise be due as a result of it. I understand that figures for the three previous years were supplied to the hon. and learned Member in 1973.

1973

1974

Number of tickets cancelled

Percentage of total

Number of tickets cancelled

Percentage of total

Chile2360·51990·4
China350·11380·3
Colombia750·2350·1
Costa Rica950·2660·1
Cuba2,1634·42,7085·1
Cyprus2,0694·22,1914·1
Czechoslovakia1440·31750·3
Dahomey11
Denmark2130·42580·5
Dominican Republic440·1520·1
Ecuador3360·72070·4
Egypt2,0084·11,6513·1
E1 Salvador390·1680·1
Ethiopia2810·62220·4
Fiji1817
Finland1690·33380·6
France6501·31,1012·1
Gabon620·1990·2
Gambia1160·23520·7
German Democratic Republic510·1
Germany, Federal Republic of1660·32600·5
Ghana1,5743·21,2092·3
Greece1,5753·21,3272·5
Guyana2770·62550·5
Haiti280·126
Honduras2390·5880·2
Hungary1,3632·81,3752·6
Iceland127
India5111·04850·9
Indonesia6771·46461·2
Iran1,4963·12,8075·3
Iraq2900·63450·7
Ireland, Republic of1520·3990·2
Israel5991·29541·8
Italy2170·43010·6
Ivory Coast3490·72790·5
Jamaica9912·08311·6
Japan780·22720·5
Jordan5161·15041·0
Kenya3050·64360·8
Khmer Republic23470·1
Korea1,2172·51,0472·0
Kuwait9251·98861·7
Laos1320
Lebanon900·21690·3
Lesotho12440·1
Liberia1480·31300·2
Libya6581·35981·1
Luxembourg1824
Malagasy Republic5351·13770·7
Malawi2880·61180·2
Malaysia1,0412·11,1602·2
Malta GC1900·42150·4
Mauritius880·21820·3
Mexico3980·83630·7
Monaco1
Mongolia250·1300·1
Morocco2060·42570·5
Nepal911
Netherlands1319
Nicaragua310·1680·1
Nigeria, Federal Republic of3,2106·63,1245·9
Norway640·1710·1
Oman290·11300·2
Pakistan1,8483·81,4022·7
Panama1410·31240·2
Paraguay3370·72020·4
Peru5451·14240·8
Philippines540·11550·3
Poland8581·81,5492·9

1973

1974

Number of tickets cancelled

Percentage of total

Number of tickets cancelled

Percentage of total

Portugal2700·61800·3
Qatar1150·23360·6
Romania2530·53410·6
Rwanda3
Saudi Arabia2,3754·91,9373·7
Senegal1920·41900·4
Sierra Leone5461·16141·2
Singapore380·1310·1
Somali Democratic Republic910·2430·1
South Africa, Republic of280·16
Soviet Union4210·96721·3
Spain1660·32450·5
Sri Lanka3470·72710·5
Sudan2730·64530·9
Swaziland15600·1
Sweden1116
Switzerland530·1330·1
Syrian Arab Republic141390·3
Tanzania2590·53890·7
Thailand6681·41,0682·0
Tonga17
Trinidad and Tobago3480·73510·7
Tunisia4230·94840·9
Turkey1,0702·21,0522·0
Uganda3700·84810·9
United Arab Emirates1050·21190·2
United States of America650·1850·2
Uruguay560·1490·1
Venezuela2700·63320·6
Vietnam1120·21100·2
Yemen Arab Republic2590·52820·5
Yemen, People's Democratic Republic23820·2
Yugoslavia1,3092·79671·8
Zaire3300·73780·7
Zambia6951·48581·6
Commonwealth Secretariat620·1760·1
Eastern Caribbean Commission5
EEC Commission156
International Coffee Organisation640·1490·1
Intergovernmental Maritime Consultative Organisation460·18
Western European Union2213
TOTALS48,79852,839

Note: The percentages are given to one decimal place. Where there is no entry the percentage of the total is insignificant.

Environment

Mr Henry Mason, Godmanchester

50.

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment if he will take steps as a matter of urgency to ensure that Mr. Henry Mason, of Porch Farm, Godmanchester, Huntingdonshire will regain access to a one-and-a-half acre field (OS 335) which, since last September, has been severed from the rest of his farm by the building of Huntingdon bypass but which he now wishes to cultivate for food production.

Yes. A temporary access is being constructed for Mr. Mason to use until a permanent access can be provided.

Architects

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment what consideration he has given to the representations made to him on 19th December by the President of the Royal Institute of British Architects on work available to the profession; and what action he proposes to take in response to those representations.

Arrangements have now been made for me to discuss this and other matters with the President of the RIBA in the very near future.

Home Loss Payments

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment whether he will introduce legislation to require all local authorities to ensure that any residents displaced by their actions are informed personally of their rights to claim home loss payments under the Land Compensation Act 1973, and to provide that, where such notification is not carried out, the six-month time limit for claims be set aside.

Sparks Farm, Cuckfield

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment whether he will publish the representations he has received regarding the proposed rubbish tip at Sparks Farm, Cuckfield.

No. It is not my right hon. Friend's practice to publish such representations.

Trees

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment what arrangements his Department makes for the replenishment of natural reserves.

If the hon. Member is thinking of trees, I would refer him to the answer he received on 5th February about planting. In addition, local planning authorities have been given the statutory duty to make planting a condition of permission for development whenever appropriate, and power to secure replacement when necessary of trees protected by preservation orders.

Roll-On/Roll-Off Freight

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment if he will undertake an investigation into the quantity of merchandise originating from or destined for continents other than Europe, that arrives or leaves the United Kingdom in roll-on/roll-off road services serving deep-sea vessels in European ports.

Statistics of port traffic are a matter for the National Ports Council which has not at present got comprehensive data on transhipment traffic. I understand there are certain difficulties, but the council is exploring what more can be obtained.

Ribble Valley

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment what estimate his Department has made of the likely increase in population in the Ribble Valley area in the next five and the next 10 years, respectively.

The Department of the Environment does not make population projections for county districts; but when the North East Lancashire Structure Plan is presented it will take account of movements in population within its area, which will no doubt include the Ribble Valley.

M5 (Huntwater-Blackbrook)

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment what further request he has received from the contractor on the M5 Huntwater-Blackbrook section for a further postponement of the completion date, what is the requested date of the postponement, what the reasons are for the application, and whether he will make a statement on the position.

An application for a further extension of time has been received and is being considered. I will let the hon. Member know the outcome but I cannot comment on the application whilst the negotiations are in progress.

Scala Theatre Development Proposal

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment what action he is taking in regard to the application for loan sanction submitted to him by the Camden Council in respect of the Scala Theatre development in Charlotte Street, W1, in October 1974.

New Towns (Consultation Paper)

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment on what date the consultation paper, "New Towns in England and Wales" was published.

The paper was first distributed for consultation purposes on 31st December 1974.

New Towns (Housing And Land Sales)

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment (1) what publicity he gave to his letter to general managers of new towns of 25th April 1974 regarding the sale of new town rented houses and freehold housing land;(2) what publicity he gave to his circular of 5th September 1974 to new town corporations and the New Towns Commission regarding the sale of freehold land;(3) what publicity he gave to his letter to new towns of 29th March 1974 regarding the sale of freehold land for private sector commercial and industrial development.

None. I see no good reason why they should have been specially publicised. Corporations will have told those who are directly affected by what is said in these documents.

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment (1) whether his letter to general managers of new town development corporations dated 25th April 1974 requesting them not to sell rented dwellings in normal circumstances took the form of a formal direction under Section 4 of the New Towns Act 1965; or whether it represented a suggested line of policy to them which they are legally permitted to reject in the absence of such a direction, if their corporation members so instruct them;(2) whether his letter to new towns of 29th March 1974, regarding the sale of freehold land for private sector commercial and industrial development, took the form of a formal direction under Section 4 of the New Towns Act 1965; or whether it represented a suggested line of policy to them which they are legally permitted to reject, in the absence of such direction, if their corporation or commission members so instruct them;(3) whether his letter to new towns of 25th April 1974, asking them not to sell housing land took the form of a formal direction under Section 4 of the New Towns Act 1965; or whether it represented a suggested line of policy to them which they are legally permitted to reject, in the absence of such a direction, if their corporation or commission members so instruct them;(4) whether his circular to new towns of 5th September 1974 regarding the sale of freehold land to private developers took the form of a formal direction under Section 4 of the New Towns Act 1965; or whether it represented a suggested line of policy to them which they are legally permitted to reject in the absence of such a direction, if their corporation or commission members so instruct them.

Neither the letters nor the circular took the shape of formal directions under Section 4 of the New Towns Act 1965. Essentially, they were requested to abide by certain guidelines pending completion of a review of new town policy. Given our good relations with development corporations, it is, I am sure, quite unnecessary to invoke formal powers and I am confident that the corporations will have the courtesy to consult me before disregarding those guidelines.

Palace Of Westminster (Lighting)

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment if he will arrange for the outdated chandeliers in Committee Rooms to be replaced by modern strip lighting in order to make a saving in use of electricity and lessen the eye strain of those who use the Committee Rooms.

I shall examine my hon. Friend's proposal in consultation with the appropriate authorities and inform him of my conclusions in due course.

Parliamentary Car Park

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment whether, to ease traffic congestion in Westminster, and to help offset the construction cost, he will make the parliamentary underground car park available to the general public on a commercial basis during parliamentary recesses.

I have been asked to reply.No. A large number of staff and Members still need parking facilities during recesses. Moreover, the House decided on 27th June last, when agreeing to the report of the Services Committee on car parking, that the underground car park should not be made available for public use during recesses.

Unsolicited Goods And Services

asked the Attorney-General whether he will instruct the Director of Public Prosecutions to institute proceedings under the Unsolicited Goods and Services Act 1971 against the companies involved for threatening to bring legal proceedings in respect of unsolicited goods, evidence for which purpose has been supplied to him by the hon. Member for Orpington.

I have already requested the Director to look into this matter.

Legal Aid

asked the Attorney-General whether he accepts the recommendation of the Lord Chancellor's Legal Aid Advisory Committee that legal aid should be extended to all statutory tribunals at present within the supervision of the Council on Tribunals; and, if so, when he proposes to take steps to implement the same.

My noble Friend has considerable sympathy with the advisory committee's recommendation, and he supports in principle the extension of legal aid to these tribunals. However, he regrets that he cannot give priority to the provision of legal aid for tribunals, in view of the urgent need for improving legal services generally. The study he has commissioned into the problems of the un-met need for legal services is making good progress. My noble Friend will review the whole position when the report is available to him.

Energy

Gas And Electricity Tariffs

asked the Secretary of State for Energy whether he will list the main items of evidence he has available to him in his examination with the industries concerned of the social and other implications of various possible modifications to the structure of the electricity and gas tariffs; whether he will place copies of these documents in the Library; and whether he will make a statement on the progress of the inquiry.

Information on this subject was given in my answers of 16th, 18th and 20th December 1974 and material was placed in the Library. In addition the Chairman of the Electricity Council and the British Gas Corporation have written to my hon. Friend with further information of the kind already given to my Department. I have nothing more to add.

Electricity Consumers

asked the Secretary of State for Energy what is his estimate of the number of credit consumers of electricity.

The number of credit customers of electricity area boards in England and Wales in 1973–74 was approximately 17,154,000.

British Petroleum Shares

asked the Secretary of State for Energy what representations he has received from the public concerning the conditions of any further disposal of the British Petroleum shares recently acquired by the Bank of England, with particular regard to a possible offer back to Burmah shareholders registered at the time of the acquisition.

Radioactive Waste

asked the Secretary of State for Energy what progress has been made in reducing or preventing radiation hazard from radioactive wastes produced by British nuclear power stations.

The radiation hazard from radioactive waste produced by British nuclear power stations is strictly controlled to prevent harm to health. These controls are kept under continuous review. They are based on the recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection, as endorsed by the Medical Research Council, and are enforced by the Nuclear Installations Inspectorate of the Health and Safety Executive. A small fraction of the waste is disposed of to the environment. Disposal of this waste is authorised and controlled under the Radioactive Substances Act 1960 in accordance with the principles set out in the White Paper "The Control of Radioactive Wastes" (Cmnd. 884).

Industry

Hs146 Aircraft

asked the Secretary of State for Industry if he will publish the official record of the tripartite meeting on 13th December 1974 concerning the HS146 project.

As indicated in my right hon. Friend's statement in the House on 9th December, the Secretary of State held a meeting on the HS146 with the firm and the trades unions concerned on 13th December, which agreed to continue discussion in a tripartite working group. This will eventually advise us on how best to secure the Government objective of keeping options open on this project for the future. It would not be in accordance with accepted practice to make public details of discussions which are still continuing.

Rolls-Royce (1971) Ltd

asked the Secretary of State for Industry what are the financial, technical and social objectives set by Her Majesty's Government for Rolls-Royce (1971) Ltd.

I refer the hon. Member to the objectives set out in the memorandum quoted verbatim in my right hon. Friend's reply to my hon. Friend the Member for East Kilbride (Dr. Miller) on 4th June 1974.—[Vol. 874, c. 389–91.]

asked the Secretary of State for Industry if he will arrange for the House of Commons to have available to it the information required to monitor the progress of Rolls-Royce (1971) Ltd., towards the financial, technical and social objectives which the company has been set by Her Majesty's Government.

asked the Secretary of State for Industry how many man-hours are required by the staff of his Department to monitor the progress of Rolls-Royce (1971) Ltd., towards the objectives set by Her Majesty's Government.

The information is not available in the form requested. However, within the Department of Industry there are nine persons employed full-time on all aspects of Government relations with Rolls-Royce (1971) Ltd. In addition, advice on specialised matters is provided from within the Department and by the Ministry of Defence Procurement Executive.

Short Bros And Harland Ltd

asked the Secretary of State for Industry what are the financial, social and technical objectives set by Her Majesty's Government for Short Bros. and Harland Ltd.

Short Brothers and Harland Ltd. functions as a commercial organisation with normal commercial objectives. Its Government-appointed directors must have regard to general Government policy. The company trades in both civil and military aerospace products, and is judged by the same criteria as other suppliers when undertaking Government contracts.

asked the Secretary of State for Industry if he will arrange for the House of Commons to have available to it the information required to monitor the progress of Short Bros. and Harland towards the financial, technical and social objectives which the company has been set by Her Majesty's Government.

The Government are the major shareholder in Short Brothers and Harland and have made loans to the company in the past. I therefore regularly receive data on its general financial position and progress reports on Government-supported projects. This information is commercially confidential and cannot be published.

asked the Secretary of State for Industry how many man-hours are required by the staff of his Department to monitor the progress of Short Bros. and Harland Limited towards the objectives set by Her Majesty's Government.

The information is not available in the form requested. Within the Department of Industry there are seven officials who over a period spend some of their time on matters relating to Short Brothers and Harland Ltd., as part of their responsibilities for the aircraft industry as a whole. This is equivalent to about one person full-time. In addition, professional advice on specialised questions is provided from within the Department and by MOD, PE.

Electricity Industry (Foreign Borrowing)

asked the Secretary of State for Industry how the $1,872·5 million borrowed abroad by the State electricity industries in 1973 and 1974 has been spent.

I have been asked to reply.$1,000 million was raised principally to finance the redemption of British Electricity Stock in 1973–74 and the remainder to finance the industries' capital requirements.

asked the Secretary of State for Industry, of the $1,600 million raised abroad by the Electricity Council, what part if any has been derived from Arab sources.

I have been asked to reply.The source of the $1,600 million raised abroad by the Electricity Council is a confidential matter between the parties concerned.

Northern Ireland

Textiles (Departmental Purchases)

asked the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland (1) what is the total value of textile goods purchased by his Department during the past 12 months;(2) what percentage of textile goods over the last 12 months has been purchased from British manufacturers by his Department;(3) if he will instruct his Department to purchase all future textile requirements from British manufacturers.

The total value of textile goods purchased by the Northern Ireland Office over the past 12 months was £121,481. The percentage of goods of British manufacture is 100 per cent. I see no present need to alter the existing procedures.

Gardiner Report

asked the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland with which political parties he or his officials have had communication on the subject of the Gardiner Report.

I have invited all Northern Ireland political parties to let me have their comments on the Gardiner Report.As I said in my statement to the House on 5th February, my officials have had a number of meetings with various organisations, including Provisional Sinn Fein, following the publication of the Gardiner Report.

Sinn Fein (Talks)

asked the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland whether he or his officials have had talks or other communication with Provisional Sinn Fein since his statement of 22nd January.

Overseas Development

Eec (Enlargement)

asked the Minister of Overseas Development what arrangements have been made in the draft convention between the European Community and the ACP countries to permit the accession of Mozambique, Angola, Namibia and Southern Rhodesia after their independence

Provision is made under Title VII of the new EEC-ACP Convention for the accession of States whose economic structure and production are comparable with those of the existing ACP countries, subject to the approval of the ministerial governing body of the Convention. Guinea-Bissau is already party to the Convention. This provision would allow the accession of other such territories as those mentioned by my hon. Friend if, on coming to independence, they wished to seek it.

Scotland

Dogs

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland what steps he has taken to reduce the risk of dogs attacking people.

My right hon. Friend the Home Secretary and I have, in consultation with interested parties, devised a Code of Practice for the Use of Guard Dogs. In framing this code, the terms of which follow, we have had the assistance of the two Associations of Chief Police Officers, the British Security Industry Association and a number of dog welfare societies. My right hon. Friend and I trust that the widespread distribution of this code will improve practice in the use of guard dogs and so go some way towards avoiding tragic accidents such as that in Glasgow last year.USE OF GUARD DOGSCODE PRACTICE1. All persons and organisations who provide dogs for security purposes, for hire or reward should

  • (i) keep a register readily available of all dogs in which the details of each dog will be recorded;
  • (ii) keep a log-book of all hirings which should include the names of the dogs and handlers; and
  • (iii) be adequately insured against all claims.
  • 2. No dog should be used for security purposes unless it is fully and propertly trained to such a standard that it can be kept under adequate control at all times.

    3. Dogs should be kept in a healthy condition, properly kennelled, fed and watered.

    4. Every dog should be used under close supervision at all times (preferably accompanied by a suitably trained handler).

    5. Unless under the immediate control of the handler, dogs should be used only on premises or in areas that are reasonably proof against escape and unauthorised entry.

    6. Dogs should be transported only in vehicles which afford adequate protection against escape by, or injury to, the dog. The dog should be in a compartment separated from the driver of the vehicle

    7. Warning notices should be displayed where dogs are being used for the purpose of guarding premises.

    Social Services

    Hypothermia

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services (1) what is her Department's estimate of the number of people whose death could be attributed in whole or in part, respectively, to inadequate heating of their home in each of the last 10 years;(2) what is her Department's estimate of the number of people whose admission to hospital, or delayed discharge from it, was in whole or in part due to inadequate heating of their home in each of the last 10 years;(3) what is her Department's estimate of the number of old, poor, chronically sick and disabled people and families whose homes are inadequately heated in winter.

    I share the concern of my hon. Friend but I regret that my Department is unable to make such an estimate.

    Public Bodies

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services if she will list those bodies other than health authorities for which she is responsible which either receive public funds or to which she makes appointments.

    Following is a list of bodies—other than health authorities—for which the Secretary of State for Social Services is responsible and which either receive funds or to which she makes appointments.

    • National Insurance Local Tribunals.
    • Supplementary Benefit Appeal Tribunals.
    • Medical Appeal Tribunals.
    • Industrial Injuries Medical Boards.
    • Mental Health Review Tribunals.
    • War Pensions Medical Boards.
    • War Pensions Committees.
    • Central Advisory Committee on War Pensions.
    • Supplementary Benefits Commission.
    • Attendance Allowance Board.
    • National Insurance Advisory Committee.
    • Industrial Injuries Advisory Council.
    • Pneumoconiosis, Byssinosis & Miscellaneous Diseases Benefit Board.
    • Workmens Compensation (Supplementation) Board.
    • Occupational Pensions Board.
    • Central Health Services Council and associated Standing Advisory Committees.
    • Dental Estimates Board.
    • Personal Social Services Council.
    • Medicines Commission.
    • Advisory Committee on the Safety of Medicines.
    • Medical Practices Committee.
    • Joint Inducement Payments Committee.
    • Advisory Committee on Distinction Awards.
    • Council for Postgraduate Medical Education.
    • Training Council for Orthotists.
    • Central Council for Education and Training in Social Work.
    • Council for the Education and Training of Health Visitors.
    • Panel of Assessors for District Nurse Training.
    • Food Hygiene Advisory Council.
    • Adivsory Committee on Irradiation of Food.
    • Advisory Committee on the Medical Aspects of Chemicals in Food and the Environment.
    • Advisory Committee on the Medical Aspects of Food Policy.
    • Advisory Committee on Borderline Substances.
    • British Pharmacopoeia Commission.
    • Ad hoc health advisory committees.

    Staffing (Edinburgh)

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services if she will publish in the Official Report a table showing the total approved establishment, analysed by grade, of Department of Health and Social Security and Supplementary Benefits Commission staff in Edinburgh, and the actual number in post as at the most recent convenient date.

    It is not possible to identify separately in all cases staff of my Department employed solely on the work of the Supplementary Benefits Commission from those engaged on national insurance work. On 1st January 1975 the authorised staff complement of Department of Health and Social Security local offices in Edinburgh and the number of permanent staff in post were as set out in the table below.

    Complements of Local Offices in Edinburgh*Permanent Staff in post on 1st January 1975
    Prin32
    SEO55
    HEO2222
    EO135137
    CO270271
    CA107102
    Typist1413
    Others22
    TOTALS558554
    * Includes supplementary benefit specialist staff attached to LOs.

    Hospital Waiting Lists (Walsall)

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services what effect the consultants' industrial action has had on waiting lists for operations of non-clinical necessity in the Walsall Area Health Authority jurisdiction.

    There has been a reduction in the number of non-urgent operations being performed in Walsall hospitals and in the number of out-patients seen. It is too early to estimate the net effect of these on waiting lists.

    Family Endowment

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services if she will publish a Green Paper setting out her policies for family endowment and giving full particulars of the administrative and financial implications.

    Food Subsidies

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services what would be the net cost to public funds, after receipt of tax, of raising family allowances, family income supplement, retirement pensions and supplementary pensions by a sufficient amount to compensate the recipients fully for the total abolition of food subsidies; and how this net expenditure would compare with the proposed £1,700 million ceiling for food subsidies in the next financial year.

    Expenditure on food subsidies in 1975–76 is expected to be of the order of £550 million, which together with expenditure in the current year will be well within the limit of £1,200 million proposed in the Prices Bill for the period up to 1st April 1976. The precise value of food subsidies varies according to circumstances but averages about 22½p a week per person, or 25p a week per retirement pensioner. To increase the benefits mentioned by these amounts respectively would cost something like £190 million a year, or £160 million after allowing for income tax receipts. Corresponding increases to other social security benefits would substantially increase the cost. But to compare these figures with each other would be misleading, since the extent to which these benefits may be increased depends on a wide variety of other factors, including the movement of prices generally and other developments affecting gross and net incomes.

    Trade

    European Economic Community

    asked the Secretary of State for Trade what was the net direct inward investment financed by a net inflow of funds to the United Kingdom for property development, manufacturing industry and other purposes, respectively, from each of the Common Market countries each year since 1960 to the latest convient date.

    I regret that the information is not available. I have nothing to add to the answer I gave to my hon. Friend on 21st January.—[Vol, 884, c. 302–6.]

    asked the Secretary of State for Trade what percentage of total United Kingdom imports and total United Kingdom exports United Kingdom imports from and exports to the EEC formed in 1974.

    Air Traffic Beacon (Barkway)

    asked the Secretary of State for Trade whether a site has been acquired for the proposed stacking beacon for air traffic at Barkway; and by when he expects it to be erected.

    The installation of navigational beacons is the responsibility of the Civil Aviation Authority, to whose Chairman I suggest that the hon. Member should write in order to obtain any further details he requires; but I understand that the Civil Aviation Authority is negotiating acquisition of a permanent site and will shortly be applying for the necessary planning permission. These procedures will, however, take some time and, because it is necessary to bring the Barkway holding area into operation in April next, the authority is proposing to erect a temporary beacon at a nearby site on Ministry of Defence land for which planning permission is not required.

    asked the Secretary of State for Trade what consultations took place with regard to the proposal to site an air navigational stacking beacon at Barkway, before the revised air routes in the London Terminal Control Area were announced; and whether he is satisfied that air traffic using such a beacon would not interfere with the operations of the radio station at Wallington, near Baldock, for the extension of which planning permission has recently been approved.

    No prior public consultations took place but explanatory documents were sent out on 18th September to 28 hon. Members, 26 county, borough and district councils, four airport consultative committees and a number of other bodies with an interest in aircraft noise. It was open to all recipients of the document to comment on the changes proposed in it, including the one relating to Barkway. With regard to the second part of the Question, I understand that the Civil Aviation Authority is maintaining contact with the appropriate authorities but otherwise there is nothing to add to the reply given to the hon. Member on 17th January 1975.—[Vol. 884, c. 208.]

    Japan (Motor Vehicles)

    asked the Secretary of State for Trade if he will consider the introduction of measures aimed at reducing the importation of Japanese cars until such time as Japan adopts more liberal trade policies in regard to British exports of cars and other products.

    No. For the reasons I gave in the Adjournment debate on 23rd January, such action could not be justified at the present time.

    Trawlers (Voyage Recorders)

    asked the Secretary of State for Trade if, following the loss of the trawlers "Morena" and "Gaul", he will invite the submission of proposals to him for the development by British industry of a "black box" type of voyage recorded for use in trawlers; and if he will make a statement.

    On the basis of evidence currently available, I am not satisfied that the fitting, of costly data-recording equipment of the kind used in aircraft would significantly contribute to the safety of life at sea. However, the research and development project on alerting and locating devices which I announced in the House on 13th January 1975 includes consideration of this aspect.—[Vol. 884, c. 25–6.]

    Textiles

    asked the Secretary of State for Trade what has been the increase in volume and the increase in value of imports of textile piece goods and made-up garments, respectively, for the latest three-month period for which the information is available, compared with the corresponding period of the previous year.

    Volume information is not available. Comparing the fourth

    £ million cif
    Country of ConsignmentPetroleum, crude and partly refined for further refining (SITC(R) 331)Petroleum Products including Petroleum Gases (SITC(R) 332 and 341)
    197219731974197219731974
    Federal Republic of Germany5·21·87·55·06·913·8
    Netherlands11·813·496·482·797·1214·1
    Belgium/Luxembourg0·90·47·523·344·450·2
    France3·56·213·814·721·344·9
    Italy3·22·84·731·148·581·4
    Denmark0·30·21·82·25·8
    Irish Republic16·236·7144·14·74·312·9

    Exports And Imports

    asked the Secretary of State for Trade (1) what was the increase in value in United Kingdom exports to the rest of the EEC, to North America and to EFTA in 1974 as a percentage of their value in 1973;(2) what was the increase in the value of United Kingdom imports from and of exports to North America in 1974 as a percentage of their value in 1973;

    quarters of 1973 and 1974, value of textile piece goods imported increased by 12 per cent. whilst that of made-up garments fell by 6 per cent.

    Oil Imports

    asked the Secretary of State for Trade what was the value of (a) crude oil and (b) petroleum products imported from each of the eight other members of the European Community in each of the years 1972, 1973 and 1974, giving the figures separately for each country.

    Following is the information:(3) what was the increase in the value of United Kingdom imports from and of exports to EFTA in 1974 as a percentage of their value in 1973.

    Following are the percentages:

    per cent.
    Exports
    EEC37
    North America17
    EFTA29
    Imports
    North America37
    EFTA27