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Prisoners

Volume 931: debated on Saturday 5 March 1977

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asked the Secretary of State for Scotland how many men and women, respectively, are now held in Scottish prisons.

On 19th April 1977 there were 2,959 men and 100 women held in Scottish prisons. Men are defined as males aged 21 or over and women are defined as females aged 21 or over.

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland what is the average daily number of convicted men and women, respectively, in prison in Scotland.

In 1976 the estimated average daily numbers of convicted men and women in prison in Scotland are 2,590 and 70 respectively. This includes an average of 22 men and four women remanded in custody after conviction awaiting sentence.

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland how many adult prisoners are serving sentences of 12 months or less; how many up to four years, four to 10 years, over 10 years and life, respectively.

Statistics in the form requested are not available, but the following table gives the average daily population of prisoners by length of sentence during 1976.Average daily population of adult prisoners by length of sentence:

SentenceNumber
Less than 18 months1,457
18 months and over but less than 4 years410
4 years and over but less than 10 years450
10 years and over94
Life imprisonment224
Adults are defined as persons aged 21 and over.

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland what tests are carried out on reception at Scottish prisons to determine whether there is addiction to hard or soft drugs.

The normal medical examination on reception, supplemented if necessary by laboratory tests, will reveal any such addiction to drugs.

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland if he will list the projects built by inmate labour in Scottish prisons in 1976.

Inmates were engaged during 1976 on the redevelopment of Polmont Borstal.

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland (1) how many prisoners in Scottish prisons were employed in sewing mail bags by hand in 1976;(2) which industries are now carried out in Scottish prisons by men and women prisoners, respectively.

In 1976 no prisoners were employed in the manufacture of new mail bags by hand. On average 110 prisoners were employed in hand repairing of mail bags and a further 34 in hand sewing of certain parts of new mail bags. This is work that is more satisfactorily carried out by hand than by machine.

The following industries are carried out in Scottish prisons by men and women prisoners:

Men

  • Clothing manufacture
  • Textiles other than clothing
  • Manufacture of concrete products
  • Electronic assembly
  • General woodwork
  • Manufacture of wooden furniture
  • Manufacture of products from glass reinforced plastics
  • Laundry work
  • Leatherwear manufacture
  • Manufacture of luggage
  • Metal fabrication Printing and bookbinding
  • Manufacture of upholstered products
  • Horticultural work

Women

  • Clothing manufacture
  • Laundry
  • Horticultural products.

asked the Seretary of State for Scotland what vocational training courses are available to men and women prisoners, respectively, in Scottish prisons who are serving sentences of 12 months or more; and where these are carried out.

For male adult prisoners serving sentences of 12 months and more vocational training courses in painting and decorating and in skilled labouring are available at Barlinnie, Edinburgh, Perth and Peterhead Prisons. Female prisoners do not receive formal vocational training courses, but at Cornton Vale Institution there is training in dressmaking, catering, textiles and office work.

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland how many guardians are now available to the prison service in Scotland.

None. Following the implementation of the Social Work (Scotland) Act 1968 local authority social work departments have assumed responsibility for persons in their area who, on release from any form of detention, require to be under supervision.

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland in which prisons the Training For Freedom scheme operates; and how many prisoners are involved.

The scheme operates at Aberdeen, Edinburgh and Perth Prisons. On 30th April 1977, 15 prisoners were involved.

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland in how many Scottish prisons is slopping out still done.

Slopping out is still necessary in 18 penal establishments in Scotland.