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Written Answers

Volume 951: debated on Friday 9 June 1978

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Written Answers To Questions

Friday 9th June 1978

Employment

Central Arbitration Committee

asked the Secretary of State for Employment how many cases have been heard by the Central Arbitration Committee under Schedule 11 to the Employment Protection Act 1974 by the latest date for which information is available; how many such claims were in respect of terms and conditions below those recognised and how many on the basis that such terms and conditions were

(a) SCHEDULE 11
NumberClaims established wholly or in part NumberPercentage of total awards
Total number of awards264*19273
Of which:
Recognised terms and conditions594718
General level of terms and conditions20114555
* Includes three questions of jurisdiction and one award under Part II of the schedule relating solely to Wages Council industries.
(b) FAIR WAGES RESOLUTION
Total number of awards17715286
Of which:
Established terms and conditions221
General level of terms and conditions17515085

Industrial Tribunals

asked the Secretary of State for Employment how many industrial tribunals are now established; how many full-time chairmen have been appointed and how many part-time members; how many and what percentage of such members are women; and how many and what percentage were appointed pursuant to nominations made by the TUC and the CBI, respectively.

There is no fixed total number of industrial tribunals since each tribunal is convened, as required, from a panel of chairmen and two panels of lay members. On average 74 tribunals currently sit in Great Britain every working day. Seventy-two full-time chairmen including 2 women—3 per cent.—have been appointed for England and Wales by the Lord Chancellor and nine full-time chairmen including one woman—11 per cent.—have been appointed for Scotland by the Lord President. There are 2,448 lay members of whom 494–20 per cent.—are women. 1,137–46 per cent.—appointments have been made below the general level; how many and what percentage of such claims were successful; and what were the equivalent figures for claims under the Fair Wages Resolution during the same period.

I am informed that up to 30th April 1978 the Central Arbitration Committee had heard some 375 cases under Schedule 11 and 190 under the Fair Wages Resolution.The following information relates to awards made up to that date of which my Department has details:pursuant to nominations made by the TUC and an identical number and percentage on the nomination of the CBI.

asked the Secretary of State for Employment how many cases were heard by industrial tribunals in each year from 1965 to 1977, respectively; and how many cases it is expected that the tribunals will determine in the year 1978.

The number of cases heard by industrial tribunals involving all jurisdictions in each year from 1965 to 1977 is as follows:

1965500
19665,356
19678,496
19688,591
19697,726
19708,632
19717,383
19727,745
19737,188
19746,857
197512,518
197619,234
197718,962
If trends so far this year are maintained it is expected that the total for 1978 will be rather lower than for 1977.

Employment Appeal Tribunal

asked the Secretary of State for Employment how many appeals have been heard by the Employment Appeal Tribunal during each of the years since its creation; into which cate-

30th March 1976–31st March 19771st April 1977–31st March 1978
Appeals heardAppeals allowed or remitted to industrial tribunal for further considerationAppeals heardAppeals allowed or remitted to industrial tribunal for further consideration
NumberNumberper centNumberNumberper cent.
Redundancy Payments Act 1965542139472962
Equal Pay Act 1970221359372054
Contracts of Employment Act 197215360
Trade Union and Labour Relations Act 19743531664746117438
Sex Discrimination Act 1975611712217
Employment Protection Act 1975955624625
4452064658623440

Post Office (Industrial Dispute)

asked the Secretary of State for Employment if the Advisory, Conciliation and Arbitration Service has been called in in connection with the Post Office engineers' dispute which is causing delays for new private subscriber installations.

I refer the hon. Member to the reply given to the Question by the hon. Member for Wells (Mr. Boscawen) on 6th June.—[Vol. 951, c. 27–8.]

Upheld
Total heardNumberPer cent.
1972 (from 28th February)1,79561234
19733,9961,47437
19743,3801,25037
19758,7293,35138
197613,4004,83836
197712,8423,95431

Bank Holiday (Good Friday)

asked the Secretary of State for Employment if he will now make Good Friday an official bank holiday.

The Government have no plans at present to add further to the bank holidays already declared under the Banking and Financial Dealings Act 1971.

gories those appeals are divided; and how many and what percentage of such appeals in each such category have been successful.

Unfair Dismissals

asked the Secretary of State for Employment how many and what percentage of claims for unfair dismissal remedies have been successful, during each of the years from 1972 to 1977 inclusive.

The number of unfair dismissal claims which were reported as heard by an industrial tribunal and the percentage of claims which were upheld during the years 1972 to 1977 inclusive were as follows:

Environment

Building Society Lending

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment whether he has any proposals to change the current limitation on building society lending.

Because of concern about a continuing acceleration in the rate of increase in house prices the Building Societies Association—BSA—agreed in March to a reduction in the previously agreed level of guideline lending for house purchase from £680 million a month to £610 million a month—excluding lending for peripheral purposes such as home improvement—for the period April-June 1978. The moderation in levels was designed to prevent the volume of building society lending, which had been at very high levels in the previous six months, from fuelling a house price explosion.There are now the first signs that the rate of increase may be abating, although these are by no means conclusive. Consequently, although it would be premature to return immediately to a greatly-increased level of lending, the Government and the BSA have now agreed that in the third quarter of 1978 it would be right to plan a controlled increase in lending levels. It has therefore been decided that in the months July. August, and September the guideline level of lending for house purchase should be £640 million a month. If there is then positive evidence that the rate of increase in house prices is slowing down, it should be possible to plan for a further increase by the end of the year. The Joint Advisory Committee on Mortgage Finance will continue to monitor lending levels and prices on a monthly basis, and will recommend further adjustments as and when necessary.In the view of the Government and the BSA, this adjustment to lending levels will not put pressure on house prices. And it will give some assistance to the house-building industry.

Windscale (Radiation Hazards)

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment in view of the fact that caesium isotopes currently contribute more radiation to the public than any other from Wind-scale, if he will seek to put an immediate specific limit on the amounts of caesium 134 and 137 that the plant may put out.

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment if, in order to ensure compliance with any recommendations which the new inspectorate proposed under recommendation 6 of the Parker Report may make, he will seek to give the inspectorate the power to restrict plant working or enforce temporary closure if permitted limits are exceeded, until improvements have been made to bring the emissions within the limits.

Public Land (Darlington)

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment when the hon. Member for Darlington can expect a reply to his letter of 11th April about the disposal of public land by the Darlington council for the extension of garage premises.

Farm Workers (Rehousing)

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment how many farm workers were rehoused under the Rent (Agriculture) Act 1976 during its first year of operation.

Over 650 farm workers or ex-workers were rehoused by local authorities in 1977 without going through the courts. The number of applications received from employers during the year was just under 1,200. This is not appreciably different from the rate at which possession orders were previously granted against occupiers of agricultural tied cottages. Detailed results for the period 1st January to 31st December 1977 have been published today and a copy has been placed in the library. The Act appears to be working very smoothly and I am grateful to local authorities for their co-operation.

Council Of Ministers (Meeting)

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment what was the outcome of the Council of Ministers (Environment) meeting in Brussels on 30th May 1978.

I represented the United Kingdom at the Council of Ministers (Environment) on 30th May 1978. Agreement was reached on two directives: one on the lead content of petrol, the other on the quality of water for fresh water fish.The lead in petrol directive will mean that the Community will adopt a maximum level for lead in petrol of 0·4 grams per litre from 1st January 1981. This date is in accordance with the Government's intentions on reducing the lead content of petrol announced in the House on 4th March 1976 by my right hon. Friend the Minister of State.The directive on the quality of water for fresh water fish is aimed at the protection and improvement of fresh waters which are or could become capable of supporting fish life. Designation of waters to which the standards in the directive will apply, will be a matter for member States. As adopted it meets the detailed objections we had to the stringency of some of the standards originally proposed. I regret to say that once again the Council failed to agree on the final details of a directive on conservation of birds which would make a particular contribution within the Community to conserving a species of migratory birds threatened with extinction. A decision was deferred for three weeks in the hope that the remaining reservation holding up agreement will be lifted.Other matters discussed included the subject of Community action on marine pollution which will be further considered by the Transport Ministers Council on 12th June and Foreign Ministers Council on 26th and 27th June.

Welding Institute (Exhibition)

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment if he will arrange for the House to see an exhibition of welded sculpture organised by the Welding Institute.

I have been asked to reply.If the hon. Member will let me have details of the proposed exhibition, I shall certainly consider this.

Energy

Oil Companies

asked the Secretary of State for Energy if he will seek to establish an independent inquiry into the role of the oil companies within the community.

I have no plans to do so. Perhaps the hon. Member would like to write to me and let me know what he has in mind.

Foreign And Commonwealth Affairs

Diplomatic Service Staff (Children's Education Allowance)

asked the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs if he will publish in the Official Report the circumstances under which Foreign and Commonwealth Office employees receive allowances for the education of their children when they are stationed in the United Kingdom.

Diplomatic Service staff stationed in the United Kingdom are entitled to an allowance for the education of their children at boarding schools in this country, provided they have served abroad and remain committed to further overseas service. The allowance is paid for a maximum of five years after an officer returns to this country—the average home posting lasts approximately three years—except in rare cases where an officer is retained in a home post for a short time beyond five years for essential operational reasons. If staff have not already served abroad, the allowance may be paid for the school term during which they are posted.

Home Department

Peter Neville And John Mcdonald

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether he will call for a report from the Chief Constable on how and why the Northumbria police paid £500 to Peter Neville and John McDonald to prevent them taking court action to press their claims of being beaten and wrongfully arrested; who paid this sum; and whether he will make a statement.

I understand from the Chief Constable of Northumbria that a civil claim by Peter Neville and John McDonald alleging false imprisonment and ill-treatment by the police in April 1976 has been settled by insurers on behalf of the Northumbria Police Authority paying the claimants compensation of £250 each, but without admission of liability. Agreement was reached in the normal manner between all the parties; I understand that the claimants have withdrawn all allegations of violence and other improper conduct made in connection with their arrest.

Immigrants (European Community)

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether he will give, for any period of time, the numbers of migrants who have arrived in Great Britain on a temporary or permanent basis from each of the countries of the EEC; and how these figures compare with the most convenient date prior to Great Britain's entry into the EEC.

The available information for the years 1973 to 1977 is given

Admissions
Totalof which accepted for settlement on arrivalAccepted for settlement on removal of time limit
Nationals of(Number of tourneys)(Number of persons)
Belgium253,1843989
Denmark104,98473173
France910,066312625
Germany (Federal Republic)*735,613241779
Italy320,275852,226
Luxembourg5,8434
Netherlands454,910213388
Total†2,784,8759634,284
* Includes a relatively small number of people from the German Democratic Republic.
† Excluding citizens of the Republic of Ireland.

British Passport Holders

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) in the light of the large numbers of British passport holders now anxious to come to Great Britain on emigration from Zambia, what action he has taken or intends taking to deal with this immigration in order to prevent the problems created at the time of the Ugandan Asian crisis;(2) following the official statement by the Government of Hong Kong on the large number of legal and illegal immigrants from the mainland of China aggravating the population, housing and employment situation in Hong Kong, what action he has taken, or intends to take, to deal with the exodus of British passport holders from Hong Kong to Great Britain, in order to avoid the problems and difficulties as created by the influx of the Ugandan Asians;

in the annual Command Papers, the latest of which is "Control of Immigration, Statistics, 1977" (Cmnd. 7160). Table 1( b) gives the total number of admissions to the United Kingdom of nationals of each EEC country, excluding the Republic of Ireland; Table 3( b) shows the number of EEC nationals accepted for settlement on removal of time limit irrespective of their date of admission, and Table 5 gives the numbers who were issued with residence permits.

The following table shows the corresponding information for 1972 and the number of EEC nationals accepted for settlement on arrival. EEC nationals have not been accepted for settlement on arrival since 1st January 1973 and residence permits have been issued to EEC nationals only since that date.

(3) what action he has taken, or intends taking, to assist the immigration of British passport holders now resident in Rhodesia who are expected to emigrate to Great Britain at the end of the year, in order to prevent the problems and difficulties as experienced at the time of the Ugandan Asian problem;

(4) whether, in the light of the large number of Kenyan Asians and other British passport holders who will be entering Great Britain as immigrants, what action he has taken, or intends taking, to prevent difficulties as experienced at the time of the Ugandan Asian immigration into Great Britain.

I do not accept the premises on which my hon. Friend's Questions are based.

Security Firms

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether he will give, for the longest and most convenient period of time, the number of robberies and the amount of valuables and money stolen connected with the firms in the security business; to what extent action has been or is to be taken to ensure that those in this business have no criminal records; and whether he will make a statement.

The information requested is not available.As I indicated in reply to a Question by my hon. Friend the Member for Walsall, South (Mr. George) on 8th May, I intend to publish a paper to facilitate further discussion of the important issues raised by proposals for control over private security activities, including the question of relaxing the present rules governing access to criminal records.—[Vol. 949, c. 326.]

Overseas Delegations (Attendance Allowances)

asked the Lord President of the Council when the daily attendance allowance for delegates to the Council of Europe, the Western European Union and the North Atlantic Assembly was last increased; and how much the cost of living in France, Belgium, West Germany and the United States of America, respectively, has increased since that date.

The allowance has stood at 280 FF—£33 plus 70 FF—£8—for miscellaneous expenses, since May 1975, but those rates were fixed at a level intended to endure for a considerable time. Consumer prices* in the countries mentioned have increased by 28·5 per cent., 21·2 per cent., 11·4 per cent. and 21·2 per cent. respectively since 1975.

* Statistical Office of the European Communities, general index for 1st April 1978–1st March for USA.

Industry

Microprocessors

asked the Secretary of State for Industry what is his policy towards making a substantial investment in British industry, in order to ensure an indigenous supply of cheap, standard mass-produced integrated circuits as the basis of the microprocessor revolution of the 1980s.

The Government's policy is to give maximum support to the development of our micro-electronic capability. Several proposals are under consideration which could lead to the manufacture in Britain of standard, mass-produced integrated circuits. The National Enterprise Board already has a significant interest in the micro-electronic industry and I have given it my consent to a major new project in this area.

asked the Secretary of State for Industry whether, in view of the fact that the importance of the microprocessor revolution is underestimated in Great Britain in terms of its employment and its overall social and economic consequences, he will set up a study to examine its implications.

The Government recognise the importance of the microprocessor to the United Kingdom economy and are studying the opportunities which it offers. The possible social and economic consequences of the spread of microprocessor applications are also being examined.

Barry Staines Ltd

asked the Secretary of State for Industry whether any public funds have been invested in Barry Staines Ltd., formerly Tayside Floorings Ltd., and, if so, what is the current value of the investment.

Yes. Assistance under Section 7 of the Industry Act 1972 was given to Barry Staines Ltd.—then called Tayside Floorcoverings Ltd.—in November 1976, in the form of a loan of £667,500. This was published in "Trade and Industry" on 15th April 1977. It is not possible in the present circumstances of the company to estimate the current value of this loan.

Postal Rates

asked the Secretary of State for Industry when he expects the Commission to report on the equalisation of postal rates as between the original six members of the EEC and the United Kingdom, Ireland and Denmark.

At the meeting of Ministers of Posts and Telegraphs of member States of the EEC held in Brussels last December, the Commission was charged with a study on the application of each member State's internal postage rate to letters of 20 grammes or less, and to postcards, posted to other member States.The Commission has recently circulated a questionnaire to member States and this is due for return by mid-July. Thereafter it will depend on the Commission itself how soon it reports.

Non-Ferrous Foundry Industry Scheme

asked the Secretary of State for Industry what has been the response to the non-ferrous foundry industry scheme.

Up to 2nd June 179 applications for assistance had been received. Of these, 17 have been rejected and 15 have been withdrawn. The remaining 147 applications relate to projects estimated to cost some £62 million and involving potential assistance of £13·6 million. In addition, some 40 companies have held discussions with the Department and these are expected to submit formal applications in the near future. This response, from about one-third of the companies in the industry, demonstrates the effectiveness of the scheme in promoting a significant programme of investment over the next three years.

Northern Ireland

Area Boards

asked the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland if he will list the names of those serving in the area boards, board by board; if he will state the reasons for their appointment and the organisations to which they belong; and if he will list the responsibilities of each of the boards.

The names of persons serving on Northern Ireland Health and Social Services Boards and Education and Library Boards are listed below. Where the membership of an organisation was a factor in the appointment of a board member this has been shown against the member's name.Appointments to the Health and Social Services Boards are made in accordance with Schedule 1 to the Health and Personal Social Services (Northern Ireland) Order 1972 with the aim of achieving a balanced and varied board of membership. The boards are responsible for the planning, provision and management of health and personal social services in their respective areas.Appointments to the Education and Library Boards are made in accordance with Schedule 2 to the Education and Libraries (Northern Ireland) Order 1972 and bring together local involvement with special interests, including professional experience of the boards' functions. Each board is responsible for the planning, provision and management of education and library services in its area.EASTERN HEALTH AND SOCIAL SERVICES BOARD

Chairman:

Sir Thomas Brown—Northern Ireland Hospitals Authority.

Vice Chairman:

Mr. M. B. McGrady, FCA—Association of Hospital Management Committees.

District Council:

  • Mr. W. B. Bailie, FSVA—North Down Borough Council.
  • Mr. N. Bicker—Down District Council.
  • Mr. W. Dickson—Belfast City Council.
  • Mr. H. Ditty—Belfast City Council.
  • Mr. H. W. Gallagher, MB, BCh, BAO, FRCS, Ed, FRCSI—Ards Borough Council.
  • Mr. F. R. Kane, JP—Castlereagh Borough Council.
  • Mr. G. Morrison—Lisburn Borough Council.
  • Mr. T. Patton—Belfast City Council.
  • Mrs. M. R. Pritchard, BA—Belfast City Council.
  • Mr. A. C. Walker, JP—Belfast City Council.

Professional:

  • Dr. S. J. Knox, FRCPsych, DPM—British Medical Association.
  • Mr. R. H. Livingston, FRCS—British Medical Association.
  • Mrs. M. McMahon, SRN, SCM, RNT, Dip Ed—Association of Hospital Tutors/Association of Nurse Administrators.
  • Mr. W. H. Morrow, BDS—British Dental Association.
  • Dr. S. R. C. Ritchie, BCh, BAO, FRCGP—British Medical Association, Royal College of General Practitioners.
  • Dr. R. M. Shearer—British Medical Association.

Lay & University:

  • Prof. W. A. S. Alldritt, MOS, FDSRCS, FFDRCSI—Queens University, Belfast.
  • Prof. M. J. Brown. Bsc, MSW, PHD, Dip Soc Sc, Dip Soc Work—Queens University, Belfast.
  • Prof. P. F. D'Arcy, B Pharm, PHD, FPS, FRIC, MPSNI—Queens University, Belfast.
  • Mr. P. B. Gilfedder—Trustees of Mater Hospital.
  • Mr. B. Graham—Irish Congress of Trade Unions.
  • Mr. W. Keown, MBE.
  • Mrs. F. A. McCartney.
  • Mrs. M. McMullan—Greater West Belfast Community Association.
  • Mr. J. F. Mitchell.
  • Mr. D. G. Neill, MA—Queens University, Belfast.
  • Rev. J. C. O'Connor, BA, Cert Ed—Down and Connor Family Welfare Association.
  • Mr. D. M. Paulin, MA, Association of Hospital Management Committees.
  • Prof. I. C. Roddie, TD, MD, DSC. FRCPI—Queens University, Belfast.

SOUTHERN HEALTH AND SOCIAL SERVICES BOARD—MEMBERSHIP

Chairman:

Mr. F. A. Mackle—Irish Congress of Trade Unions.

Vice Chairman:

Mrs. M. F. Simms, BA.

District Councils:

  • Mr. S. Cairns—Craigavon Borough Council.
  • Mr. S. J. Cowan—Banbridge District Council.
  • Mr. T. H. Creith—Craigavon Borough Council.
  • Mr. M. G. Morrow—Dungannon District Council.
  • Mr. J. F. Nicholson—Armagh District Council.
  • Mrs. N. Sands—Newry and Mourne District Council.
  • Mr. P. Toner—Newry and Mourne District Council.

Professional:

  • Dr. R. A. Burnett, BAO, BCh—British Medical Association.
  • Dr. J. H. Bruce, FRCP—British Medical Association.
  • Miss S. V. Cooke, AIMSW—British Association of Social Workers.
  • Dr. R. B. Flood, BA—British Medical Association, The Royal College of General Practitioners.
  • Dr. J. E. Galway, BAgr, FFARCSI—British Medical Association.
  • Mr. C. McCullagh, SRN, RMN, RNT—Royal College of Nursing.
  • Mr. M. O'Farrell, LDS, RCSI—British Dental Association.

Lay and University:

  • Mrs. R. C. Dickson—Northern Ireland Hospital Authority.
  • Mr. J. Donnelly.
  • Miss E. M. Harrison, MA, BLitt—Queens University, Belfast.
  • Mr. J. Hassard, JP.
  • Mr. J. V. McCart.
  • Prof. J. H. McK. Pinkerton, MD, FRCOG—Queens University, Belfast.
  • Mr. A. Wadforth—Community Organisations of Northern Ireland.

WESTERN HEALTH AND SOCIAL SERVICES BOARD—MEMBERSHIP

Chairman:

Mr. W. R. Pinkerton, CBE, JP—Association of Hospital Management Committees and Northern Ireland Hospitals Authority.

Vice Chairman:

Mr. F. G. Guckian, JP.

District Councils:

  • Mr. G. K. Barr—Londonderry City Council.
  • Mr. A. I. Cooper—Strabane District Council.
  • Mr. R. I. A. Grant—Limavady District Council.
  • Mr. W. Keys—Londonderry City Council.
  • Mr. J. C. Leahy—Fermanagh District Council.
  • Mr. J. F. McBarron—Fermanagh District Council.
  • Mr. G. E. McEnhill—Omagh District Council.
  • Mrs. K. H. Milligan—Londonderry City Council.

Professional:

  • Dr. N. M. Reidy-Brady, BCh—British Medical Association.
  • Mrs. F. Gibson, MA, BEd—British Association of Social Workers.
  • Mr. R. M. Harvey, FRCS—British Medical Association.
  • Mr. P. V. Lang, MB, DA, FFARCSI—British Medical Association.
  • Mr. W. C. Magee, FPSNI—The Local Pharmaceutical Committee (Northern Ireland).
  • Miss I. J. Miller, OBE, SRN, SCM—Association of Nurse Administrators.
  • Mr. C. A. Sullivan, LAH—British Medical Association.

Lay and University:

  • Prof. D. T. Carter, MA, MSc, PhD—New University of Ulster.
  • Mr. G. A. Cathcart—Fermanagh Association of Health Committees.
  • Mr. E. Deane—Community Organisations of Northern Ireland.
  • Prof. J. W. Dundee, MD, PhD, FFARCS, MRCP—Queens University, Belfast.
  • Mrs. A. M. Gault—Association of District Committees.
  • Mr. B. McCool—Irish Congress of Trade Unions.
  • Mrs. A. A. McCorkell, OBE—Londonderry County Borough Welfare Committee.
  • Mrs. T. S. Sinclair, JP—Northern Ireland Hospitals Authority.

NORTHERN HEALTH AND SOCIAL SERVICES BOARD—MEMBERSHIP

Chairman:

Mr. J. W. Moore, JP, DLitt.

Vice Chairman:

Mr. C. A. Dallat—Standing Conference of Councils of Social Services and Community Councils.

District Councils:

  • Mr. J. H. Allen, OBE—Antrim Borough Council.
  • Mr. G. M. Armstrong, MPSNI—Carrickfergus Borough Council.
  • Dr. W. Calwell, DPH, BCh—Larne Borough Council.
  • Mrs. M. P. M. Ellis—Ballymoney Borough Council.
  • Mr. J. A. Howard—Cookstown District Council.
  • Mr. A. M. McSparran, MB—Moyle District Council.
  • Miss D. E. Robb, JP—Newtownabbey Borough Council.
  • Mr. S. Spence—Ballymena Borough Council.
  • Mr. F. H. E. Thompson, Magherafelt District Council.
  • Prof. T. Wilson, CBE, MD, DPH, DTM, DTH—Coleraine Borough Council.

Professional:

  • Mrs. A. J. Bell, MSCP, Dip, TP—Ulster College.
  • Dr. E. Casement, OBE, DPM, MRCP(I), MRCPsych—British Medical Association.
  • Mr. B. P. Caul, BA, Dip. App. Soc. Stud.
  • —British Association of Social Workers.
  • Miss S. Daly, BSc, MPSNI—Northern Ireland Council of Social Service.
  • Mr. J. E. Johnston, LDS—British Dental Association.
  • Dr. T. G. Lowry, BCh, BAO—British Medical Association.
  • Dr. W. H. Moffatt, FRCPI—British Medical Association.
  • Miss A. M. Murphy, SRN, SCM, MTD—Royal College of Nursing.

Lay and University:

  • Mr. J. I. Bill, BSc, FICE, FIHE.
  • Dr. E. B. Cathcart, BSc.
  • Mr. I. D. Fleming—Irish Congress of Trade Unions.
  • Mrs. M. J. Holmes, JP—Association of Welfare Committees.
  • Mr. G. K. Logue.
  • Mr. G. P. McGuigan—Standing Conference of Community Councils and Councils of Social Service.
  • Mr. J. A. O'Reilly, BComm, MBA, MRCIMA—Ulster College.
  • Prof. J. Valiance-Owen, MA, MD, FRCP, FRCPI, FRCPath—Queen's University, Belfast.

BELFAST EDUCATION AND LIBRARY BOARD

Chairman:

Mr. H. E. Smith, VRD, BA, LLB.

Vice-Chairman:

Rev. C. McCaughen, BA, EI.

District Councillors:

  • Mr. W. T. Annon—Belfast City Council.
  • Mr. F. E. Ashby—Belfast City Council.
  • Mrs. G. Bannister, JP—Belfast City Council.
  • Mr W. Bell—Belfast City Council.
  • Mr. W. Blair—Belfast City Council.
  • Mr. A. Cairns, JP—Belfast City Council.
  • Mrs. M. Crooks—Belfast City Council.
  • Mrs. D. Dunlop—Belfast City Council.
  • Mr. H. Fletcher, JP—Belfast City Council.
  • Mr. B. Glass—Belfast City Council.
  • Mr. R. O. Jamison—Belfast City Council.
  • Mr. B. McDonagh—Belfast City Council.
  • Miss M. V. McKeown—Belfast City Council.
  • Mr. F. Millar—Belfast City Council.

Representatives of the Interests of Transferors of Schools:

  • Rev. R. D. E. Gallagher, OBE, MA, BD, DD—Methodist Church Board of Education.
  • Rev. W. D. F. Marshall, MA—Presbyterian Church Board of Education.
  • Rev. Canon W. A. Macourt, MA—Church of Ireland Board of Education.
  • Rev. A. A. Sleith, MA, BEd—Presbyterian Church Board of Education.
  • Rev. C. N. Sansom, MA—Church of Ireland Board of Education.

Representatives of the Interest of the Trustees of Maintained Schools:

  • Rev. S. McCartney, BA, CC—Catholic Maintained Schools Commission.
  • Rev. C. McCaughan, BA, EI—Catholic Maintained Schools Commission.
  • Rev. T. Toner, BA—Catholic Maintained Schools Commission.

Persons with an Interest in the Services for which the Board is responsible:

  • Mr. F. Devlin, BA—Ulster Teachers' Union Association of Principals of Colleges.
  • Dr. W. F. Kerr—Ulster Teachers' Union Association of Principals of Colleges.
  • Mrs. E. M. B. McConaghy, BA, Med—Associating Assistant Mistresses.
  • Prof. M. J. Boyd, MA, MRAI—Queen's University, Belfast.
  • Mr. H. E. Smith, VRD, BA, LLB—The Library Association.
  • Mr. A. E. C. W. Spencer, MSc (Econ), FIS—Queen's University, Belfast.
  • Mr. R. Allen, MBE, JP—Northern Ireland Committee of the Irish Congress of Trade Unions.
  • Mr. F. Bunting, BA, Dip Ed.—Youth Committee for Northern Ireland.
  • Dr. W. A. Conlon, MBE—Youth Committee for Northern Ireland.
  • Mrs. M. Gordon—Women's Group on Public Welfare.
  • Mrs. M. M. Mooney, BA—Women's Group on Public Welfare.
  • Mrs. M. O. Scott.
  • Mr. G. P. C. Thompson, MA—Northern Ireland Chamber of Commerce & Industry.

NORTH-EASTERN EDUCATION AND LIBRARY BOARD

Chairman:

Mr. A. N. Johnston.

Vice Chairman:

Rev. Canon F. G. Guy, MA.

District Councillors:

  • Mr. J. Anderson—Coleraine Borough Council.
  • Mr. J. R. Beggs—Larne Borough Council.
  • Mr. T. J. Bradley, JP—Magherafelt District Council.
  • Mr. R. L. Caul—Newtownabbey Borough Council.
  • Mr. A. N. Clarke—Coleraine Borough Council.
  • Mr. J. M. Cunningham—Antrim Borough Council.
  • Mr. J. F. Drysdale—Ncwtonabbey Borough Council.
  • Mr. J. A. Gaston—Ballymoney Borough Council.
  • Mr. C. H. G. Kinahan, CBE—Antrim Borough Council.
  • Mr. A. P. McConaghy—Moyle District Council.
  • Mr. H. Nicholl—Ballymena Borough Council.
  • Mr. S. Simms—Carrickfergus Borough Council.
  • Mr. A. McG. Templeton—Newtownabbey Borough Council.
  • Mr. W. F. J. Turtle—Ballymena Borough Council.

Representatives of the Interests of Transferors of Schools:

  • Rev. R. G. Craig, BA—Presbyterian Church Board of Education.
  • Rev. Canon F. G. Guy, MA—Church of Ireland Board of Education.
  • Rev. B. H. S. Liddell, MA—Presbyterian Church Board of Education.
  • Rev. A. L. McAloney, BA, BD—Presbyterian Church Board of Education.
  • Rev. Canon R. E. W. Thornton, BA—Church of Ireland Board of Education.
  • Rev. J. W. Young—Methodist Church Board of Education.

Representatives of the Interests of Trustees of Maintained Schools:

  • Rev. O. P. Kennedy, BA, BD—Catholic Maintained Schools Commission.
  • Very Rev. W. B. Tumelty, BA, STL, HDipEd, PP, VF—Catholic Maintained Schools Commission.

Persons with an interest in the services for which the Board is responsible:

  • Mr. R. Pinkerton, AM, IRTE, HNC—National Association of Teachers in Further and Higher Education.
  • Mr. J. A. Scott—National Association of Schoolmasters/Union of Women Teachers.
  • Mr. R. Waterman—Ulster Teachers Union.
  • Mr. A. N. Johnston—The Library Association
  • Mrs. M. McGregor—Association of County Councils.
  • Miss E. N. Tyrrell, MSc, ALA.
  • Mr. J. Blair—Ulster Farmers' Union.
  • Mr. G. Craig—Northern Ireland Committee of the Irish Congress of Trade Unions.
  • Mr. D. Haley—Confederation of British Industry.
  • Mr. R. H. Law—Northern Ireland Parents' Association
  • Mr. C. McAllister.
  • Mrs. J. P. Newbould, BSc—New University of Ulster.
  • Mrs. M. E. O'Kane.

WESTERN EDUCATION AND LIBRARY BOARD

Chairman:

Mr. J. Doherty, BA, BComm.

Vice-Chairman:

Mr. W. B. Loane, DL.

District Councillors:

  • Mr. P. J. Bogan—Omagh District Council.
  • Mr. D. Campbell—Fermanagh District Council.
  • Mr. F. Donnelly—Londonderry City Council.
  • Mr. H. Faulkner—Londonderry City Council.
  • Mr. J. Fegan—Londonderry City Council.
  • Mr. J. T. Lunny—Fermanagh District Council.
  • Mr. F. McAteer—Londonderry City Council.
  • Mr. H. McCauley—Omagh District Council.
  • Mr. J. T. McKelvey—Strabane District Council.
  • Mr. E. Murray—Limavady District Council.
  • Mr. W. C. Noble—Fermanagh District Council.
  • Mr. G. Peoples—Londonderry City Council.
  • Mr. E. Turner—Stranabe District Council.

Representatives of the interests of Transferors of Schools:

  • Rev. D. Alderdice—Methodist Church Board of Education.
  • Rev. R. H. Pinkerton—Presbyterian Church Board of Education.
  • Archdeacon F. J. L. Skuce—Church of Ireland Board of Education.

Representatives of the interests of the Trustees of Maintained Schools:

  • Very Rev. T. P. Donnelly, PP—Catholic Maintained Schools Commission.
  • Right Rev. Mgr. P. J. Flanagan, BA, BD, PP, VG—Catholic Maintained Schools Commission.
  • Rev. M. J. Keaverey, BA, BD, Adm—Catholic Maintained Schools Commission.
  • Rev. V. A. Mulvey, Adm—Catholic Maintained Schools Commission.

Persons appearing to have an interest in the services for which the Board is responsible:

  • Mr. N. J. McLaughlin—Irish National Teachers Organisation.
  • Mr. W. J. A. Miller—National Association of Teachers in Further and Higher Education.
  • Mr. W. E. Morrison—National Association of Schoolmasters/Union of Women Teachers.
  • Mr. W. B. Loane, DL—Ulster Association of County Councils Co-Librarian. Association of NI Education Committees.
  • Mrs. A. M. McQuaid—Association of NI Education Committees.
  • Mr. G. C. Whiteside—The Library Association.
  • Mr. R. C. Bond, JP—Association of Northern Ireland Education Committees.
  • Mr. J. Doherty, BA, BComm—Association of Northern Ireland Education Committees.
  • Mr. M. J. Harte—The Youth Committee for Northern Ireland.
  • Mrs. M. E. Hogg—The Women's Group on Public Welfare.
  • Prof. F. J. Lelievre, MA—New Univer city of Ulster.
  • Mr. F. P. McCrossan—Northern Ireland Committee of the Irish Congress of Trade Unions.

SOUTH-EASTERN EDUCATION AND LIBRARY BOARD

Chairman:

Mr. P. O'Hagan.

Vice Chairman:

Mr. R. W. C. Kirkwood, BSc(Econ), ALA.

District Council

  • Mr. M. E. Anderson—Castlereagh Borough Council.
  • Mrs. H. Bradford—North Down Borough Council.
  • Mr. J. Carey—Down District Council.
  • P. Grosse—Castlereagh Borough Council.
  • R. W. C. Kirkwood, BSc(Econ), ALA—Lisburn Borough Council.
  • Mr. J. A. Magee—North Down Borough Council.
  • Mr. A. J. Morrow—Castlereagh Borough Council.
  • Mrs. M. E. O'Fee—North Down Borough Council.
  • Mr. J. Scott—Ards Borough Council.
  • Mr. S. Semple, MBE, JP, FRSA—Lisburn Borough Council.
  • Mr. Wm. Sheldon—Ards Borough Council.
  • Mrs. E. M. Smyth—Down District Council.
  • Mr. W. G. Watson—Lisburn Borough Council.

Representatives of Interests of Transferors of Schools:

  • Very Rev. W. Boyd, MA, DD—Presbyterian Church Board of Education.
  • Rev. J. D. Caldwell, BA, BD—Church of Ireland Board of Education.
  • Rev. R. J. Chisholm, MA—Church of Ireland Board of Education.
  • Mr. F. Jeffrey, OBE, BA, AKC—Methodist Church Board of Education.
  • Very Rev. W. A. Park, MA DD—Presbyterian Church Board of Education.
  • Rev. S. Wilson, BA, BD—Presbyterian Church Board of Education.

Representatives of the Interests of Trustees of Maintained Schools:

  • Very Rev. Dr. J. Maguire, MA, PP—Catholic Maintained Schools Commission.
  • Very Rev. D. McHugh, BA, BD, PP—Catholic Maintained Schools Commission.

Persons with an Interest in the Services for which the Board is responsible:

  • Mr. J. Frost, BA, Bsc, HDIPEd—Ulster Headmasters' Association.
  • Mr. G. N. Jardine, BSc, AMIEE, AMIMechE—Association of Principals of Colleges.
  • Mr. P. O'Hagan—Irish National Teachers' Organisation.
  • Mrs. S. E. D. Bell.
  • Mrs. C. Condy.
  • Mr. J. Magee, MA. HDipEd—The Library Association.
  • Mrs. E. Benton.
  • Mr. G. Bruce, MA—NI Parents Association.
  • Mr. W. E. S. Fullerton—Ulster Farmers' Union.
  • Mrs. R. Kelly.
  • Mr. J. Lennon.
  • Mr. P. A. McCartan—Northern Ireland Committee of the Irish Congress of Trade Unions.

SOUTHERN EDUCATION AND LIBRARY BOARD

Chairman:

Rev. Canon F. W. Gowing, BA.

Vice Chairman:

Mrs. M. M. Cullen.

District Councillors:

  • Mr. F. C. Armstrong—Armagh District Council.
  • Mr. M. S. Bailey—Banbridge District Council.
  • Mr. J. Bell—Newry and Mourne District Council.
  • Mr. W. M. Buchanan—Dungannon District Council.
  • Mr. D. N. Calvert—Craigavon Borough Council.
  • Mr. E. Crozier, JP—Craigavon Borough Council.
  • Miss A. M. Cunningham—Newry and Mourne District Council.
  • Mr. W. J. Henning—Armagh District Council.
  • Mr. H. J. Heslip, JP—Banbridge District Council.
  • Mr. V. McGahie—Cookstown District Council.
  • Mr. P. E. McGlinchey—Dungannon District Council.
  • Mr. W. J. Russell—Newry and Mourne District Council.
  • Mrs. M. Simpson—Craigavon Borough Council.

Representatives of Interests of Transferors of Schools:

  • Rev. J. C. M. Anderson, MA—Presbyterian Church Board of Education.
  • Rev. Canon F. W. Gowing, BA—Church of Ireland Board of Education.
  • Rev. Canon R. M. Wilkinson, MA—Church of Ireland Board of Education.

Representatives of Interests of Trustees of Maintained Schools:

  • Very Rev. E. C. Hamill, Adm—Catholic Maintained Schools Commission.
  • Very Rev. F. C. McLarnon, DD, PP—Catholic Maintained Schools Commission.
  • Rev. K. P. Moran, BA, CC—Catholic Maintained Schools Commission.
  • Very Rev. C. C. Murray, PP—Catholic Maintained Schools Commission.

Persons with an Interest in the Services for which the Board is Responsible:

  • Mr. C. W. Bennett, FRSA—National Association of Teachers in Further and Higher Education.
  • Mr. V. S. Cranny, BA—Irish National Teachers' Organisation.
  • Mr. W. McK Kenny, BA—Ulster Teachers' Union.
  • Mrs. M. A. Bell, JP—Association of Northern Ireland Education Committees.
  • Mr. P. J. Byrne, BA—Ulster Farmers' Union.
  • Mrs. R. Cowdy—Association of County Councils.
  • Mr. V. W. Acheson—Community Associations.
  • Mrs. M. M. Cullen.
  • Mr. W. J. Mateer—Confederation of Industry.
  • Mrs. A. D. McMurray—Association of Northern Ireland Education Committees.
  • Mrs. B. Rodgers.

Road Safety Education

asked the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland if he will indicate in the Official Report the main projects on which £637,283 was spent on road safety in 1975–76 by education and library boards; and how much of the total sum was spent by the South Eastern Education and Library Board.

This expenditure relates to the employment of school crossing patrols. Almost all the expenditure was on pay and related items, with a small addition for protective clothing, advertising, and miscellaneous expenses. Expenditure by the South Eastern Education and Library Board accounted for £121,685 of the total.

Overseas Development

Niger

asked the Minister of Overseas Development if she has received any request for food aid for Niger or any other Sahelian country.

In the current harvest year the Interstate Committee on Drought Control in the Sahel has appealed for food aid for all the Sahel countries. The Secretary General of FAO has launched a similar appeal based on the findings of a multi-donor mission to each country. Bilaterally we have had a formal request from the Government of Niger. Our diplomatic posts are closely in touch with the Governments of all these countries about their food supplies.

asked the Minister of Overseas Development if she has received any requests for further technical assistance or local costs from Niger.

Zambia

asked the Minister of Overseas Development what is the total aid to Zambia promised by Her Majesty's Government for the period 1977–79.

Estimated expenditure of aid to Zambia in the financial year 1977–78 was £12 million. The soft loan of £15 million offered to Zambia during President Kaunda's recent visit to London is expected to be spent in 1978–79 and 1979–80. This together with disbursements from previous commitments is likely to result in total expenditure of capital aid and technical co-operation for those two years of about £47 million.

Indonesia

asked the Minister of Overseas Development if she will have consultations with the General Council of British Shipping before any decision is made to give aid to Indonesia for the purchase of ships.

I have no plans to give British aid to Indonesia for the purchase of ships.

Social Services

Phased Retirement

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services whether he will set up an inquiry to examine the possibility of introducing phased retirement in Great Britain, along lines similar to that in Sweden.

I see no need to set up an inquiry but it is proposed to obtain up-to-date information about the effectiveness of the Swedish scheme.

Drugs (Safety)

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services (1) if he will list in the Official Report the names of all those drugs the applications for licences for which have been turned down since the Committee on Safety of Medicines regulations came into force in 1970;(2) when he last met the Chairman of the Committee on Safety of Medicines to discuss problems arising when licences are refused for drugs;(3) how many drugs were on the original list of acceptances by the Committee on Safety of Medicines; and how many are on it currently:(4) if he will list the in the

Official Report the main grounds for the rejection of claims of those drug firms which were refused licences in each of the last seven years.

Under the Medicines Act the appropriate Section 4 committee advises the licensing authority on questions of safety, quality and efficacy: a product licence may not be refused on those grounds except after consultation with the appropriate committee or the Medicines Commission. Where the committee advises refusal, the applicant has the right to be heard or make representations to the Medicines Commission.From the beginning of licensing on 1st September 1971 until 31st December 1977 the number of applications for product licences—other than product licence of right—in respect of products for which the Committee on Safety of Medicines—CSM—is the appropriate committee, has totalled 4,000.The outcome of these applications has been as follows:

Licence Granted (with or without modifications)2,342
Licence Refused103
Applications withdrawn by applicant850
Applications still under consideration at 31st December 1977705
Virtually all the refusals were on grounds of safety. The withdrawals include cases where safety problems arose but this category also includes withdrawals for commercial reasons.It is not the practice to publish details of unsuccessful applications.In 1972, 36,000 product licences of right were granted without reference to the Committee on Safety of Medicines because these products had been on sale before the appointed day—1st September 1971. These products are under ongoing review by the Committee on the Review of Medicines and the number of products on the market has now fallen to 23,000.I meet the chairman of the CSM from time to time on matters concerned with its functions but no occasion has arisen to discuss problems arising when licences are refused; I am not aware of any such problems.

Mentally Handicapped Persons

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services why those mentally handicapped who claim noncontributory invalidity pension at the age of 16 years must wait four years for a long-term addition whilst mentally handicapped adults receive such long-term additions after a continuous period in receipt of social security allowances of two years.

A non-contributory invalidity pensioner who was without household responsibilities would not usually qualify for supplementary benefit until he reached the age of 18. Only when a person has been receiving supplementary benefit for two years does he become eligible for the long-term rate of that benefit.

Hearing Aids

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services (1) what help or guidance is given to parents or deaf children in the care and use of hearing aids;(2) what provision exists for the proper training of all staff involved in the fitting and use of hearing aids by children.

The amount of instruction given to the parent of a deaf child is a matter for professional judgment and will depend upon a variety of factors, but every parent should be taught how to use and routinely maintain his or her child's hearing aid. My Department has produced an illustrated booklet entitled "General Guidance for Hearing Aid Users" which is available, free of charge, at hearing aid centres, and which should be issued to new hearing aid users to reinforce the instructions given verbally If the right hon. Gentleman is aware of any instance where such advice has not been given, I shall be glad to make inquiries.

The extent to which the training of staff includes instruction in the fitting and use of hearing aids varies according to the discipline concerned. Courses in the theory and the practical use of hearing aids specifically in relation to children are run by the Department of Audiology at the University of Manchester and health authorities may make their own arrangements as necessary for in-service training.

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services what help, if any, is given to the young deaf adult who has been wearing a non-National Health Service hearing aid provided free of charge while he is a child, but who may be unable to meet the cost of paying for it, as he is required to do from his 18th birthday.

I appreciate the right hon. Gentleman's concern, but at this stage I have nothing to add to the reply which my hon. Friend gave my hon. Friend the Member for Nottingham, North (Mr. Whitlock) on 16th May.—[Vol. 950, c. 155.]

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services if he is satisfied with the facilities available for testing deaf children's use of hearing aids, to ensure that the aids are working properly.

Hearing aids supplied under my Department's contracts for the National Health Service are subject to inspection and quality assurance procedures before their release to hearing aid centres. Staff at these centres should ensure that aids are functioning correctly at time of issue. Faults which develop later can usually be dealt with by immediate issue of a replacement aid. If the right hon. Member has a specific case in mind and would like to give me details, I shall be glad to make further inquiries.

National Health Service (Industrial Disputes)

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services how many working days were lost in each of the last five years through industrial disputes in National Health Service establishments.

The number of working days lost through industrial disputes in the National Health Service—excluding local authority health functions—for 1973 to 1976—the most recent year for which figures are available—were:

1973286,517
197417,811
197513,225
197614,931
These figures exclude stoppages involving fewer than 10 workers, and those which lasted for less than one day, except where the aggregated number of man days lost exceeded 100. These figures relate to the United Kingdom.

Hospitals (Hygiene)

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services how many deaths or serious illnesses in each of the last five years arose from lack of hygiene or adequate sterilisation in National Health Service hospitals.

Hospitals (Catering)

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services what is the current annual cost of catering services in National Health Service hospitals; and what percentage of this is carried out by private contractors.

Expenditure by National Health Service authorities in England on hospital services catering for the year ended 31st March 1977, the latest for which accounts have been rendered by the authorities, totalled £205,351,667. As the accounts submitted to the Department do not separately identify payments to private contractors I regret that I am unable to provide the percentage requested.

National Health Service Buildings (Cleaning)

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services what is the current annual cost of domestic cleaning and ancillary services in National Health Service buildings; and what percentage of this is carried out by private contractors.

Expenditure by National Health Service authorities in England on domestic cleaning and portering services for the year ended 31st March 1977, the latest for which accounts have been rendered by the authorities, totalled £304,533,102. As the accounts submitted to the Department do not separately identify payments to private contractors I regret that I am unable to provide the percentage requested.

Hospitals (Cleaning Services)

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services what is the policy of his Department on the employment of private contractors to carry out cleaning and ancillary services in National Health Service hospitals; and if he will make a statement.

It is for the responsible health authority to decide whether or not private contractors are employed to carry out cleaning and allied services in National Health Service hospitals. Cost, however, is not the only criterion which will affect the decision.

Hospitals (Domestic And Ancillary Services)

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services what is his estimate of the cost of using domestic staff to carry out the domestic and ancillary services now performed by nurses in National Health Service hospitals.

No such estimate is available. The extent to which nurses carry out duties which are more appropriate to domestic services and other ancillary staff varies considerably throughout the service.

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services how many of the 200 health service districts have district domestic service managers.

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services how many of the 14 health service regions have regional domestic service officers on their staffs.

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services (1) if the organisational arrangements to monitor expenditure on domestic services within the National Health Service have been fully implemented;(2) if he is satisfied with the existing arrangements for monitoring the expenditure on cleaning services in National Health Service buildings; and if he will make a statement.

My Department does not prescribe specific organisational arrangements for monitoring expenditure on detailed matters such as domestic and cleaning services in the National Health Service. Appropriate monitoring arrangements which take account of local circumstances are a matter for the health authorities who have access to my specialist advisers in domestic services management.

Hospitals (Security)

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services if he is satisfied with security arrangements in National Health Service hospitals; and if he will make a statement.

It is the responsibility of individual health authorities to provide adequate security arrangements in their hospitals and health premises, and I have every confidence in their exercise of this responsibility.

Pre-School Health Module

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services when the principles of confidentiality which have been agreed between his Department and the medical profession with regard to the pre-school child health system will be published; and if it is planned to extend them to cover all applications of computers to medical records.

I refer the right hon. Member to my right hon. Friend's reply to my hon. Friend the Member for Goole (Dr. Marshall) and the hon. Member for Ealing, Acton (Sir G. Young) on 26th May.—[Vol. 950, c. 808–9.] The principles set out in that reply have not yet been formally agreed with the central ethical committee of the British Medical Association with whose Secretary my Department is still in correspondence. I would be ready to commend them to all health authorities using computers for medical record purposes.

Secretary Of State (Visit To China)

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services what was the outcome of his recent visit to China.

I visited the People's Republic of China from 21st May to 29th May. I was very satisfied with the results of the visit and am certain that our political and trading links with China will continue to improve. I had the opportunity of extensive talks with Vice-Premier Keng Piao and Minister of Public Health Dr. Chiang Yi-Chen. I was also able to visit hospitals and other health facilities and to learn something of China's plans for future health services.My discussions took place in an atmosphere of great warmth and friendliness and China's desire to co-operate with the United Kingdom in respect of advanced technology was made very clear.In the health field, I made several proposals designed to increase co-operation between China and the United Kingdom. I shall be discussing these further with Vice-Minister of Public Health Chien Hsin-Chung when he visits this country from 13th to 26th June. This co-operation will, I hope, take the form of more reciprocal visits by doctors, academics and technical representatives. The Chinese are particularly interested in research knowledge and high technology equipment in the fields of non-invasive diagnosis, biomedical engineering, molecular biology and immunology.I also hope that relations between our two countries will be strengthened by a visit from Minister Chiang in the early part of next year.

Housewife's Invalidity Pension

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services how many claimants of the housewife's non-contributory invalidity pension were turned down on the grounds that they could perform normal household duties but were then granted on the wife's non-contributory invalidity pension by an appeal tribunal.

pursuant to his reply [Official Report, 6th June 1978; Vol. 951, c. 97–8], gave the following information:During the period 17th November 1977 to 30th April 1978 2,452 appeals were heard by local tribunals against decisions in which the insurance officer had disallowed claims for non-contributory invalidity pension on the ground that the claimants were not incapable of performing normal household duties. In 1,284 cases the tribunals allowed the benefit.

Agriculture, Fisheries And Food

Sugar

asked the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food if he will publish a table in the Official Report showing for each crop year from 1972–73 to the end of May in the crop year 1977–78, the quantities of white sugar marketed by the British Sugar Corporation arising from sugar from each of the following sources: beet raws grown in the United Kingdom; beet raws grown outside the United Kingdom; cane sugar; and white sugar imported from other EEC member States.

The nature and extent of the British Sugar Corporation's marketing are commercial matters involving the day-to-day operation of the Corporation, on which it is the custom for Ministers to decline to reply.

Fisheries Agreements

asked the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food why, since bilateral fisheries agreements are permitted by the EEC between Norway and Denmark, Germany and Greenland, and Belgium and Iceland, the United Kingdom has not been permitted to negotiate similar agreements.

The Government have taken the view up to now that the long-term interest of our fishing industry would best be served by working within the framework of a revised Community policy which met our essential needs, and have, therefore, not so far sought to negotiate bilaterally.

Scotland

Transport Action Scotland A74 Study Group (Report)

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland if he has received a copy of the Transport Action Scotland A74 Study Group Report; and what consideration he will give to its finding.

My right hon. Friend received a copy of this report a few days ago. Without being committed to its findings he welcomes it as a contribution to the discussion about the A74 and will consider the implications, both environmental and economic, of its recommendations.

Chiropodists

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland if the supply of State registered chiropodists has increased since 1974; and if he will give the relevant figures for Scotland and the Glasgow area, respectively.

There are two chiropody schools in Scotland where students can obtain qualifications leading to State registration. The numbers qualifying in Scotland and in the Glasgow area from 1974–77 are:

ScotlandGlasgow
19744124
19754526
19763322
19774632

Dentists (Glasgow)

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland what view his Department has taken in discussions with the Greater Glasgow Health Board over the feasibility of providing general dental practitioner accommodation in the planned Maryhill Health Centre; and if he is aware there has been an under-provision of facilities in the area.

Agreement has been reached on the need, in the Mary-hill area, to employ dental practitioners on a salary plus bonus arrangement under terms agreed with the profession; and the necessary surgery accommodation is being provided in an extension to the health centre. This accommodation should be ready for entry in 1980.

National Finance

Child Benefit

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer what estimate he has made of the cost to the Treasury of giving 52 per cent. of the proposed £4 child benefits to persons earning the national average wage and above, as opposed to giving child allowances to the same group of people.

I assume that the hon. Member is referring to the answer given by my right hon. Friend the Minister for Social Security in which he estimated that 52 per cent. of child benefit payments are received by families on national average earnings and above—[Vol. 950, c. 53–5.] The cost of child benefit for this group at a weekly rate of £4 per child would be about £1,500 million. If the child tax allowances were restored to their 1976–77 levels, the total cost of child tax allowances for the same group at 1978–79 income levels would be about £875 million. This figure does not take account of family allowance.

Members Of Parliament (Travel Warrants)

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer in view of the fact that Members of the House of Lords receive first-class travel warrants to and from their homes and places of meetings together with out-of-pocket reimbursed expenses when attending meetings connected with their Membership of the House of Lords, why Members of the House of Commons attending the same meetings with the same expenses have to pay tax on their travel warrants when used in exactly the same manner to and from the same towns.

Members of the House of Commons are holders of paid offices and are therefore taxable on all their emoluments, including the cost of travel warrants between home and duty, whereas Members of the House of Lords are holders of unpaid offices and so are not taxed on the reimbursement of the cost of their travel to the House.

Value Added Tax

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer what is the estimated revenue from VAT on motor vehicles in 1977–78 and 1978–79.

About £300 million in 1977–78 and £350 million in 1978–79.

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer what is the estimated revenue from VAT on motor spirit and derv, respectively, in 1977–78 and 1978–79.

About £300 million in 1977–78 and £325 million in 1978–79. Separate estimates for derv are not available but the amount is likely to be small.

Petrol And Derv

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer what is the estimated revenue from excise duty on motor spirit and derv, respectively, in 1977–78 and 1978–79.

Estimates of the revenue from excise duties on road fuel are:

(£ million)
PetrolDerv
1977–78 (provisional)1,653533
1978–79 (estimates)1,650570

Giro

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer if he will arrange for the references to National Giro in Government Accounting (A/cs Gen. 18) to be expanded so that such services as in-payments into and transfers between National Giro accounts are included among the methods of making and receiving payments which may be used by Government Departments.

There are a number of references in the latest version of Government Accounting which make it clear that Government Departments are as free to use the services of National Giro for making or receiving payments as those offered by other recognised banks. If my hon. Friend has any particular point in mind, and will let me have details, I shall look into the matter.

Premium Bond Scheme

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer whether he will make a comprehensive statement on the progress and development of the premium bond scheme since its inception 21 years ago, giving the amounts of moneys contributed and the prizes paid; and to what extent a person holding bonds since the commencement of the scheme has had his holdings depreciated due to inflation allowing for no wins, and a series of nominal wins as stated over this period.

The scheme has made steady progress since its inception in November 1956. The annual net investment has ranged from £35 million to £103 million with an annual average appreciation of £58 million. Currently the total sum invested is £1,285 million. The number of prizes paid annually has increased from 95,000 in 1957–58 to 1,332,000 in 1977–78. The number of prizes to be distributed in the monthly June 1978 draw is 117,501 with a value of £5,891,725. The rate of interest on which the prize fund is calculated rose from 4 per cent. to 5⅝ per cent. and the maximum prize from £1,000 to £100,000. All prizes are free of United Kingdom income tax and capital gains tax.The money used to purchase a £100 premium savings bond in 1956 would now have a purchasing power of £23·64.As regards the final part of the Question, the reinvestment of any prizes won by bonds would have increased the amount of the holding, but the award of prizes depends entirely on the luck of the draw and it is not possible to give any meaningful estimate of the value or frequency of prizes that might have been won.

Mineworkers And Steelworkers (Home Improvement Loans)

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer what rate of interest is being charged to mineworkers and steelworkers on loans for the improvement of their houses with money provided by the European Commission; whether and to what extent the recipients will be chargeable with a taxable benefit; and whether identical treatment is available for employees of companies in the private sector.

The European Coal and Steel Community operates a scheme to provide loans to mineworkers and steelworkers for the improvement of their houses at a rate of interest of 1 per cent. At present the share of resources set aside for United Kingdom mineworkers is used exclusively for National Coal Board housing and the benefits of the low interest rate are entirely passed on to the tenants through the rents being lower than would otherwise be so. It is unlikely that tax liability will arise in other than an exceptional case. Loans on similar terms are available to employees of steel companies in the private sector.

National Debt

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer what was the average annual financial debt of the central Government for each year from 1969 to the first quarter of 1978 at 1970 prices; and what is the current financial debt.

The figure of national debt is available only on 31st March in each year. The national debt in March of each year from 1969 to 1978 at 1970 prices is as follows:

£ million
196935,735
197030,079
197130,765
197230,606
197329,135
197427,923
197526,654
197626,830
197727,152
197829,443
The provisional figure of national debt at 31st March 1978 is £79,083 million.

Travel-To-Work Costs

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer what is his estimate of (a) the degree of administrative difficulty and (b) the increase, if any, in the number of Inland Revenue staff, if the costs of travelling to work were made tax-deductible.

There would be very considerable administrative difficulties in ascertaining these costs and in taking, them into account in determining tax liabilities and PAYE codings. Annual returns and formal assessments would be required for very many more PAYE taxpayers than at present. The increase in Inland Revenue staff would depend on the details of the scheme but would be substantial.

National Land Fund

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer if, in the light of his answer to the hon. Member for Warley, East, Official Report, 13th May 1977, column 631–2, giving details of debits from the National Land Fund for the purchase of paintings and objets d'art offered in lieu of tax, and similar details in answers of 17th July 1973 and 20th March 1975, and of the refusal to give such details in answer to the hon. Member for Staffordshire, South-West (Mr. Cormack), he will make a statement of his practice in answering in detail on such matters; if, in particular, he will state whether the offer in part satisfaction of tax liabilities of a pastel by Degas of two dancers, currently on loan to the Fitzwilliam Museum in Cambridge has now been accepted; and, if so, what sum has been debited or is to be debited to the National Land Fund in respect of such acceptance.

Economic Prospects

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer if he will publish a later equivalent to table No. 5 in the Red Book adjusted to take account of the amendments to the Finance Bill passed in Committee of the whole House.

I do not propose to publish another version of the FSBR table 5 before the next Industry Act forecast.

Shareholdings

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer what proportion of shares in companies employing more than 2,000 workers his Department estimates is owned by (a) pension funds, (b) other insurance groups, (c) unit trusts, (d) investment trust companies, and (e) other institutions.

I have been asked to reply.The only data available are for 31st December 1975 for listed ordinary shares in United Kingdom companies irrespective of their numbers of employees and are contained in an article "Ownership of company shares: a new survey" published in

Economic Trends, No. 287, September 1977 (page 96). A copy is in the Library.

Estate Duty

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer if he will publish tables to show the effective rates of tax for estates of various sizes (a) in March 1974 and (b) March 1978, assuming that values have risen in line with the retail prices index, where half of the estate passes to the surviving spouse of the deceased and for similar estates where

TABLE 1
Effective rates applying where half the property passes to a surviving spouse
Value of estates in March 1974Effective rate of tax in March 1974Assumed value of estate in March 1978Effective rate of tax in March 1978
£per cent.£per cent.
15,00028,000
20,00037,400
30,00056,1000·5
40,0006·974,8002·3
50,00012·093,5004·2
60,00016·3112,2005·9
80,00023·4149,6008·8
100,00029·0186,90011·1
150,00038·8280,50015·6
200,00045·0374,00019·0
500,00059·9934,50025·6
1000,00067·41,869,50028·9
2,000 00071·23,739,00031·9
TABLE 2
Effective rates applying where halt the property passes to a surviving spouse and the other half, consisting of business property, passes to a son
Value of estates in March 1974Effective rate of tax in March 1974*Assumed value of estate in March 1978Effective rate of tax in March 1978
£per cent.£per cent.
15,00028 000
20,00037,400
30,00056,100
40,0005·274,800
50,0009·493,500
60,00013·0112,2000·27
80,00019·1149,6001·1
100,00023·9186,9002·1
150,00032·4280,5004·0
200,00037·7374,0005·6
500,00050·6934,50010·6
1,000,00057·11,869,50012·8
2,000,00060·43,739,00014·5
* It has been assumed that two-thirds of the business property would have qualified for the estate duty business relief.

Transport

A21 (Tonbridge Bypass)

asked the Secretary of State for Transport whether he will install as a matter of urgency a crash barrier along the central reservation of the A21 (Ton-bridge bypass).

It is not our general practice to provide central reserve barriers on all-purpose trunk roads. At this site the county council has very recently suggested such provision and the matter is being examined.

half the estate is left to a surviving spouse and the other half, consisting of business property, is left to a son.

asked the Secretary of State for Transport if he will list the accidents that have occurred on the A21 (Tonbridge bypass) since it was opened as a result of vehicles going on to, or across, the central reservation, stating in each case (a) the date of the accident, (b) the location on the Tonbridge bypass of the accident, (c) the numbers and types of vehicles involved, (d) the number of people injured and (e) the number of people killed.

I regret that in the time available it has not been possible to extract the necessary information, but I will provide the hon. Member with the data as soon as possible.

Trade

Oil Pollution ("Eleni V")

asked the Secretary of State for Trade whether he will make a further statement on the blowing up of the Greek oil-tanker "Eleni V"; why this action was not taken earlier; and whether he will list the coastal resorts which have been adversely affected since this tanker foundered.

The bow section of the "Eleni V" was blown up some 26 miles east of Lowestoft on 30th May. This course was adopted as a last resort since it meant deliberately releasing the oil remaining in the hulk and risking further pollution.Since the collision, oil has come ashore at points between Winterton and Alder-burgh. The only significant beach pollution is now at Hopton and Corson.

Ivory Coast

asked the Secretary of State for Trade what information he has on the products and services for which there may be export opportunities in the Ivory Coast.

Her Majesty's Government recognise the growing importance of the Ivory Coast as a market for British goods and services. The British Overseas Trade Board publicises, principally through the Export Intelligence Service, opportunities for the sale of British goods and services in the Ivory Coast. In addition to providing information about day-to-day demand for our products, we have drawn the attention of business men to the 1976–80 Ivorian Development Plan. This covers 61 projects in the sectors of textiles, agro-industry, tropical hardwoods, chemical industries, rubber, paper, construction materials, mechanical and electrical industries, and tourism, details of which may be inspected at the Statistics and Market Intelligence Library, Expert House, Ludgate Hill, London.

Copper And Cobalt (Imports)

asked the Secretary of State for Trade what percentages of Great Britain's requirements of copper and cobalt, respectively, have been imported from Zaire for each of the last three years for which figures are available.

Following are the tonnages of United Kingdom imports of copper consigned from Zaire, together with the percentages which these represent of our total imports of the metal in this form:

REFINED COPPER, UNWROUGHT (SITC(R) 682·12)
19751977
Metric tonnes5,9002,600
Percentage of total imports1·60·7
There were no imports of copper from Zaire in 1976 or of cobalt in any of the three years in question. These figures do not take account of imports of copper and cobalt mined in Zaire but consigned from other countries, whether or not following further processing. Of total United Kingdom imports of cobalt metal in 1977–2,117 tonnes—42 per cent.—891 tonnes—was consigned from Belgium-Luxembourg.

Defence

Hms "Bulwark"

asked the Secretary of State for Defence when he expects HMS "Bulwark" to commission.

HMS "Bulwark" will be brought to a fully operational state in the course of this year and will rejoin the operational Feet early in 1979.

Royal Naval School Of Music, Deal

asked the Secretary of State for Defence if he will make a statement about the future of the Royal Naval School of Music, Deal.

In October last year I announced that, subject to the usual consultations with other Government Departments, the staff side and the trade unions, it was our intention to move the Royal Marines School of Music from the Royal Marines Depot at Deal to Eastney Barracks in Portsmouth. The consultation process has been completed and I have written to the hon. and learned Member for Dover and Deal (Mr. Rees) to confirm that the school will be transferred, probably in 1981.It is particularly gratifying that the transfer of the school will not result in the closure of the depot at Deal. The long association between the Royal Marines and the town will be maintained by the presence of 41 Commando Royal Marines.

Entertainment Allowance

asked the Secretary of State for Defence what is the entertainment

Daily rates in £
RankUp to 19731973–751975–77Since 1977
NAVY
Commodore0·801·041·502·06
Captain0·600·781·121·53
Commander0·400·520·751·03
Lt.-Commander0·360·470·680·93
ARMY AND R.A.F
Brigadier/Air Commodore0·600·781·121·53
Colonel/Group Captain and Lt.-Colonel/Wing Commander:
Officer establishment 10=290·340·440·630·86
30=590·400·520·751·03
60–990·500·650·941·29
100–1390·600·781·121·53
For each additions 40 officers0·500·070·100·14
Special rates of entertainment allowance may be authorised where an officer with entertainment responsibilities is not entitled to a standard rate because it is not an in-command appointment; or because the standard rate does not match up to the cost of official entertainment which the appointment entails. For officers of flag or equivalent rank in national appointments revised rates, individually assessed, were introduced in August last year; the previous full review was in 1974. The United Kingdom contribution to allowances attaching to international appointments held by British officers is also assessed individually, but over a three-year period.

Hms "Fearless" And Hms "Intrepid"

asked the Secretary of State for Defence what is the present employment of HMS "Fearless" and HMS "Intrepid".

In addition to her operational role as an assault ship HMS "Fearless" is employed as a training ship for both officers and ratings. She is allowance for officers of field and flag rank, respectively; and how this has altered in each of the past six years.

Standard rates of entertainment allowance are paid to officers in command appointments in the rank of brigadier, colonel or lieutenant colonel or equivalent for the entertainment of officers under command and of casual visitors. Details of the rates over the past six years are shown below. The Navy rates also cover lieutenant commander and are based on slightly different criteria.at present taking part in the amphibious exercise Whisky Galore in the Hebrides. HMS 'Intrepid" is undergoing a refit at Portsmouth dockyard which is expected to be completed later this year.

"Equal Opportunities Commission News"

asked the Minister for the Civil Service if it is Government policy that Departments should allocate part of their advertising budget to Equal Opportunities Commission News.

No. I understand that the Equal Opportunities Commission News carries no advertising.

Civil Service

Pay

asked the Minister for the Civil Service, further to his answer to the hon. Member for Aberdeen, South on 25th May 1978, regarding the pay of industrial civil servants, if he will list the main job titles of these 23,000 civil servants.

The main job titles are as follows:

  • Barmaid
  • Batwomen in married quarters
  • Canteen assistant
  • Caretaker
  • Counterhand, senior
  • Gardener/handyman
  • General hand
  • Kitchen porter
  • Labourer (cleaner)
  • Labourer, unskilled
  • Laundress/laundry checker/laundry worker
  • Lavatory attendant
  • Machine hand, trainee
  • Mess hand
  • Night porter
  • Nightwatchman
  • Seamstress (basic grade)
  • Servant II
  • Servant
  • Waitress
  • Ward orderly
  • Watchman