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Criminal Damage

Volume 889: debated on Thursday 10 April 1975

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asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many convictions, on findings of guilt, for offences of criminal damage to property were recorded in England and Wales in each year from 1960 to 1974, inclusive; how many such convictions were recorded against young people between 14 and 21 years of age; and how many such findings of guilt were recorded against children between the ages of 10 and 14.

Figures for 1974 are not yet available. The figures given in the following table are not comparable over the whole period because of a change in the age of criminal responsibility from eight to 10 years on 1st February 1964, and because of changes in the definition of offences classified as criminal damage resulting from the Criminal Damage Act 1971:

PERSONS FOUND GUILTY OF OFFENCES CLASSIFIED AS MALICIOUS OR CRIMINAL DAMAGE: BY AGE, ENGLAND AND WALES, 1960–73
Persons found guilty
YearAll agesAged 8 and under 14Aged 14 and under 21
196016,9054,9626,789
196117,6244,7367,438
196218,5374,6107,962
196318,3663,5878,142
YearAll agesAged10 and under 14Aged14 and under 21
196417,3482,5528,168
196517,9492,6918,233
196617,2002,4857,727
196716,6972,1627,311
196818,0642,1868,099
196918,6621,9698,772
197020.7432,14810,023
197122,8792,05011,245
197225,5942,05812,387
197331,4172,47015,678

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what was the total cost of repairing damage caused by reported criminal damage-solved and unsolved-in England and Wales in each year from 1960 to 1974, inclusive.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether, in order to detect, prevent and deter the commission of offences of criminal damage by children and young persons, he will seek to ensure that all police forces have the necessary manpower and resources to ensure the level of regular foot patrols.

It is the responsibility of each chief officer of police to deploy his force to the best advantage. All chief officers are aware of the value of foot patrols and make appropriate provision for them in authorised establishments. It is the Government's policy to continue to strengthen the police by encouraging recruitment within these establishments.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether, in order to deter and prevent the commission of offences of criminal damage by children and young persons, he will introduce appropriate legislation to enable the courts to sentence offenders to corporal punishment in appropriate cases.