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Written Answers

Volume 885: debated on Friday 7 February 1975

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Written Answers To Questions

Friday 7th February 1975

Environment

Transport (Expenditure)

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment what is the estimated expenditure on local transport by each county in 1974–75; what is the level of expenditure accepted by him for each county in 1975–76; and what change this represents in each case over 1974–75.

The estimated expenditure for each county in England in 1975–76 accepted for transport supplementary grant is given in the following table. Comparable up-to-date estimates of transport expenditure in 1974–75 for each county are not yet available.Accepted expenditure 1975–76 at November 1974 prices:

£ million
GLC206·280
Greater Manchester42·853
Merseyside29·787
Tyne and Wear43·218
West Midlands52·140
South Yorkshire22·565
West Yorkshire42·870
Avon10·153
Bedfordshire8·069
Berkshire11·773
Buckinghamshire7·296
Cambridgeshire7·875
Cheshire17·342
Cleveland13·958
Cornwall4·629
Cumbria6·676
Derbyshire10·205
Devon15·743
Dorset7·025
Durham7·103
East Sussex8·872
Essex15·987
Gloucestershire5·753
Hampshire24·840
Hereford and Worcester11·971
Hertfordshire15·868
Humberside8·121
Isle of Wight1·720
Kent16·806
Lancashire15·298
Leicestershire8·577
Lincolnshire7·617
Norfolk7·796
Northamptonshire11·875
Northumberland6·280
North Yorkshire10·230
Nottinghamshire11·000
Oxfordshire5·701
Shropshire5·448
Somerset5·014
Staffordshire15·092

£ million

Suftolk6·394
Surrey11·312
Warwickshire6·739
West Sussex8·182
Wiltshire7·409
Total England827·462

Thames Estuary

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment if he will obtain, and publish in the Official Report, the total tonnage of crude oil and oil products that entered the Thames Estuary for each of the years 1964 to 1974, inclusive; and his estimate of the growth of this traffic over each of the next six years, assuming the proposed new refineries at Canvey Island and Cliffe are built and become operational.

Information has been provided by the Port of London Authority for traffic with destinations other than the Medway, and by the Port of Medway Authority for destinations in the Medway. Tonnages of oil moving in and out of the Thames estuary:

Units million tonnes
PeriodImportsExportsTotal*
196431·513·044·5
196533·013·346·3
196635·715·851·5
196737·715·753·4
196837·415·452·8
196937·813·751·5
197038·214·652·8
197136·612·148·7
197238·512·951·4
197338·913·952·8
197435·411·647·0
* The figures include oil brought into the estuary and subsequently re-exported.
Estimates of future tonnages are not available, but some indication of future trends might be derived from the terminal capacities proposed for the Canvey Island and Cliffe refineries, which, it is understood, are as follows:

Canvey Island:
Occidental6 million tonnes per annum
URL4 million tonnes per annum
Cliffe:
Burmah/Total6 million tonnes per annum

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment if he will obtain, and publish in the Official Report, information relating to the total numbers and tonnage of oil tankers which are expected to enter the Thames Estuary to serve each of the three proposed oil refineries at Canvey Island and Cliffe, respectively, and the total number and tonnages of tankers and other vessels

Burmah/Total, CliffeOccidental, Canvey IslandUnited Refineries Ltd., Canvey Island
Crude petroleum 75,000 deadweight tons or larger111
Petroleum products—
30,000 deadweight tons1
20,000 deadweight tons3
13,000–18,000 deadweight tons12
4,000 deadweight tons51
1,500 deadweight tons720
1,000 deadweight tons320
500 deadweight tons20

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment if he will obtain, and publish in the Official Report, information regarding the total number of oil tankers and vessels carrying other hazardous cargoes that entered the Thames Estuary in each of the years 1964 to 1974 inclusive.

Most vessels carry some form of hazardous cargo, ranging from paints and matches to chemicals and explosives. The following figures relate to vessels carrying crude oil and oil products, and liquefied natural gas:

Number of Vessels
PeriodFigures provided by the Port of London AuthorityFigures provided by the Port of Medway Authority
19643,2701,882
19653,4501,833
19663,4952,145
19673,7622,251
19683,8322,243
19693,9082,166
19703,5481,973
19712,9401,924
19722,8742,226
19732,5572,344
19742,403*
* Not yet available.

Derelict Land

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment what is the total acreage of derelict land in Scotland, Wales and each of the eight English regions served by an economic planning council to the latest available date.

carrying hazardous cargoes leaving the refineries.

Estimates of the weekly shipping requirements given by the oil companies at the relevant planning inquiries are as follows:England, including the regional breakdown, are not yet available, but preliminary estimates are that the total amount of derelict land is just over 100,000 acres, of which about 80,000 acres are considered to justify treatment. The latest available figures for English regions, showing the position as at 31st December 1971 are:

RegionTotal acreage of derelict landAcreage justifying treatment (included in (2))
(1)(2)(3)
Northern20,49514,948
North-West15,11312,367
Yorkshire and Humberside13,85010,544
West Midlands11,72110,166
East Midlands8,5477,259
South-West18,8513,450
South-East5,2923,027
East Anglia3,2222,492
I understand from my right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Scotland and my right hon. and learned Friend the Secretary of State for Wales that there are at present about 25,000 acres of derelict land in Scotland which are considered to justify treatment and that in Wales there is a total of 51,000 acres of derelict land of which some 27,000 acres are considered to justify treatment.

House Completions

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment what was the number of public sector houses completed in Scotland, Wales and each of the eight regions of England served by an economic planning council in the last year for which figures are available; and what were the figures for each of the last five years.

PUBLIC SECTOR DWELLINGS COMPLETED
196919701971197219731974 (first nine months)
Northern12,86610,94911,2018,1156,6466,648
Yorkshire and Humberside15,72513,41210,8439,7026,8286,428
East Midlands8,1828,6677,6207,4137,6046,259
East Anglia4,5623,9774,4333,9253,9423,174
South East50,97651,84447,31838,79133,30831,112
South West8,1417,1218,3475,9506,3214,748
West Midlands21,26817,38413,7228,0087,2457,086
North West21,07025,00320,36716,63314,36311,659
Wales7,9986,8255,9274,1353,3772,776
Scotland34,30234,94729,13020,15517,81811,711
These figures relate to the revised economic planning regions constituted on 1st April 1974.

Road Vehicles (Numbers)

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment whether the TRRL has revised its forecasts of vehicle numbers and use in the light of the higher fuel prices and lower population and growth forecasts now prevailing; and when he expects the results of such a revision to be published.

Wincanton Bypass

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment if he will report progress on the proposals to start construction on the A303 bypass at Wincanton.

Subject to the satisfactory completion of the statutory procedures for the acquisition of the land needed for the road, work should start in July this year.

EXPENDITURE BY LOCAL AUTHORITIES ON DERELICT LAND RECLAMATION (LAND ACQUISITION AND WORKS)
Region1968–69 £'000s1969–70 £'000s1970–71 £'000s1971–72 £'000s1972–73 £'000s1973–74 £'000s
(1)(2)(3)(4)(5)(6)(7)
Northern7361,1831,4072,5623,1753,750
North-West1532561,0021,9991,7272,640
Yorkshire and Humberside1121713185761,0231,105
West Midlands751262606667651,200
East Midlands3578328620649825
South-West5934675214953
South-East23811544931
East Anglia112151133
Total for England1,2041,8693,4686,6307,5509,607

Figures for the first nine months of 1974 and for the previous five years are given below:

Land Reclamation

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment what have been the total amounts of money spent on the clearance of derelict land in Scotland, Wales and each of the eight English regions served by an economic planning council for the last year for which figures are available; what were the figures for the preceding five years; and what is the estimated figure for the next three years.

The figures for England for 1973–74 and the five preceding years are set out below. Total expenditure for the current financial year is expected to be about £9 million. As stated by my right hon. Friend in answer to my hon. Friend the Member for Llanelli (Mr. Davies) on Friday 31st January—[Vol. 885, c. 348.]—the rate of reclamation is to be increased, but he is not yet in a position to give an estimate of the expenditure.

I understand from my right hon. Friends the Secretary of State for Scotland and my right hon. and learned Friend the Secretary of State for Wales that the figures for Scotland and Wales respectively are as follows:

Scotland

Local authority expenditure for 1973–74 and the previous five years:

Financial Year

Local authority expenditure

(1)(2)

£ million

1968–691·1
1969–700·8
1970–711·0
1971–720·9
1972–731·1
1973–742·0

It is estimated that expenditure in 1974–75 will be of the order of £2·2 million.

Wales

Local authority expenditure for 1974 and the previous five years:

Calendar Year

Expenditure

(1)(2)

£ million

19691·6
19701·8
19712·1
19722·5
19734·2
19742·4

It is estimated that expenditure in 1975 will be of the order of £3·2 million.

Following the recently announced proposals for the establishment of the Scottish

ACREAGE OF DERELICT LAND RESTORED IN ENGLAND 1967–72

Region

1967

1968

1969

1970

1971

1972

Northern3317046277621,5051,788
North-West1682884402885151,000
Yorkshire and Humberside230167205856477743
West Midlands4604937088241,093844
East Midlands119116193461555704
South-West101414212917990
South-East137171242282328107
East Anglia93133474314084
Total for England1,6392,1132,5043,6454,7925,360

I understand from my right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Scotland and my right hon. and learned Friend the Secretary of State for Wales that the figures for Scotland and Wales are as follows:

Acreages reclaimed in 1974 and the previous five years

Development Agency and the Welsh Development Agency the position is under review and my right hon. Friends are not yet able to estimate the future expenditure on increased programmes of derelict land reclamation under the new arrangements.

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment what is the total acreage of derelict land that has been reclaimed in Scotland, Wales and the eight English regions served by an economic planning council in the last year for which figures are available; what are the figures for the preceding five years; and what are the estimated figures for the next three years.

The figures for England for 1972 and five preceding years are set out below. Figures for 1973 and the first quarter of 1974 have been collected as part of the new 1974 survey. Detailed results, including regional figures, are not yet available, but it is estimated that some 6,400 acres were restored during the 15 months period 1st January 1973 to 31st March 1974, representing an annual rate of about 5,100 acres. Progress for the remainder of 1974 and the current year is expected to be of broadly the same order. As explained in the preceding answer, my right hon. Friend is not yet able to estimate the acreages to be reclaimed for the next three years.

Acreage reclaimed
Calendar yearScotlandWales
(1)(2)(3)
1969301802
1970329748
19717321,052
19724141,024
19736221,566
19741,028710

It is estimated that about 1,000 acres and 720 acres will be reclaimed in Scotland and Wales respectively in 1975.

For the reason given in the preceding answer my right hon. Friends are unable to forecast the future rate of reclamation progress but look forward to its being increased.

Road Accidents (Whalley-Clitheroe Bypass)

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment how many accidents involving loss of life or injury have occurred on the Whalley-Clitheroe bypass in the last year; and how that figure compares with the previous year and the national average for similar roads.

There were 10 accidents during the first 11 months of 1974 compared with 24 in the whole of 1973. The accident rate on this stretch of road over the three years 1971–73 was about two-thirds the average for all rural A roads in Great Britain.

Railways

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment if he will list those proposed rail closures which have been stopped since February 1974.

They are: Cambrian Coast (Machynlleth-Pwllheli); Kyle of Lochalsh-Inverness; Ashford-Hastings; Bedford-Bletchley; Wimbledon-West Croydon; Stockport-Stalybridge.

A320 (Mayford)

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment what is now the earliest date at which work on the next stage of improvement to the A320, Woking-Guildford road, at Mayford could begin.

This is in the first instance a matter for the Surrey County Council as highway authority.

Sports Facilities

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment if he will give an estimate of the upper, lower and average cost per annum of maintaining an association football, rugby union and hockey pitch by local authorities; if an estimate can also be made of the running cost of providing a pitch and shower bath facilities; and if he will make a statement.

Costs may vary widely according to circumstances, and such information is not recorded centrally.

Nationalised Industries (Borrowing)

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment if he will list the overseas borrowings of the nationalised industries for which he is responsible in each of the last 10 years, together with the value of their exports and the value of their imports of capital goods and services.

Overseas borrowings were as follows:

British Railways BoardNational Freight Corporation
£m.£m.
1965–70NilNil
197120Nil
19728Nil
197341·2
1974Nil5·5
Estimated values of exports by the British Railways Board were as follows:

£ millions
1965–6919701971197219731974
nil0·62·83·31·04·4
The other figures requested are not readily available.

Civil Service

Civil Servants (Posts In Scotland)

asked the Minister for the Civil Service (1) if he will publish in the Official Report details, by grade and Department, of the numbers of civil servants in the administrative, executive and clerical structure who are employed in offices outwith Scotland, but who have expressed a wish to serve in a Civil Service office in Scotland; and if he is satisfied that such figures are reliable as indicating the extent of the problem;(2) what efforts are being made to meet the wishes of those civil servants, employed outwith Scotland, who have expressed a wish to serve in Scotland;

(3) whether steps will be taken to ensure that vacancies in the administrative, executive and clerical grades arising in Government offices located in Scotland are filled not only by officers already in Scotland but by those serving outwith Scotland even though this might involve a change in the employing Department.

Departments are responsible for the management of their own staff and do what they can to meet the wishes of individuals for postings to particular locations, including Scotland. Given the total size of the Civil Service—there are over 250,000 staff in the administrative, executive and clerical structure alone—it is not practicable to set up standing arrangements for inter-departmental transfers for staff who wish to move to Scotland or to any other location, but there is machinery in my Department for arranging such moves in compassionate cases.There is no central record of the number of staff who have expressed a wish to move to Scotland.As a result of the decisions on the dispersal of Civil Service work from London taken last July some 7,000 posts will be dispersed to the Glasgow area. This will provide opportunity for civil servants engaged on the work being dispersed, or elsewhere within the Departments concerned or the Service as a whole, to volunteer for transfer to Scotland.

Public Appointments

asked the Minister for the Civil Service whether he will publish the list of people available for public appointments known as the book of the good and great; what are the criteria for being included on the list; whether political affiliations are taken into account; and whether applications for inclusion are acepted from anybody.

No. It is the responsibility of Ministers to satisfy themselves that the people they appoint to statutory bodies are ones best fitted for the job. In making such appointments they are not reliant on the existence of lists, but are, nevertheless, always glad to hear about, and taken note of, people whose qualifications and experience might equip them for such appointments. There are no set criteria, whether political or otherwise.

Defence

Royal Naval Hospital, Haslar

asked the Secretary of State for Defence whether the medical facilities at Royal Naval Hospital, Haslar, which permitted treatment to be given to 74 civilians on 4th February after an escape of ethylene oxide gas, are provided out of the Defence Estimates.

Yes. No charges are raised against the National Health Service, which, in turn, gives free treatment to Service patients.

Northern Ireland

asked the Secretary of State for Defence how many members of the security forces have been killed or injured on Duncairn Gardens since 1972 after the hours of darkness.

Since 1st January 1972 no Service men have been killed but eight have been injured on Duncairn Gardens between the hours of 6 p.m. and 6 a.m.

Ulster Defence Regiment

asked the Secretary of State for Defence in what areas of north Belfast the UDR is not permitted to patrol.

The UDR does not patrol in those areas of north Belfast where it might become involved in crowd control or riot duties. This restriction applies generally in Northern Ireland.

asked the Secretary of State for Defence, since July 1974, how many patrols and road stops the UDR has taken part in between Limestone Road and Clifton Street.

Records are not kept in a form which enables me to provide the information requested.

Employment

Unemployed Persons

asked the Secretary of State for Employment what is the level of unemployment in Scotland, Wales and each of the eight English regions which are served by regional economic planning councils to the latest available date; and what were the figures for each of the past five years.

The following table shows rates of unemployment for the

PERCENTAGE RATES OF UNEMPLOYMENT
JanuaryJanuaryJanuaryJanuaryJanuaryJanuary
1975*19741973197219711970
Scotland4·84·56·17·15·34·3
Wales4·73·84·65·54·24·3
South-East2·11·62·02·51·91·8
East Anglia2·92·02·53·62·92·2
South-West4·02·73·24·13·33·1
West Midlands2·72·13·03·92·31·9
East Midlands2·82·12·73·42·62·2
Yorkshire and Humberside3·32·83·84·63·32·9
North-West4·33·44·75·03·32·7
North5·24·65·96·95·25·0
* Figures based on a simplified counting procedure and for revised regions.

Catering Industry (Immigrants)

asked the Secretary of State for Employment whether all immigrants working in the catering industry are in possession of a valid work permit.

Several thousand permits are given each year to enable overseas workers to take jobs in the catering industry. There will also be many whose restrictions on employment have been removed, or in the case of Commonwealth workers were admitted for settlement before 1973, or in the case of EEC nationals do not require work permits.The Government are concerned about reports that people without work permits are being employed illegally in this industry. My right hon. Friend is looking into the matter in conjunction with the Home Secretary.

Filipinos

asked the Secretary of State for Employment what is the total number of Filipinos issued with work permits in the years 1968–74, indicated by sex and occupation.

standard regions for statistical purposes at January each year. The figures for January 1975 relate to revised standard regions which coincide with the economic planning regions. For earlier dates the figures are for the old standard regions which were broadly similar to the old economic planning regions. The unemployment statistics for January 1975 have been obtained using a simplified counting procedure, and the percentage rates for January 1975, which are quoted in the table, should be regarded only as approximate indicators.

Except for the year 1973 a detailed analysis of work permits issued is not available. The total number of permits issued to Filipinos for the years 1968–74 were as follows:

1968252
1969367
1970591
19711,205
19722,677
19732,691
1974991
(including 246 men)
In 1973 permits were issued to Filipinos as follows:

Domestic and hospital work1,524
Hotels and catering799
Nursing294
Entertainments44
Others30
Total2,691
A similar analysis for 1974 will be available shortly.

Training And Services Agencies (Scotland)

asked the Secretary of State for Employment how many members serve on each of the Manpower Services Commission, Training Services Agency and Employment Service Agency; and, of these, how many are resident in Scotland in each instance.

My right hon. Friend appoints a chairman and nine members to the Manpower Services Commission. One member is resident in Scotland. The Employment Service Agency and the Training Services Agency each consists of three members appointed by the commission. None is resident in Scotland.

Self-Employed Persons

asked the Secretary of State for Employment how many workers are self-employed.

In June 1973 the estimated number of self-employed persons, including those with employees, in Great Britain was 1,916,000.

Energy

Offshore Supplies Office

asked the Secretary of State for Energy (1) how many meetings audit engineers in the employment of the Offshore Supplies Office have had with Scottish industrial companies;(2) what contacts audit engineers in the employment of the Offshore Supplies Office have had with Scottish industry; and if he will state how many audit engineers are based in London and how many in Glasgow.

The audit engineers, together with other staff of the Offshore Supplies Office, have had numerous meetings with a very large number of British industrial and service companies, many of which are based in Scotland. Ten audit engineers are based in London and two in Glasgow.

Fuel Costs (Industrial Users)

asked the Secretary of State for Energy if he will up-date his answer given in the Official Report, 31st July 1974, column 354, in the light of present costs.

The following table sets out the latest information available in respect of coal, fuel oil and natural gas, It is regretted that it is not yet possible to provide more up-to-date figures for electricity than those shown in the answer given on 31st July 1974.

FUEL COSTS TO INDUSTRIAL USERS
p/therm
EnglandScotlandWales
Coal*5·5–6·46·3–6·86·6–6·7
Fuel Oil*9·5–10·59·5–10·59·5–10·5
Natural Gas†3·83·63·6
* Figures relate to end December 1974.
† Figures relate to the period April to September 1974

North Sea Gas

asked the Secretary of State for Energy what is the current extent of North Sea gas reserves; and what steps he is taking to conserve its use.

Recoverable reserves of gas from proven and probable discoveries were estimated, in the 1974 report to Parliament, as about 35 TCF (1012) cubic feet. My right hon. Friend will be publishing revised estimates in this year's report. Conservation strategy for gas is being formulated as progressively more information becomes available.

Conservation

asked the Secretary of State for Energy whether he will now take steps to establish an energy commission to co-ordinate the production, sale and use of energy in the United Kingdom and, in particular, to help avoid competition between energy industries aimed at increasing level of energy usage.

I am not convinced that an energy commission of this kind is needed. I shall be ready, however, to strengthen the resources available for advising me on energy matters if that becomes necessary.

Electricity Tariffs

asked the Secretary of State for Energy whether he will take steps to end the higher current electricity tariffs for those who choose to generate their own electricity and rely only on CEGB supplies as standby.

The total charges for energy actually supplied under a standby arrangement reflect not only the normal cost of providing electricity but also the cost of maintaining the additional plant needed to meet standby requirements. My right hon. Friend will, however, be discussing this matter with the industry.

Nationalised Industries (Borrowing)

asked the Secretary of State for Energy if he will list the overseas borrowings of the nationalised industries for which he is responsible in each of the last 10 years, together with the value of their exports for the same years and the value of their imports of capital goods and services.

The information is set out in the following table:

£m.*
1964–65
CoalIndustry GasElectricity
Overseas borrowing
ExportsN.A.
ImportsN.A.N.A.
£m.*
1965–66
CoalIndustry GasElectricity
Overseas borrowing
ExportsN.A.
ImportsN.A.N.A.
£m.*
1966–67
CoalIndustry GasElectricity
Overseas borrowing
Exports13·6
ImportsN.A.N.A.
£m.*
1967–68
CoalIndustry GasElectricity
Overseas borrowing
Exports10·8
ImportsN.A.N.A.
£m.*
1968–69
CoalIndustry GasElectricity
Overseas borrowing
Exports16·0
ImportsN.A.N.A.
£m.*
1969–70
CoalIndustry GasElectricity
Overseas borrowing32·121·1
Exports20·0
ImportsN.A.N.A.

£m*
1970–71

Coal

Industry Gas

Electricity

Overseas borrowing36·115·4
Exports20·0
ImportsN.A.N.A.

£m.*
1971–72

Coal

Industry Gas

Electricity

Overseas borrowing20·6
Exports16·00·2
ImportsN.A.N.A.

£m.*
1972–73

Coal

Industry Gas

Electricity

Overseas borrowing10·438·8
Exports20·00·9
ImportsN.A.½m.

£m.*
1973–74

Coal

Industry Gas

Electricity

Overseas borrowing26·6122·1566·1
Exports21·51·8
ImportsN.A.2·5

* Outturn prices.

N.A.=Not available.
— Nil or negligible.

Northern Ireland (Legal Aid)

asked the Attorney-General if he will provide for people of low income who are receiving benefit to be entitled to be represented free before a local tribunal or commissioner.

I have been asked to reply.My noble Friend the Lord Chancellor is at present engaged in a study of the most appropriate manner in which legal services may be extended in Great Britain. I shall review the position in Northern Ireland in the light of any recommendation which may be made to provide legal aid for representation before tribunals in the rest of the United Kingdom.

Education And Science

Nursery Education

asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science (1) what is the number of children in England in full or part-time nursery education; and if he will express this total per 100 children of nursery school age;

(2) what is the number of children in each local education authority in England in full or part-time nursery education; and if he will express each total in each authority area per 100 children of nursery school age.

JANUARY 1974—

Notes:

1. Full-time and part-time pupils in maintained nursery schools and in nursery classes in maintained primary schools.
2. Other under 5s full-time and part-time in maintained primary schools.
3. Percentages 1 and 2 of the estimated population (half of the 1–4 age group) as at 30th June 1973 (source: Registrar General's estimates).

(a)(b)(c)(d)

January 1974 Local Education Authority

Full-time and part-time pupils in nursery schools and in nursery classes in primary schools

Other under 5s full-time and part-time in primary schools

(a) as a percentage of half the age-group 1–4 (at 30th June 1973)(b) as a percentage of half the age-group 1–4 (at 30th June 1973)
ENGLAND—
Greater London:
Barking2011,1834·627·2
Barnet8372,28410·729·1
Bexley3051,1134·416·0
Brent4782,1265·926·2
Bromley1141,0761·312·4
Croydon4082,1283·920·6
Ealing1,1142,40812·927·8
Enfield5981,9188·025·6
Haringey1,2161,96817·828·7
Harrow4467457·712·8
Havering1141,6101·521·0
Hillingdon7311,64710·824·4
Hounslow6901,73611·428·7
Kingston-upon-Thames82369022·218·6
Merton79092217·220·0
Newham1,79970424·09·4
Redbridge808791·314·1
Richmond-upon-Thames2301,0885·525·9
Sutton4855510·21·2
Waltham Forest4098715·611·9
Total Outer London Boroughs11,86827,1518·920·3
Total ILEA14,8959,24222·814·2
Total Greater London26,76336,39313·418·3
Metropolitan Districts:
West Midlands:
Birmingham3,7495,91611·317·8
Coventry1,0103,5978·530·1
Dudley8491,1998·111·4
Sandwell1,4123,07813·629·6
Solihull971,9811·325·9
Walsall1,3892,14412·519·3
Wolverhampton1,0562,00611·521·9
Total9,56219,92110·221·2
Merseyside:
Knowsley3668494·710·9
Liverpool2,9324,69618·429·5
St. Helens1251,9641·828·9
Sefton1,1072,33111·023·1
Wirral8441,8997·5170
Total5,37411,73910·422·7

On the assumption that the number of children of nursery age in any given new local education authority area may be taken to be about one-half of the 1–4 age group the figures are as follows:

(a)(b)(c)(d)

January 1974 Local Education Authority

Full-time and part-time pupils in nursery schools and in nursery classes in primary schools

Other under 5s full-time and part-time in primary schools

(a) as a percentage of half the age-group 1–4 (at 30th June 1973)(b) as a percentage of half the age-group 1–4 (at 30th June 1973)
ENGLAND—
Greater Manchester:
Bolton1,6182,55418·429·0
Bury1701,2112·819·9
Manchester5,6872,61537·317·1
Oldham4282,2175·528·4
Rochdale1,2172,03116·928·2
Salford1,4442,29916·225·8
Stockport4472,3634·624·1
Tameside5531,5957·421·4
Trafford3191,6494·422·6
Wigan5623,3365·130·1
Total12,44521,87013·924·4
South Yorkshire:
Barnsley1,4281,44418·218·4
Doncaster1,8822,35920·025·1
Rotherham1,1251,98012·221·4
Sheffield2,2792,93513·217·0
Total6,7148,71815·319·9
West Yorkshire:
Bradford2,5392,76816·518·0
Calderdale6241,21710·220·0
Kirklees1,3621,78210·613·9
Leeds1,8724,7698·221·0
Wakefield1,3672,42513·123·3
Total7,76412,96111·519·2
Tyne and Wear:
Gateshead4771,7126·924·6
Newcastle upon Tyne9052,53111·231·4
North Tyneside5551,9518·931·2
South Tyneside4861,2319·624·4
Sunderland7693,1347·831·7
Total3,19210,5598·829·2
West Midlands9,56219,92110·221·2
Merseyside5,37411,73910·422·7
Greater Manchester12,44521,87013·924·4
South Yorkshire6,7148,71815·319·9
West Yorkshire7,76412,96111·519·2
Tyne and Wear3,19210,5598·829·2
Total Metropolitan Districts45,05185,76811·822·4
Non-Metropolitan Counties:
Isles of Scilly
Avon2,4524,5829·016·8
Bedfordshire9271,1025·26·2
Berkshire2,2302,57110·011·6
Buckinghamshire1,2872,5097·815·2
Cambridgeshire2,1743,43813·020·5
Cheshire1,5745,7285·218·8
Cleveland2,0674,81510·324·1
Cornwall462,4840·422·3
Cumbria8864,0486·328·6
Derbyshire2,0104,8187·317·5
Devon5713,3442·413·8
Dorset1982,5491·317·1

(a)(b)(c)(d)

January 1974 Local Education Authority

Full-time and part-time pupils in nursery schools and in nursery classes in primary schools

Other under 5s full-time and part-time in primary schools

(a) as a percentage of half the age-group 1–4 (at 30th June 1973)(b) as a percentage of half the age-group 1–4 (at 30th June 1973)
ENGLAND—
Durham2,0905,76911·431·4
East Sussex6653,0344·219·2
Essex1,3194,8002·810·3
Gloucestershire1463,0991·020·4
Hampshire7873,2171·76·8
Hereford and Worcester2882,8881·615·7
Hertfordshire4,1105,53214·118·9
Humberside1,6034,4545·716·0
Isle of Wight359041·333·5
Kent9924,9732·210·9
Lancashire4,2449,85110·524·3
Leicestershire4,6151,23817·04·6
Lincolnshire6332,7443·917·0
Norfolk7225,5983·829·6
North Yorkshire7642,1284·111·4
Northamptonshire8393,1195·018·5
Northumberland1562,7602·136·8
Nottinghamshire2,7053,8668·512·1
Oxfordshire1,3142,6438·016·2
Salop4681,1674·010·0
Somerset2442,7952·225·5
Staffordshire3,5714,54810·813·7
Suffolk6162,6833·515·1
Surrey1,4013,9165·114·1
Warwickshire6753,6614·122·5
West Sussex3441,9632·112·1
Wiltshire92,9650·117·0
Total Non-Metropolitan Counties51,777138,3036·116·2
Total England123,591260,4648·618·1

asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science how many nursery schools and classes will have been provided by the end of the 1976 financial year; and how many full-time places there will then be in England and Wales.

In January 1974 there were in England 523 maintained nursery schools and a further 1,997 nursery classes in maintained primary schools providing a total of 80,370 full-time equivalent nursery places. Nursery education building allocations for England for 1974–76 amount to £38·7 million. Local education authorities are responsible for deciding which projects would start within their allocations, and costs of individual projects vary. It is, therefore, not possible to say in advance how many schools, classes or places these resources will provide.

Nursery schools and classes in Wales are a matter for my right hon. and learned Friend the Secretary of State for Wales.

asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science what is his target for nursery education in the whole of the 3-to 5-year age group; and when he hopes that this will be achieved.

The Government's aim remains as stated by my right hon. Friend on 2nd April 1974:

"to make provision as soon as possible for nursery education for children of three and four years of age, mainly on a part-time basis".—[Vol. 871, c. 1077.]
It is not possible to give a firm date by which sufficient places will be available in all parts of the country. This will depend on any future changes in the birth rate and demand for nursery education as well as the available resources.

Edleston Road Junior School, Crewe

asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science when he expects a decision under Section 13(4) of the Education Act 1944 to be announced regarding the future of Edleston Road Junior School.

My right hon. Friend hopes to give a decision in the course of this month.

Children's Play Facilities

asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science (1) how many schools in England and Wales provide after-school care or play facilities for children from 5 to 11 years of age;(2) how many nursery or infant schools in England and Wales provide after-school care or play facilities for children from 3 to 5 years of age;(3) how many local education authorities in England and Wales run holiday play schemes or supervised adventure playgrounds during school holidays;(4) what information he has about the number of universities and colleges in England and Wales that provide playgroups or nursery classes for the children of students or staff, and the number of places there are;(5) how much financial help local education authorities in England and Wales give each year to support playgroups;(6) how many colleges of education and colleges of further education in England, and Wales training teachers or nurses run playgroups or nursery classes; and how many places these provide.

School Transport

asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science when he expects to complete his consideration of the outcome of the review of the question of school transport charges and related matters; and if he will make a statement.

I have nothing to add to the reply which I gave on 4th February to the Question from my hon. Friend the Member for Whitehaven (Dr. Cunningham).—[Vol. 885, c. 449.]

University Teachers' Pay

asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science what further proposals he has in mind with regard to the salary position of university teachers following upon the recommendations made by the Houghton Committee in respect of other teachers and the Government's action thereon.

A claim for an increase on the October 1974 salaries for university teachers has been submitted and will be considered by the negotiating committee on university academic salaries.

Eec Legislation

asked the Lord Advocate for what purposes his Department scrutinises EEC secondary legislation; if he will give details of this scrutiny; and if he will make a statement.

My Department does not undertake a systematic and comprehensive scrutiny of all EEC secondary legislation. My officials take part in the examination of proposals for such legislation where those proposals have legal implications which might affect the law of Scotland. Their purpose in doing so is to ensure that the special doctrines of Scots law and the requirements of the Scottish legal system are fully taken into account in the formulation of the policy of Her Majesty's Government towards such proposals.

asked the Lord Advocate whether, in all discussions with the EEC on law or constitutional matters, he will make it his practice to attend.

I am afraid that I cannot undertake to attend every discussion which takes place with the EEC on law or constitutional matters, although I would certainly wish to be present on occasions of major importance, such as the recent meeting of the Council and Conference of EEC Ministers of Justice. I can, however, assure the hon. Lady that I have made, and will continue to make, every effort to secure that in any such discussions the fullest account is taken of the separate nature of the law of Scotland, and that, where necessary, a person qualified in Scots law takes part as a representative of Her Majesty's Government.

House Of Commons

Photography

asked the Lord President of the Council who authorised the broadcasting and photography on 4th February of a Press conference held by a candidate for the leadership of the Conservative Party in a House of Commons Committee Room; and whether such authorisation was given by or under the authority of the House of Commons (Services) Committee.

The Serjeant at Arms' Office gave permission for an ITN cameraman to take photographs in Room 14 when it was empty. No application was received to take pictures of the proceedings in that room, and if one had been received it would have been turned down because it contravenes the regulations for photography agreed by the Services Committee.

National Finance

Credit Restrictions (Boat Building)

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer whether he will give urgent consideration to a review of the credit restrictions now operating in the small boat building industry.

The operation of the consumer credit controls generally is already being kept under review. There are no plans for making any changes at present.

Charities (Taxation)

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer what is the estimated annual cost to the Exchequer of tax concessions to registered charities.

I regret that there are no reliable estimates of the total cost of tax concessions to registered charities, including relief from income and corporation tax on income received gross and from capital gains tax. It is estimated, however, that for the year ended 30th September 1974 the cost of repayments of tax to charities and of transitional relief under Section 52 of the Finance Act 1973 was of the order of £70 million to £75 million. These Inland Revenue figures relate to charities as defined by Section 360 of the Income and Corporation Taxes Act 1970, which are not necessarily the same as registered charities. No account has been taken of relief from estate duty on the estates of those making qualifying charitable bequests. In addition it is estimated that the present annual cost of certain concessions to charities in respect of VAT and the Pool Betting Duty is about £2 million.

Capital Transfer Tax

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer whether he will now publish his proposed reduced scale of rates of capital transfer tax on lifetime gifts.

Yes. I propose that the scale should be as follows:

Slice of chargeable transfers-£000Rate on slice Percentage
0– 15
15– 205
20– 25
25– 3010
30– 4012½
40– 5015
50– 6017½
60– 8020
80– 10022½
100– 12027½
120– 15035
150– 20042½
200– 25050
250– 30055
300– 50060
500–1,00065
1,000–2,00070
2,000+75
Where a gift is made within three years of the death of the donor the tax charged will be increased to that appropriate to a transfer on death.

Northern Ireland

Legal Aid

asked the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland if he will take steps to have the recent English Acts relating to legal advice made applicable to Northern Ireland.

I propose to introduce an Order in Council to bring the legal advice scheme in Northern Ireland broadly into line with the provisions of the Legal Aid Act 1974, which apply in England and, of course, to Wales.

Architectural Heritage Year

asked the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland what is the result of his consideration of the ways in which the work of the Northern Ireland Committee of the European Architectural Heritage Year might appropriately be recognised.

Assassinations (Press Notices And Funerals)

asked the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland how many victims of assassinations in 1974 were described in newspaper death notices as members of the Provisional IRA; and how many were given IRA-type funerals.

As far as I have been able to ascertain, during 1974 there were no victims of assassinations described in newspaper death notices as members of the Provisional IRA and no IRA-type funerals of victims so described.

Departmental Correspondence

asked the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland when he expects to be able to write to the hon. Member for Belfast, North, as promised in his answer of 20th December (column 704).

Scotland

Croft Tenures

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland what representations he has received from political organisations about his proposals for reform of crofting tenure; which organisations, if any, oposed a scheme of owner-occupation; and what replies he has sent.

I have received no representations from any political organisation about my proposals for the reform of crofting tenure.

Child Adoption Orders

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland what was the number of adoption orders made by the Scottish courts in 1974.

Scottish Pre-School Playgroups Association

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland how much financial assistance he gave to the Scottish Pre-School Playgroups Association for 1974–75; and what is the estimated figure for assistance during 1975–76.

A grant of £16,500 was offered to the Scottish Pre-School Playgroups Association for 1974–75, but the final amount will depend on the actual expenditure of the association. My Department is in discussion with the association about the level of grant for 1975–76.

Playgroups

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland how many hospitals in Scotland run playgroups or nursery classes for children of their employees; and if he will list them in the Official Report.

Playgroups or nursery classes for children of their employees are run by the following hospitals in Scotland:

  • Gartnavel District General Hospital, Glasgow.
  • Belvidere Hospital, Glasgow.
  • Law Hospital, Carluke.
  • Ninewells Hospital, Dundee.
  • Ashludie Hospital, Monifieth, Angus.

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland how much financial help the education authorities in Scotland give each year to support playgroups.

Nursery Schools (Play Facilities)

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland how many nursery and infant schools provide after-school care or play facilities for children from three to five years of age.

I understand that about 50 nursery schools in Glasgow offer care for a short period after the end of the normal school day. I am not aware of any other instances in which nursery schools provide after-school care, but my information is not necessarily comprehensive.

Sports Facilities

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland if he will give an estimate of the upper, lower and average cost per annum of maintaining an association football, rugby union and hockey pitch by local authorities; if an estimate can also be made of the running cost of providing a pitch and shower bath facilities; and if he will make a statement.

GlasgowClydebank
££
(1) Total additional amount payable in period 1st October 1972 to 27th January 1975.18,611,200·001,142,900·00
(2) Total additional amount payable in period 1st October 1972 to 27th January 1975 by individual tenant.125·25125·25
(3) Total additional amount payable in period 1st October 1972 to 15th May 1975.21,475,600·001,322,000·00
(4) Total additional amount payable in period 1st October 1972 to 15th May 1975 by individual tenant.144·00144·00
NOTE: The above figures do not take account of the increases which would have been imposed on 1st October 1974 but were prevented by the freeze on rents.

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland how much additional rent has been paid by council tenants in Glasgow and Clydebank, respectively, in the period from 1st October 1972 until the present time; if he will give an estimate of the amount of additional

GlasgowClydebank
££
(1) Total additional amount payable in period 1st October 1972 to 27th January 1975.16,912,500·00988,600·00
(2) Total additional amount payable in period 1st October 1972 to 27th January 1975 by individual tenant.111·52104·92
(3) Total additional amount payable in period 1st October 1972 to 15th May 1975.20,372,700·001,219,400·00
(4)Total additional amount payable in period 1st October 1972 to 15th May 1975 by individual tenant134·77129·07

Social Services

Birth Induction

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services how she accounts for the increase in the proportion of induced births over the past five years.

Rents

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland what is the amount of additional rent payable by council tenants in Glasgow and Clydebank, respectively, in the period from 1st October 1972 until the present time and from 1st October 1972 until the end of the rent freeze in May 1975, respectively, attributable to a strict conformity with the timetable of the Housing Finance Act 1972; and if he will express these global figures in terms relating to an average.

The information on additional rent payable assuming conformity with the timetable imposed by the 1972 Act is calculated as follows:rent they will have paid from 1st October 1972 to the end of the freeze period in May 1975; and if he will express these global figures in terms relating to an average tenant.

This increase may have occurred because the greater availability of fetal monitoring equipment has improved the accuracy of determining when induction should be performed on clinical grounds and because induction is now undertaken more frequently for social reasons. My right hon. Friend shares the concern which has recently been expressed on some aspects of the growth in the use of this technique, and in her reply to the right hon. and learned Gentleman the Member for Surrey, East (Sir G. Howe) on 19th December 1974—[Vol. 883, c. 552–3.]—she referred to the surveys she has commissioned to provide more information about current practice.

Child Welfare

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services if she will take steps to ensure that full details of register systems for cases of children at risk are made available to the House of Commons before the Children Bill [Lords] is brought to the House.

This information is not in itself relevant to the Children Bill, but I will endeavour to have it available when the Bill reaches this House.

Wales

Sports Facilities

asked the Secretary of State for Wales if he will give an estimate of the upper, lower and average cost per annum of maintaining an association football, rugby union and hockey pitch by local authorities; if an estimate can also be made of the running cost of providing a pitch and shower bath facilities; and if he will make a statement.

Prices And Consumer Protection

Pyramid Selling

asked the Secretary of State for Prices and Consumer Protection if she will make a statement upon her investigations of the United Kingdom operation of a pyramid selling organisation, whose name has been supplied to her.

Inquiries which have been made by my Department about the organisation in question have revealed no contraventions of Part XI of the Fair Trading Act 1973.

Trade

Chemicals

asked the Secretary of State for Trade if he will list in tabular form the values and quantities of major classes of chemicals imported into and exported from the United Kingdom in each of the last five years.

For years 1970 to 1972 information by value and, where available, by quantity is published in Volume 1 of the appropriate Annual Statement of Overseas Trade and for years 1973 and 1974 in the respective December issues of the monthly Overseas Trade Statistics.

Furniture

asked the Secretary of State for Trade what is the total cost of office furniture imported into the United Kingdom during each of the past three years for which statistics are available.

Office furniture is not separately distinguished from other kinds of furniture in the Overseas Trade Statistics.

Travel And Holidays (Legislation)

asked the Secretary of State for Trade if he can now state when it is intended to introduce the promised legislation to give better protection to the public in respect of foreign holiday bookings; and whether it is his intention that the provisions should come into force well before the peak of the forthcoming summer holiday period.

The Air Travel Reserve Fund Bill was published yesterday. The Bill provides for the fund to be used to make payments to customers of air travel organisers in respect of losses or liabilities incurred in connection with an overseas air travel contract to be performed after 1st April 1974.

Airport Management (Customers' Representation)

asked the Secretary of State for Trade if he will nominate one or more members of the Civil Aviation Authority's Airline Users Committee to sit on the airport consultative committee at each of the British Airports Authority's airports.

Members of airport consultative committees at BAA airports are appointed by the authority, but I understand the BAA is reviewing the composition of the committees with a view to strengthening the existing consumer representation.

Nationalised Industries (Borrowing)

asked the Secretary of State for Trade if he will list the overseas borrowings of the nationalised industries for which he is responsible in each of the last 10 years, together with the value of their exports for the same years, and the value of their imports of capital goods and services.

The British Airports Authority was established in April 1966. It has undertaken no foreign borrowing. There were no imports of capital

£ million
1964–651965–661966–671967–681968–69
Overseas loans outstanding at 31st March each year (sterling equivalents)Not available16·228·6
Imports of capital equipment (aircraft and initial spares)5·05·04·010·812·8
£ million
1969–701970–711971–721972–731973–74
Overseas loans outstanding at 31st March each year (sterling equivalents)48·396·2123·0107·0112·6
Imports of capital equipment (aircraft and initial spares)12·768·660·511·530·9
Exports1971197219731974
Earnings overseas208·0267·0317·0382·0
less operating expenses overseas115·0144·0176·0230·0
Net balance of payments contribution93·0123·0141·0152·0

Agriculture, Fisheries And Food

Cattle Subsidies

asked the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food if he will extend the calf subsidy, for horned Hereford bulls born after 1st November 1974, which is available in England, Scotland and Wales, to Northern Ireland; and what are the reasons for this subsidy not hitherto being available.

I am considering whether there is a case for relaxing for certain classes of calves, including Hereford bulls, the requirement that when presented live only calves without horns may receive

goods and services until 1972–73. It is estimated that in each of that and the following year such imports amounted to about £1 million. Foreign currency earnings were as follows:

£ million
1966–671967–681968–691969–70
6·47·08·49·6
1970–711971–721972–731973–74
10·611·612·613·6

The British Airways Board was established in April 1972. For earlier years the information below relates to the former British Overseas Airways Corporation and British European Airways combined. Figures for overseas borrowing are only readily available from 1967–68 and in terms of the amount outstanding—that is, after repayments—at the end of each financial year. Export figures are available only from 1971 and in the form indicated. The information is:

calf subsidy in Northern Ireland. The requirement was introduced as an extension to the arrangements in Northern Ireland whereby, with very few exceptions, animals with horns cannot be offered for sale.

asked the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food whether the bulls for which subsidy has been refused in Northern Ireland will be eligible for subsidy to the English buyers when they purchase the same at the forthcoming sales in Balmoral, Belfast.

Yes, if the hon. Member is referring to the presentation in England, Wales, or Scotland of live bulls with horns for the calf subsidy and subject to the bulls meeting all the other conditions of the scheme.

Flood Prevention

asked the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food what, in cash terms, are the contributions to be made by frontagers towards flood prevention works in Kent and in Essex.

As I told my hon. Friend on 15th January, the amount of any contribution from frontagers is a matter for negotiation between the frontager and the appropriate water authority. I understand that few settlements have so far been reached.

Beer

asked the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food what representations he has received on the definition, composition and labelling of beer; and when he expects to receive the report of the Food Standards Committee on this matter.

The Food Standards Committee has received representations from 25 organisations and individuals. The committee is making good progress with its review. However, this is a complex subject, and it is too early as yet to forecast when I will receive the committee's report.

Foreign And Commonwealth Affairs

Cyprus

asked the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs if in his recent discussions with the United States Government he raised the matter of the Cyprus problem; and what assurances he was given about the United States rôle on this matter.

asked the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what discussions he has had with Dr. Kissinger in regard to his aim to reach a Cyprus settlement; and what further meetings are contemplated.

I would refer the hon. Members to the statement my right hon. Friend made in the House of Commons on Wednesday 5th February.—[Vol. 885, c. 1374–6.]

Ministerial Visits

asked the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what official visits were made by Ministers of Her Majesty's Government in his Department during 1974 to Iraq, Kuwait, Egypt, Saudi Arabia and Algeria.

The then Minister of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, Lord Balniel, paid an official visit to Kuwait from 20th to 23rd January 1974. There were no other visits by Foreign and Commonwealth Office Ministers to the States in question in 1974.

Industry

Nationalised Industries (Borrowing)

asked the Secretary of State for Industry if he will list the overseas borrowings of the nationalised industries for which he is responsible in each of the last 10 years, together with the value of their exports for the same years and the value of their imports of capital goods and services.

The information is as follows:

BRITISH STEEL CORPORATION (established 1967)
million)
March 1967/September 1968October 1968/September 1969September 1969/March 19701970–711971–721972–731973–741974–75 (to date)
Overseas Borrowing47215
Export Sales*193·8190·1106·2233·5264·9214·7225·6Not available
I regret that figures for imports are not readily available.
POST OFFICE
million)
1964–651965–661966–671967–681968–691969–701970–711971–721972–731973–741974–75 (to date)
Overseas Borrowing7·52·1212·6217·4
Imports †0·81·21·11·31·72·54·73·714·56·6Not available
ExportsNot available0·20·30·60·60·60·60·8Not available
* Excludes sales to overseas subsidiaries.
† Figures do not include adjustments between administrations in connection with normal international posts and telecommunications services.