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Written Answers

Volume 889: debated on Thursday 10 April 1975

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Written Answers To Questions

Thursday 10th April 1975

European Community

Q5.

asked the Prime Minister if he has any plans to meet the Heads of the EEC Governments.

Q10.

asked the Prime Minister when he next expects to meet with the Heads of Government of the European Community.

I refer my hon. Friends to the reply which I gave to the hon. Member for Faversham (Mr. Moate) on 18th March.

Jamaican Prime Minister

Q6.

asked the Prime Minister whether he will make a statement on his talks with the Prime Minister of Jamaica.

Q7.

asked the Prime Minister whether he will make a statement on his talks with the Prime Minister of Jamaica.

Q9.

asked the Prime Minister whether he will make a statement on his talks with the Prime Minister of Jamaica.

I have had no recent meetings with Mr. Manley, but I will, of course, be seeing him at the end of this month when I go to Jamaica for the Commonwealth Heads of Government meeting.

Prime Minister (Visits)

Q8.

asked the Prime Minister if he will now pay an official visit to Merseyside.

I frequently visit Merseyside, most recently last weekend when I visited the Young Persons Housing Association at Eldon Grove, Liverpool, but I have no further plans for an official visit at present.

Q11.

asked the Prime Minister if he will make an official visit to Canning Town

Q19.

Q20.

I refer my hon. Friend to the reply which I gave to the hon. Member for Banbury (Mr. Marten) on 20th March.

Prime Minister (Speech)

Q12.

asked the Prime Minister if he will place in the Library a copy of his public speech in Cardiff City Hall on unemployment on 15th March.

Q14.

asked the Prime Minister if he will place in the Library a copy of his public speech made in Cardiff on 15th March concerning economic affairs.

Q18.

asked the Prime Minister whether he will place in the Library a copy of his public speech in Cardiff on 15th March about unemployment.

I refer the hon. Members to the reply which I gave to the hon. Member for Mid-Sussex (Mr. Renton) on 8th April.

Prime Minister(Engagements)

Q13.

asked the Prime Minister if he will list his official engagements during the Easter Recess.

I refer the hon. Member to the reply which I gave to my hon. Friend the Member for Newcastle-upon-Tyne, East (Mr. Thomas) on 8th April.

Cabinet Ministers

Q15.

asked the Prime Minister whether he will now outline the methods by which the agreement to differ within the Cabinet over the EEC will be implemented.

Q16.

asked the Prime Minister whether he will now outline the methods by which the agreement to differ within the Cabinet over the EEC will be implemented.

I refer the hon. Members to the reply which I gave to my hon. Friend the Member for Kings-wood (Mr. Walker) on 7th April.

Inflation (Minister'sspeech)

Q17.

asked the Prime Minister whether the public speech of the Lord President of the Council on inflation at Blackpool on 15th March represents Government policy.

I refer the hon. Member to the reply which I gave to the hon. Member for Tonbridge and Mailing (Mr. Stanley) on 8th April.

European Communitymembership (Referendum)

Q21.

asked the Prime Minister if he will now make a ministerial television broadcast on the Government's position in the forthcoming referendum.

I refer the hon. Member to the reply which I gave to the hon. Member for Roxburgh, Selkirk and Peebles (Mr. Steel) on 20th March.

European Communitymembership (Referendum)

30.

asked the Lord President of the Council whether, in the light of public discussion since the publication of the White Paper, he plans to make any changes to the proposals in the White Paper concerning Government information activity relating to the EEC referendum.

I would refer my hon. Friend to the answer my right hon. Friend the Prime Minister gave to the hon. Member for Christchurch and Lymington (Mr. Adley) on 8th April.

Home Department

Police Interrogations (Oral Statements)

19.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if his attention has been called to observations of Lord Justice Lawton in Regina v Turner and Others that something must be done, as quickly as possible, to make evidence about oral statements to the police difficult to challenge or to concoct; and if he will expedite the work of the feasibility study into this problem.

The steering committee which my right hon. Friend has appointed to consider the feasibility of an experiment in tape recording police interrogations is about to begin its work. We shall draw Lord Justice Lawton's remarks to the committee's attention.

Marijuana

20.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what investigations he is sponsoring into the long-term effect of smoking marijuana.

None. The Advisory Council on the Misuse of Drugs is, however, keeping under review the international research being carried out into this matter.

Civil Defence (Nuclear Attack)

21.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will outline the provisions made for shelters in a nuclear attack.

Adequate protection against initial blast effects close to an explosion is not practicable. In more peripheral areas the main shelter against radioactive fall-out would be in the home.

Vandalism (Penalties)

22.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if, in view of the increasing acts of vandalism throughout the United Kingdom, he will introduce measures designed to direct those convicted to do work of restoration and reclamation.

My right hon. Friend has no plans for new legislation of this kind but I would remind my hon. Friend of the existing provisions in England and Wales on community service orders and the payment of compensation. The courts may also defer passing sentence to enable them to have regard, in determining sentence, to an offender's conduct after conviction, including any reparation he makes for his offence.

Police (Civilian Personnel)

23.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many civilian personnel were employed by the police authorities in England and Wales on 1st April 1974 and at the latest available date, respectively.

On 31st March 1974 there were 36,139 police civilians, and on 28th February 1975 there were 39,571.

Hitler Birthday Celebration

24.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether he will refuse entry to Great Britain of guests of the Nazi organisation "Column 88" in connection with the celebration of Hitler's birthday to be held in Bolney, Sussex, details of which have been sent to him.

If passengers are detected at the ports who seek entry for purposes connected with any extremist organisation in Great Britain, they are closely examined and, where appropriate, refused leave to enter.

Winchester Prison

25.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will make a statement on the situation in Winchester Prison.

Differences of opinion on local matters between the governor and staff have been dealt with by the governor through the normal processes.

Mrshelepin (Visit)

26.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will give details in the Official Report of the total cost and the numbers of police concerned on security duty in connection with the visit to Great Britain of Mr. Alexander Shelepin; what discussions took place with the TUC on the security aspect of the visit; and what advice he gave them.

Up to about 500 police officers were employed at any one time on all duties in connection with the visit. It would involve considerable work to estimate the additional cost to which the deployment of officers who would not otherwise have been on duty gave rise. The police discussed the details of the programme with representatives of the TUC in London and Glasgow. I had no contact with the TUC on this matter.

Open Prisons

27.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he has any plans to increase the number of open prisons in the United Kingdom; and if he will make a statement.

My right hon. Friend has no present plans to do so but will, of course, keep the position under review in the light of changing circumstances.

Vietnamese Children

28.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether he is aware that babies are being deprived of their right, laid down by the United Nations, to be brought up in the country of their citizenship, Vietnam; and whether, after their health and safety have been assured, he will take steps to ensure that none are adopted without the consent of both Vietnamese Governments.

It is not our intention to frustrate any humanitarian initiatives by the exercise of immigration control but children have been admitted to this country from South Vietnam only when sponsored by a reputable voluntary organisation which was prepared to take full responsibility for their care, maintenance and future upbringing. Any future applications for entry will be judged by the same criteria. Any question of adoption in this country will be a matter for the courts, and my hon. Friend will be aware of the safeguards built into the adoption procedure.

Community Service Orders

29.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department when he expects to be able to provide facilities in the West Midlands for the enforcement of orders by the courts for community services under the Criminal Justice Act 1972.

It is for each probation and after-care committee to decide, in the light of available resources and subject to the approval of the Secretary of State, when to introduce arrangements for community service. I understand that the West Midlands Probation and After-Care Committee does not yet feel able to propose a date for the introduction of these arrangements in its area.

Mr Shelepin (Visit)

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) how many police were allocated to guard Alexander Shelepin and his party during their recent visit to Great Britain; and at what cost to the public;(2) what he estimates the total cost to the British taxpayer was of the visit of Alexander Shelepin and his party to Great Britain.

I would refer my hon. and learned Friend to the answer I gave this afternoon in reply to a Question by my hon. Friend the Member for Basildon (Mr. Moonman).

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether licences for the carrying of guns were issued to Russian bodyguards of Alexander Shelepin and his party; and if so by whom.

I explained the practice of chief officers of police in my reply to a Question by my hon. and learned Friend on 20th March—[Vol. 888, Cols. 534–5]— but it would not be in the interests of security to publish specific information about particular cases.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department when were visas, valid for the 30th March, issued to Alexander Shelepin and his party.

Visas were issued in Moscow on 21st March and were valid for use from that date.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what was the cost of providing police escorts to Mr. Shelepin during his recent visit.

Police escorts, as such, were not provided during the visit. On the cost incurred by the police in connection with the visit I would refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave this afternoon in reply to a Question by my hon. Friend the Member for Basildon (Mr. Moonman).

Police (Complaints)

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department when he expects to introduce the new procedures for reviewing complaints against the police.

I would refer my hon. Friend to the answer which I gave to a Question by my hon. Friend the Member for Bethnal Green and Bow (Mr. Mikardo) on 6th March.—[Vol. 887, c. 1754–5.]

Accused Persons (Extradition)

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many alleged criminals have been extradited from the Irish Republic to stand trial in the United Kingdom for crimes of violence in each year since 1965, respectively; and how many alleged offenders have been extradited from the United Kingdom to the Irish Republic in such cases for the same periods.

I regret that the full information requested is not available. The issue or execution of warrants in the United Kingdom under the Backing of Warrants (Republic of Ireland) Act 1965 is a matter for the police and the courts in the separate parts of the United Kingdom.

Prison Rules

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department why money sent to prisoners is dealt with under Rule 42(2)c, and not credited to the prisoner.

Rule 42(2)c is invoked only where the sender of money to a convicted prisoner cannot be identified and the circumstances cast sufficient doubt on the genuineness of the transaction to justify withholding the money from the prisoner.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department how much money in the last year for which figures are available has been paid into an account to be applied for the benefit of discharged prisoners under Rule 42(2)(c).

£484 in the year ended 31st March 1975, which may include some amounts under Rule 42(3)(c) and (4)(c).

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many adult and juvenile prisoners, respectively, sleep or are confined in cells or rooms in which the Secretary of State has given leave under Rule 23(2) that the number may exceed the maximum laid down by the inspector.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will amend Prison Rules 26(2) and (3) in order to eliminate sex discrimination and to ensure that men's hair is not cut without their consent.

This is not a matter which we have under consideration at the moment.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department on how many occasions, in the last year for which figures are available, he has required a charge under Prison Rule 51(5) to be referred to him; on how many of those occasions he found the charge proved; and what punishment he determined.

Once, in 1974. The officer in the Home Office who inquired into the charge found the offence proved and awarded 28 days' forfeiture of remission.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) if he will amend the Prison Rules to allow prisoners to have the right to be legally represented when charged under the provisions of Rule 51;(2) if he considers it appropriate for a prisoner charged under Rule 49 to be represented especially in cases where the governor enforces Rule 50(

e) and 50( g).

I would refer my hon. Friend to the reply I gave to a similar Question from him yesterday—[Vol. 889, c. 417.]

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department why he considers it necessary under Prison Rule 33(3) for every letter or communication to or from a prisoner to be read or examined by the governor or an officer deputed by him.

I would refer my hon. Friend to Rule 3 of the Prison (Amendment) Rules 1974. An experimental relaxation of censorship is now in operation in several open establishments.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department on how many occasions, in the last year for which figures are available, has he remitted or mitigated a disciplinary award, respectively, under Prison Rule 56.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will explain what constitutes "objectionable" and "inordinate length" under Prison Rule 33(3); and if he is satisfied that the governor should so decide.

The words have to be considered in the light of the need to maintain good order and discipline, prevent crime and assist the sound administration of prisons. These are matters of which the governor will have first-hand knowledge.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will list in the Official Report the abuses of which he has been informed by visiting commitees or boards of visitors under Prison Rule 94(4) for the last year for which figures are available.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will list in the Official Report the reports that he has received from visitors' committees and boards of visitors under Prison Rule 94(3) in the last year for which figures are available.

I would refer my hon. Friend to the reply which I gave to a similar Question from him yesterday.—[Vol. 889, c. 418]

Prison Act 1952

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many painful tests have been carried out on prisoners under Section 17 of the Prison Act 1952 in the last year for which figures are available.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department to what extent he is able to fulfil the obligation laid down in Section 14(1) of the Prison Act 1952 that in every prison sufficient accommodation is provided for all prisoners.

The distribution of the prison population between prison service establishments is kept under constant review. Although existing establishments can at present accommodate all inmates received into custody it is necessary for about 15,000 to sleep two or three in a single cell, and the restrictions of accommodation, other than sleeping accommodation, affect the regimes of many establishments, especially local prisons.

Criminal Damage

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many convictions, on findings of guilt, for offences of criminal damage to property were recorded in England and Wales in each year from 1960 to 1974, inclusive; how many such convictions were recorded against young people between 14 and 21 years of age; and how many such findings of guilt were recorded against children between the ages of 10 and 14.

Figures for 1974 are not yet available. The figures given in the following table are not comparable over the whole period because of a change in the age of criminal responsibility from eight to 10 years on 1st February 1964, and because of changes in the definition of offences classified as criminal damage resulting from the Criminal Damage Act 1971:

PERSONS FOUND GUILTY OF OFFENCES CLASSIFIED AS MALICIOUS OR CRIMINAL DAMAGE: BY AGE, ENGLAND AND WALES, 1960–73
Persons found guilty
YearAll agesAged 8 and under 14Aged 14 and under 21
196016,9054,9626,789
196117,6244,7367,438
196218,5374,6107,962
196318,3663,5878,142
YearAll agesAged10 and under 14Aged14 and under 21
196417,3482,5528,168
196517,9492,6918,233
196617,2002,4857,727
196716,6972,1627,311
196818,0642,1868,099
196918,6621,9698,772
197020.7432,14810,023
197122,8792,05011,245
197225,5942,05812,387
197331,4172,47015,678

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what was the total cost of repairing damage caused by reported criminal damage-solved and unsolved-in England and Wales in each year from 1960 to 1974, inclusive.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether, in order to detect, prevent and deter the commission of offences of criminal damage by children and young persons, he will seek to ensure that all police forces have the necessary manpower and resources to ensure the level of regular foot patrols.

It is the responsibility of each chief officer of police to deploy his force to the best advantage. All chief officers are aware of the value of foot patrols and make appropriate provision for them in authorised establishments. It is the Government's policy to continue to strengthen the police by encouraging recruitment within these establishments.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether, in order to deter and prevent the commission of offences of criminal damage by children and young persons, he will introduce appropriate legislation to enable the courts to sentence offenders to corporal punishment in appropriate cases.

Ice (Pensions)

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will introduce a scheme to extend the provisions for the payment of a policeman's pension to his widow for three months following his death to all those whose service ceased before 1st April 1972 and whose wives are still living.

No. We do not think it would be possible to single out for retrospective application a provision which was one of a number of improvements made in public service pension schemes in 1972. The cost of the retrospective application of the improvements as a whole would be considerable and, as is usual, they applied only to officers serving at the time.

Ward Boundaries

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether it is the policy of his Department to ensure that ward boundaries for administrative county councils and for district councils are co-related the one with the other; and if he will make a statement for the guidance of local authorities.

The rules to be observed in considering electoral arrangements for counties are contained in Schedule 11 to the Local Government Act 1972. In considering these arrangements, the Local Government Boundary Commissions for England and Wales—and subsequently the Secretary of State—must have regard to the boundaries of the wards of the districts in the relevant county. This is, however, only one of the factors that they must take into account and is subject to the other provisions contained in Rule 1 of Schedule 11 to the Act of 1972.

Post Office (Casual Employment)

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what police information is given to the Post Office about applicants for casual employment at Christmas.

No information is given to anyone, however responsible, unless there are strong considerations of public interest which justify departure from this general rule. But the Post Office has a special problem, in that once a year a large number of casual staff has to be recruited over a very short period, and there is insufficient time to follow the usual course of taking up references before offering employment. These staffs have access both to the mails and to the working procedures of the Post Office, and, after careful consideration I am satisfied that in the interest of security they need to be screened. I am therefore asking chief officers of police to co-operate with local postmasters in checking the previous convictions, if any, of applicants for these posts. The decision whether to offer employment will continue to rest with the Post Office. As at present an applicant will be asked to disclose on the application form details of any previous convictions and will be left in no doubt that a check may be made.

Defence

Raf Director-General Of Personnelmanagement (House)

asked the Secretary of State for Defence what is the cost of the repairs to the house allocated to the Director of Personnel RAF Innsworth.

The repairs and modifications necessary to the house that has been purchased for the holder of the post of Director-General of Personnel Management at RAF Innsworth have not been completed yet, but their final cost is estimated to be £6,500. They include structural repairs, electrical rewiring, conversion from oil-fired to gas-fired central heating, painting and redecorating.

Vulcan Bombers

asked the Secretary of State for Defence whether the Vulcan bombers recently withdrawn to Great Britain from Cyprus are to be committed to NATO; and what are the reasons for the decision.

The Vulcan bombers withdrawn from Cyprus are being committed to NATO in keeping with the Government's intention that the alliance should have first call on the resources available for defence.

Canberra Aircraft

asked the Secretary of State for Defence what is the approximate average age of the additional Canberra aircraft recently earmarked to SACLANTCINCHAN; and what was their role before being so earmarked.

The additional Canberra aircraft which are being earmarked to SACLANT are about 20 years old and are currently used for miscellaneous training and support tasks. They will continue in those rôles until assigned to NATO command in a period of tension.

Cyprus

asked the Secretary of State for Defence how many major Army units are now in Cyprus; and, of these, how many are attached to the United Nations forces.

There are at present three major Army units serving in Cyprus, of which an armoured reconnaissance regiment less one squadron is attached to the United Nations forces. A Royal Marine commando is also attached to the United Nations forces in the infantry rôle.

asked the Secretary of State for Defence what is the reason for the accommodation problems that have arisen within the sovereign base areas in Cyprus which are referred to in paragraph 40 of the statement on the Defence Estimates; and when he expects the shortage to be eased.

The accommodation problems are those to which my hon. Friend the Minister of State for Defence referred in his speech on the 17th December—[Vol. 883, c. 1285]. They arose, as a result of last summer's emergency, from the need to accommodate within the sovereign base areas the considerable number of Service men who had formerly been housed with their families in dormitory areas outside and from the need also to accommodate larger forces on the island. The shortage of single accommodation has already eased considerably and the situation will further improve as a result of the force reductions referred to in Chapter 1, paragraph 40, of the Defence White Paper (Cmnd. 5976). A shortage of married quarters is likely to persist.

Army (Living Quarters)

asked the Secretary of State for Defence what proportion of the Army's living quarters consists of hutted accommodation.

Nato (Secondments Of Personnel)

asked the Secretary of State for Defence what is the policy of Her Majesty's Government in regard to secondments of personnel between the British Forces and the forces of other NATO countries.

The policy of Her Majesty's Government is to strengthen ties between the British Forces and the forces of other NATO countries wherever this is possible, and one way of doing this is through exchanges of personnel.

asked the Secretary of State for Defence if he will list the number of secondments of personnel which have taken place between the British Forces and the forces of other NATO countries in the last 12 months, indicating the duration of the secondments in each case.

In the last 12 months 325 exchange posts were in operation between the British Forces and forces of other NATO countries. These were filled on a reciprocal basis as follows:

CountryNo. of Exchanges
USA201
Canada92
France8
FRG11
Netherlands8
Italy3
Norway2
With the exception of two posts between the United Kingdom and the Netherlands which are for one year, the normal period of exchange in each post is two years.

Social Services

Vietnamese Children

31.

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services if she will list the statutory provisions and regulations governing the adoption of Vietnamese children; and if she will make a statement.

The entry of the child to the United Kingdom is governed by the Immigration Rules for Control on Entry laid before Parliament on 25th January 1973 under Section 3(2) of the Immigration Act 1971.Once the child is in this country, the normal adoption law applies, that is, the Adoption Act 1958 and, in England and Wales, the following rules and regulations made under that Act:The Adoption (High Court) Rules 1971 (SI 1971, No. 1520).The Adoption (County Court) Rules 1959 (SI 1959, No. 480).The Adoption (Juvenile Court) Rules 1959 (SI 1959, No. 504).The Adoption Agencies Regulations 1959 (SI 1959, No. 639).Similar rules and regulations apply in Scotland.

National Health Service Staff(Grades)

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services whether she will now specify the scales to which it is intended to assimilate the special grades covered by the administrative and clerical section of the Whitley Council within the reorganised National Health Service.

Negotiations on this matter are not yet completed but I shall send the hon. Member details as soon as an agreement has been reached by the Whitley Council.

National Insurance Contributions

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services whether she will extend the period in which application for deferment of payment of class 4, and class 2, national insurance contributions may be made.

Yes. I propose to exercise the power given in the Contributions Regulations to allow applications made after 6th April to be considered, in view of circumstances attendant upon the launching of the new arrangements. Applications should be made as quickly as possible, however, so that, where necessary, action can be taken by my Department and the Inland Revenue to defer liability for payment of Class 2 and Class 4 contributions for 1975–76.

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services what reports she has received on the non-availability of form CF 359 (Application for Deferment of Payment of Class 4 (and Class 2) Contributions) at local offices; and whether she will make a statement.

The initial distribution of these forms to our local offices and to local tax offices was made in September 1974. On 17th March 1975 we first learned of shortages in a few areas, which appeared to have arisen from a sudden upsurge in demand. Immediate steps were taken to provide further supplies and the form should now again be available at all our local offices, as well as at local tax offices.

Old People

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services in how many local authority areas there is no local register of those most at risk amongst the elderly; and whether she will now take steps designed to see that all local authorities will compile such a register as soon as possible.

Health and social services authorities are well aware of the need to identify old people at risk but they are not required to compile formal registers of such people. I do not intend to introduce such a requirement, as I consider that the resources needed for the introduction and maintenance of registers are better used in providing services for old people.

Migraine

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services what estimate she has of time lost from work by migraine sufferers in each of the past five years; and what costs were incurred in benefits payments in England and Wales.

Information is not available in the precise form requested, but the following table gives the number of days of certified incapacity for work due to migraine, notified in connection with claims to sickness and invalidity benefits, in England and Wales in the

Thousands and £ thousands
EnglandWalesEngland and Wales
Statistical year endedNumber of daysCost of benefitsNumber of daysCost of benefitsNumber of daysCost of benefits
31st May 19693884104548433458
31st May 19703924384247433485
5th June 1971*3734443541408485
3rd June19723524752736379511
2nd June 19723535373451387588
* 53 weeks.

European Community

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services (1) what progress has been made towards reaching an agreement with the Italian Government to enable all United Kingdom citizens not covered by existing EEC regulations to obtain medical care whilst visiting Italy:(2) what progress has been made towards reaching an agreement with the West German Government to enable all United Kingdom citizens not covered by existing EEC regulations to obtain medical care whilst visiting West Germany;(3) what progress has been made towards reaching an agreement with the Government of Holland to enable all United Kingdom citizens not covered by existing EEC regulations to obtain medical care whilst in Holland;(4) what progress has been made towards reaching agreement with the French Government to enable all United Kingdom citizens not covered by existing FEC regulations to obtain medical cafe whilst visiting France;(5) what progress has been made towards reaching agreement with the Belgian Government to enable all United Kingdom citizens not covered by existing EEC regulations to obtain medical care whilst in Belgium;(6) what progress has been made towards reaching agreement with the Government of Luxembourg to enable all United Kingdom citizens not covered by existing EEC regulations to obtain medical care whilst visiting Luxembourg;(7) whether it is the policy of Her Majesty's Government to seek amendment of existing EEC regulations governing medical treatment for nationals of member States travelling within the Community so as to include self-employed persons within the scope of general pro-

latest available five-year period, and the estimated corresponding benefit costs:

tection; what steps have been taken to notify the appropriate organs of the Community of such a policy; and what steps it is proposed to take to bring about an early appropriate amendment of the material regulations.

United Kingdom citizens not covered by the existing EEC regulations can already obtain medical care whilst visiting Denmark under a bilateral agreement made before the United Kingdom acceded to the EEC. Similar provision will shortly extend to the Federal Republic of Germany under a bilateral agreement signed last year and due to be ratified soon. It was stressed at the meeting of the Council of Ministers (Social Affairs) in Luxembourg on 10th June 1974 that Her Majesty's Government attach great importance to the early extension of social security and health provisions to persons moving between member States who are not already covered by existing EEC arrangements. Discussions to this end are already proceeding within the Community.

Dental Patients

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services whether she is aware that certain National Health dental patients have to wait some six to eight months for caps which their dentists have prescribed for them; and what steps is she taking to reduce the period of delay.

Dentists are required by their terms of service to complete a course of general dental service treatment within six months of the date of acceptance of the patient or, where the Dental Estimates Board's prior approval is required, within six months of the date on which approval is received. The time limit does not apply where delay is due to failure by the patient to attend for treatment.

If the hon. Member can supply me with specific information about delays I may be able to provide a fuller reply.

Disabled Persons (Resettlement)

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services whether she will issue a circular to all hospital consultants, doctors, matrons and nursing sisters employed by the National Health Service, drawing their attention to the need to notify the Department of Employment's local disablement resettlement officer of the names and addresses of all patients who might require his assistance.

Such a circular would be inappropriate since the point at which a patient should be referred to a disablement resettlement officer is a matter for the judgment of the consultant concerned. Both my Department and that of my right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Employment recognise the need to provide facilities whereby this referral may be made as soon as possible during treatment, and pilot schemes are in operation to determine the best methods of achieving this.

Cigarette Manfacturing Industry

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services if she will make a statement on recent discussions with the cigarette manufacturing industry.

On 17th July 1974 I made a number of detailed proposals to the industry with a view to securing its voluntary agreement to new measures designed to bring home to the public the very serious dangers to health of cigarette smoking. The industry reported its response to me at a meeting in February and there have been further meetings since then.First, I proposed that the tobacco industry should voluntarily contribute a sizeable percentage of its total expenditure on promotion towards public education about the danger to health of smoking.The industry does not reveal its promotional expenditure, but in 1974–75 we estimate that expenditure on Press, poster and cinema advertising in the United Kingdom was about £15½ million, on sponsorship between £2 million-£4 million and the value of gift coupons over £50 million, which is, of course, reflected in the price of the cigarettes. The total figure for promotion in 1974–75 was probably therefore around £70 million; health education expenditure at national level on smoking in the United Kingdom was only £330,000. The industry, I regret, decided to reject the proposal for a voluntary contribution.My second proposal was that the advertising of cigarettes in cinemas be abolished. The industry offered in February to withdraw advertisements from "U" films, but as these represent only a small proportion of films and children may see "A" and "AA" films I have asked the industry at the minimum to extend its withdrawal to these films also.My third proposal was that tighter control be exercised over the way in which sponsored events were used by cigarette manufacturers to promote their products. In particular, I asked that names of brands of cigarettes should not be given to sponsored events or shown on racing cars, since this circumvented the ban on television advertising. I regret that the industry is not yet ready to agree to stop using brand names in this way.My fourth proposal was for a speedy conclusion to the discussions that have been going on for some time on the showing on cigarette advertisements and packets of the tar yield of the brand. Since July, agreement has been reached on showing tar yields on Press and poster advertisements within five broad groups ranging from "Low" to "High", but no progress has been made on the inclusion of the tar group on packets.My fifth proposal related to the health warning and was that the position on the packets should be changed and put on the flap so that it would be seen more easily and that the wording of the health warning on packets and advertisements should also be changed. The industry said in February that a change in the wording would not be difficult if the amount of wording was the same but to change the position of the warning would mean a redesign of the whole packet and this would be a major, lengthy and expensive operation. I accepted that if we could reach agreement on a new position it should last for at least five years but as there had been no change since 1971 I felt that to change the position of the wording in 1976 was quite reasonable On 3rd March I wrote to the industry asking for agreement that from the earliest possible date both cigarette advertisements and packets should carry the same messsage as will be carried in future on the Department's posters and leaflets about tar and nicotine yields of brands of cigarettes. This message will be:DANGER: CIGARETTES CAUSE LUNG


CANCER, BRONCHITIS, HEART DISEASE.

I accepted that the industry would want the revised warning initially to be carried in the same space in cigarette advertisements and packets as the current warnings, but so far it has not agreed to this.

My sixth proposal was that gift coupons should be abolished or limited to brands with "Low" or "Low to Middle" tar yields; the proposal was rejected.

It is a matter of great regret to me and, I think, to all who are concerned about the real dangers to health which come from smoking, which currently accounts for at least 50.000 premature deaths a year, that the industry was not able to agree to any of the above proposals.

The industry has agreed that Press advertising of free samples should end and that control over the code of practice for the advertising of cigarettes should be taken out of its hands and exercised by the Advertising Standards Authority; the code of practice has also been clarified.

Th Africa

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services whether she will endeavour to obtain reciprocal agreements with South Africa which would ensure that Britons drawing the national insurance retirement pension in that country receive the benefit of any increase in that pension made after they left Great Britain.

No negotiations are planned at present.South Africa has a State pensions scheme of a type which does not lend itself to reciprocity with the United Kingdom.

Employment

European Social Fund (Loans)

asked the Secretary of State for Employment what grants and loans have been approved for the South-West area from the European Social Fund since 1st January 1973.

Grants from the European Social Fund are not made specifically for particular areas of England. Some of our allocations are for the whole of Great Britain and a breakdown between regions is not readily available. The South-West area shares in the benefits from grants made in respect of national schemes of training, rehabilitation and resettlement.The larger allocations are in respect of the development areas and a certain number of intermediate areas. The largest allocation since 1st January 1973 has been for the Training Opportunities Schemes; at a rough estimate about £750,000 of this was for the South-West area.

Retail Prices Index

asked the Secretary of State for Employment what would the retail prices index have been for February 1975 if the basis for calculation had remained the same as for January 1975.

The figure is not available. Only one retail prices index is calculated for each month, on a basis which incorporates the latest weights established at the beginning of each year together with, for this year, the additional changes in weighting and indicators which the Retail Prices Index Advisory Committee recommended should be used as from the beginning of this year.

Northern Region

asked the Secretary of State for Employment what proposals he has for training in the Northern Region to meet the demand for skills expected to accrue as a result of the development of North Sea oil and gas.

I am informed by the Manpower Services Commission of the following arrangements to meet the demands for skills arising from North Sea developments. The Engineering Industry Training Board has been given funds by the Training Services Agency for special training centres to be set up. These will provide training in mechanical and electrical engineering construction skills and one of the first of these centres will be on Teesside.The Shipbuilding Industry Training Board will receive financial support from the Training Services Agency to introduce special grant schemes as an encouragement to employers to provide more training opportunities in key skills which are common to shipbuilding and oil related activities. Shipbuilders and ship repairers in the North Eastern Region are expected to benefit substantially from these arrangements.The Training Services Agency provides training courses under the Training Opportunities Scheme in those skills which cover welding, pipe-fitting, plating, electrical work and scaffolding at six skill-centres in the North Eastern Region.The Training Services Agency has set up a national committee to look into the co-ordination needed to meet requirements in the engineering, shipbuilding and engineering construction industries resulting from the North Sea Oil programme. There will be a North East Regional Committee and sub-regional committees for Tyneside-Wearside and Teesside.

Industrial Areas (Hazards)

asked the Secretary of State for Employment how many major hazard sites there are in (a) the United Kingdom, (b) in Wales, being considered by the committee of experts set up after the Flixborough explosion; and how many of these sites (a) in the United Kingdom and (b) in Wales are large liquefied petroleum gas installations.

I am informed by the Chairman of the Health and Safety Commission that the Committee of Experts on Major Hazards was set up to provide the commission with general policy guidelines and it will not be expected to carry out detailed consideration of individual sites.I am also informed that precise information about the total number of large-scale storages of liquefied petroleum gas is not available, since not all such storages were subject to the legislation enforced in the past by the several inspectorates now incorporated in the Health and Safety Executive. The numbers of

factory premises (

a) in Great Britain and ( b) in Wales where storage of 100 tons or more of liquefied petroleum gas takes place are 184 and 23, respectively.

Health And Safety

asked the Secretary of State for Employment whether he will exercise his powers under the Health and Safety at Work, etc. Act to provide a code of practice to apply in cases where employees fail or refuse to use protective clothing or to comply with safety rules designed for their own protection or for the protection of their fellows.

The Health and Safety at Work, etc. Act 1974 came into effect on 1st April 1975 and Section 7 imposes statutory duties on employees to take reasonable care for the health and safety of themselves and other persons who may be affected by their acts or omissions at work, and to co-operate with their employers to enable any duties or requirements of the relevant statutory provisions to be complied with.The Health and Safety Commission has not yet considered whether a code of practice would be appropriate or useful.

asked the Secretary of State for Employment whether he will now exercise his powers under the Health and Safety at Work, etc. Act, to extend the protection of that Act to offshore engineering work, outside British territorial waters.

pursuant to his reply [Official Report, 27th March 1975; Vol. 889, col. 285], gave the following information:The question of the application of the Health and Safety at Work, etc. Act 1974 to offshore workers outside British territorial waters is at present under urgent study.

Asbestos

asked the Secretary of State for Employment when he expects to receive the final report of the advisory panel on problems arising from the use of asbestos; and what interim reports have been published.

pursuant to his reply [Official Report, 27th March 1975; Vol. 889, col. 286], gave the following information:The advisory panel on problems arising from the use of asbestos reported in January 1968. No further report by the panel was planned.Arising out of the recommendations of the panel a prospective study of asbestos workers was set up and a register of cases of mesothelioma was compiled. Details of progress in the design and execution of the asbestos study were presented in a series of occasional papers issued by the Employment Medical Advisory Service in 1973 and in the annual reports of Her Majesty's Chief Inspector of Factories for 1970 and 1971. Progress reports on the mesothelioma study appeared in the annual reports of Her Majesty's Chief Inspector of Factories for 1968, 1969, 1970 and 1971, and further details were published in the British Journal of Industrial Medicine (1974) and in a conference report of the International Agency for Research on Cancer (1973).

Public Appointments

asked the Secretary of State for Employment if he will name those appointed by his Department to the Health and Safety Commission, the Manpower Services Commission, Remploy Limited, the Royal Commission on the Distribution of Income and Wealth, the Industrial Arbitration Board, industrial tribunals, and the Office of the Umpire.

As the reply is rather long I shall write to my hon. Friend as soon as possible.

Industrial Rehabilitation

asked the Secretary of State for Employment if he will publish the locations of all existing and planned in-industrial rehabilitation units in England and Wales.

I am informed by the Manpower Services Commission that the location of existing employment rehabilitation centres—formerly known as industrial rehabilitation units—in England and Wales is as follows:

Billingham.Leicester.
Birmingham.Liverpool.
Bristol.Long Eaton.
Cardiff.Manchester.
Coventry.Perivale.
Egham.Plymouth.
Felling.Portsmouth.
Garston Manor, near Watford.Port Talbot
Sheffield.
Hull.Stoke-on-Trent.
Killingworth.Waddon, near
Leeds.Croydon.

For the future, firm plans have been made by the Employment Service Agency for a large centre at Preston to provide up-to-date facilities, including residential accommodation, to serve the northern half of the country. A proposal for a new centre to provide facilities for East London will be given early priority when a suitable site is found. Speculative provision has been made for possible future development of smaller centres closely linked with medical rehabilitation services, but no decisions have yet been made on the organisation or location of any such developments.

asked the Secretary of State for Employment what plans he has to set up an industrial rehabilitation unit in the Bournemouth area.

The plans of the Employment Service Agency approved by the Manpower Services Commission do not include setting up an employment rehabilitation centre in the Bournemouth area.The agency is in consultation with the Department of Health and Social Security about a number of possible locations in the country for any future developments in the form of smaller centres closely linked with medical rehabilitation services, but no decisions have yet been made about the organisation or location of any such developments.The Employment Service Agency is aware of representations which have been made for provision of facilities in the Bournemouth area and will bear them in mind.

Environment

Construction Industry (Northernregion)

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment if he will make proposals to stimulate employment in the construction industry in the Northern Region in view of persistent unemployment in the building trades.

The Government have taken a number of measures to assist the construction industry. In particular, various initiatives on private sector house-building were announced on 27th January.

I shall continue to keep a close watch on the position, but it has to be considered in the context of the overall economic situation.

Council Housing Subsidies (Cornwall)

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment if he will publish in the Official Report the value of grants or loans given to local authorities in Cornwall for the purpose of improving existing council housing for the years 1970 to 1974 and the estimate for the next financial year.

The totals of allowable costs approved for subsidy purposes in respect of improvements to council-owned dwellings in Cornwall were as follows:

£
197062,463
1971192,808
1972675,855
19731,012,435
1974675,759
No comparable estimate can be given for 1975–76.

Vehicle Overloading

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment if he will publish in the Official Report the number of heavy vehicles entering Great Britain through the Channel ports that were checked for overloading and the number of those checked which were actually overloaded.

The number of heavy goods vehicles entering Great Britain through the Channel ports which were checked by my Department's Traffic Examiners for overloading in the calendar years 1973 and 1974 was as follows:

Number of vehicles checkedFound overloaded and prohibited
19732,614446
19745,028586
The above figures do not include weight checks carried out by the county councils consumer protection officers or the police.

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment if he will introduce legislation to ensure that all heavy vehicles entering Great Britain are checked for overloading at the port of entry.

Powers already exist under the Road Traffic (Foreign Vehicles) Act 1972 and the Road Traffic Act 1974 to check weigh heavy goods vehicles entering Great Britain at the port of entry. I am satisfied that the existing legislation is sufficient.

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment what is the total number of staff employed in or around the Channel ports to check the loading of heavy vehicles entering Great Britain.

The total number of my Department's traffic examiners employed, at present, on enforcement duties in or around the Channel ports is 13. In addition, consumer protection officers of the county councils concerned and the police also carried out weighing checks on heavy goods vehicles entering Great Britain. The number of staff involved in this case is not known to me.

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment what evidence he has of the extent of overloading of heavy vehicles owned and operated by British hauliers.

The evidence regarding the extent of overloading is supplied by the figures given below which are in respect of gross overloads, for the calendar years 1972–1974 inclusive:

Total checkedOverloaded(Gross)
197224,4191,315
197328,5381,698
197426,4682,348

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment how many hauliers, British and foreign, were prosecuted in the last three years because of overloading; and what was the average fine.

Under the provisions of the Road Traffic (Foreign Vehicles) Act 1972 the Department's Traffic Examiners prohibit—not prosecute—overloaded foreign goods vehicles until the excess weight has been removed. This is a worthwhile deterrent in that the delay caused means that the vehicle is standing idle and out of action until offloading has been carried out.

As regards British vehicles, the numbers prosecuted and average fines over the last three years is:

Prosecutions

Average fine£

19722,33316·28
19732,46927·52
19741,69331·55

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment what evidence he has regarding the extent to which overloaded lorries arc entering Great Britain through the Channel ports.

The evidence regarding the extent of overloaded lorries entering the country through the Channel ports is shown by the fact that my Department's traffic examiners checked about 50 per cent. more in 1974 than in 1973 and the proportion meriting prohibition dropped from some 17 per cent. to 11 per cent.

Notices To Quit (Housing Regulations)

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment what regulations have been made under Section 123 of the Housing Act 1974 prescribing the content of notices to quit.

No regulations have as yet been made under Section 123 of the Housing Act 1974.

Rates

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment how many rate increases have so far been reported to him; and whether the Greater London Council increase in rate of 80 per cent. is the largest percentage increase in England and Wales.

381 of the 403 rating authorities have now reported their general rates, and all 54 upper-tier authorities their precepts for 1975–76. The highest percentage increase compared with 1974–75 is 79 per cent. This figure relates to the precept of the Greater London Council, and does not include the Inner London Education Authority precept.

Motor Vehicles (Parking On Pavements)

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment what plans he has to make an order under Section 7 of the Road Traffic Act 1974 to prohibit parking on pavements.

The Department is consulting the local authority associations over the commencement date for this provision.

Ex-Service Men (Housing)

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment when he expects to issue his new guidance circular to local authorities about the provision of council houses for ex-Service men.

Soon, now that the Department has received the last comments from the organisations consulted.

Railways

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment whether he will make a statement about his future plans for the size of the rail network.

My right hon. Friend has no plans for substantial changes in the size of the network.

askedthe Secretary of State for the Environment what is the value of investment proposals submitted for his formal approval by British Rail for Scottish Region with regard to rolling stock, motive power, PW and structures, freight, passenger facilities, and signalling, respectively, for the present financial year and the two previous financial years.

Government control over British Rail's capital investment programme is not exercised on a regional basis. The information is not, therefore, available.

Water Authorities (Expenditure)

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment (1) if he will publish a table to show, in respect of each of the regional water authorities, the total sums spent during the year 1974–75 and estimated to be required for 1975–76 in order to service past capital expenditure;(2) if he will publish a table to show, in respect of each of the regional water authorities, the total sums spent during the year 1974-75 and estimated to be required for 1975–76 in respect of current operating costs.

The table below shows, for each water authority, the total sums spent during the year 1974–75 and estimated to be required for 1975–76 in respect of current operating costs; and

1974–751975–76
Water AuthorityOperating costsCost of servicing capital expenditure incurred up to and including 1973–74Operating costsCost of servicing capital expenditure incurred up to and including 1974–75
(1)(2)(3)(4)(5)
£000£000£000£000
North-West50,33340,32969,16653,082
Northumbrian11,84710,49817,39112,417
Severn Trent51,46445,55077,09061,110
Yorkshire33,06122,66244,31534,752
Anglian31,33938,23740,59949,610
Thames86,96042,312104,90557,195
Southern29,36914,50339,06420,278
Wessex11,54211,97316,17913,813
South-West10,1359,73113,49014,994
WNWDA31,98517,30344,15826,877

Water Charges

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment (1) if he will seek to amend the Water Act 1973 so as to ensure that representatives of the district councils are able to participate in the processes whereby the regional water authorities determine their general service charges;(2) if he will seek to amend the Water Act 1973 so as to ensure that representatives of the administrative county councils are able to participate in the processes whereby the regional water authorities determine their general service charges.

The Water Act 1973 already provides for members appointed by local authorities to be in a majority on water authorities.

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment if he will introduce appropriate legislation to apply the rate support grant system to relieve individual ratepayers of part of the cost of water rates.

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment if he will introduce appropriate legislation transferring the cost of servicing all present capital expenditure presently the responsibility of

the total sums spent during the year 1974–75 and estimated to be required for 1975–76 in order to service past capital expenditure.

the various regional water authorities to the Exchequer.

There is nothing I can add to my answer of 27th March in reply to the hon. Member for Caernarvon (Mr. Wigley).—[Vol. 889, c. 257–8.]

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment whether, in view of the Government's having requested the various regional water authorities to allow only 9 per cent. for inflation during the past year when fixing their charges for 1974–75, he will take appropriate action to make available to each regional water authority the amount needed to make up any deficit thereby incurred.

I am not aware of any such request to regional water authorities. My right hon. Friend has no plans to increase public expenditure by introducing subsidies to water authorities.

Housing Finance

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment what arrangements have been made in the course of the current review of housing finance to draw upon experience available outside Government.

I have invited leading figures in fields which are relevant to the work of the review to sit on an advisory group, which will meet periodically under my chairmanship to consider progress and to comment on the work of the review. I am grateful to the following for agreeing to serve on the group in a personal capacity:Mr. J. R. Coward, director of the Notting Hill Housing Trust;Prof. J. B. Cullingworth, director of the Planning Exchange, Glasgow;Cllr. K. Gould, chairman of the Housing Committee, Leeds City Council;Mr. M. Harloe, Centre for Environmental StudiesCllr. Mrs. P. L. Hollis, chairman of the Housing Committee, Norwich City Council;Mr. F. Layfield, QC, chairman of the Committee of Inquiry into Local Government Finance;Cllr. J. A. D. Mills, chairman of the Housing Committee, London borough of Camden;Miss A. A. Nevitt, Reader in Social Administration, London School of Economics;Mr. J. R. L. Potter, Chairman of the Halifax Building Society;Cllr, D. J. Seligman, Chairman of the Planning and Development Committee, Cardiff City Council;Mr. H. G. Simpson, OBE, Controller of Housing, Greater London Council;Mr. P. Trench, CBE, chairman of Y. J Lovell (Holdings) Ltd.;Mr. R. K. Wilkinson, senior lecturer, Division of Economic Studies, Sheffield University.Other arrangements may be made as the review proceeds for consultation outside Government on specific aspects of housing finance policy.

Airedale Route

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment, when he intends to publish revised proposals for the Airedale route.

Forestry (Capital Transfer Tax)

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment if he will mount a publicity campaign designed to offset the effect of the capital transfer tax on forestry planting which has fallen by 30 million trees.

I have been asked to reply.No. The relief given in Schedule 9 to the Finance Act 1975 is designed to encourage private woodland owners to maintain an adequate level of planting.

Education And Science

Circular 7/73

asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science whether he will announce his conclusions in respect of the proposals submitted by Humberside Local Education Authority in response to Circular 7/73.

I am anxious to reach a decision on this important matter and will do so as soon as the views of all the interested parties have been received and considered.

Energy

Oil Production Platforms

asked the Secretary of State for Energy how many modules for production platforms have been ordered in 1972, 1973 and 1974; and of these how many have been ordered from locations in Scotland, England, Wales, Northern Ireland and abroad.

The information requested is set out below:

(a) MODULES ORDERED FOR PRODUCTION PLAT FORMS ON THE UNITED KINGDOM CONTINENTAL SHELF
Year
197219731974
Place of manufacture
Scotland41536
England151733
Wales001
Northern Ireland000
Abroad*2861
* Not available.
(b) MODULES ORDERED IN THE UNITED KINGDOM FOR PRODUCTION PLATFORMS OUTSIDE THE UNITED KINGDOM CONTINENTAL SHELF
Year
197219731974
Place of manufacture
Scotland0013
England0115
Wales004
Northern Ireland000

North Sea Oil

asked the Secretary of State for Energy whether the rules of the EEC permit Great Britain to make North Sea oil available to industrial and domestic consumers in Great Britain at more advantageous terms and prices than to industrial and domestic consumers in other member States of the EEC.

It is the intention of the Government that North Sea oil should be disposed of at market prices. Differential pricing would involve a significant departure from Government policy. To the extent that it would distort competition it would also be inconsistent with the Treaty of Rome.

Prices And Consumerprotection

Foodstuffs (Sales)

asked the Secretary of State for Prices and Consumer Protection if she will list the items of foodstuffs which at present are required to be sold in prescribed imperial quantities; and what will be the effect of the United Kingdom's obligations under the EEC on the existing legislation on this matter.

The foodstuffs at present required to be sold in prescribed imperial quantities appear in Schedule 4 to the Weights and Measures Act 1963. Under the units of measurement directive we can retain imperial units of measure-

New TownChairmandate of Ffirst appointmentSalary (excluding Threshold Supplement)
East Kilbride and StonehouseLord Wallace of Campsie20th January1969£4,340 (not accepted)
GlenrothesMr. R. R. Taylor12th November 1964£4,340
CumbernauldSir Donald Liddle1st October 1971£4,340
LivingstonMr. B. D. Misselbrook1st October 1972£4,340
IrvineSir Wm. S. Gray1st October 1974£4,340
Chairmen are expected to devote an average two days per week to corporation business, which includes corporation and committee meetings.

Devolution

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland how many senior officials in the Scottish Office are now employed on work connected with the Government's devolution policy.

I refer to the replies which I gave the hon. Member for Clackmannan and East Stirlingshire (Mr. Reid) on 18th November 1974 and 29th January 1975—[Vol. 881, Col. 333; Vol. 885, col. 195]—when I explained that a number of senior officials in the Scottish Office under the direction of the Permanent Under Secretary of State are concerned with aspects of devolution, the work being co-ordinated through a special administrative division. Arrangements have now additionally been made for an Under Secretary to work full-time on devolution matters.

ment until 31st December 1979, and, where there are special reasons, for even longer. By April 1978 we will need to permit packs designated in metric quantities to be marketed, though we retain the right to require an imperial marking in addition.

Scotland

New Town Corporations (Chairmen)

ask the Secretary of State for Scotland if he will publish the names of chairmen of new town corporations, give the date of appointment and salaries, and show the attendance record of each in respect of full board and committee meetings.

Apart from attendance records, which are not collected centrally, the information requested is set out in the Table below:

Lorry Drivers (Hours Of Work)

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland what representations he has had from the Freight Transport Association about the effect on transport costs in Scotland of the Common Market regulation on drivers' hours which comes into effect on 1st January 1976; and if he will make a statement.

In common with other Scottish Members of Parliament, I have received representations from the Scottish Region of the Freight Transport Association about the effect on Scottish industry of EEC Regulation 543/69 which, among other things, refers to drivers' hours and which, if this country stays in the European Community, will come into effect on 1st January 1976.Road freight matters are primarily the responsibility of my right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for the Environment, and I understand that a copy of the association's submission has been sent to the Minister for Transport.

General Practitioners

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland how many Scottish general practitioners have emigrated from Scotland in each year since 1963; and how many general practitioners have immigrated into Scotland during this period.

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland what is the average salary for a general practitioner in (a) Scotland, (b) England and Wales and (c)the United Kingdom respectively.

Information in this form is not readily available. I shall write to the hon. Member.

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland what is the ratio of general practitioners to population for (a) the cities of Glasgow, Aberdeen, Dundee and Edinburgh and (b) Scotland as a whole.

At 1st October 1974 the ratio of principals in general practice to population was as follows:

Glasgow1:1,802
Aberdeen1:1,814
Dundee1:1,928
Edinburgh1:1,778
Scotland1:1,902

National Finance

Corporation Tax

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer what was the amount of corporation tax collected from companies located in each county of Wales and in Wales as a whole for the last available year.

Corporation tax is assessed on a company at the address of its registered office, which may not be its head office or main place of business. The figures below do not, therefore, necessarily reflect tax yields on the income of all companies from operations either in Wales as a whole or in individual counties. On this basis corporation tax collected in counties in Wales in 1973–74 was:

CT(£ million)
Clwyd1·9
Dyfed1·2
Mid Glam2·3
South Glam8·1
West Glam3·4
Gwent3·4
Gwynedd0·5
Wales20·8
The figure for Clwyd may include a small amount of tax due from companies whose registered offices are not in Wales.

Development Land

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer if, on the basis of current arrangements for the taxation of land development gains, he will estimate the tax to be forgone following the implementation of the Community Land Bill proposals in Wales.

Public Appointments

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer if he will name those appointed by his Department to the National Economic Development Office, the Review Board for Government Contracts and the Advisory Panel appointed under Section 482, Income and Corporation Taxes Act 1970.

National Economic Development Office

Sir Ronald McIntosh (Director General).

Review Board for Government Contracts

Sir William Slimmings.

Viscount Caldecote.

Mr. B. S. Eckersley.

Sir St. John Elstub.

Lord Robcrthall.

Advisory Panel (Section 482 Income and Corporation Taxes Act 1970)

Mr. A. H. Carnwath.

Sir Arthur Driver.

Mr. H. H. Monroe QC.

Foreign Borrowing

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer what is his estimate of the net foreign borrowing in the past financial year.

I assume that the hon. Member is referring to foreign currency borrowing for domestic purposes by the public sector and Her Majesty's Government. This totalled some $4,710 million in 1974–75, including the $2.5 billion loan from the clearing banks.Details of the capital account of the balance of payments, including sterling inflows, for the last three quarters of 1974 are given in the March edition of "Economic Trends" to be published within the next week.

Republic Of Ireland (Currency)

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer what is his latest estimate of the amount of Irish currency circulating in Northern Ireland, and Great Britain, respectively; what policy governs its acceptance; and what is his estimate of its effect on monetary stability.

Republic of Ireland notes and coin circulate freely in Northern Ireland but hardly at all in Great Britain. They are not legal tender in the United Kingdom but may be exchanged through banks or by those who choose to accept them. United Kingdom currency also circulates in the Republic and I do not consider this two-way traffic a threat to monetary stability.

Estate Duty (Mcneil Whistler Drawing)

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer whether the acceptance in lieu of estate duty of a harbour scene in coloured chalks by J. McNeil Whistler at a cost of £600, on the ground that it is pre-eminent for aesthetic merit or historical value, means that it is the decision of the Treasury that the drawing in cuestion had qualified for such acceptance under Section 34(1) of the Finance Act 1956.

Mr. Joel Barnett