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Written Answers

Volume 959: debated on Thursday 30 November 1978

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Written Answers To Questions

Thursday 30th November 1978

Prime Minister(Engagements)

Q6.

asked the Prime Minister if he will list his official engagements for 30th November.

Q7.

asked the Prime Minister if he will list his public engagements for 30th November.

Q8.

asked the Prime Minister if he will list his public engagements for 30th November.

Q10.

asked the Prime Minister if he will list his official engagements for Thursday 30th November.

Q11.

asked the Prime Minister if he will list his engagements for Thursday 30th November.

Q12.

asked the Prime Minister if he will list his official engagements for 30th November.

Q17.

asked the Prime Minister if he will list his official engagements for 30th November.

Q18.

asked the Prime Minister if he will list his public engagements for 30th November.

Q21.

asked the Prime Minister if he will list his official engagements for 30th November.

Q23.

asked the Prime Minister if he will list his official engagements for Thursday 30th November.

Q26.

asked the Prime Minister if he will list his engagements for 30th November.

Q27.

asked the Prime Minister whether he will list his official engagements for 30th November.

Q28.

asked the Prime Minister if he will list his official engagements for Thursday 30th November.

Q30.

asked the Prime Minister if he will list his public engagements for 30th November.

Q31.

asked the Prime Minister if he will list his engagements for 30th November 1978.

Q32.

asked the Prime Minister if he will list his public engagements for 30th November.

Q36.

asked the Prime Minister if he will list his official engagements for 30th November.

Q38.

asked the Prime Minister whether he will list his official engagements for 30th November.

Q43.

asked the Prime Minister whether he will list his official engagements for 30th November.

Q45.

asked the Prime Minister if he will list his official engagements for 30th November.

Q46.

asked the Prime Minister if he will list his official engagements for 30th November.

Q48.

asked the Prime Minister if he will list his official engagements for Thursday 30th November.

asked the Prime Minister if he will list his official engagements for 30th November.

I refer my hon. Friends and hon. Members to the reply which I gave earlier today to my hon. Friend the Member for Welwyn and Hatfield (Mrs. Hayman).

President Carter

Q9.

asked the Prime Minister if he will invite President Carter to visit the United Kingdom.

Agriculture, Fisheries And Food

European Community (Butter Sales)

asked the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food if he will place in the Library an account of his representations to the European Economic Commission on the subject of the projected surplus butter sales to the USSR and Poland and also of the replies he received.

I refer my hon. Friend to the reply given to my hon. Friend the Member for Thurrock (Dr. McDonald) on 22nd November.—[Vol. 958, c. 607–8]

Calves And Barren Cows (Export)

asked the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food how many calves and barren cows, respectively, were exported to the EEC for slaughter up to the most recent convenient date; and what is his estimate of the proportion of the average dairy farmer's income which is derived from the sale of barren cows and calves for export on the hoof and destined for slaughter from the United Kingdom to another EEC member State.

Separate figures for barren cows are not available but the numbers of calves and cows other than those for breeding and dairy purposes exported to the EEC in the first 10 months of 1978 were as follows:

Calves

322,346

Cows other than for breeding and dairying

17,738

It is estimated that approximately 8 per cent. of the average dairy farmer's income would currently be derived directly from this trade, though the existence of the trade has an additional unquantifiable effect on the generality of calf and barren cow prices.

Thames Barrage

Mr. Hayhoe asked the Minister of Agriculture, Fisherines and Food what is the latest estimate of the earliest date at which the Thames barrage can be brought into effective use.

The GLC estimates that under the present construction programme the barrier will be operational in late 1983. The possibility of a change in the programme, which could bring forward this date by some 12 months, is at present under consideration.

Northern Ireland Pig Marketing Board

asked the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food whether he will make a statement in the light of the European Court's judgment in the case concerning the powers of the Northern Ireland Pig Marketing Board.

I have noted the European Court's judgment in this case. It is now for the court in Northern Ireland to apply the judgment to the facts of the case, and it would be premature for me to comment in detail before that has been done. We are, however, already engaged in urgent discussions with the Commission in Brussels about the longterm arrangements for Northern Ireland pigs in the light of the European Court's ruling and it will be the objective of my right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland and myself to ensure that these provide for satisfactory marketing arrangements.

Animals (Exports)

asked the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food what steps are being taken to ensure that horses and ponies are not exported from Great Britain.

An order was made today increasing from 27th December the minimum values that apply for export purposes as follows:

Old value £New value£
Pony over 12 hands up to and including 14½ hands160300
Pony not exceeding 12 hands other than Shetland120220
Shetland pony not exceeding10½ hands60145
Heavy draft horse300715
Vanner, mule or jennet250495
Ass120220
The existence of these minimum values helps to protect certain types of horse and all ponies from being exported for slaughter. They will be kept under review.

Northern Ireland

Grant-Making Charitable Trust

asked the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland what progress has been made in setting up in Northern Ireland an independent grant-making charitable trust, referred to in the consultative document"The Government and the Voluntary Sector "; to what extent the trust would initially be financed by the Government; and if he will make a statement.

pursuant to his reply [Official Report, 29th November 1978; Vol. 959, c. 221], gave the following information:Steps are now being taken to set up an independent charitable trust to stimulate and support voluntary work in Northern Ireland.While some of the charitable trusts in Great Britain have in the past made welcome grants in Northern Ireland, and some are still doing so, it is important that Northern Ireland develop its own source of charitable funds. Generous grants for voluntary bodies are already available from statutory agencies, but local groups should not be totally dependent on Government. As well as raising money themselves, they should have access, as in the rest of the United Kingdom, to funds from independent charitable trusts, which can be geared to respond to need with speed, flexibility and the minimum of formality.The Government are therefore encouraging the establishment of a trust in Northern Ireland, the aims and objects of which will broadly be to promote the welfare of deprived groups in the community through support for voluntary organisations, groups or bodies engaged in charitable activities for the relief of poverty and social deprivation, especially where there is special social need. The trust would raise money from private sources in Northern Ireland and from the main charitable trusts in the United Kingdom and abroad. It should attract considerable support, accumulate funds and become an important factor in voluntary work in Northern Ireland. As it will take a year or two to achieve this level of support from private sources, and in order to enable the trust to begin operating as a funding agency from the date of its foundation, the Government will provide a capital sum of £·5 million to be pain on the setting up of the trust. To encourage private donors the Government will also match pound for pound up to a maximum of £250,000 any funds that the trustees raise from other sources. Parliamentary approval for the capital sum of £0·5 million, which will be by way of an extra-statutory grant in aid, will be sought in the Spring Supplementary Estimate for the Department of Health and Social Services for Northern Ireland.My noble Friend the Minister of State is now arranging for a group of people to come together as trustees-designate to discuss the legal setting up of the trust, which is expected to be in operation by 1st April 1979.

Disabled Children (Myoelectric Hands)

asked the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland how many myoelectric hands have been issued to disabled children in Northern Ireland.

None. The myoelectric hand is not available for general issue under the Health Service as it is still in the testing stage. Steps have been taken to identify suitable children to take part in trials of the hand at the limb fitting centres at Roehampton and Manchester but so far no disabled children in Northern Ireland have been found who would be suitable for inclusion in the trials.

Cockcroft Committee

asked the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland when he expects to make a statement about the report of the Cockcroft committee.

Maze Prison (Deputy Governor's Murder)

asked the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland if he will make a statement on the murder on 26th November of the deputy governor of Her Majesty's Maze prison by the Provisional Irish Republican Army, and what security was available at the deputy governor's home on the night of the murder.

At 8.30 p.m. on Sunday 26th November, Mr. Miles, the Deputy Governor of Her Majesty's Maze prison was shot dead by a gunman who called at his home in North Belfast. Police investigations into this crime are continuing. It would not be in the interests of security to disclose the security precautions which apply to members of the prison service either generally or in any particular case.

" Enterprise Ulster "

asked the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland what has been the total amount of money paid to"Enterprise Ulster"out of Government funds since it was set up.

asked the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland if he will list the leading officials of"Enterprise Ulster ", the dates of their appointment, their qualifications and the amount of their salaries and expenses, respectively, and the dates when their terms of office expire.

asked the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland what is the number of jobs which were tendered for by small private landscaping firms which have been undertaken by"Enterprise Ulster."

Ulster Defence Regiment(Murder Of Sergeant)

asked the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland if he will make a statement on the murder of a part-time sergeant in the Ulster Defence Regiment on Monday 27th November by the Irish Republican Army; what sort of weapon was used in the attack; how many shots were fired; and how many arrests were made.

Shortly after 5 p.m. on 27th November, a part-time sergeant in the Ulster Defence Regiment was shot dead by a gunman as he sat in his parked car near Belfast city centre. It is believed that the gunman fired four or five shots from a 38 revolver: forensic tests are being conducted in order to establish the facts. Police investigations into the incident are continuing but no arrests have been made.

Ballymena (Swimming Pool)

asked the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland why he has delayed the implementation of the democratic decision by the Ballymena borough council to close its swimming pool on Sundays; while Sunday opening decisions by other councils have been implemented immediately.

pursuant to his reply [Official Report 24th November 1978; Vol. 958, c. 798], gave the following information:Ballymena borough council first submitted byelaws relating to the hours of opening of its swimming pool complex to the Department of Education for Northern Ireland on 14th March 1978. After these byelaws had been carefully considered the council was told on 23rd June that, on the basis of legal advice, the byelaws fell short of the statutory requirements. On 15th August the council told the Department that it had clarified this, and revised byelaws were received by the Department in early October. The Department wrote to the council on 21st November conveying further legal advice and comments on the byelaws.

Stevenson's School, Dunmurry

asked the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland when Steven-son's school, Dunmurry, will be acquired by the Department of Education for youth work and recreational purposes.

pursuant to his reply [Official Report 27th November 1978; Vol. 959, c. 87], gave the following information:The South-Eastern Education and Library Board intends to acquire these premises for youth activities. There have been problems over the title to the property, following its closure as a primary school, and on advice the Board is applying to the High Court for permission to use the building for youth work and recreational purposes.

Social Services

Unemployed Persons

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services if he will publish a table for each year since 1948, showing unemployment by entitlement to benefit, and including numbers in receipt of earnings related supplement.

I shall publish the available information in the Official Report as soon as possible.

Secure Units

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services if he will indicate each regional health authority's share of the capital sums allocated since 1976 for the establishment of regional interim secure psychiatric units; and what use, in detail, each regional health authority has made of the money.

Central capital funds are not normally made available for interim units. In 1976–77 Yorkshire regional health authority was allocated £40,000 to meet capital expenditure on interim regional secure facilities at Lynfield Mount hospital, Bradford—£15,000—and Stanley Royd hospital, Wakefield—£25,000.

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services (1) why he is continuing to allocate money to regional health authorities for the establishment of regional secure psychiatric units when they have not used the money to date for that purpose;(2) how 60 per cent. of the special revenue allocated to regional health authorities for 1977–78 was spent on the provision of staffing of intensive secure units in the absence of a single regional interim secure psychiatric unit;(3) if he will indicate each regional health authority's share of the £17·7 million revenue allocation made since 1976 for regional secure psychiatric units; and what use in detail each regional health authority has made of the money.

The distribution of the £5·2 million in 1976–77 and the recurrent amounts for subsequent years totalling £17–7 million is shown below. The amounts for 1977·78 and 1978·79 were not separately identified in each region's allocation; the figures shown for these years are revaluations of the 1976·77 distribution.

£'000
RHA1976–771977–781978–79
Northern347400434
Yorkshire398459497
Trent510588637
East Anglian201232251
NW Thames386445482
NE Thames415479519
SE Thames403465504
SW Thames325375406
Wessex296342370
Oxford246284308
South Western352406440
West Midlands582672728
Mersey280323350
North Western459530574
Total5,2006,0006,500
On the use made in 1976–77 by health authorities of the special revenue allocations, I refer my hon. Friend to my reply to him and to my hon. Friend the Member for Newcastle upon Tyne, East (Mr. Thomas) on 28th July 1977—[Vol. 936, c.

611–12.] The following is the information for 1977–78:

Regional Health Authority

Northern:—£310,000 spent on improving facilities in mental hospitals for the care of unpredictable or potentially violent patients.

Yorkshire:—£86,000 on permanent facilities—staff recruitment and training—£27,000 on interim facilities at Lynfield Mount, Scalebor Park and Stanley Royd hospitals; £150,000—together with other available resources—to assist start on psychiatric-geriatric unit.

Trent:—Non-recurrent allocations totalling £445,000 made for improving mental hospitals throughout the Region.

East Anglia:—52,000 for interim secure facilities at Little Plumstead hospital. Balance allocated to AHAs for items in psychiatric hospitals to achieve minimum standards.

NW Thames:—£150,000 spent on interim facilities at Leavesden hospital. Balance allocated to AHAs for psychiatric services.

NE Thames:—Allocation distributed to AHAs to improve mental health services.

SE Thames:—£75,000 spent on psychiatric staffing.

SW Thames:—£20,000 on staff planning RSU. £338,000 on improving services in mental hospitals.

Wessex:—£233,000 on interim unit at Knowle hospital, which the RHA propose should be extended to form the permanent unit.

Oxford:—Allocation retained in regional reserve.

South Western:—Allocation is enabling AHA's to undertake mental health developments which otherwise would not be possible.

West Midlands:—£55,000 on interim secure facilities and £13,000 for staff for secure facilities. £290,000 allocated to general psychiatric services.

Mersey:—£178,400 on interim secure units at Rainhill, Parkside and West Cheshire hospitals.

North Western:—£167,000 on interim secure unit at Prestwich hospital.

Special revenue allocations for secure psychiatric facilities are continuing to be made to regional health authorities so that funds are immediately available to authorities when they require them. Meanwhile, authorities not in a position to devote their whole allocation to secure psychiatric facilities have been urged to make good use of these funds for other short-term projects, and as far as possible on services for the mentally ill. My Department will continue to ask regional health authorities for regular reports on how the special allocations are being spent.

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services where the interim secure psychiatric facilities providing 100 places are located.

Region and Hospital

  • Yorkshire
  • Lynfield Mount
  • Scalebor Park
  • Storthes Hall
  • Stanley Royd
  • Trent
  • Pastures
  • Wessex
  • Knowle
  • Mersey
  • Rainhill
  • Parkside
  • West Cheshire
  • North Western
  • Prestwich
  • Calderstones

In addition, there are secure facilities for disturbed mentally handicapped patients at Aston Hall hospital—West Midlands—Little Plumstead hospital—East Anglia—and Leavesden hospital—North-West Thames.

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services which regional health authorities have not sent in plans for regional secure units.

Plans for regional secure psychiatric units have not so far been submitted by the East Anglian, South-West Thames, North-West Thames and Oxford regional health authorities.

Special Hospitals (Patients' Transfers)

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services how many consultants, and from which National Health Service hospitals, have visited the special hospitals with members of their nursing teams in order to obtain first-hand knowledge of patients waiting transfers.

Consultants from the National Health Service hospitals listed below have made a total of 142 visits to the special hospitals so far this year in order to obtain first-hand knowledge of patients awaiting transfer.It is thought that on at least one-third of the visits the consultants have been accompanied by members of their nursing teams but a precise record is not maintained.

  • Aston Hall Hospital, Aston-on-Trent.
  • Balderton Hospital, Newark-on-Trent.
  • Banstead Hospital, Sutton.
  • Bethlem Royal Hospital, Beckenham.
  • Borocourt Hospital, Reading.
  • Brocknall Hospital, Blackburn.
  • Brookwood Hospital, Woking.
  • Bryn-y-Neuadd Hospital. Llanfairfechan, Gwynedd.
  • Calderstones Hospital, Whalley.
  • Carlton Hayes, Leicester.
  • Cell Barnes Hospital, St. Albans.
  • Claybury Hospital, Woodford Bridge.
  • Coldharbour Hospital, Sherborne.
  • Coney Hill Hospital, Gloucester.
  • Darenth Park Hospital, Dartford.
  • Doncaster Royal Infirmary, Doncaster.
  • Dovenby Hall Hospital, near Cockermouth.
  • Ely Hospital, Cardiff.
  • Essex Hall, Colchester.
  • Fair Mile Hospital, Wallingford.
  • Farmfield Hospital, Horley.
  • Fieldhead Hospital, Stanley, near Wakefield.
  • Friern Hospital, New Southgate N.11.
  • Fulbourn Hospital, Cambridge.
  • Garlands Hospital, Carlisle.
  • Glenside Hospital, Bristol.
  • Garth Angharad Hospital, Dolgellau, Gwynedd.
  • Goodmayes Hospital, Ilford.
  • Graylingwell Hospital, Chichester.
  • Greaves Hall Hospital, Banks, near Southport.

  • Harmston Hall Hospital, Hampton, Lincoln.
  • Harperbury Hospital, Radlett.
  • Hellingley Hospital, Hailsham.
  • Herrison Hospital, Dorchester.
  • Herts and Essex General Hospital, Bishop's Stortford.
  • Ida Darwin Hospital, Fulbourn, Cambridge.
  • John Connolly Hospital, Birmingham.
  • Kingsway Hospital, Derby.
  • Knowle Hospital, Fareham, Hants.
  • Leavesden Hospital, Abbots Langley, near Watford.
  • Lea Castle Hospital, Wolverley, near Kidderminster.
  • Leicester Frith Hospital, Leicester.
  • Little Plumstead Hospital, Norwich.
  • Mapperley Hospital, Nottingham.
  • Maudsley Hospital, London S.E.5.
  • Meanwood Park Hospital, Leeds.
  • Middlewood Hospital, Sheffield.
  • Monyhull Hospital, Birmingham.
  • Naburn and Bootham Park Hospital, York.
  • Nethorne Hospital, Coulsdon.
  • Newchurch Hospital, Warrington.
  • Nova Fry Hospital, Shepton Mallett.
  • Northgate Hospital, Morpeth.
  • Oakwood Hospital, Maidstone.
  • Park Hospital, Bridgend, Glamorgan.
  • Parkside Hospital, Macclesfield.
  • Pen-y-fal Hospital, Abergavenny.
  • Powick Hospital, Worcester.
  • Prestwich Hospital, Manchester.
  • Prudhoe Hospital, Prudhoe.
  • Rainhill Hospital, Warrington.
  • Ridge Hill Hospital, Stourbridge.
  • Roundhay Hospital, Devizes.
  • Royal Albert Hospital, Lancaster.
  • Royal Western Hospital, Starcross.
  • St. Andrew's Hospital, Northampton.
  • St. Ann's Hospital, Bournemouth.
  • St. Clement's Hospital, Ipswich.
  • St. Crispin's Hospital, Northampton.
  • St. Ebba's Hospital, Epsom.
  • St. Edward's Hospital, Leeds.
  • St. Francis Hospital, Haywards Heath.
  • St. George's Hospital, Stafford.
  • St. John's Hospital, Lincoln.
  • St. Luke's Hospital, Middlesbrough.
  • St. Margaret's Hospital, Birmingham.
  • St. Mary's Hospital, Axminster.
  • St. Nicholas Hospital, Gosforth.
  • Scalebor Park Hospital, Ilkley.
  • Selwood Hospital, Frome.
  • Severalls Hospital, Colchester.
  • South Ockenden Hospital, South Ockenden, Essex.
  • South Western Hospital, London, S.W.9.
  • Stone Park Hospital, Bristol.
  • Thatchbury Mount Hospital, Southampton.
  • Tone Vale Hospital, Taunton.
  • Towers Hospital, Humberstone, Leicester.
  • Warneford Hospital, Oxford.
  • West Norfolk and King's Lynn General Hospital, King's Lynn.
  • Whitchurch Hospital, Whitchurch, Cardiff.
  • Whitcroft Hospital, Newport, Isle of Wight.
  • Whittingham Hospital, Preston.

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services which health authorities and which National Health Service hospitals his officials have visited in order to discuss the transfer of patients from the special hospitals, and what was the outcome of the discussions.

The following health authorities and National Health Service hospitals have been visited this year:

  • South Western Regional Health Authority.
  • Wessex Regional Health Authority.
  • Birmingham Area Health Authority.
  • Hampshire Area Health Authority.
  • Mary Dendy Hospital, Alderley Edge.
  • Church Hill House Hospital, Bracknell.
  • Little Plumstead Hospital, Norwich.
  • Middlewood Hospital, Sheffield.
  • St. Luke's Hospital, Middlesbrough.
  • Farmfield Hospital, Hortley.
  • Balderton Hospital, Newark.
  • Stoke Mandeville Hospital, Aylesbury.
  • Leavesden Hospital, Watford.
  • Garth Anghard Hospital, Dolgellau.
  • King's Mill Hospital, Sutton in Ashfield.
  • St. Laurence's Hospital, Caterham.
  • Scalebor Park Hospital, Ilkley.
  • Whittingham Hospital, Preston.
The discussions have helped to overcome the difficulties in arranging transfers in individual cases. They have generally speeded the process of negotiation and led to clearer and more prompt identification of the reasons for the delay in effecting transfers from the special hospitals.

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services how many patients awaiting transfer from the special hospitals have been taken to National Health Service hospitals for assessment by the local clinical team; and what has been the result.

Nine patients awaiting transfer from the special hospitals have been taken to National Health Service hospitals so far this year for assessment by the local clinical team. Of these, seven have been accepted for admission, one has been rejected and one is awaiting a decision.

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services how many patients transferred in the last year from special hospitals and National Health Service hospitals have been readmitted to the special hospitals.

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services how long each of the eight men and three women currently in Rampton and who have been waiting for over four years for a transfer to a National Health Service hospital have been waiting; how many hospitals have refused to take each of them; if they would be suitable for transfer to a regional interim secure psychiatric unit: and what is the age of the two ladies over 60 years.

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services how long the man and 10 women currently in Moss Side who have been waiting for over four years for a transfer to a National Health Service hospital have been waiting; how many hospitals have refused to take each of them; and what are their ages.

The man, aged 66, has been waiting eight years four months for a place at Royal Eastern Counties hospital.Only one woman at Moss Side hospital has been waiting for transfer over four years. She is aged 65 and has been waiting four years three months for a place at Church Hill House hospital, Bracknell.

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services what are the ages of the two men aged under 20 years currently in Moss Side and awaiting transfer to a National Health Service hospital; and which hospitals have refused to accept them.

I regret that an error occurred in my reply of 20th November 1978—[Vol. 958, c. 944–6.]—giving a break-down in tabular form of the number of patients at the special hospitals who are awaiting transfer to NHS hospitals. The entries in the"Under 20"category also covered patients age 20.The two men are now both aged 20. The delays in effecting their transfers are not due to the refusal of National Health Service hospitals to accept them. The one, who requires to be treated in some degree of security, has been accepted for transfer to the Royal Western Counties hospital as soon as that hospital has suitable facilities. In the case of the other one, the consent of my right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for the Home Department to the transfer has been sought but not yet given. I understand that he is in the process of seeking the advice of the Advisory Board on Restricted Patients.

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services what is the age of the girl aged under 20 years who is currently in Rampton and who has been waiting for up to a year for transfer to a National Health Service hospital; and which hospitals have refused to accept her.

The girl is now aged 20. She is on the waiting list for St. Margaret's hospital, Birmingham and will be admitted when there is a vacancy in a suitable ward.

Sickle Cell Anaemia

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services what measures he is taking to ensure that the medical profession is aware of the need to screen surgical patients for sickle cell anaemia.

I am satisfied that the medical profession is already aware of

Groups receiving supplementary allowancesTotal in group(including the temporarily separated)One-parent families in group (excluding the temporarily separated)
(i)Unemployed and registered for work671,0007,000
(ii)Lone parents except those in other groups309,000307,000
(iii)Sick and incapable of work229,0003,000
(iv)Widows with a national insurance widow's benefit22,0005,000
(v)People caring for elderly or sick relatives at home11,000None
(vi)Others11,0001,000

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services what savings (a) in staff numbers and (b) in staff costs would be achieved if the recovery and collection of maintenance from husbands, ex-husbands and other close relatives of one-parent families on supplementary benefit were ended.

Supplementary Benefit (Appeals)

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services, in the latest year for which figures are available, how many women out of what totals there were among appellants to supplementary benefit appeals tribunals and the three panels from which the members of these tribunals are drawn, respectively.

the need to screen potential sufferers from sickle cell anaemia before the administration to them of anaesthetics prior to surgery. My Department is not the appropriate body to give advice to the medical profession in matters which involve the training and clinical judgment of its members.

One-Parent Families

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services how many one-parent families are included in each of the groups I, III, IV, V and VI of the table in paragraph 2.5 of the Department of Health and Social Security's report"Social Assistance ".

A detailed breakdown of the number of one-parent families in each of these groups of recipients of supplementary allowances can be obtained only from the annual special inquiry. The latest available figures from this source are for 30th November 1977, when the numbers in each group were as shown in the table below.

I regret that information is not readily available about the number of women appellants to supplementary benefit appeal tribunals and could be obtained only at disproportionate cost.The current composition of the three panels from which the members of these tribunals are drawn is as follows:

TotalWomen
Chairman31456 (18 per cent.)
Workpeople's representatives.1,199234 (20 per cent.)
Other members1,224460 (38 per cent.)

Sex Equality

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services when he hopes to implement EEC legislation ensuring women equality with men in social security rights.

I very much welcome the agreement which we have reached on an EEC directive which will represent a major step towards full equality for women. It provides, subject to some exceptions affecting widowhood and maternity benefits, child benefit and certain other long-term benefits, that within six years men and women must enjoy equal entitlement to personal social security benefits and increases for dependent adults and children. We shall of course be considering how the directive should be implemented and I shall report further to the House in due course.

Back Pain

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services when he now expects to receive the report of the working party studying back pain; and if he will make a statement.

I have received the report of the working group on back pain. It is being published and should be available as an HMSO publication in March or April of next year.

Mobility Allowance

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services if he will now give details of the phasing-in of the next age-group of disabled people to be included in the mobiilty allowance scheme; and if he will make a statement.

I am glad to say that a further commencement order will be laid before the House in January. This will bring into the scheme men and women aged 59 and 60. They will be invited to claim mobility allowance in March and payments will commence next June. We anticipate that between 8,000 and 10,000 successful claims will be received from this age group. I shall make a further announcement as soon as possible about the precise date from which claims may be made.Our present expectation is that ultimately there will be 145,000 receiving the allowance when it is fully phased-in. By the financial year 1980–81 we shall be spending an estimated £89·7 million on outdoor mobility for the disabled.

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services if he will now update the table of total expenditure by his Department on mobility help, which was provided in reply to a Question by the hon. Member for West Stirlingshire (Mr. Canavan) on 24th February, to reflect the proposed further improvements in the mobility allowance scheme.

The following is the information:

ANNUAL TOTAL EXPENDITURE BY DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND SOCIAL SECURITY
Financial Year£-million
1972–739·2
1973–7411·2
1974–7513·1
1975–7617·2
1976–7726·2
1977–7840·3*
1978–7965·7*
1979–8082·5*
1980–8189·7*
*estimated

Unemployment Benefit (Students)

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services when the report of the National Insurance Advisory Committee on the revised draft regulations designed to limit the entitlement of students to unemployment benefit in the short vacations is to be published.

The report of the National Insurance Advisory Committee has been laid before Parliament today, and will be published as a Command Paper as soon as circumstances permit. The Government are disappointed that the majority of the Committee felt unable to recommend that the regulations should be made, and in the light of the Committee's report we do not propose to proceed with the regulations for the present. We still consider it important in principle, however, that students should not have such easy access to unemployment benefit, and we shall be examining the matter further to see whether these, or other changes, should be brought into effect for the 1979–80 academic year.

Disabled Housewives

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services what action he proposes to take with regard to the household duties test for disabled housewives; and if he will give an undertaking that no housewife will have non-contributor invalidity pension taken away from her under the Social Security (Non-Contributory Invalidity Pension) Amendment Regulations 1978 (S.I., 1978, No. 1340), dated 12th September 1978, until Parliament has had a chance to debate the issue in Government time and vote on it.

I have decided to refer to the National Insurance Advisory Committee for consideration and advice under section 138(3) of the Social Security Act 1975 the following question:

" Taking into account the implications for cost and manpower (including medical manpower), and the decision of the Tribunal of National Insurance Commissioners dated 8th September 1978 (C55/78) to consider, in relation to housewives non-contributory invalidity pension, alternative ways of using the power conferred by Section 36(7) of the Social Security Act 1975 to prescribe the circumstances in which of performing normal household duties; and a woman is or is not to be treated as incapable to report."
Such a reference will enable the issues to be fully discussed, and provide an opportunity for those who have a concern in this field to give evidence to an independent body whose conclusion will of course be made available in a published report which can then be debated in the House.Decisions on national insurance claims are given by independent adjudicating authorities. Our intention in amending the regulations in September was to provide in statutory form the same test of incapacity for household duties as had been applied by the adjudicating authorities by means of case law in over 60,000 cases before the tribunal of commissioners gave its decision. It seems unlikely therefore that the application of the new regulation would itself result in the disallowance of any claim on which an award had been made before the tribunal decision was given. If, however, before Parliament has had a chance to debate the NIAC report a disallowance is imposed on such a claim, solely because of the amendment
Weekly Tax Refund
Tax paid at 25 per cent, onlyTax paid at25 per cent, plus33 per cent.
Family type££
Single person4·757·60
Married couple7·4011·05
Married couple plus one child aged 37·9011·70
Married couple plus 2 children aged 4 and 68·3512·35
Married couple plus 3 children aged 3, 8 and 129·0013·20
Married couple plus 4 children aged 3, 8, 11 and 169·8014·25
Receipt of tax refunds may affect entitlement to free school meals but is unlikely to affect any other means-tested benefit. Figures are not readily available to the regulation, the Government will take steps to ensure that the housewife does not lose benefit.

Family Incomes

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services if he will now bring up to date the net weekly spending power figures published in reply to the hon. Member for Norfolk, North (Official Report, 22nd November 1977 and 24th July 1978), showing the relative financial position in and out of work for each family grouping, on the assumption that earnings or previous earnings were £30, £35, £45, £55, £65, £75, £85, £95, and £105 per week, using the new rates of benefits and the new benefit levels due to take effect in November, assuming that the taxpayer is in each case contracted into the new State pension scheme, and including examples for a family with three children as well as for families with each of one, two and four children; and if he will also show in each case the maximum number of weeks for which tax refunds could be payable during sickness or unemployment.

pursuant to his reply [Official Report, 9th November 1978; Vol. 957, c. 334–5], gave the following answer:The information requested is set out in the tables below. The assumptions made about the ages of the children and housing and work expenses are shown at the head of each table. Income tax refunds have not been included as part of net weekly spending power of the unemployed man, for the reason given in the reply to the hon. Member on 15th October 1976–[Vol. 917, c.

245–50.] The approximate weekly amounted such refunds, where payable, would, however, now be as follows:

to show in each case the maximum number of weeks for which tax refunds could be payable and could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

Other assumptions made to compile the tables are as follows:

1. For married couples, the wife has no personal income (apart from child benefit, where appropriate) from earnings or social security benefits.

2. There have been no previous spells of unemployment or sickness which would affect the amount of unemployment benefit and earnings-related supplement payable.

3. Means-tested benefits are taken up in full by working and unemployed families. In the

TABLE 1
SINGLE PERSON: RENT £5·30; RATES £1·95; WORK EXPENSES £2·10

Employed

Normal earnings

Tax

N.I.

Rent rebate

Rate rebate

Net weekly spending power

££££££
302·761·952·711·0119·66
354·152·281·860·7121·79
457·452·930·1025·37
5510·753·5831·32
6514·054·2237·38
7517·354·8743·43
8520·655·5349·47
9523·956·1855·52
10527·256·8261·58

Unemployed (Weeks 3–28)

former earnings

U.B.

Rent rebate

Rate rebate

Net weekly spending power

£

£

£

£

£

3020·224·941·7319·64
3521·544·611·6320·53
4522·874·281·5221·42
5524·193·951·4222·31
6525·513·621·3123·19
7526·833·291·2024·07
8528·153·031·1225·05
9529·472·801·0426·06
10530·792·580·9627·08

TABLE 2
MARRIED COUPLE: RENT £5·30; RATES £1·95; WORK EXPENSES £2·10

Employed

Normal earnings

Tax

N.I.

Rent rebate

Rate rebate

Net weekly spending power

£

£

£

£

£

£

300·121·955·301·9325·81
351·372·284·291·5327·82
453·962·932·240·8431·84
557·263·580·540·2435·59
6510·564·2240·87
7513·864·8746·92
8517·165·5352·96
9520·466·1859·01
10523·766·8265·07

case of family income supplement (FJS), where entitlement existed while at work, payment continues for the first 6 months of unemployment.

4. There are no tax allowances apart from personal allowances.

The tables relate only to the particular illustrative situations quoted, and have no general application and no validity if quoted out of context without stating the assumptions used.

Unemployed (Weeks 3–28)

Former earnings

U.B.

Rent rebate

Rate rebate

Net weekly spending power

£

£

£

£

£

3025·505·301·9525·50
3526·205·301·9526·20
34532·624·891·7231·98
5533·944·561·6132·86
6535·264·231·5133·75
7536·583·901·4034·63
8537·903·571·2935·51
9539·223·241·1936·40
10540·542·991·1037·38

TABLE 3
MARRIED COUPLE WITH ONE CHILD AGED 3 RENT £6·00; RATES £2· 25; WORK EXPENSES £2·10; CHILD BENEFIT £3·00

Employed

Normal earnings

Tax

N.I.

F.I.S.

Rent rebate

Rate rebate

Free Welfare milk

Net weekly spending power

£

£

£

£

£

£

£

£

301·958·004·851·750·9536·25
350·892·285·504·221·550·9536·70
453·392·930·503·181·200·9537·16
556·633·581·560·6339·63
659·934·2243·50
7513·234·8749·55
8516·535·5355·59
9519·836·1861·64
10523·136·8267·70

Unemployed (Weeks 3–28)

Former earnings

U.B.

F.I.S.

Rent rebate

Rate rebate

Free Welfare milk

Net weekly spending power

£

£

£

£

£

£

£

3027·358·005·511·960·9538·52
3527·355·506·002·160·9536·71
4533·690·505·802·050·9537·74
5536·795·401·9337·87
6537·115·071·8238·75
7538·434·741·7239·64
8539·754·411·6140·52
9541·074·081·5041·40
10542·393·751·4042·29

TABLE 4
MARRIED COUPLE WITH TWO CHILDREN AGED 4 AND 6 RENT £6·30; RATES £2·35; WORK EXPENSES £2·10; CHILD BENEFIT £6·00

Employed

Normal earnings

Tax

N.I.

F.I.S.

Rent rebate

Rent rebate

Free school meals

Free Welfare milk

Net weekly spending power

£

£

£

£

£

£

£

£

£

301·9510·005·421·931·250·9542·85
350·412·287·504·791·731·250·9543·78
452·912·932·503·621·351·250·9544·08
556·003·582·340·901·2545·16
659·304·220·640·301·2548·92
7512·604·8752·78
8515·905·5358·82
9519·206·1864·87
10522·506·8270·93

Unemployed (Weeks 3–28)

Former earnings

U.B.

F.I.S.

Rent rebate

Rate rebate

Feer school meals

Free Welfare milk

Net weekly spending power

£

£

£

£

£

£

£

£

£

3029·2010·005·622·001·250·9546·37
3529·207·506·242·201·250·9544·69
4533·692·506·302·241·250·9544·28
5537·646·012·121·2544·37
6538·965·682·021·2545·26
7540·285·351·911·2546·14
8541·605·021·811·2547·03
9542·924·691·701·2547·91
10544·244·361·591·2548·79

TABLE 5
MARRIED COUPLE WITH THREE CHILDREN AGED 3, 8 AND 12 RENT £6·30; RATES £2·35; WORK EXPENSES £2·10; CHILD BENEFIT £·00

Employed

Normal earnings

Tax

N.I.

F.I.S.

Rent rebate

Rate rebate

Free school meals

Free Welfare milk

Net weekly spending power

£

£

£

£

£

£

£

£

£

301·9512·005·812·062·500·9549·62
352·289·505·181·862·500·9550·96
452·262·934·503·931·462·500·9551·40
555·143·582·951·122·500·9552·05
658·444·221·250·522·5054·86
7511·744·8756·64
8515·045·5362·68
9518·346·1868·73
10521·646·8274·79

Unemployed (Weeks 3–28)

Former earnings

U.B.

F.I.S.

Rent rebate

Rate rebate

Free school meals

Free Welfare milk

Net weekly spending power

£

£

£

£

£

£

£

£

3031·0512·005·541·972·500·9554·36
3531·059·506·172·172·500·9552·69
4533·694·506·302·352·500·9550·64
5539·496·302·262·5050·90
6540·816·102·152·5051·91
7542·135·772·052·5052·80
8543·455·441·942·5053·68
9544·775·111·842·5054·57
10546·094·781·732·5055·45

TABLE 6
MARRIED COUPLE WITH FOUR CHILDREN AGED 3, 8, 11 AND 16 RENT £7·20; RATES £2 ·70; WORK EXPENSES £2·10; CHILD BENEFIT £12·00

Employed

Normal earnings

Tax

N.I.

F.I.S.

Rent rebate

Rate rebate

Free school meals

Free Welfare milk

Net weekly spending power

£

£

£

£

£

£

£

£

£

301·9513·506·862·433·750·9555·54
352·2811·506·112·193·750·9557·22
451·472·936·504·861·793·750·9558·45
554·093·581·503·841·453·750·9558·82
657·394·222·390·943·750·9561·42
7510·694·870·690·343·7564·22
8513·995·5365·48
9517·296·1871·53
10520·596·8277·59

Unemployed (Weeks 3–28)

Former earnings

U.B.

F.I.S.

Rent rebate

Rate rebate

Free school meals

Free Welfare milk

Net weekly spending power

£

£

£

£

£

£

£

£

3032·9013·506·132·203·750·9561·53
3532·9011·506·632·363·750·9560·19
4533·696·507·202·703·750·9556·89
5541·181·507·062·503·750·9559·04
6542·667·072·503·750·9559·03
7543·986·742·393·7558·96
8545·306·412·293·7559·85
9546·626·082·183·7560·73
10547·945·752·083·7561·62
N.I. = National Insurance contribution.
U.B. = Unemployment Benefit.
F.l.S. = Family Income Supplement.

Benefits (Earnings Limits)

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services if he will publish in the Official Report the estimated number of persons in full-time work whose net income is below their equivalent supplementary benefit level for each year since 1970; and if he will also publish the numbers of persons who are dependent on these wage earners.

pursuant to his reply [Official Report, 3rd August 1978; Vol. 955, c. 695], gave the following information:I regret that the full information requested is not available. The following table, however, gives estimated numbers of workers—single persons and heads of families—who are under pension age, normally in full-time work or self-employed and have incomes below supplementary benefit level; and estimated numbers of persons dependent on the heads of families. These estimates, which are for December in each of the five years from 1972 to 1976, are subject to the qualifications set out in the notes below the table.

YearEstimated number of workersEstimated number of dependants of heads of families
197280,000170,000
197390,000170,000
1974130,000230,000
1975210,000420,000
1976290,000600,000

Notes

1. These estimates are based on an analysis by the Department of Health and Social Security of incomes and other information recorded by respondents to the family expenditure survey—FES. The estimates, which are subject to sampling error, have been rounded to the nearest 10,000.

2. The estimates relate only to the population living in private households; families and persons in institutions are not sampled in the FES.

3. The supplementary benefit level is taken as being the appropriate supplementary benefit scale rate(s). Income refers to next income less net housing costs less work expenses where appropriate.

4. The comparison is based on the worker's normal income in his normal employment. For example, where he had been off work due to sickness or unemployment for less than three months at the time of the survey, his income when at work was used in determining the level of income.

5. The 1976 estimates of workers with incomes below the supplementary benefit level are directly comparable with those for 1975 and 1974 but not with those for 1972 or 1973. In earlier years it had been assumed that the income distribution of the self-employed was the same as for other employees. Self-employed sample records were included in the analysis in 1974 for the first time and this has been repeated in 1975 and 1976. The figures on the self-employed are especially liable to error because their incomes recorded in the FES tend to be particularly low in relation to their recorded expenditure. This discrepancy is partly due to the incomes of the self-employed being recorded in many cases for a much earlier period than that to which their expenditure relates and the data in the tables for 1975 and 1976 have been adjusted to take account of this.

Perinatal And Infant Mortality

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services whether he will publish in the Official Report the perinatal mortality rate and infant mortality rate in each year since 1947 classified by legitimacy and place of confinement.

pursuant to his reply [Official Report, 24th November 1978: Vol. 958, c. 770], gave the following information:The rates for England and Wales are as follows:

Perinatal mortality

Infant mortality

Stillbirths and deaths under one week of age per 1,000 total births

Deaths under one year of age per 1,000 live births

Legitimate

Illegitimate

Legitimate

Illegitimate

By legitimacy
194739·653·540·859·6
194837·752·933·946·0
194937·153·832·045·4
195036·849·929·339·7
195137·552·429·438·9
195236·850·327·235·0
195336·348·526·533·0
195437·548·925·132·2
195536·848·924·531·7
195636·247·323·428·4
195735·648·022·830·0
195834·446·222·327·8
195933·545·121·927·4
196032·341·521·526·4
196131·541·221·225·3
196230·240·421·327·3
196328·737·120·826·0
196427·537·119·426·3
196526·234·818·524·9
196625·634·218·524·6
196724·633·917·923·7
196824·031·917·823·4
196922·730·617·325·7
197022·831·017·526·2
197121·629·616·825·4
197221·128·216·722·5
197320·526·916·322·9
197419·727·115·722·6
197518·725·815·022·5
197617·123·913·620·5
197716·422·613·219·1

Perinatal mortality

Infant mortality

Stillbirths and deaths under one week of age per 1,000 total births

Deaths under one year of age per 1,000 live births

1975

1976

1975

1976

By place of confinement
NHS hospital "A"5·04·27·26·7
NHS hospital"B "20·418·816·114·6
Other hospitals14·114·215·313·0
At home18·618·515·715·4
Elsewhere72·477·049·730·5
Figures are not available before 1975 and not yet available for 1977.

NHS hospital "A"Hospitals and homes under the NHS (except psychiatric hospitals) with beds allocated to GP maternity but not obstetrics.
NHS hospital"B "Remainder of hospitals and homes under the NHS (except psychiatric hospitals).
Other hospitalsMainly maternity homes not under the NHS.
At homeAt the usual place of residence of the mother.
ElsewherePlaces of confinement which include all psychiatric institutions, homes for unmarried mothers, remand homes, reception centres, private houses (other than mother's usual residence).

Transport

Road And Rail Investment

asked the Secretary of State for Transport what strategic or policy studies he has initiated to compare the rates of return from investment in road and rail, along the lines recommended by the Leitch committee; what research funds and manpower within his Department he has assigned to these studies; and with which outside bodies his Department is collaborating in these studies.

I have set up a working group with the Department which is studying this in collaboration with the British Railways Board. No specific limit has been put on the research funds or manpower to be employed.

National Finance

Vehicle Excise Duty

asked the Secretary of State for Transport (1) in respect of how many commercial vehicles in each of the last five years vehicle excise duty has been paid;(2) in respect of how many vehicles in each of the following categories in each of the last five years vehicle excise duty has been paid (

a) commercial vehicles, ( b) private vehicles used exclusively for private use, being the only car owned by the taxpayer, ( c) private vehicles used exclusively for private use, being one of two cars owned by the taxpayer, and ( d) private vehicles used exclusively for private use, being one of more than two cars owned by the taxpayer.

The number of commercial vehicles—public road passenger vehicles, general goods vehicles, farmers goods vehicles, and tractors paying vehicle excise duty—licensed in September 1978 was 2·2 million and has been at this level for the past five years. The number of cars licensed in September 1978 was 14·1 million. This represents an increase of about 1 million since 1973. In 1977, 10·3 million cars were in private use either exclusively or with less than 500 miles of business travel a year, of which 7·7 million were the only car normally available to a household and 2·6 million were in multi-car households. Those with more than 500 miles of business use numbered 3·7 million, of which 2·4 million were only cars and 1·3 million were in multi-car households.

asked the Secretary of State for Transport what savings in staff will be made as a result of the abolition of vehicle excise duty; and whether the staff displaced will be transferred to other Departments or be made redundant.

Rather more than 2,000 posts. At Swansea the reduction can be met by natural wastage. In local offices the effect has to be considered in detail and in consultation with the unions involved. But the rundown will be made with full regard to staff interests.

Petrol

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer what was the total revenue derived from excise duty on petrol in each of the last five years; and how much related to (a) private vehicles in private use, (b) private vehicles being used partly for commercial purposes and (c) commercial vehicles.

I have been asked to reply.The United Kingdom total excise duty on petrol was £1,117 million, £1,101 million, £1,102 million, £1,517 million and £1,666 million in the financial years 1973–74 to 1977–78 respectively. In 1977 some 80 per cent. of petrol was sold for use in cars available for private use by households, 15 per cent. for commercial vehicles and 5 per cent. for other users—including motorcycles. It is estimated from the national travel survey that 35 per cent. of the petrol sold was used in household cars which were used for more than 500 miles a year on business.

Transport

Private And Commercial Vehicles (Mileage)

asked the Secretary of State for Transport how many (a) private vehicles on private business, (b) private vehicles on commercial business and (c) commercial vehicles travelled less than 5,000 miles, 5,000–10,000 miles, 10,000–15,000 miles, 15,000–20,000 miles, 20,000–25,000 miles, 25,000–30,000 miles, 30,000–35,000 miles 35,000–40,000 miles and over 40,000 miles in each of the last five years.

Mileage data are available only from the 1975–76 national travel survey which enable estimates to be made of annual mileage for vehicles available to households for private travel. Some 3·9, 4·5, 3·9, 1·1 and 0·6 million household cars travel a total of 0·4, 5·8, 9·14, 15·20 and 21-plus thousand miles a year respectively. Over one-quarter of these cars are used at least 500 miles a year for business purposes. Of these, some 1·9, 0·8, 0·6 and 0·4 million cars travel 0·5–4, 5–8, 9–14, 15-plus thousand miles a year on business respectively.

Lorries

asked the Secretary of State for Transport (1) against how many over-length lorries the police and licensing authorities have taken action in the past 12 months; and how many of these vehicles were registered abroad;(2) what are the current maximum fines available in respect of over-length lorries; and what has been the average level of fines in the past 12 months;(3) if he is satisfied with the operation of the law limiting over-length lorries.

In 1976, the latest year for which figures are available, there were 83 prosecutions in England and Wales and the average fine was £17. No information is available on the place of registration of these vehicles. The current maximum fine is £100.There may be cases in which some lorries slightly exceed the legal limits but I have no evidence of any substantial and widespread infringement in this respect or that the law is not being reasonably enforced.

Regional Highway Traffic Model

asked the Secretary of State for Transport whether the informed debate on the regional highway traffic model is taking place as recommended by the Leitch committee; and when it took place and who has taken part in it to date.

Such a debate on the regional highway traffic model project has occurred on four major occasions:i. The Institution of Civil Engineers Transportation group meeting in London on 13th June 1978 on the particular aspect of car ownership forecasting.ii. A two-day colloquium on 21st and 22nd June 1978 attended by 150 participants invited as leading practitioners and researchers in the field of highway and transportation planning, including chief or senior officers of county councils, consulting engineers and planners, heads of departments of universities and research establishments. Government officers and members of the Leitch committee.iii. A full day meeting at the PTRC Education and Research Services Limited, annual summer meeting on 11th July 1978, at Warwick university for participants who applied to PTRC for places.iv. A second colloquium on 31st October, 1st and 2nd November 1978 at the School for Advanced Urban Studies, Bristol university attended by 23 participants invited in 23; personal capacity as active practitioners and researchers, in the field if highway and transportation planning.

Trunk Roads (Public Inquiries)

asked the Secretary of State for Transport when he intends to introduce a framework as proposed by the Leitch report at a public inquiry into a trunk road proposal.

A framework of the kind recommended in the Leitch report has already been used at a number of public inquiries on an experimental basis.

Trunk Road Assessment

asked the Secretary of State for Transport by what criteria he judges the land use effects of highway proposals to be relevant matters for the system of appraisal recommended by the Leitch report.

We take particularly careful account of those effects to which the local planning authorities draw attention. The Leitch committee recognised that, in the present state of knowledge, the assessment of land use implications must be largely subjective, and primarily for those authorities.

Accidents (Seat Belts)

asked the Secretary of State for Transport what proportion of drivers and passengers involved in road accidents were and were not wearing seat belts.

I regret that this information is not available nationally as accidents in which no personal injury occurs are not reported to our Department.However, a recently published localised study of accidents in the area around the Transport and Road Research Laboratory—TRRL report LR 811—indicated that some 30 per cent. of front seat occupants of cars were wearing seat belts at the time of the accident.

Travel Surveys (Expenditure)

asked the Secretary of State for Transport how much has been paid to research organisations in each of the years 1973, 1974, 1975, 1976 and 1977 for the purpose of carrying out travel surveys for his Department; what is the estimated cost of the travel survey currently being carried out by the Opinion Research Centre; whether travel facilities in general have been improved as a result of the surveys; and whether, in particular, the 1976 sample survey affected London travel facilities.

The cost of carrying out household travel surveys for our Department was as follows:

Year£000
197350
197450
1975220
19761,000
1977140
The estimated cost to the Department of the travel survey, currently being carried out by ORC is £72,000.Household travel surveys combined with data from roadside interviews and traffic censuses contribute to improvements in the planning and management of both highways and public passenger transport. I regret that it is not possible to make an assessment of their specific contribution to these improvements. The 1976 survey in London was not related directly to improving travel facilities. It was a research project into the ways that people's journeys were affected by an increase in fares on public transport.

Road Schemes (Chiswick And Brentford)

asked the Secretary of State for Transport whether he will list all road schemes for which his Department is responsible now in hand or in the pipeline, which directly affect the Chiswick and Brentford area.

There are three schemes:1. North Circular Road A406: proposal to provide dual carriageways between Popes Lane —B4491—and Western Avenue—A40. This will be subject to public consultation in the spring of 1979.2. Great West Road A4: provision of a special"U"turn facility near the Firestone factory. Work is expected to start in January 1979.3. Great West Road A4: widening of the trunk road between Boston Manor Road and the Firestone factory including widening of the Canal bridge. Work is expected to start in the spring of 1979.

Petrol (Lead Content)

asked the Secretary of State for Transport what research his Department has commissioned to discover the connection between the efficiency of petrol engines and the tetraethyl lead content of petroleum fuel.

There is a well-established relationship between the lead content of petrol and the efficiency of petrol engines. Engines with high compression ratios, and therefore a high performance capacity, need high octane fuel, and this is progressively more difficult and expensive to produce when the lead content is reduced. A reduction of lead content below a certain point makes it expedient to have engines with lower compression ratios which are capable of working on lower octane fuel.

Small Firms

asked the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster whether one of the measures of assistance to small firms currently being considered is a Government-backed loan guarantee facility; and if he will consider making this facility available to small concerns registered under the Industrial and Provident Societies Acts, and the Industrial Common Ownership Act 1976.

The possibility of setting up a loan guarantee scheme on a commercial basis is being considered in the light of the report of the Roll committee and I will certainly bear my hon. Friend's point in mind.

Employment

" Department Of Employment Gazette "

asked the Secretary of State for Employment if he will henceforward, in the table published in the Department of Employment Gazette of unemployment in selected countries, include the figures for Norway, Sweden, Austria and Switzerland.

I am reviewing the list of countries in the table with the aim of extending it to those suggested and other industrialised countries.

Trade Union Leaders (Expenses And Emoluments)

asked the Secretary of State for Employment what scrutiny the Registrar of Friendly Societies makes of expenses and emoluments paid to trade union leaders.

Under the Employment Protection Act 1975, trade unions and employers' associations are now required to render their annual returns, including their accounts, to the Certification Officer appointed under the Act. The accounts required include an analysis of administrative expenses, showing separately the remuneration and expenses of staff. Following the practice of his predecessor, the Chief Registrar of Friendly Societies, the Certification Officer does not, however, require details of the amounts paid to individual officers of the union.

Merseyside

asked the Secretary of State for Employment if he will make a statement on the recent unemployment figures on Merseyside.

Provisional figures show that on 9th November 1978 there were 86,685 persons registered as unemployed in the Merseyside special development area. The unemployment rate for the area was 11·5 per cent.The Government recognise that whilst the latest figures represent a welcome improvement on the position 12 months earlier, the unemployment level on Merseyside is still far too high. As a special development area Merseyside will continue to benefit from the highest levels of regional assistance available under the Industry Act, and from the wide range of special employment and training measures which so far have helped over 54,000 people there. In the coming months the extension of the small firms employment subsidy, which my right hon. Friend announced on 9th November, will provide further help. The Government will, through the inner city partnership and in other ways, continue to strive to bring prosperity to Liverpool.

Prices And Consumer Protection

Tyre Industry

asked the Secretary of State for Prices and Consumer Protection when he expects to be able to indicate when he will introduce a code of practice for the tyre industry.

The Director General of Fair Trading is continuing to discuss proposals for a code of practice with the tyre industry. I understand that it is not yet possible to indicate when a date can be announced for the successful conclusion of these discussions.

Furniture Industry

asked the Secretary of State for Prices and Consumer Protection whether the trade associations have agreed to the introduction of the proposed code of practice for the furniture industry: and when he expects its introduction.

The furniture industry code of practice, which has been drawn up in consultation with the Director General of Fair Trading, was introduced on 1st August 1978. The code is supported by five trade associations representing furniture manufacturers and retailers: the Branded Furniture Society the British Furniture Manufacturers Federated Associations, the National Bedding Federation, the National Association of Retail Furnishers and the Scottish House Furnishers Association.

Resale Prices Act

asked the Secretary of State for Prices and Consumer Protection what steps are being taken to deal with the allegations of infringements of the Resale Prices Act made in the recent Thames television programme"TV Eye"and if he will make a statement.

I have seen a transcript of the programme and am very concerned at the scale of the allegations. It is for the Director General of Fair Trading to investigate allegations of breaches of the Resale Prices Act. I understand that he has already begun investigations to see whether there is sufficient evidence to justify recommending that proceedings be taken on behalf of the Crown against one or more of the suppliers concerned for contravention of the provisions of the Act. I also understand that proceedings by the Crown under the Act are being considered in another case.

Education And Science

School Building

71.

asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science (1) if she will include in her engagements for 30th November a speech on the need to replace pre-1910 schools;(2) what action she intends to take, in the light of her Department's publication,"A Study of School Building ", to provide increased resources for school improvements and for nursery education.

Over the three years 1979–80 to 1981–82 starts for the improvement and replacement of old primary and secondary schools will total £75 million, nearly £ 40 million more than previously planned. The improvements of £11·3 million included in the school building programme announced on 24th August 1978 will now be more than doubled to about £25 million and the additional allocations will be issued shortly. The remaining £50 million is planned for starts in 1980–81 and 1981–82. The allocation of this amount will be announced next year. At the same time I will announce my conclusions on the consultations with the local education authorities which followed the publication of the Department's study of school building.Over the same three years starts for nursery education will total over £14 million, some £3 million more than previously planned. My Department will shortly be issuing the nursery education programme for 1979–80 which will now total £5·9 million.These additional resources do not involve any increase in total public expenditure.

Student Grants

asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science what measures she proposes to take to compensate the parents of students aged 19 years and over who do not qualify for a mandatory grant, following the abolition of child tax allowances in April 1979.

Section 26 of the Finance Act 1977 already provides for special transitional compensation up to and including the financial year 1980–81, for the parents of students who receive no grant from public funds and who were aged 19 or more and attending a full-time course on 31st December 1976. There are no proposals to change these arrangements.

asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science how many qualifications in advanced further education there are which do not now qualify for mandatory grants; how many students are involved each year, approximately; what would be the cost of making all these courses eligible for mandatory awards; and what proportion of these courses will be redesignated by clause 15 of the Education Bill 1978.

It is estimated that some 15,000 home students in grant-aided establishments in England and Wales are attending full-time and sandwich advanced courses—other than postgraduate—which are not designated for mandatory awards. The additional cost of making awards mandatory for these courses would be of the order of £7 million a year. I regret, however, that the number of qualifications concerned is not known.Clause 15 of the Education Bill would not itself designate these courses but would enable my right hon. Friend to do so by or under regulations. The intention is to designate particular courses or categories of course as the need arises and resources can be made available.

Tate Gallery

asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science whether she will make a statement on the request from the Tate gallery for assistance to enable it to buy a painting by Georges Braque.

The Government have agreed to make a special purchase grant of £318,000 and have approved an advance from the annual purchase grant of the Tate gallery for 1979£80 of £325,000 to enable that gallery to acquire the painting by Braque"Clarinet and Bottle of Rum on a Mantelpiece ", the total cost of which is about £650,000. The Government contribution has been found from the savings elsewhere in the arts budget. Parliament will be asked to approve this provision in the Supplementary Estimates, published today.

Further Education

asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science whether she will now announce the capital resources she intends to allocate to higher and further education.

For the three years 1979–80 to 1981–82 I am planning to make available approximately £125 million for further education building in England. The major part of this sum, which has been increased by £18·1 million over previous plans, will be allocated to non-advanced further education, in order to reduce pressures on accommodation and to meet projected demand. For 1979–80 the starts programme in total amounts to £45·6 million. In the same three years, total programmes of £30·6 million are envisaged for the universities of Great Britain. For 1979–80 a starts programme of £10·42 million has been allocated to the University Grants Committee which will settle individual starts programmes with the universities.

Overseas Development

Rhodesian Students

asked the Minister for Overseas Development what sums she has expended in each of the years 1974 to 1977 on aid to Rhodesian students in Great Britain; and how much she expects to spent for this purpose in 1978, 1979 and 1980, respectively.

Expenditure figures relate to financial years and are as follows:

£
1974–75482,657
1975–761,658,000
1976–771,902,000
1977–78 2,504,200
1978–79 (estimated)3,000,000
The size of the 1979–80 Rhodesian African training programme in the United Kingdom is under consideration.

Public Record Office

70.

asked the Attorney-General under what circumstances public documents deposited at the Public Record Office for inspection and study by research workers, after the prescribed 30-year period during which they remain closed, may subsequently be withdrawn and withheld from public access.

Mr.

Where documents in the Public Record Office are found to belong to a category of public records for which extended closure under the Public Records Acts 1958 and 1967 is approved, the documents are closed for an extended period. These categories are:Exceptionally sensitive papers, the disclosure of which would be contrary to the public interest, whether on security or other grounds—including the need to safeguard the revenue;Documents containing information supplied in confidence, the disclosure of which would or might constitute a breach of good faith; andDocuments containing information about individuals, the disclosure of which would cause distress or embarrassment to living persons or their immediate decentants.

Environment

Local Authority Housing Finance

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment if he will (a) publish in the Official Report the amounts of local authority housing allocation blocks one, two and three for local authorities (a) Hertfordshire, Bedfordshire, Essex and East Anglia in 1977 together with the amounts etither over- or under-spent and (b) give the allocations for 1978–79 together with the allowances spent to date.

Copies of the housing allocations for 1977–78 were placed in the Library of the House on 14th October 1977; similar arrangements were made on 9th January 1978 for the 1978–79 allocations. I would invite my hon. Friend to seek information on spending from the individual local authorities.

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment what is the anticipated underspending of the housing finance programme as a whole, and in particular the anticipated underspending on block 1 for the financal year 1978–79; which local authorities are failing to take advantage of moneys allocated to them; and what are the reasons for the under-spending in the authorities concerned.

The eventual level of spending in 1978–79 will depend upon the extent to which local authorities respond to encouragement to take up their capital allocations. Estimates for the first half year suggest that about 40 per cent. of the national total allocation was spent in that period. If that trend were to continue, the possible underspent for the year as a whole could be at least £150 million, much of it in block 1 programmes. The national estimate of spending is based upon an aggregation of returns from individual authorites and embraces a variety of individual patterns of spending from quarter to quarter. We do not, therefore, think that it would be helpful to name individual authorities at this stage.

Forth And Clyde Canal

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment what progress the British Waterways Board and local authorities have made in cleaning up sections of the Forth and Clyde canal.

Work is nearing completion on environmental improvements to the Clydebank section of the canal under arrangements agreed between the British Waterways Board and the district council. Elsewhere the canal is maintained to the Board's current standards for remainder canals.As regards the long term, I understand that a subject plan is being prepared which will take full account of the canal's recreational potential.

Vegetable Drying Plants

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment when he now expects to publish the code of practice on the control of odours from vegetable drying plants.

A manual of guidance on the measurement and control of odours is currently being prepared, and this will contain material relevant to vegetable drying plants. Work is still in progress, and the manual cannot be published for another year. Meanwhile local authorities may seek expert advice from Warren Spring laboratory.

Mentmore Towers

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment what is the difference between the price at which Mentmore was offered to him for public purchase and the market value lately realised in the actual sale; and what is his estimate of the consequent saving to the taxpayer.

Lord Rosebery originally offered Mentmore Towers, together with its contents and adjoining land, to the Government for about –2 million. He subsequently increased the price to about –3 million. This was not accepted by the Government, and the greater part of the contents of the house were sold by auction in 1977. According to press reports, the house and some adjoining land has now been sold privately for £240,000. I do not think any useful comparison can be drawn between Lord Rosebery's original offer of the house and its contents with the recent sale of the empty house.

Mortgages

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment if he has any plans to extend the scope of mortgage assistance granted to home buyers by local authorities.

Yes. As foreshadowed in the Gracious Speech, my right hon. Friend hopes to include in the forthcoming Housing Bill measures to enable local authorities to keep their own mortgage interest rates in line with those charged by building societies. He also intends to introduce provisions to clarify and strengthen local authority powers to guarantee mortgages.

House Building

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment if he is satisfied with the level of private house building.

Private housing starts in the first nine months of this year are 14 per cent. up, and completions 7 per cent. up, on the same period last year. Since 1974 we have been working for, and have achieved, reasonable stability in production. My belief is that builders should be able to plan with reasonable confidence for 1979.

Rate Rebates

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment how many people, other than supplementary benefit recipients, have received rate rebates in each year since the scheme was introduced; and what is his estimate for the current year.

As my hon. Friend indicated in his answer on 13th November—[Vol. 958, c.107–8]—the latest available information is as follows:

NUMBER OF RATE REBATES GRANTED IN ENGLAND AND WALES
Financial year endingThousands
March 1967896
March 1968786
March 1969792
March 1970808
March 1971795
March 1972806
March 1973905
March 1974910
March 19752,300
March 19762,580
March 19772,670
A more generous scheme was introduced in 1974. Information in respect of 1977–78 will be published shortly.

Local Government Finance

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment if the fees and charges working group has now reported to the consultative council on local government finance; and if he will make a statement.

The further work undertaken by the fees and charges working group has taken longer than expected. It is now envisaged that a report will be presented to the consultative council on local government finance in the spring of next year.

Concrete Floors (Woodwool Formwork)

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment whether he will make a statement on the outcome of his departmental inquiry into the use of woodwool formwork for concrete floors; what action has been taken arising out of it; and when the report will be published.

The Fire Research Station's report on the fire problems associated with the use of woodwool formwork for concrete floors was published on 22nd November and I am sending the hon. Member a copy. The report indicates that where woodwool has been suitably plastered the structure will provide a reasonable standard of fire resistance even if the protection to the steel by concrete is inadequate. I do not propose any further action in the light of these findings.

Housing (Elderly Persons)

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment when he will be publishing a draft circular of guidance on the housing needs of old people, including those with special housing needs.

I expect to send the draft circular to the local authority associations and other interested bodies for their comments within the next few weeks.

Canals And Waterways

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment whether he will direct the British Waterways Board to restore its agreement to the use of voluntary labour in the restoration and repair of canals and waterways and, in particular, of the Grantham canal.

No. Agreements involving the use of voluntary labour for the restoration and improvement of British Waterways Board waterways, including the Grantham canal, are at present suspended due to official union activity and I do not think that action on the lines suggested would be helpful.

Exchange Station, Liverpool

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment what steps he proposes to take to ensure that the proposed Government office development at the Exchange station site, Liverpool, will be completed on time.

The scheme is to convert the hotel to offices and to build new offices on the adjoining station site. Because of the interrelationship between the two parts, it is desirable that construction should be managed under a single contract. Detailed plans for the conversion of the hotel are ready and the work ought to start soon to avoid further deterioration of the fabric. If a conversion contract were let now and a separate contract for the new construction deferred until the new building was fully designed, the advantages of co-ordinated management would be lost, occupation of the hotel would be delayed by 12 months and the completion of the whole scheme by 15–21 months.In view of the scheme's contribution to the regeneration of Liverpool's central area, and the additional Civil Service jobs that will be provided there, I think it important to take special action to complete the project as early as possible. I am advised that a management contract would be the most effective means of ensuring this. It would enable the hotel conversion to begin quickly. The new contruction would follow in fully pre-planned packages which would be subcontracted on a competitive basis as detailed design work was completed. I have instructed the Property Services Agency accordingly.

Regional Economic Planning Councils

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment if he will make a statement about the membership of the eight English regional economic planning councils.

I have recently completed the 1978 review of the membership of the North, North-West, Yorkshire and Humberside, East Midlands, West Midlands, East Anglia, South-East and South-West economic planning councils. The following is a list of the current members of each council.I am glad to take this opportunity to pay tribute to the excellent work done by those who give up their time to serve on these councils.

Northern Economic Planning Council Membership: 1978

Chairman

Sir Maurice Sutherland—Solicitor; Member: Cleveland County Council; Stockton Borough Council; Northumbria Water Authority; Tees and Hartlepool Port Authority.

Members

Councillor Dr. G. J. Adam—Mining Engineer NCB, Deputy Leader, North Tyneside Metropolitan District Council.

G. Arnold, JP—Divisional Organiser, Tyne Area AUEW; Chairman, TUC Northern Regional Council.

I. G. Bonas—Managing Director, Bonas Machine Co Ltd; Member, CBI, Northern Regional Council.

E. S. Bulmer—Manager, Lakeland Area, North West Electricity Board.

Councillor M. Campbell—Leader, Tyne and Wear Metropolitan County Council; Trade Union Officer.

* J. Chadderton—Director of Education, Newcastle CC; Co-opted Member, NEPC Working Group on Manpower, Training and Education.

G. R. Chetwynd, CBE—Director, British Steel Corporation (Industry) Ltd; Member, Northern Industrial Development Board.

* Councillor Mrs. A. Collins—Member: Cleveland CC; Council's Policy and Resources, Social Services (Vice-Chairman), and Education Committees; Langbaurgh BC.

A. W. Dickinson—Works Manager, Pirelli Ltd.

Professor J. B. Goddard—Henry Daysh Chair of Regional Development Studies, Newcastle University.

D. J. Grant—Chairman and Managing Director, Darchem Ltd; Member, CBI, Northern Regional Council.

* Councillor R. Hall—Company Director; Leader, Langbaurgh BC; Member, Cleveland CC; Member, National Housing Consultative Council.

J. W. Harper, CBE—Regional Secretary, Union of Construction Allied Trades and Technicians; Secretary, TUC Northern Regional Council.

Councillor J. Hudson—Member, Stockton-on-Tees Borough Council; Member, Cleveland County Council; Member, Thornaby Branch UCATT.

Councillor I. Johnson—Employee, British Steel Corporation; Member, Langbaurgh Borough Council.

Councillor J. L. Johnston—Analyst in British Steel Corporation; Member, Copeland District Council.

Dr. P. L. Kirby, OBE—Director, Welwyn Electric Ltd.

Councillor H. Little—Assistant to Personnel Manager Metal Box Ltd; Member, Carlisle City Council; Cumbria County Council.

Councillor F. Long—Miner; Member, Durham County Council.

J. L. J. Machin—Senior Lecturer, Management Control Systems; Durham University Business School.

J. E. Moffitt, CBE—Farmer.

F. M. Osborn, CBE—Managing Director, Northern Rock Building Society.

Dr. P. W. Reynolds—Former Deputy Chairman, Agricultural Division, ICI.

The Rt. Hon. Viscount Ridley, TD, DL—Landowner; Farmer; Chairman, Northumberland County Council.

* Councillor R. Storey—Secretary, Northumberland County Assoc. of Trades Councils; Member, Regional TUC Executive Committee; Member, NUM; Member, Wansbeck DC; Chairman, Northumberland District Manpower Committee.

Councillor Mrs. A. M. Tait—Member, Cumbria County Council; Barrow in Furness District Council.

C. B. Ward, MBE—Teesside District Secretary, Transport and General Workers Union.

Councillor W. Wilson—Member, Newcastle City Council.

* New Member.

North West Economic Planning Council Membership: 1978

Chairman

Lord Sefton—Chairman, Runcorn New Town Development Corporation; Member, New Towns Commission; Member, Merseyside and North Wales Electricity Board; Member, Social Science Research Council.

Deputy Chairman

Dr. D. A. Harper, OBE, JP—Director, Turner & Newall Ltd.; Member, North-West Regional Board NEB.

Members

W. H. Aldritt, JP—Regional Secretary (Liverpool), National Union of General and Municipal Workers; Member, North-West Industrial Development Board.

Professor G. W. Ashworth—Professor of Urban Environmental Studies, University of Salford; Chairman, Executive Committee, Civic Trust for the North West.

C. M. Barnett—Secretary, North West Regional Council TUC; North West Divisional Officer, National Union of Public Employees; Member, North West Industrial Development Board; Chairman, MSC Special Programmes, Manchester Area Board.

R. Byrom—Controller, Retail and Services Division, Co-operative Wholesale Society Limited.

* Councillor D. Coulston—Member, Lancashire County Council.

R. B. de Zouche—Chairman, Merseyside Chamber of Commerce and Industry; Member North West Industrial Development Board: Member, Clothing Industry Advisory Board.

* K. H. Dixon—Deputy Chairman and Chief Executive, TBA Industrial Products Ltd: Vice-Chairman, North West Regional Council CBI.

D. G. Dodds, CBE—Consultant, Merseyside & North Wales Electricity Board; Member. Merseyside Chamber of Commerce and Industry; Chairman, Port of Preston Advisory Committee; Director, Development Corporation for Wales.

Councillor K. Eastham—Deputy Leader, Manchester City Council.

J. F. Eccles—Regional Secretary (Lancashire), National Union of General and Municipal Workers; Member, General Council TUC.

B. Entwistle—North West Divisional Officer, NUR; Member, British Rail London Midlands Region Board (Transport); Member, Chartered Institute of Transport; Member, North West Water Authority.

D.G. Farrar—Chairman, North West Regional Council TUC; Regional Secretary, Transport and General Workers Union; Member. North West Regional Board NEB; Member, North West Industrial Development Board.

* J.D.M. Forbes—Managing Director, Booker Line Ltd,; Vice Chairman, Merseyside Chamber of Commerce and Industry.

Councillor R.A. Fieldhouse—Leader, Greater Manchester Council.

I. Fuchs—Chairman and Managing Director. Clough Mill Limited.

J.Goldberg—Chairman, Salford Council for Voluntary Service; Chairman, Greater Manchester Council for Voluntary Service; Vice-President, North West Arts Association; Member, Council of the University of Salford.

G. N. Hague—Managing Director, Welwyn (Garments) Limited; Member, North West Industrial Development Board; Member, Court of the University of Manchester: Member, Court of the University of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology.

Councillor J. D. Hamilton, JP—Member, Liverpool City Council.

Councillor J. C. Hanscomb—Leader, Bilton Borough Council.

F. G. Humphreys—District Organiser (Preston), National Union of Agricultural and Allied Workers

Professor R. H. Kantorowich—Professor & Director of School of Town and Country Planning, University of Manchester.

Mrs. A. W. Mack—Managing Director, Watters Westbrook & Company Limited; Member, Hallmarking Council.

* New Member

Professor A. Mercer—Professor of Operational Research, University of Lancaster; Member, Central Lancashire New Town Development Corporation; Chairman, Centre for North West Regional Studies, University of Lancaster.

C. B. Muir—Vice Chairman, North West Regional Council for Sport and Recreation.

J. G. Parkes, CBE—Treasurer, North West Civic Trust.

Councillor A. Richardson—Member, Cheshire County Council; Member, North West Water Authority.

R. N. Swarbrick—President (Lancashire), Country Landowners Association.

Lord Taylor, CBE, JP—Member, Court of the University of Lancaster.

Sir Robert Thomas, DL, JP—Alderman, Greater Manchester Council.

Councillor G. M. Thornton—Member, Wirral Borough Council.

Councillor Mrs. M. Tomlinson, JP—Member, Burnley Borough Council.

R. Turton—Chief Executive, Halton Borough Council.

* S. G. Vincent—General Secretary, North Western Area, National Union of Mineworkers.

Councillor D. Walker, OBE, JP—Member, Rochdale Borough Council.

L. C. Young—Deputy Chairman, J. Bibby & Sons Ltd.; Chairman, North West Regional Council CBI; Chairman, North West Industrial Development Board.

* New Member

Yorkshire And Humberside Economic Planning Council Membership: 1978

Chairman

B. E. Cotton, CBE—President, Samuel Osborn and Co. Ltd., Sheffield.

Members

K. E. Bantock—Port Director, Humber, British Transport Docks Board.

H. Best—Executive Councillor, Electrical, Electronic, Telecommunication and Plumbing Union.

Councillor St. J. Binns, MBE, JP—Divisional Organiser, Amalgamated Union of Engineering Workers, Leeds; Members, West Yorkshire Metropolitan County Council.

F. N. Booth—Regional Secretary, General and Municipal Workers' Union.

R. Bradley—Chief Executive, Scarborough Borough Council.

Councillor J. E. Brownbridge—Member, West Yorkshire Metropolitan County Council; Property Owner.

Councillor A. E. Clarke—Chairman, Humber Bridge Board; Member, Hull City Council: Solicitor.

* Councillor E. H. Cretney—Member, Humberside County Council; Chairman, the Association of Yorkshire and Humberside Chamber of Commerce.

* L. H. Dale. MBE—Chairman and Managing Director, Dale Electric International Ltd.

Councillor E. A. K. Denison, TD—Leader of North Yorkshire County Council; Solicitor.

* J. E. Eardley, JP—Chairman, British Syphon Industries Ltd.

Mrs. H. W. Foster, OBE—North East Regional Administrator WRVS.

* G. M. A. Harrison—Chief Education Officer, Sheffield City Council.

E. Hayhurst, OBE, JP—Yorkshire and North Midland Regional Secretary, Transport and General Workers' Union.

* T. W. Hibbert—Chairman, British Mohair Spinners Ltd.; Chairman, Wool Textile Delegation.

Councillor D. E. Hudson—Member, Leeds City Council.

Mrs. B. Huffinley—Secretary, Regional TUC.

Councillor J. Layden, JP—Leader, Rotherham District Council.

The Rt. hon. the Lord Middleton, MC—Director, Birdsall Estates Ltd.

R. S. Newiss—Senior Partner, R. Stewart Newiss and Co. (Surveyors).

T. Park—Lecturer, Leeds University.

* New Member

Councillor A. D. Pollard—Member, Bradford City Council; Solicitor.

K. H. Potts—Chief Executive, Leeds City Council.

Wg. Cdr. F. D. Procter, DFC—Regional Secretary, Yorkshire branch County Landowners' Association.

* W. Robinson—Divisional Officer, National Union of Railwaymen, Doncaster.

Councillor R. Thwaites—Deputy Leader, South Yorkshire County Council.

Dr. G. Tolley—Principal, Sheffield City Polytechnic.

The Hon. Neil Turner—Chairman, Edward Turner and Associates.

J. Wadsworth—Chairman, Iron and Steel Industry Training Board.

F. W. Ward, OBE—Town Clerk and Chief Executive, Grimsby Borough Council.

* S. G. Webster, JP—Member, National Farmers Union

East Midlands Economic Planning Council Membership: 1978

Chairman

W. L. Miron, CBE, TD, JP, DL—Solicitor.

Members

Councillor, G. C. Addis—Member, Wellingborough Borough Council; Flooring Contractor.

Councillor A. K. Allman—Member, Derbyshire County Council; Peak Park Planning Board; Leader, High Peak Borough Council.

Councillor W. A. W. Bemrose—Vice-Chairman, Derbyshire County Council; Management Consultant.

A. T. Brown, BEM—Divisional Organiser, A UEW, Derbyshire.

* Dr. C. C. Butler—Vice-Chancellor Loughborough University.

R. W. Chadburn, JP—Farmer; Chairman, Mansfield Brewery Co. Ltd.

Councillor C. K. Elliott, MBE, TD—Member Leicester City Council; former Director, Wolsey Hosiery Manufacturers Ltd., Leicester.

G. L. Fyfe—Chief Executive Officer, Leicester Co-operative Society Ltd.

Councillor B. M. Haigh—Member, Nottingham County Council; Solicitor.

Councillor N. Harris—Member, Leicestershire County Council; Chairman Harris (Furnishers) Ltd. Leicester.

* Councillor F. J. Hawkins—Member, Mansfield District Council; Miner.

P. Jenkin-Jones—Solicitor; Deputy Coroner, Newark.

A. Kennedy, JP—Member, East Midlands Regional Council of the Labour Party.

Sir Sydney P. King, OBE, JP—District Organiser, National Union of Agricultural and Allied Workers, Lincolnshire; Chairman, Trent Regional Health Authority.

W. E. Lane—Former Clerk Lindsey County Council; Solicitor; former member Yorkshire and Humberside EPC.

* New Member

Councillor J. L. Lowther—Leader, Northamptonshire County Council; Farmer.

D. D. Macklin—Chief Executive, Lincolnshire County Council.

J. E. Madocks, CBE—Chairman, East Mid. lands Region of Chambers of Commerce; past President, Nottinghamshire Chamber of Commerce and Industry; Bursar, Nottingham University.

Professor J. E. Mitchell—Professor of Political Economy, Nottingham University; member, and Chairman of Research Panel, of Wilson Committee to Review the Functioning of Financial Institutions.

Councillor P. Newton—Chairman, Lincolnshire County Council; Farmer.

Mrs. D. J. Parker—Director and Company Secretary, Vacu-Lug Traction Tyres Ltd., Grantham.

J. Porteus—Director-General, Midland Region, CEGB; member CBI East Midlands Regional Council.

G. J. Roberts, CBE, JP—Chairman, Oxford Regional Health Authority; Deputy Chairman, Commission for New Towns.

* Councillor L. M. Rose—Vice-Chairman, West Derbyshire District Council; Solicitor.

H. M. Spanton, OBE—Area Director (North Nottinghamshire) National Coal Board.

L. Teeman—Group Managing Director, The Clay Cross Company Ltd., Derbyshire; Vice-Chairman CBI East Midlands Regional Council.

* R. Trench—Divisional Officer, National Union of Railwaymen.

C. A. Unwin, JP—Regional Secretary, National Union of General and Municipal Workers.

J. Walkerdine—Managing Director, Walker-dine (Builders) Ltd., Derby.

C. F. Ward—Chairman, Dobson Park Industries Ltd., Nottingham; member CBI East Midlands Regional Council.

* R. J. Wickstead—Managing Director, Spiro Engineering Ltd., Kettering.

* G. Wightman—Chairman and Chief Executive, Sketchley Limited; member CBI East Midlands Regional Council.

* New Member

West Midlands Economic Planning Council Membership: 1978

Chairman:

Joseph Pope, DSc, Ceng—Vice-Chancellor, University of Aston in Birmingham.

Miss E. A. Bache—Joint Managing Director, Bailey & Mackey Ltd., Birmingham.

Mr. R. J. Bailey, CBE—Managing Director, Royal Doulton Tableware Ltd.

Mr. D. Beavis, CBE—Formerly Chairman, West Midlands Gas.

Mr. A. P. Berry, MA, DPA, MBIM—Director, Coventry & District Engineering Employers' Association.

Councillor J. A. W. Bird—Leader, Wolverhampton Metropolitan District Council.

Councillor N. B. A. Bosworth, LLB—Leader, City of Birmingham Metropolitan District Council.

Councillor F. A. Cholerton, CBE—Leader, City of Stoke-on-Trent District Council.

Councillor J. H. G. Cotterell—Chairman, Hereford and Worcester County Council.

Mr. T. A. G. Davis, LLB, MBA—Association of Scientific, Technical and Managerial Staffs, Manager, British Leyland.

* Professor L. Fishman—Professor of Economics, Keele University.

Mr. T. S. Gamier, MA, MBIM—Managing Director, Kalamazoo Ltd.

Dr. I. F. Gibson—Economist, Member, Telford Development Corporation.

Mr. F. C. Graves, FRICS—Chartered Surveyor.

* Mr. D. Groves—Divisional Officer, Association of Scientific, Technical and Managerial Staffs.

* Councillor M. A. Hamrnon—Leader, Warwickshire County Council.

Sir Timothy Harford—Managing Director, Singer & Friedlander Ltd.

Councillor J. Haynes—Leader, Nuneaton District Council.

Councillor Sir Michael Higgs—Hereford and Worcester County Council.

Mr. P. C. Higgs—Amalgamated Union of Engineering Workers (Engineering Section). Convenor, Rolls Royce Ltd., Coventry.

Professor D. Hinton, FRIBA—Professor of Architecture, University of Aston in Birmingham. Chairman, Redditch Development Corporation.

Mr. R. Ireland, FCIS—Finance Director, Wolselsey-Hughes Ltd.

Mr. J. T. Lally, JP—President, Midlands Area, National Union of Mineworkers.

Mr. F. W. Leath, JP—Association of Professional, Executive, Clerical and Computer Staff.

Mrs. M. McQuillan, DSc—Formerly Special Projects Manager, Company Planning, Imperial Metal Industries.

Mr. J. C. Mason—Regional Secretary, General and Municipal Workers' Union.

Mr. B. Mathers—Regional Secretary, Transport and General Workers' Union.

Mr. D. Nendick—Bank of England Agent, Birmingham.

Mr. J. E. Owen—Managing Director and Chief Executive, Rubery Owen (Darlaston) Ltd.

Mr. L. V. Pike, MBE, JP—County Organiser, Worcestershire and Gloucestershire National Union of Agricultural and Allied Workers.

Mr. J. Pollard, ERD, TD—Formerly Divisional Manager, British Rail.

Councillor Dr. H. Roy—Sandwell Metropolitan District Council.

* Mr. S. B. Shuttleworth—Divisional Officer, National Union of Public Employees.

Councillor J. M. Taylor—Leader, West Midlands Metropolitan County Council.

Councillor A. G. Ward JP—Chairman, Staffordshire County Council.

Councillor E. C. J. Whittingham—Chairman, Salop County Council.

Mr. S. A. Williams—Formerly Member, Warwickshire County Council. Stress Engineer, Rolls Royce Ltd., Coventry.

Sir Stan Yapp—Formerly City of Birmingham District Council and West Midlands County Council.

* New Appointments.

Membership Of The East Anglia Economic Planning Council 1978

Chairman

The Rt. Hon. The Lord Walston, CVO—Farmer, Thirplow, Cambridgeshire and company Director.

Members

J. V. Boodle, MA—Director, British Fermentation Products Ltd., Felixtowe.

B. J. Capon, MA—Chief Executive, Norfolk Country Council.

G. O. B. Clarke, TD, CEng, MIMechE—Divisional Manager (Eastern) British Rail, Norwich.

J. R. Clayton, MBIM—Managing Director, Pauls & Whites Ltd., Ipswich.

Professor K. M. Clayton, MSc, PhD—Professor of Environment Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich.

* M. W. R. Davies—Works Director, Great Yarmouth.

J. L. Evelyn—Chief Executive, Jpswich Port Authority.

B. W. Foreman—Assistant Divisional Organiser, Amalgamated Union of Engineering Workers, Colchester.

Councillor R. F. Harwood—Farmer; Member, Suffolk Country Council.

Councillor Mrs. P. Hollis, MA, Phd— Lecturer in English History, University of East Anglia; Member, Norwich District Council.

Dr. K. M. Humphreys, MA, PhD, ARIC—Managing Director, CIBA-GEIGY (UK) Ltd., Cambridge.

W. J. James—Managing Director, Coulson & Son Ltd., Cambidge.

I. A. H. Jordon—Regional Secretary, Union of Construction, Allied Trades and Technicians, Cambridge.

Dr. K. E. Keeble, MA PhD—Lecturer in Geography, University of Cambridge.

* Councillor J. W. H. Knight—Solicitor, Local Government, Bury St. Edmunds.

Councillor M. H. Osborn—Managing Director, M. H. Osborn Ltd.; Member, Fenland District Council.

* New Appointment.

R. H. Paul, OBE—Farmer, Woodbridge, Suffolk.

Councillor Mrs. M. J. Shaw, MA—Member, Cambridgeshire County Council.

Councillor Captain R. J. Sheepshanks—Member, Suffolk County Council; Farm, Woodbridge.

Councillor Sir Arthur South, JP—Member, Norwich District Council; Senior Partner. Norwich Fur Co.

Mrs. P. A. Spreckley—Company Secretary of Landmans Co-Ownership Limited.

R. Travers, FCA—Director, Peter Brotherhood Ltd., Peterborough.

Councillor The Hon. R. H. Walpole, JP—Farmer; Member, Norfolk County Council.

The Rt. Hon. The Lord Whaddon—Director, Cambridge Chemical Co. Ltd.

South East Economic Planning Council—Membership 1978

Chairman:

Lord Porchester, KBE, DL—Farmer, former Chairman of Hampshire County Council.

Members

* R. C. Allen—Official, National Graphical Association.

* Dr. A. J. R. Anderson—Member, Hertfordshire County Council.

F. F. Baker MBE—Former Secretary, South East Regional Council, TUC.

Miss J. E. Benton—Member, National Executive of the Union of Post Office Workers.

Councillor A. T. Blowers—Member, Bedfordshire CC, Lecturer, Open University.

Colonel S. 0. Briggs—Chairman and Managing Director, Jameson Engineering Ltd.; Chairman of CBI West Surrey Area Committee and Member of CBI Central Council and London and South Eastern Regional Council.

A. T. Brown, CBE—Chief Executive, Oxfordshire CC.

A. J. Coles, MBE—Divisional Organiser, AUEW.

Baroness Evelyn Denington, DBE—Former Chairman GLC Chairman of Stevenage Development Corporation.

Councillor R. W. Dixon-Smith—Farmer, Member, Essex County Council.

* Ms. M. Donnelly—Official, Society of Post Office Executives.

W. R. Doughty—Executive Director, Cape Industries Ltd.; Member of CBI Central Council and London and South Eastern Regional Council.

Councillor E. J. F. Green—Member, West Sussex CC (Former Chairman), Director, various timber firms.

Professor P. G. Hall—Head of Department of Geography, Reading University.

* R. A. Hammond—Divisional Organiser, USDAW.

Councillor N. Howard—Member, GLC Assistant Secretary POEU.

* New Member.

Cllr. D. B. Hoodless—Deputy Leader, Islington BC; Director Circle 33 Housing Trust; Chairman, LBA's Housing and Works Committee.

Cllr. Dr. D. A. Hoyle—Vice-Chairman Woking-ham DC, and Chairman of Policy Committee.

M. L. Kilby—Manager, Project Planning and Government and Trade Relations, General Motors Components—Europe (General Motors Overseas Corporation).

* J. Knapp—Divisional Officer, NUR.

Dr. D. M. A. Leggett—Former Vice-Chancellor of Surrey University.

Dr. G. M. Lomas—General Secretary, London Council of Social Service.

G. Manners—Reader in Geography, London University; Member of Location of Offices Bureau.

* P. D. H. Marsden—Councillor, Havering LB.

* N. N. B. Ordman—Executive Director, PLA; Member, Thames Water Authority.

J. M. A. Paterson, JP—Chairman, Bifurcated Engineering Ltd.; Member of CBI Central Council and Southern Region Council.

Dr. D. A. Quarmby—Member, London Transport Executive (Planning).

P. Readman—Financial Adviser to Commercial Union Assurance Co. Ltd.; Adviser to CPRS.

Cllr. Miss S. Roberts—Member GLC (Chairman Planning and Transportation Committee); Industrial Relations Adviser.

Evelyn de Rothschild—Merchant Banker; Deputy Chairman, Milton Keynes Development Corporation.

* D. J. Sainsbury—Finance Director, J. Sainsbury Ltd.

Prof. P. J. O. Self—Professor of Public Administration; London University.

Sir James Swaffield, CBE—Director General, GLC.

J. A. Wedgwood—Chairman, Southern Electricity Board.

G. J. Yates—Director and Chief Executive, Butterfield Harvey Ltd.; Member of CBI Central Council and London and South Eastern Regional Council.

* New Member.

South West Economic Planning Council Membership 1978

Chairman

Mr. J. L. Thomas, BA—Industrial Relations Consultant.

Members

Councillor R. V. A. Allbright—Member, Pen-with District Council; Solicitor.

Councillor B. H. Bailey, OBE, JP—District Organisation Officer, National and Local Government Officers' Association; Member, Somerset County Council; Chairman, South Western Regional Health Authority.

Professor V. H. Beynon, BSc—Head of the Agricultural Economics Unit, University of Exeter.

D. K. Clarke, CBE, MA—Economic Consultant.

Dr. W. H. Darlington, MBE—Former Managing Director, Stothert & Pitt Ltd.

* Councillor A. G. S. T. Davey—Member, Cornwall County Council.

Captain The Rt. Hon. the Lord Digby, DL, JP—Vice-Lieutenant of Dorset; Member, Dorset County Council.

Dr. E. F. C. Ferrett—Senior Lecturer, Cam-borne School of Mines.

Councillor Mrs. B. L Furzeman—Teacher; Member, Plymouth City Council; Member, South West Transport Users Consultative Committee.

Mrs. Pam Goodger—Public Relations Officer, Longleat House.

R. P. Harries—Chief Executive, Wiltshire County Council.

L. Hill, JP—Chairman, South West Water Authority.

D. B. Houlden—Trade Union Official, EEPTU; Committee Member, South West Regional Council of the TUC.

Alderman Mrs. Pat Jacob, JP—Former National Chairman, National Federation of Women's Institutes.

Mrs. N. Lawson, Bcom—Secretary, The Camp-den Food Preservation Research Association.

Councillor Lt. Col. W. A. McLelland, TD, DL—Chairman Gloucestershire County Council.

Councillor C. E. Merrett—Lord Mayor of Bristol; Area Organiser, Union of Shop, Distributive and Allied Workers.

R. S. Pascoe—South West District Delegate, Amalgamated Society of Boilermakers, Shipwrights, Blacksmiths and Structural Workers.

J. H. Perry—Managing Director, P & H Hotels (Torquay) Ltd.

Councillor Mrs. P. E. Phillips—Member, Somerset County Council.

C. D. Pike, OBE—Chairman, Watts, Blake, Beame & Co., Ltd.

N. J. Record—Company Planning Manager, C. & J. Clark Ltd.

Councillor A. L. Sayers—Member, Devon County Council.

A. L. Sparks—Chairman and Managing Director, Da Vere (Kensington) Ltd; Member, North Devon Manufacturers' Association.

P. Sutcliffe—Chairman, the Community Council of Devon; Chairman, Dartington Glass Ltd.

A. T. Swindall—County Planning Officer, Dorset County Council.

T. E. Turvey, JP—Area Organiser, Union of Ship Distributive and Allied Workers.

Councillor G. G. Walker, JP—Chairman, Avon County Council.

S. J. West—Local Director, Barclays Bank Ltd., Exeter District.

Mrs. E. R. Wheatley-Hubbard—Farmer, Wiltshire.

Mrs. P. Woods—Member, Devon Conservation Forum; Farmer.

* New Member

Zebras

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment if he is proposing to protect the quagga which has been extinct for over 100 years.

No. There seems to be some confusion over the Latin name equus quagga used by some European taxonomists as an alternative to equus burchelli to describe the common or Burchell's zebra.I am happy to say that since the end of September the skins of all not extinct zebra species have been added to the lists of parts and derivatives controlled

DES Grant: recurrent*DES Grant: capitalCountry side Commission: capital†English Tourist Board: capital‡Total
£££££
1973–749,4002,79912,199
1974–7510,24027,1716,80044,211
1975–7612,29039,952117,6502,900172,792
1976–7714,75078,7942,00095,544
1977–7817,70011,94012,96036,83979,439
* Grant towards the headquarters administrative expenses of the Youth Hostels Association (England and Wales).
† The Countryside Commission was empowered from 1st April to give grants for the conservation and enhancement of the countryside, and facilities for its enjoyment. Before then grants were available from the Department of the Environment but details are not readily available.
‡ The English and Welsh tourist boards are empowered to give financial assistance towards projects which improve tourist amenities and facilities. No grants were paid by the Welsh Tourist oard for youth Hostel projects during this five-year period.

Motor Vehicle Exhausts(Lead Emissions)

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment whether he can now give a date for the publication of the report on the study of lead from motor vehicles by the Atomic Energy Research Establishment; and if he will make a statement.

The report was published today. The study is part of a research programme on the sources of lead pollution and its effects on health.The report concludes that more of the lead present in the air we breathe may be absorbed by the body than we had thought when this work was commissioned. This is an important finding and may be particularly significant where under schedule 3 to the Endangered Species (Import and Export) Act 1976. The common zebra was described on that order as equus burchelli and not as equus quagga. If we had considered that including the quagga would have improved its chances of resurrection we might have included it.

Youth Hostel Association

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment what was the total amount of Government assistance to the Youth Hostel Association for England and Wales in each of the past five years.

I have been asked to reply.Government assistance to the Youth Hostels Association (England and Wales) during the financial years 1973–74 to 1977–78 was as follows:people are exposed to high levels of