Skip to main content

Mobility Allowance

Volume 931: debated on Monday 9 May 1977

The text on this page has been created from Hansard archive content, it may contain typographical errors.

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services if he will reconsider the decision which makes it impossible for an invalid who has opted to have a tricycle since 1st January 1976 to receive the no-age-limit mobility allowance.

No. Those who have claimed, under the new arrangements in operation from January 1976, whether claiming a tricycle or a mobility allowance, have done so subject to and in full knowledge of the upper age-limit laid down for mobility allowance. They are in a quite different position, therefore, from those with reserved rights under the old scheme. It would be inconsistent and unfair to remove the upper age-limit for tricycle optants alone; and removing it generally would be prohibitively expensive.

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services if he will now amend paragraph 3(1)(b) of the Mobility Allowance Regulations SI 1975 No. 1573 to include all persons who are advised by their doctor that they must not walk; and if he will make a statement.

Mobility allowance is payable to anyone who is within the prescribed age-limits and who is unable or virtually unable to walk because of physical disablement; who is likely to remain so for at least a year; and who can benefit from the allowance. Regulation 3(1)(b) of the Mobility Allowance Regulations provides that a person shall be treated as unable or virtually unable to walk if the exertion required to walk would constitute a danger to his life or would be likely to lead to a serious deterioration in his health. If the age and duration conditions are satisfied, then any person who is not allowed to walk, because the medical advice is that the exertion required to do so would constitute a danger to his life, or would be likely to lead to a serious deterioration in his health, is likely to qualify without any amendment of the regulations. If my hon. Friend has a particular case or point in mind, however, I shall be glad to have it considered and to write to him.