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Written Answers

Volume 961: debated on Wednesday 24 January 1979

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Written Answers To Questions

Wednesday 24 January 1979

Civil Service

Parliamentary Papers (Printing Costs)

asked the Minister for the Civil Service what is his estimate in a full year of the extra printing costs incurred by the British Parliament to ensure that hon. Members and Peers have EEC documents available to them.

EEC publications are not separately printed in the United Kingdom. Those required by Parliament are supplied through Her Majesty's Stationery Office which is official United Kingdom sales agent for EEC publications. I regret that information is not readily available about the cost of meeting demands by hon. Members for these publications; but further inquiries are being made and I will write to my hon. Friend as soon as possible.If my hon. Friend has any particular documents in mind perhaps he will write to me.

Education And Science

School Costs (Parental Contributions)

asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science what information she has about the extent to which schools request parents to pay for equipment, visits, and other items as a

Attendance in 1978Percentage increases/decrease on 1977
British Museum4,034,431-2·2
British Museum (Natural History)2,910,005-8·9
Geological Museum531,453+4·1
Imperial War Museum1,434,978+3·2
National Gallery2,500,109-6·9
National Maritime Museum1,260,000+0·8
National Portrait Gallery424,658-20·6
Science Museum4,971,894+3·6
Tate Gallery1,080,956+7·5
Victoria and Albert Museum1,934,439-17·3
Wallace Collection144,881-8·5

asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science what were the total amounts at 1 January 1979 covered by certificates of indemnity issued by the national museums, galleries and libraries

part of, or as an extra in, the education of their children.

None. My Department does not collect such information. Occasional complaints from parents are investigated to establish whether there has been any breach of section 61 of the Education Act 1944.

Nursery Education (Macclesfield)

asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science how many children below the age of five years are either in part or full-time education at nursery schools or infant schools in the area covered by the Macclesfield constituency.

My Department does not compute pupil numbers for parliamentary constituency areas.

Museums And Art Galleries

asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science whether she will publish in the Official Report the attendance figures for 1978 reported by the national museums and galleries in England, broken down to the individual institutions but comprising their outstations, with figures in each area of the percentage increase or decrease on the attendance figures for 1977.

Following is the information requested:in England in respect of objects lent to their permanent collections on a long-term basis, broken down to the individual institutions, and recording the comprehensive total for all the institutions together.

The total was £22,522,847. The amounts in respect of the individual institutions are given below:

£
British Library1,500,000
British Museum1,662,590
Science Museum500,000
Victoria and Albert Museum11,222,832
Imperial War Museum385,900
National Gallery10,200
National Maritime Museum891,325
National Portrait Gallery1,350,000
Tate Gallery5,000,000

Council For National Academic Awards

asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science whether she will advise the Council for National Academic Awards to send unabridged copies of its quinquennial reports to the directorates, the trades unions and the students' unions of the polytechnics concerned.

CNAA is an autonomous body, and it is for the council to decide on the procedures for the dissemination of its reports. I understand that it is its practice to send an unabridged copy of its reports to the director or principal of the institution concerned, copying these at the same time to the maintaining local or national authority. The council strongly encourages the recipients to have the contents of such reports discussed widely within the institutions concerned, and attaches importance to the involvement of staff and student representatives in such discussions.

asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science whether she will advise the Council for National Academic Awards to make a practice of consulting student unions when it is conducting its quinquennial reviews.

CNAA is an autonomous body and it is for the council to decide on procedures for the conduct of its quinquennial review. I am informed that it is its normal practice to involve student unions in these reviews.

Maintained schools including Nursery and Special—England
October 1977October 1978
(i) Pupils in attendance7,878,1917,729,484
(ii) Numbers taking dinners4,855,4225,096,433
As proportion of pupils in attendance61·7 per cent.65·9 per cent.
(iii) Numbers taking free dinners927,0001,074,000
As proportion of pupils attendance11·8 per cent.13·9 per cent.
As proportion of numbers taking dinners19·1 per cent.21·1 per cent.

School Milk

asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science if the results of the October 1978 census of school milk are now available.

In October, 1,675,000 pupils in maintained special schools and pupils in other maintained schools in England who were entitled to it on grounds of age were receiving free school milk, representing 94·4 per cent. of the age group present on the day of the census. In addition, 1,018,000 primary pupils over the age of 7, in 55 LEAs, were receiving free milk under the new discretionary powers available to local education authorities and 23,000 such pupils were receiving free milk provided by 28 non-education authorities under their "free-rate" powers. A further 14,000 pupils in this age group were receiving free milk on health grounds.

School Dinners

asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science if she will publish a table showing the estimated cost of a school dinner in each educational area; and how much of that cost is attributable to the food used.

My Department does not collect local education authority estimates of the cost of a school dinner, but the relevant figures are contained in "Education Estimates Statistics" published annually by the Chartered Institute of Public Finance and Accountancy, copies of which are available in the Library.

School Meals

asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science if the results of the October 1978 census of school meals are now available; and how they compare with those of the census carried out in October 1977.

A detailed statement of the returns from local education authorities on which those figures are based is being placed in the Library.

The census also collected information about pupils purchasing snack meals in school and those bringing their own food to eat at mid-day. The numbers were 33,000 and 880,000 respectively, compared with 27,000 and 1,025,000 in 1977.

On the day of the census, school dinners were taken by 75 per cent. of all pupils present in primary schools (70·5 per cent. in 1977) and by 53·9 per cent. of all pupils present in secondary schools (50·3 per cent. in 1977). Of the total number of snack meals, 98 per cent. were purchased in secondary schools (89 per cent. in 1977) and 16 per cent. of secondary pupils brought sandwiches compared with 8 per cent. of primary pupils (17 per cent. and 10 per cent. in the previous year).

Agriculture, Fisheries And Food

Soft Drinks

asked the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food if it is the intention of the EEC Commission to issue a draft directive on soft drinks in the near future; and whether this will include proposals on artificial sweeteners.

Soft drinks are included in the EEC Commission's food harmonisation programme, but I have no information at present as to when proposals will be issued or what they will contain.

"Food From Our Own Resources"

asked the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food when he intends to publish the review of the White Paper, "Food from Our Own Resources".

Tractors (Directives)

asked the Minister of Africulture, Fisheries and Food if he will state the number of regulations or directives issued by the EEC Commission since 1 January 1973 concerning the approximation of laws of the member States relating to wheeled agricultural or forestry tractors; and how many of these documents are of current validity.

Fifteen directives have been adopted by the Council of the EEC since 1 January 1973, of which 14 are currently in force.

Farm Buildings

asked the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food if, pursuant to his written reply to the hon. Member for Falmouth and Camborne, dated 7th December 1978, that the code of that the code of practice for farm building (BS 5502) provides guidelines for the assessment of farm buildings for capital grant purposes, the code's provisions for fire protection in livestock buildings are, in fact, followed by his own Department when assessing buildings for grant eligibility.

Picketing

asked the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food whether he will investigate immediately the action of the Leeds Transport and General Workers' Union in refusing to allow vehicles in and out of sugar warehouses in Pontefract, Wakefield and Sheffield owned by a food manufacturing company; and if he will make a statement.

I have been asked to reply.The Government regard sugar as a priority supply. The Transport and General Workers' Union fully accepts that it is within this category and has advised its members that pickets should not seek to prevent or delay its movement. I understand that vehicles are being allowed in and out of sugar warehouses in Pontefract, Wakefield and Sheffield.

Home Department

Ian Brady And Myra Hindley

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether he will make a statement about the prospects of release from prison of Ian Brady and Myra Hindley.

Ian Brady and Myra Hindley were sentenced to life imprisonment for murder. Prisoners serving life sentences are not eligible for parole as Such but may be released on licence when the Home Secretary considers this to be justified. I cannot, however, order the release of such a prisoner unless I am recommended to do so by the Parole Board and after consulting the Lord Chief Justice and, if he is available, the trial judge.There is no fixed time at which the case of a life sentence prisoner must be formally reviewed by the Parole Board. That is a matter for the Home Secretary. But the timing of the first formal review is fixed in consultation with the board, through a joint committee of representatives of the board and of the Home Office. This committee recently considered the cases of Brady and Hindley. The committee felt unable to recommend a date for a formal review, but recommended that it should consider the cases again in 3 years' time. I have decided to accept this recommendation.Final decisions on all matters relating to the release of life sentence prisoners rest with the Home Secretary of the day. He is not bound to accept a recommendation by the joint committee. Nor is he bound to accept a recommendation by the Parole Board that a prisoner should be released. I cannot bind my successors, but for my part I have reached no view about the time in the future when serious consideration might be given to the release of either prisoner. My present decision means that, unless there is some unforeseen development which would justify a different course, nothing will be done to initiate the formal review machinery for at least the next three years.

Illegal Entrants

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) what was the number of people detained in prison department establishments as (a) illegal entrants by deception and (b) illegal entrants by avoiding controls, as at 15th November 1978;(2) what was the number of people detained in prison department establishments for illegal entry under the authority of an immigration officer on 15 November 1978; how many had been detained for one month or less, for three months or less and for longer than four months; and what was the longest period for which any person was detained.

The information available is as follows:Apart from those awaiting trial or serving sentences of imprisonment, there were on 16 November 1978, 60 people detained in prison and elsewhere as illegal entrants on the authority of an immigration officer.In 10 cases the precise method of entry could not be established. In 38 it was concluded that entry had been by deception, and in 12 that entry had been by avoidance of the immigrantion controls.The periods of detention were as follows:

1 month or less31
More than 1 month, and up to and including 3 months24
More than 3 month, and up to and including 4 months1
More than 4 months4
The longest period of detention was 17 months.

Deportation

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department, in the light of the difference in emphasis between Home Office circular HOC 113/1978 issued to all courts with regard to powers to direct release after recommending deportation, and paragraph 287 of "The Sentence of the Court", a handbook for courts on the treatment of offenders, whether he intends to amend the entry in the handbook to reflect present policy.

It is our intention to revise paragraph 287 of "The Sentence of the Court" when the next edition is prepared, but this may not be for some time.

Arrested Persons

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department, in the light of circular 74/1978 to chief officers of police concerning section 62 of the Criminal Law Act 1977, whether he will give (a) the total number of arrests in each force area under this section to date, (b) the total number of cases in which, following a request under section 62, the proviso has been applied and the result has been that the arrested person has been detained at the police station or other place of custody for four hours or more without an attempt being made to convey the intimation and (c) the total number of such cases in which the corresponding delay has been 24 hours or

PERSONS ARRESTED* BY POLICE FORCES BY TIME BEFORE ACTION TAKEN TO NOTIFY PERSON NOMINATED UNDER SECTION 62 OF THE CRIMINAL LAW ACT 1977
ENGLAND AND WALES—19TH JUNE-30TH NOVEMBER 1978—NUMBER OF PERSONS
Request under section 62 not dealt with within
Police force areaTotal arrested4 hours24 hours (included also in previous column)
Avon and Somerset13,00161
Bedfordshire5,99218
Cambridgeshire6,990
Cheshire7,7622
Cleveland9,02210
Cumbria4,78510
Derbyshire6,2023
Devon and Cornwall8,4904
Dorset5,2385
Durham6,4044
Essex12,265211
Gloucestershire3,89511
Greater Manchester36,7988
Hampshire17,816332
Hertfordshire6,10714
Humberside12,45423
Kent14,584213
Lancashire14,9156
Leicestershire9,048121
Lincolnshire5,08511
London, City of1,56372
Merseyside26,4239
Metropolitan police District142,72441059†
Norfolk3,3824
Northamptonshire6,1975
Northumbria24,79519
North Yorkshire5,1006
Nottinghamshire12,457159‡
South Yorkshire15,9395
Staffordshire10,48711
Suffolk4,62913
Surrey7,1964
Sussex14,618305
Thames Valley15,711243
Warwickshire2,5679
West Mercia9,04815
West Midlands32,43651
West Yorkshire23,18330
Wiltshire2,96911
Dyfed Powys2,2797
Gwent6,28411
North Wales3,8554
South Wales12,9124
Total593,60787091
* Provisional figures and subject to slight amendment.
† 19 of these persons were involved in 8 cases each of which involved 2 or 3 persons.
‡ 7 of these persons were involved in a single case.
§ These 3 persons were involved in a single case.

Rev J P Haldane-Stevenson

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether the Rev. J. P. Haldane-Steven-

more since the section came into force on 14 June 1978.

The information available is given in the following table:son's claim to the peerage of Eure has been finalised; and whether he was given the opportunity of pursuing it in accordance with article 10 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and article 6(1) of the European Convention of Human Rights.

As Mr. Haldane-Stevenson's petition claiming the barony of Eure did not show a prima facie case I felt Unable to refer it to the Law Officers. It is open to him to submit a further petition without the defects to which his attention has been drawn. It would not be appropriate for me to comment on the relevance to his case of the human rights provisions to which the hon. Member refers.

Prisoners

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many prisoners were transferred to hospital under section 72 of the Mental Health Act 1959 in each of the last six years; and if he will explain the reasons for the decrease in such orders.

I refer my hon. Friend to the reply I gave on 17 January to his earlier question on this subject.—[Vol. 960, c. 755–6.]

Swinfen Hall Prison

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many prisoners in Swinfen Hall prison, Lichfield, are receiving psychiatric treatment.

Immigration Detainees

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) how

PERSONS HELD UNDER THE PROVISION OF THE IMMIGRATION ACT 1971 IN SHARED ACCOMMODATION ON 30TH SEPTEMBER 1978
One in a CellTwo in a CellThree in a CellDormitory
Pentonville100
Birmingham8
Risley4
Leeds
It is general policy, wherever possible, to give sympathetic consideration to requests for single accommodation or for particular detainees to share accommodation with others of the same nationality.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many immigrants have been recommended for deportation by the courts following conviction for criminal offences: how many

many people who were detained under Immigration Act powers committed, or attempted to commit, suicide while in prison department establishments during the second, third and fourth quarters of 1978;

(2) how many people detained under the Immigration Act powers are known to have caused themselves serious self-inflicted injuries which were regarded as short of attempted suicide while in prison department establishments during the second, third and fourth quarters of 1978.

None committed suicide.I regret that the other information requested is not readily available. The annual returns of prison medical officers on cases of attempted suicide or serious self-inflicted injuries do not differentiate between particular categories of prisoner. A summary of the cases reported to have occurred in 1977 was given in paragraph 214 of the report on the work of the prison department 1977—Cmnd. 7290.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many people detained in prisons under Immigration Act powers were required to share a cell with, respectively, one, two, three or more other people as at 30 September 1978 at (a) Her Majesty's prison, Pentonville, (b) Her Majesty's prison, Win-son Green, (c) Risley remand centre, (d) Her Majesty's prison, Armley, (e) other prisons by name and (f) prison department establishments by name.

I regret that this information is not available for all establishments. The figures for the four prisons named by my hon. Friend as are follows:recommendations have been confirmed during 1976, 1977 and to the latest convenient date; and if he will list them by country of birth.

Records are not kept in a form which would enable completely accurate information on the lines requested to be provided without disproportionate expense. A manual check through records of individual cases has produced the following information:

197619771978
Number of court recommendations for deportationNumber of Deportation Orders made following court recommendationsNumber of court recommendations for deportationNumber of Deportation Orders made following court recommendationsNumber of court recommendations for deportationNumber of Deportations Orders made following court recommendations
Belgium4552
Denmark121
France3414226146
Germany1991910127
Italy41202872516
Netherlands912441
Afghanistan331
Algeria271621132612
Andorra11
Angola1
Argentine1072261
Austria535311
Bahrain11
Benin1
Bolivar12
Brazil15161
Bulgaria1
Cameroons13213
Chile84128156
China2
Colombia24162142723
Costa Rica1
Czechoslovakia1
Dahomey211
Djibouti21
Ecuador1111
Egypt441967275620
Ethiopia11
Finland1111
Greece9210443
Honduras1
Hungary1
Indonesia31111
Iran62155226512
Iraq21524
Israel756382
Ivory Coast11
Japan453
197619771978
Number of court recommendations for deportationNumber of Deportation Orders made following court recommendationsNumber of court recommendations for deportationNumber of Deportation Orders made following court recommendationsNumber of court recommendations for deportationNumber of Deportations Orders made following court recommendations
Jordan423331
Kuwait11
Lebanon432131
Liberia311
Libya54115123
Liechtenstein11
Madagascar1
Martinique11
Mexico3
Morocco2414129118
Mozambique1
Nicaragua21
Norway112121
Peru1143
Philippines23113
Poland837153
Portugal1668652
Qatar111
Saudi Arabia434254
Somalia11121
South Africa418385
Spain96148135
Sudan3111
Sweden3222
Switzerland31115
Syria32121
Thailand512361
Tunisia528556
Turkey481387586628
United States of America291524152217
Uruguay21
Venezuela6243103
Yemen216452
Yugoslavia627344
Zaire212112
Stateless49354
Antigua22
Australia189191398
197619771978
Number of court recommendations for deportationNumber of Deportation Orders made following court recommendationsNumber of court recommendations for deportationNumber of Deportation Orders made following court recommendationsNumber of court recommendations for deportationNumber of Deportations Orders made following court recommendations
Bahamas11
Bangladesh23112722104
Barbados221
Bermuda1
Canada858263
Cyprus421653285428
Gambia12121
Ghana773694729761
Guyana1033495
Hong Kong1149665
India543660464833
Jamaica738265
Kenya1358751
Malawi111
Malaysia16513967
Malta858941
Mauritius4530129129
New Zealand65543
Nigeria88411256710761
Seychelles33
Sierra Leone746281
Singapore2222
Rhodesia2231
Sri Lanka231512992
Tanzania1143322
Trinidad53531
West Indies Associated States11513
Uganda25
Zambia535
Republic of Ireland752859253822
Pakistan975974603829
TOTALS1,1905561,175688980551
The country which issued the passport is shown in column 1; this may not be the country of birth in all cases.
The number of deportation orders made in any one year does not related directly to the number of recommendations made by the courts in the same year.

Mr Anthony Ledger

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if Mr. Anthony Ledger, sentenced to five years' imprisonment at Chichester Crown Court on 21 December 1977 because Grayling-well psychiatric hospital, Chichester, had refused to admit him, even though he was suffering from severe mental illness, is still in prison; if so, where, and what treatment he is receiving; and what effort has been made to find him a hospital place.

Animals (Experiments)

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether he will publish a detailed analysis of the 81,331 experiments performed on living animals in the 1977 statistics.

No further analysis of these 81,331 experiments is possible beyond that shown in table 13 of "Experiments on living animals Statistics 1977," Cmnd. 7333. These experiments were carried out by licensees whose licences were revoked during 1977 and who reported in less detail before the introduction of the new form in December 1977.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether he will list, by name and address, the laboratories which tested tobacco and its substitutes on 15,170 live animals during 1977.

It is not the practice to disclose information about experimentation at particular establishments. As explained in "Experiments on living animals: Statistics 1977"—Cmnd. 7333—licensees submitted their returns under the assurance that information would not be published in any way which would prejudice commercial or academic confidentiality.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what information he has on the suppliers of the 14,119 dogs subjected to experiments under the Cruelty to Animals Act 1876, distinguishing between those purchased From voluntary licensed dealers, unlicensed dealers and those bred by research establishments for experimental purposes.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what are the minimum qualifications of the holders of the 291 licences issued to people to carry out experiments on live animals in polytechnics during 1977; and whether he will list the polytechnics where such experiments are carried out.

Any applicant for a licence under the Cruelty to Animals Act 1876 must be recommended by the president of a learned society and also by a professor of a branch of medical science, unless he himself is such a professor, and must satisfy the Home Office on the advice of the Cruelty to Animals Inspectorate whose members all hold medical or veterinary qualifications as to his competence to hold a licence. Each case is considered on its merits; there is no prescribed list of minimum qualifications, but the applicant's qualifications and experience are taken into account. Where appropriate, conditions as to supervision are attached to a licence. A complete list of places registered under the Act, including polytechnics, is in the Library of the House.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many applications for licences to experiment on live animals under the Cruelty to Animals Act 1876 have been refused (a) in each of the last 10 years and (b) in total since the Act came into force.

This information is not available. Refusals are not common because prospective applicants and heads of departments usually discuss the matter first with a Home Office inspector and applications which are unlikely to be successful are not put forward.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many of the 14 inspectors under the Cruelty to Animals Act 1876 have been trained in behavioural science; and whether he will list the specific qualifications for appointment to these positions.

Each of the 15 inspectors possesses medical or veterinary qualifications which include training in behavioural matters, although none possesses a specific behavioural qualification. Inspectors are required to have been fully registered as medical practitioners or veterinary surgeons, to be abreast of current trends in medical and biological research, and to be experienced in two or more of the following fields: clinical practice, medical or biological research, laboratory diagnosis, the care of laboratory animals, or administration.

Travellers

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what information is required from travellers (a) who are citizens of the United Kingdom and Colonies, and (b) who are citizens of some other country when they register at an hotel in the United Kingdom; under what statutory authority this information is required; what use is made of the information; and to whom it is made available.

The Immigration (Hotel Records) Order 1972 requires a person aged 16 or over who stays at an hotel to inform the keeper of his full name and nationality. An alien is required to give in addition the number and place of issue of his passport or other document establishing his identity, and on his departure his next destination and, if it is know, his full address there.The purpose is to enable information to be obtained about the addresses of aliens, who may be required to notify the police of changes of address. The records kept under the order are open to inspection by a constable or a person authorised by me.

Mr Raj Mal Jain

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department why it took him until 11 January 1979 to reply to a letter form the hon. Member for Newham, North-West dated 17 July 1976 concerning Mr. Raj Mal Jain; and whether he will take action to ensure that letters are replied to more expeditiously.

After a question by my hon. Friend about this case was answered on 26 July 1976, letters were sent to him on 18 October and 23 November 1976 and on 6 January and 15 February 1977. In the last of these I said that the case was sub judice because of proceedings at the Central Criminal Court and that I would write again when the matter was resolved and a firm decision taken regarding Mr. Jain's position in this country. The case remained sub judice until April 1978. Mr. Jain then made further representations and he was interviewed in September. A decision regarding his position in this country was taken on 2 January 1979 and I wrote to my hon. Friend on 11 January.

Children (Court Appearances)

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department which areas have not yet implemented the section in the Children and Young Persons Act 1969 requiring consultation between police and local authority social service departments before a child can be brought to court.

Section 5(3) of the Children and Young Persons Act 1969, which requires consultation with a local authority before a young person is prosecuted, has not yet been brought into effect. Nevertheless, I understand that it is common practice in most areas for the police to seek the views of the local authority when considering what action to take against a child or young person in respect of an offence. The Government attach importance to consultation in cases concerning juveniles. A joint circular has recently been issued by the Home Office, DHSS, DES and Welsh Office reminding all the agencies which deal with juveniles of the need for inter-service co-operation generally. A copy of this circular (HOC 211/1978) is in the Library of the House.

Juvenile Courts

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many juvenile courts are held in buildings where adult offenders are prosecuted; how many are held in totally separate buildings; and what action he is taking to increase the latter.

The information sought in the first two parts of my hon. Friend's question could be obtained only at disproportionate cost. On the third responsibility for initiating proposals for magistrates courts building schemes rests with the Magistrates' Courts Committee and providing authority for the petty sessional division concerned. The obligation to protect children and young persons attending at court from association with their adult counterparts is already recognised in section 31 of the Children and Young Persons Act 1933; but it has not been considered necessary to require separate buildings for juvenile courts.

Cigarettes (Television Advertising)

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what action he proposes to take to prevent the clandestine advertising of cigarettes on television, which breaks the agreement with the tobacco industry as shown by the information sent to him by the hon. Member for Brent, South.

Since 1965 the advertising of cigarettes or cigarette tobacco on independent television, whether in advertisements for cigarettes or other products or services, has been prohibited under the Independent Broadcasting Authority code of advertising standards and practice. The authority assures me that, in accordance with its statutory duties under the IBA Act 1973 to enforce its code of advertising standards and practice, indirect advertising of cigarettes and cigarette tobaccos in advertisements for other products or services would not be permitted.

Licensing Act 1964 (Compensation Fund)

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) who holds the money held in the compensation fund set up by the Licensing Act 1964; and what is the annual rate of interest paid;(2) when was the last occasion on which the compensation authority made a payment out of the compensation fund under the Licensing Act 1964; how much was paid; to whom; and for what purpose;(3) if the compensation authority is still imposing charges under section 17 of the Licensing Act 1964; and when the last charge was imposed;(4) what were the expenses of the compensation authority in each year since 1964.

Licensing compention funds are held locally by 58 compensation authorities. Most of this money is invested, and the annual rate of interest varies according to the type of investment.The most recent information available centrally about the payment of compensation and the imposition of charges by the compensation authorities relates to the year ended 31 December 1977. During this period the authorities paid out a total of £95,530 in compensation in respect of 13 premises. Charges under section 17 of the Licensing Act 1964 were imposed by only two authorities and totalled £2,058.Information about the annual expenses of compensation authorities since 1964 is not readily available and could be obtained only at disproportionate cost.

Victims Of Violence (Compensation)

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will list the amounts paid in compensation to victims of violence for each of the last three years and the average amounts paid per person.

The amounts paid by the Criminal Injuries Compensation Board

Total paidAverage award
££
1975–766,476,680563
1976–779,677,389694
1977–7810,106,513719

Heavy Goods Vehicles (Competent Voluntary Drivers)

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what estimate he has of the numbers of persons enrolled for Civil Defence or active in other voluntary organisations who are capable of driving a heavy goods vehicle.

The Civil Defence Corps was disbanded in 1968. I have no information about the number of members of voluntary organisations qualified to drive heavy goods vehicles.

Police Authorities (Notice Of Processions)

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what guidance he has issued to police authorities about proposals for legislation making it a requirement that notice be given of processions.

None. I refer my hon. Friend to the reply given by my hon. Friend the Under-Secretary of State to a question by my hon. Friend the Member for Stockport, North (Mr. Bennett) on 30 November—[Vol. 959, c. 351–2.]

Indo-China (Immigrants)

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many applications have been received by the Government from those living in Indo-China who wish to come and settle in the United Kingdom permanently in each of the last five years and how many in 1978.

The information requested could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Juvenile Court Magistrates

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many magistrates in juvenile courts there are in each of the following age bands: 21 to 30 years, 30 to 40 years, 40 to 50 years, and 50 to 65 years of age.

I have been asked to reply.Except in Inner London, magistrates are not appointed to the juvenile panel directly by my noble Friend but are elected by their own benches throughout the country for a three-year term. The information asked for is not available in central records held by the Department of my noble Friend and can be ascertained only by the expenditure of a disproportionate amount of time and money.

Enterpriseprice increase notified (percentage)Interim increase (percentage)
Imperial Tobacco Ltd1·921·92
Air Products Ltd.10·0*Nil
Butlins Ltd.14·4Nil
BOC Ltd.9·8Nil§
The Daily Telegraph Ltd.4·54·5†§
Perkins Engines Co.10·6310·63†‡§
Rugy Portland Cement Co. Ltd.10·98·5§
United Biscuits (UK) Ltd.3·963·96†§
* Subsequently amended by the company to 6 per cent.
† Increases under the Commission's discretionary powers in pursuance of section 4(5)(i) of the Price Commission Act 1977.
‡ Two variation notices given: firstly under the Commission's discretionary powers, subsequently under the Safeguard Regulations.
§ Investigations still in progress.

If my hon. Friend wishes to have the information concerned in respect of any specific area or areas and will write to my noble Friend, he will obtain it for her.

Prices And Consumer Protection

Food Subsidies

asked the Secretary of State for Prices and Consumer Protection, in respect of each commodity, what is the amount spent on food subsidies in each of the years from February 1974 to date; and what effect these subventions have had in total on the retail prices index, the food prices index and the pensioners index, respectively.

Company Prices

asked the Secretary of State for Prices and Consumer Protection if, pursuant to his reply to the hon. Member for Romford, Official Report, 31 July 1978, columns 20–2, he will now update the information to include companies which have been investigated by the Price Commission in the last six months.

Between August 1977 and 23 January 1979 the Price Commission initiated 36 investigations under sections 4 and 5 of the Price Commission Act 1977. Thirty-one investigations have now been completed.The following table shows interim increases permitted under variation notices to enterprises subject to investigation under section 4 since the end of July 1978:

In the following case an undertaking to restrict prices has been given by the enterprise concerned to the Secretary of State for Prices and Consumer Protection:

GPBM/Rizla Ltd.—cigarette paper booklets and filter tips. No increase in the price of cigarette paper booklets before 1 January 1979 and of filter tips before 1 January 1980.

In the following cases companies have given assurances, recorded in the Price Commission's reports, that certain prices will be held for various periods unless major or unexpected cost increases are incurred:

  • Trust Houses Forte Hotels Ltd.
  • Lever Brothers Ltd.
  • Procter and Gamble Ltd.
  • Imperial Tobacco Ltd.
  • Air Products Ltd.
  • Dollond and Aitchison Ltd.
  • Thermos Ltd.

Private Clinics (Operations)

asked the Secretary of State for Prices and Consumer Protection what criteria the Director General of Fair Trading operates in granting licences under the Consumer Credit Act 1974 to private clinics which offer operations on hire purchase; how many such licences have been granted; and if he is satisfied that patients are not being unduly induced into having treatment they do not need.

This is a matter for the Director General of Fair Trading. I am asking him to write to my hon. Friend.

Retail Price Index

asked the Secretary of State for Prices and Consumer Protection by what percentage prices have risen in the latest 12 months for which figures are available, as measured in the retail price index.

Trade

Tankers (Safety)

asked the Secretary of State for Trade (1) if he will take steps to ensure that all tankers above the appropriate size limits built in the United Kingdom incorporate up-to-date safety equipment;

(2) if he will undertake consultations with the oil companies, tanker owners and representatives of seafarers' unions and other related unions with a view to establishing new safety standards for oil tankers;

(3) if he will raise with the EEC Commission the question of new safety standards for oil tankers; and whether the EEC is at present considering taking an initiative on this matter given the large amount of intra-EEC trade in oil products.

We have taken a leading role in the Intergovernmental Maritime Consultative Organisation (IMCO) in seeking international agreement on practical and effective measures to improve the safety of tankers, whether flying our flag or that of other States. The main priority now is to bring into force what has been agreed, and, for our part, one of the main reasons for introducing the Merchant Shipping Bill, currently before the House, was to enable us to ratify and implement the latest international agreements in the field.Given the international character of the shipping and oil industries, safety standards are best set on a world-wide basis, but the EEC has made a useful contribution by recommending member States to ratify the relevant IMCO agreements by specified dates.I and officials of my Department are in continuing touch with both sides of the industry about various aspects of marine safety.

European Community (Auditors)

asked the Secretary of State for Trade what representations he has received concerning the proposed eighth directive relating to the qualifications of EEC auditors; and when he expects to make a statement.

Last October, my Department sent copies of the draft directive to over 40 bodies, inviting their comments. The Consultative Committee of Accountancy Bodies and some, but not all, of the others have now responded. The advice received will help to determine the United Kingdom line when an EEC Council working party begins its detailed consideration of the text.

Industry

Product And Process Development Scheme

asked the Secretary of State for Industry if he will list the grants made under the new product and process development scheme in each of the past three years and the products or processes favoured in each case.

By 30 November 1978, 420 formal applications for assistance under the product and process development scheme had been received since its inception in July 1977. Of these, 130 had been approved, involving a Departmental contribution of approximately £11 million towards total project costs of £38 million. The rate of new approvals is currently about 20 per month. Details of individual grants cannot be made available, for reasons of commercial confidentiality.

Treaty Of Rome

asked the Secretary of State for Industry what use has been made of article 90 of the Rome Treaty to date; and whether there are any comparable provisions in the Treaty of Paris.

I am not aware of any use which has been made of article 90 of the Treaty of Rome to date. There are no directly comparable provisions in the Treaty of Paris, but, under that Treaty, the Commission has certain powers to ensure that the Treaty objectives relating to competition policy are attained.

Space Activities

asked the Secretary of State for Industry what has been the expenditure by his Department in each of the years since 1974–75 on space activities.

Expenditure in each of the years since 1974–75 on space activities has been:

£ million
1974–7523·31
1975–7631·03
1976–7736·54
1977–7834·48

Industrial Disputes

asked the Secretary of State for Industry what repre- sentations he has received from the British Textile Employers' Association relating to the lorry drivers' strike; and if he will make a statement on his Department's assessment on the long-term damage done to the textile industry and the loss of output by this strike, the dispute involving the tanker drivers and the unofficial industrial action being taken by certain employees of the North-West water authority.

The British Textile Employers' Association has made clear to me its grave concern about the situation. It is too early to try to make a detailed assessment of the impact of these disputes.

Spanish Steel, Shipbuilding And Motor Vehicle Industries

asked the Secretary of state for Industry what is the Government's policy on the transitional arrangements for the entry of the Spanish steel, shipbuilding and motor vehicle industries into the Common Market of the EEC.

We will seek a full and rapid application by Spain of the tariff reductions on industrial goods, including motor vehicles, for which provision was made in the 1970 EEC/Spain Agreement. We expected this to be followed by a fully reciprocal dismantling of tariffs between Spain and the EEC and the full application of the provisions of the treaties applicable to competition.We will aim to achieve the integration of the Spanish shipbuilding and steel industries into the Community framework in a way which minimizes any additional problems of Community overcapacity which enlargement may bring.

British Steel Corporation

asked the Secretary of State for Industry what was the total amount in grants subsidies and loans to the British Steel corporation in each year since 1970.

The annual reports and accounts for the Corporation, which are in the Library, give for each financial year the total amounts of advances under section 18 of the Iron and Steel Act 1975 and of National Loans Fund moneys, details of regional development and other grants, and net changes in the Corporation's other borrowings. BSC does not receive any subsidies.

asked the Secretary of State for Industry what information he has received from the British Steel Corporation in respect of break-even trading estimates.

The Corporation is working to its objective of operating on a break-even basis by the end of the financial year 1979–80 as stated by Sir Charles Villiers on 30 November.

Motor Car Industry

asked the Secretary of State for Industry what was the total amount in grants under each of his Department's schemes to the car industry in each year since 1970.

  • £40,000,000 (Section 8 Industry Act 1972)
  • £41,325 (Ferrous Foundry Scheme)

1977

  • £1,500,911 (Section 8)
  • £79,121 (Ferrous Foundry Scheme)

1978

  • £45,768,387 (Section 7 Industry Act 1972)
  • £10,000,000 (Section 8)
  • £436,078 (Ferrous Foundry Scheme)
  • £989,000 (Accelerated Projects Scheme)

1979 to date

£1,500,000 (Section 7)

Funds have also been provided for the car industry under section 8 in the form of loans or equity. Details of regional development grants paid to the car industry cannot be made available without disproportionate cost; however, details of individual payments over £25,000 have been published quarterly in "Trade and Industry" since 31 December 1974.

Cutlery Industry

asked the Secretary of State for Industry (1) what recent discussions he has held with trade unions in the cutlery industry about its future organisation and development and job opportunities within the industry;(2) what recent discussions he has held with manufacturers in the cutlery industry about the future development and reorganisation of that industry;

(3) what progress is being made with his Department's special study of the cutlery industry.

There have been no recent substantive discussions with either side of the industry. However, with the completion of the preliminary survey of the industry the way is now clear for the joint industry Goverment working party to consider how the industry's efficiency and competitiveness might be improved. The working party is to hold its first meeting on 2 February.

Small Businesses

asked the Secretary of State for Industry how many firms employing fewer than 200 people have received grants under his Department's schemes; and what sum has been provided in this way.

The figures are not readily available and can be obtained only at a disproportionate cost.

British Steel (Industries) Ltd

asked the Secretary of State for Industry if he will list in the Official Report the new jobs, numbers and sizes of factories, achieved by British Steel (Industries) Ltd. in the regions of operation, and if he will include the costs to British Steel since the formation of British Steel (Industries) Ltd.

This is a matter for the British Steel Corporation which I have asked to write to my hon. Friend.

Industry Act 1972 (Section 8 Assistance)

asked the Secretary of State for Industry what total payments have so far been made, and what commitments entered into, under section 8 of the Industry Act 1972.

Up to 31 December 1978 commitments totalling £882·7 million have been made under section 8 of the Industry Act 1972. Payments so far made arising from their commitments amount to £445·4 million.

Steel

asked the Secretary of State for Industry what quantities of (a) tool steel, (b) high speed steels and (c) stainless steel bars were imported into the United Kingdom in 1978; and how the figures compare with 1977 and 1976.

UNITED KINGDOM IMPORTS
Tonnes
197619771978 (January-November
Alloy tool die and magnet steel*23,80235,52536,554
High speed steel†3,4194,2513,862
Stainless steel bars‡7,95512,20111,654
Figures of tool steel are not available.
* Alloy tool die and magnet exclude carbon tool steel.
† High speed steel includes high speed wire rod.
‡ In addition to stainless steel bar, valve steel and tube rounds are included.
§ The figures for 1978 are on a slightly different basis from the earlier years owing to changes in the 1978 tariff codings. The tonnages involved are small.

Source: Customs and Excise.

asked the Secretary of State for Industry what were the principal countries of origin of imports of (a) tool steel, (b) high speed steels (c) stainless steel bar, into the United Kingdom in 1978, 1977 and 1976 giving the approximate quantity for each country.

UNITED KINGDOM IMPORTS OF SPECIAL STEELS
Tonnes
Principal countries197619771978 (January-November)
Alloy tool die and magnet steel.France5,15411,23612,061
Federal Republic of Germany2,4204,5458,314
Italy2,0003,9082,724
Sweden4,8035,3482,005
Austria1,1892,226611
All countries23,80235,52536,554
High speed steel bars and rods (including wire rod).France252718430
Federal Republic of Germany52433254
Sweden2,4912,2572,542
Austria382416484
All Countries3,4194,2513,862
Stainless steel barsFrance8531,189>1,772
Federal Republic of Germany2,1273,0112,693
Italy4702,5023,215
Austria453749757
Spain1,2452,2511,621
All countries7,95512,20111,654
Source: Her Majesty's Customs and Excise.
(a) Tool steel is not separately defined in the trade accounts but is included with the figures for alloy tool, die and magnet steel. This category excludes carbon tool steel.
(b) High speed steel includes high speed wire rod.
(c) In addition to stainless steel bar this category includes valve steel and tube rounds.

asked the Secretary of State for Industry (1) what further discussions have taken place with Commissioner Davignon about imports of special steels into the United Kingdom market (a) from other EEC countries and (b) from outside the EEC;(2) what action is being taken on the findings of the National Economic

These figures are not readily available. The table which follows shows imports classified according to the country of consignment, but this analysis is probably much the same as that by country of origin.Development Organisation section working party on special steels;(3) what recent discussions he has held with Sheffield trade unions and Sheffield industrialists, respectively, about imports of special steels into the United Kingdom market;(4) what recent discussions have been held with the British Independent Steel Producers Association about the imports of special steel into the United Kingdom market.

My right hon. Friend wrote to Commissioner Davignon again in December and the Commissioner replied earlier this month. My right hon. Friend immediately sent copies to the NEDO iron and steel sector working party and to the British Independent Steel Producers Association—BISPA—and invited their comments, which we expect to receive shortly. My right hon. Friend the Minister of State also took the opportunity when in Brussels for the Council of Ministers in December to stress to Commissioner Davignon the importance we attach to the problems of the special steels industry. My right hon. Friend met a delegation from BISPA in November along with the President of the Sheffield Chamber of Commerce, the chairman of the NEDO iron and steel sector working party and the chairman of the TUC steel committee who is also general secretary of the Iron and Steel Trades Confederation.The NEDO iron and steel sector working party has been asked to let my right hon. Friend know what it has in mind or in hand about the many issues which the report on special steels raises besides imports. My right hon. Friend has offered the help of Government under our various schemes for encouraging new investment in the industry and we have discussed the provision of temporary employment subsidy to some producers to help preserve jobs.

asked the Secretary of State for Industry what imports of steel, giving classifications, took place in the year 1978–79.

asked the Secretary of State for Industry what exports of steel from the British Steel Corporation took place in 1978–79.

This is strictly a matter for the British Steel Corporation, but I understand that in the calendar year 1978, which is the latest period available, the Corporation's total exports amounted to 3·01 million tones.

asked the Secretary of State for Industry what further steps have been taken to control imports of steel from within the EEC and from countries outside the EEC.

The anti-crisis measures for imports from countries outside the EEC are being renewed for 1979 and have been strengthened by measures designed to ensure a greater degree of discipline in intra-Community trade.

Copper Tubing

asked the Secretary of State for Industry what representations he has received from the building industry and others about a developing shortage of copper tubing, especially 15 mm diameter; and if he will announce any measures to deal with the problem.

The Departments of Industry and the Environment have received many representations from the building industry about the shortage of copper tube for domestic use, and have been in close touch with the industry. Although supplies were reduced for a month towards the end of 1978 by a strike at one of the leading producers, United Kingdom manufacturers say that deliveries to the home market in 1978 were 13½ per cent. more than in 1977, a bigger increase than in the rate of installation. The manufacturers are now on full production and are delivering as much as they can to the home market. They will consider investment in new capacity, which could not affect the immediate problem, in the light of estimates of future market demand. I have written to the British Non-Ferrous Metals Federation asking it to consider if any further action is possible to increase domestic supplies.

Shipbuilding (Redundancy Payments)

asked the Secretary of State for Industry what is the total payment made so far under the Shipbuilding (Redundancy Payments) Act 1978; to how many men payments have been made; and what is the average payment for men paid out.

I understand that payments under the schemes for Great Britain and for Northern Ireland will, by the end of this week, have been made to 2,802 people to a total amount of £3,719,779·83. So far only lump sum payments have been made. The average lump sum is £1,327·54 per person. Periodical payments will commence shortly.

National Enterprise Board

asked the Secretary of State for Industry if he will publish in the Official Report a list of the shareholdings held by the National Enterprise Board on

CompanyNumber and description of shares held by NEBPercentage of nominal value and total equityCost (£'000)Stock Exchange closing price on 22nd January where available
Barrow Hepburn Group Ltd1,000,000 25p Ordinary4·145030p
BL Ltd1,144,554,026 50p Ordinary98·9695,52320p
Brown Boveri Kent Ltd10,856,585 25p Ordinary20·03,29349p
Bull Motors Ltd1,020,000 £1 Ordinary100·01,020
BTB (Engineering) Ltd30,000 £1 Redeemable PreferenceNot equity*30
RR Chapman (Sub Sea Surveys) Ltd50,000 £1 Ordinary47·2*50
Computer and Systems349,750 5p Ordinary49·9882
Engineering Ltd.15,200 £1 Redeemable PreferenceNot equity48
Ferranti Ltd10,666,666 50p Ordinary50·06,993323p
Hird-Brown Ltd250,000 £1 Redeemable PreferenceNot equity*250
ICL Ltd8,148,000 £1 Ordinary24·412,134430p
Monotype Holdings Ltd25,000 10p Ordinary37·5250
Negretti & Zambra960,000 25p Deferred Ordinary29·871073p
460,622 £1 Redeemable PreferenceNot equity461
Pakment International Ltd23,230* £1 Ordinary34·447
200,000 £1 Redeemable PreferenceNot equity200
Sinclair Radionics Ltd75,000 £1 Ordinary73·3650
200,000 £1 Preference
3,800,000 £1 Redeemable PreferenceNot equity3,800
Technical Resources (equipment) Ltd36,750 £1 Ordinary24·537
200,000 £1 Redeemable PreferenceNot equity200
* These items are corrections to the statement of 15 November 1978.

asked the Secretary of State for Industry if he will list the members of the National Enterprise Board and their declared financial interests.

The present members of the board are:Sir Leslie Murphy.Mr. Richard Morris.Mr. David Basnett.Mr. Alistair Frame.Mr. John Gardiner.Mr. John Lyons.Mrs. Caroline Miles.Mr. Hugh Scanlon.Mr. Harry Urwin.Sir Jack Wellings.

24 January 1979, showing the number and description of the shares, the percentage of the total equity held by the National Enterprise Board, the cost of the shareholding and, where appropriate, the market value of the shareholding at close of business on 24 January 1979.

The reply I gave the hon. Member on 15 November 1978—[Vol. 957, c. 222–226], needs to be updated, and at four points corrected, as follows:The latest published information on members' financial interests is set out in Appendix C of the board's annual report and accounts 1977. A copy is in the Library.

National Finance

Personal Incomes (International Comparisons)

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer if he will publish from international sources available to him a table showing the top 25 countries in order of income per head of population over the past five years; and if he will express the relative positions both in terms of gross national product per head in United States dollars, and in percentage terms, using the United States of America's gross national product per head as base.

I would refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave today to the hon. Member for Chingford (Mr. Tebbit).

Unrecovered Debt (Liquidation)

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer what was the total sum of unrecovered debts in the last financial year owing to the Inland Revenue, caused by its inability to collect PAYE and national insurance contribution payments from companies which have gone into liquidation.

This figure is not available.However, in the accounting year to 31 October 1977, Inland Revenue wrote off £3·7 million PAYE and £172,000 national insurance contributions due from employers, including companies, on grounds of insolvency and bankruptcy. In addition, in the year to 31 March 1978, the Department of Health and Social Security in cases transferred by Inland Revenue similarly wrote off £1·96 million national insurance contributions.

National Land Fund

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer what was the total value of the assets of the National Land Fund at 2 January 1979.

The market value of the National Land Fund's assets on 2 January 1979 was about £16,050,000.

£ Sterling

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer what has been the change in the purchasing value of the £ sterling for each of the years from 1975 to 1978.

Taking the internal purchasing power of the £ as 100p in December 1974, the value in December 1975 was 80p; in December 1976, 70p; in December 1977, 62p; and in December 1978, 57p. The estimates are based on movements in the General Index of Retail Prices.

Public Expenditure

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer if the statement on Her Majesty's Treasury's 1972 publication "Public Expenditure White Papers: Handbook on Methodology" that the net effect of the retail price effect adjustment is to increase the growth rate of total public expenditure by some 0·6 per cent. per annum is still valid; and, if not, what the trend effect of the retail price effect is now reckoned to be.

Gross Domestic Product (International Comparisons)

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer if he will list for 1977 or the latest date for which information is available the gross domestic product at factor cost per head of total population in each member State of the EEC, the United States of America, Canada and Japan.

, pursuant to his reply [Official Report, 18 January 1979; Vol. 960, c. 866], gave the following answer:The latest available information is given in the table below.Comparative estimates of gross domestic product published by international organisations are given in terms of market prices; and they are converted to a common unit of measurement on the basis of official or market rates of exchange. The use of these exchange rates in this context can be misleading since they do not necessarily reflect the relative purchasing power of national currencies in terms of the goods and services available in the countries being compared. It is generally recognised that a more realistic assessment of relative levels of GDP can be made through the use of purchasing power parities. However, there are now two sets of purchasing power parities based on studies by the United Nations and by the statistical office of the European Communities; and they give slightly different results. Alternative

GROSS DOMESTIC PRODUCT AT MARKET PRICES IN 1976 PER HEAD OF TOTAL POPULATION
Based on official or market rates of exchange*Based on purchasing power parities (UK = 100)
US DollarsUK=100UNSOFC
Belgium6,713172NA118
Denmark7,594194NA129
France6,552167134122
Germany, Federal Republic7,247185134127
Irish Republic2,50964NA66
Italy3,041788079
Luxembourg6,276160NA120
Netherlands6,501166119116
United Kingdom3,914100100100
United States7,912202168NA
Canada8,409215NANA
Japan4,922126106NA
NA = Not available.
*Source: National accounts of OECD countries Volume 1.
† Extrapolated from benchmark estimates for 1970 and 1973 produced by the UN international comparisons project.
Source: SOEC—extrapolated from benchmark estimates for 1975

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer if he will list for the top 25 economies, including, where relevant, economies in the Communist bloc, the gross national product per capita at factor cost and expressed in terms of United States dollars, for 1951, 1964, 1970, 1973, 1976 and 1977.

, pursuant to his reply [Official Report, 18 January 1979; Vol. 960, c. 867], gave the following information:Estimates at factor cost are not readily available from international sources. The table below contains estimates of gross national product at market prices per head of the population for the top 25 economies in respect of the years 1974–76. The figures have been calculated by the World Bank. Comparable figures for 1977 and for years before 1974 are not available. The top 25 economies have been defined through the figures published by the World Bank and include only those countries with a population of 1 million or more. The figures are based on average relative prices and exchange rates during 1974–76 and the year-to-year movements reflect changes in real output in each country and in the rate of inflation in the United States.There are special difficulties in producing comparable estimates for centrally planned economies, where national

native estimates are given in the table for those countries covered by both studies.

accounts are compiled on the basis of the system of material product balances. Estimate of GNP for these countries on a comparable basis have been made by the World Bank, but more than usual caution in the use of figures is advised.

Alternative estimates, but relating only to the member countries of OECD, covering the period from 1961 to 1976 are given on page 133 of "National Accounts of OECD Countries 1976, Volume 1, Main Aggregates", published by OECD.

It is recognised that the use of official or market-exchange rates to convert GNP or GDP estimates to a common unit of measurement can give very misleading results because the rates do not necessarily reflect the relative purchasing power of national currencies in terms of the goods and services available in the countries being compared. A more realistic assessment is given by the use of purchasing power parities to convert to a common unit. Estimates of relative GDP at market prices have been included in the table, derived on the basis of purchasing power parities extrapolated from the benchmark estimate for 1970 and 1973 provided by the United Nations International Comparisons Project.

These estimates are available only for a limited number of countries at present. Alternative estimates for EEC member countries in 1976, based on purchasing power parities developed by the statistical office of the European Communities, are

Gross national product at market prices per capita

*

Gross domestic product at market prices per capita Based on Purchasing power Parities

1974

1975

1976 (preliminary)

1974

1975

1976 (preliminary)

1974

1975

1976

US $ per head

USA = 100

USA = 100

Kuwait11,27015,19015,480169213196
Switzerland8,2808,4108,880124118113
Sweden7,4408,1508,670111114110
United States6,6807,1207,890100100100100100100
Canada6,3906,9307,510969795
Denmark6,2906,8107,450949694
Norway6,0406,7607,420909594
Germany, Federal Republic6,2806,6707,380949494808080
Belgium5,8406,2706,7808788867978NA
France5,5205,9506,550838483788080
Libya4,3605,5306,310657880
Netherlands5,4205,7506,200818179737271
Australia5,3605,7006,100808077
Finland4,9705,4205,620747671
Austria4,5304,8705,330686868
Japan4,0404,4504,910606362636464
Saudi Arabia3,0904,0104,480465657
New Zealand4,0804,2804,250616054
German Democratic Republic‡3,4503,9104,220525553
United Kingdom3,5303,7804,020535351606160
Israel3,6003,7903,920545350
Czechoslovakia‡3,2403,6103,840495149
Italy2,6902,8103,050403939494948
Spain2,5102,7502,920383937
Poland‡2,2702,6002,860343736

*

Source: World Bank Atlas.

† Extrapolated from the benchmark estimates for 1970 and 1973 produced by the United Nations International Comparisons Project.
‡ Tentative estimates produced by the World Bank.

Northern Ireland

Assassinations (Classification)

asked the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland how he defines the classification "sectarian and interfactional assassinations" in the statistics of security; and whether he will reconsider this classification.

The term "sectarian and interfactional assassinations" applies to what are regarded as the deliberate killing of individuals or groups because of their religion or their membership of a political or parliamentary organisation. Since the relevant figures in the quarterly statistics also include killings of members of political or paramilitary organisations by members of the same organisation, it is proposed in future to adopt a new classification of "sectarian, interfactional and intrafactional assassinations."

contained in another answer given to the hon. Member today.

Employment

Pneumoconiosis And Silicosis

asked the Secretary of State for Employment (1) whether, further to his answer of 26 July 1978 to the hon. Member for Stoke-on-Trent, South, he can confirm that the inter-departmental working group on compensation for sufferers from pneumoconiosis and silicosis has taken evidence from pottery workers; and, if so, on what dates it was taken and from whom;(2) why the working group on compensation for sufferers from pneumoconiosis and silicosis has not yet reported; and when he now expects to receive the report;(3) what new evidence the working group on compensation for sufferers from pneumoconiosis and silicosis has adduced on its subject of inquiry.

I refer my hon. friend to the reply given to the hon. Member for Caernarvon (Mr. Wigley) on 17 January. The working group has available to it a great deal of information relevant to its task, including evidence submitted to the Pearson Commission generally and information on the pottery industry provided by the Ceramic and Allied Trades Union. It is primarily for the working group to decide if further information is required. I understand that so far the group has not sought additional evidence from the pottery or other industries.

Government Grants (Merseyside)

asked the Secretary of State for Employment if he will list the nature and amount of Government grants which have been made to companies on Merseyside since October 1974; and what steps the Government are taking to recover the sums so granted.

It is estimated that some £19·5 million has been paid to employers in the Merseyside special development area through the special employment measures administered by my Department. The total is made up as follows:

Temporary employment subsidy17,000,000
Recruitment subsidy for school leavers213,000
Youth employment subsidy796,000
Small firms employment subsidy1,379,000
Short time working compensation scheme35,000
Adult employment subsidy55,000
In addition, since 1975 the Government have made funds available, which are channelled through the Manpower Services Commission, for special training measures to maintain levels of apprentice recruitment in industry. Analysis of the funds below national level is not available.None of the sums paid are recoverable.These figures do not include grants which have been made to employers in the Merseyside special development area by other Government Departments.

Job Creation

asked the Secretary of State for Employment (1) if he will give the latest figures for the number of people assisted in each English economic planning region, Scotland and Wales under each of the following measures: temporary employment subsidy, short-time working compensation scheme, small firms employment subsidy, job release scheme, adult employment subsidy, job introduction scheme, youth opportunities programme, community industry, special temporary employment programme, and job creation programme;(2) if he will indicate, for the following schemes (

a) the date the scheme started, ( b) the date the scheme closed or closes for applications or the date on which the scheme ceased operation and ( c) the cumulative number of people assisted in each English economic planning region, Scotland and Wales, namely, youth opportunities programme, special temporary employment programme, job creation programme, temporary employment subsidy, small firms employment subsidy, short-time working compensation scheme, job introduction scheme, adult employment subsidy, job release, community industry, recruitment subsidy for school leavers, youth employment subsidy, and work experience scheme;

(3) how many applications have been received under the special temporary employment programme for the funding of co-operative workshops; and how many have been approved, giving details of the name of sponsor, the amount of grant, the number of jobs created, the nature of project and the period of funding.

Professional Consultants (Reports)

asked the Secretary of State for Employment if he will list the subjects on which professional consultants' reports were commissioned by his Department and by the Manpower Services Commission, and the total cost to the Department and the Manpower Services Commission of such reports, in each of the years 1974, 1975, 1976, 1977 and 1978.

Average Earnings

asked the Secretary of State for Employment if he will compare the national average wage in Great Britain with those in each of the other EEC countries, expressed in £ sterling for the latest date for which figures are available; and if he will express each as a percentage of the British national average wage.

, pursuant to his reply [Official Report, 18 January 1979; Vol. 960, c. 856], gave the following information:The following table gives the latest available data which relate to manual workers in manufacturing and certain other production industries in October 1977.The figures given are not strictly comparable owing to differences in national definitions. Furthermore, international comparisons of earnings statistics are not meaningful unless account is taken of differences in taxation and social benefits and differences in internal purchasing power which are not reflected by market exchange rates.

AVERAGE GROSS HOURLY EARNINGS OF MUNUAL WORKERS IN MANUFACTURING, MINING QUARRYING AND CONSTRUCTION—OCTOBER 1977
£ sterling*Percentage of United Kingdom figure
United Kingdom1·54100
Federal Republic of Germany2·82183
France1·83119
Italy····
Netherlands2·81182
Belgium2·85185
Luxembourg3·17206
Irish Republic*1·4997
Denmark‡3·49227
… Not available.
* Based on average market exchange rate of October 1977.
† September 1977
‡ Excluding construction.

Sources:

Eurostat—"Hourly earnings Hours of work".

Irish—"Industrial Enquiries".

Pay

asked the Secretary of State for Employment (1) how many women in full-time employment could benefit by the £3·50 a week pay increase allowed in the Government's new pay guidelines; and what percentage this is of the total female work force;(2) how many men in full-time employment could benefit by the £3·50 a week pay increase allowed in the Government's new pay guidelines; and what percentage this is of the total male work force;

(3) what has been the average percentage wage increase of full-time male manual workers in the period February 1974 to January 1979; and how this compares with the rate of inflation in that period;

(4) what has been the average percentage wage increase of full-time female workers in the period February 1974 to January 1979; and how this compares with the rate of inflation in that period;

(5) by what percentage the salaries of managerial staff who in February 1974 were earning £5,000 per year and above have increased; and how this compares with the rate of inflation during this period.

European Community

Assembly Members (Oath Of Allegiance)

asked the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs if directly elected members of the European Assembly will have to take an oath of allegiance on being elected; and, if so, in what form.

No. Neither the treaties establishing the European Communities, the rules of the European Assembly nor United Kingdom law requires any oath of allegiance by directly elected Members of the European Assembly.

Foreign And Commonwealth Affairs

Spain (Extradition Treaty)

asked the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs if he will make a statement about the ending of the extradition treaty between Great Britain and Spain.

The Spanish embassy gave notice on 13 April 1978 of its Government's wish to terminate the extradition treaty. An offer to negotiate a new treaty was made to the Spanish Government with the aim of avoiding a period with no treaty in force. The termination notice remained effective, however, and the treaty terminated on 13 October 1978. Correspondence is continuing with the Spanish authorities with a view to finding a mutually acceptable basis for negotiation of a new treaty.

Embassies And High Commissions

asked the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs how much the British embassies or high commissions in the following countries are expected to spend in transport and hospitality, respectively, in the current financial year: the United States of America, New Zealand, India, West Germany, France, Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Iran and Italy.

Estimated expenditure in 1978–79 in the two categories referred to is set out below. The transport figures include the net capital costs as well as current expenditure.

CountryTransportHospitality
££
United States of America158,145264,318
New Zealand14,22324,935
India22,48634,818
West Germany182,883136,741
France198,547134,989
Egypt16,84513,547
Saudi Arabia41,35211,757
Iran36,95423,411
Italy56,74271,232

Hong Kong

asked the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs (1) how many British civil servants have served on secondment to Hong Kong, and how many Hong Kong civil servants have served on secondment to the United Kingdom in each of the last five years;(2) if, pursuant to his reply to the question of the hon. Member for Thornaby of 9 November 1978, he has made progress on the interchange programme for Hong Kong and British civil servants.

British civil servants are regularly seconded to professional, administrative, police and other appointments in Hong Kong. Detailed statistics about them are not readily available either here or in Hong Kong. A senior Hong Kong official was seconded to the Northern Ireland Office in 1977. Another has just started work in the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, dealing with Hong Kong affairs. Many others come here on duty or for training. Both governments attach importance to maintaining and strengthening these links.

asked the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs how many Vietnamese refugees are at the moment accepted as temporary residents in Hong Kong and awaiting resettlement elsewhere.

On 21 January 1979 there were 9,670 people from Vietnam wishing to be resettled from Hong Kong. This figure includes those who arrived on board the "Huey Fong."

asked the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs if he will list the representatives from each country to the third group of the Economic and Social Committee and their full-time occupations.

, pursuant to his reply [Official Report, 18 January 1979; Vol. 960, c. 827–830], gave the following information:The entry given for Miss Eirlys Roberts should read: "Chairman of the Research Institute for Consumer Affairs; formerly Deputy Director of the Consumers' Association and Research Director, Research Institute for Consumer Affairs."

Social Services

Smallpox Virus (Shooter Report)

54.

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services what steps he is taking, in the light of the Shooter report, to suspend work with smallpox virus in populated areas and for the transfer to other locations of units such as that at St. Mary's Hospital, Paddington; and if he will make a statement.

St. Mary's hospital medical school is the only laboratory recorded as holding smallpox virus, and my hon. Friend will have seen my reference to it in the statement I made in the House earlier today.

Menières Disease And Tinnitus

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services what research is being undertaken to combat menières disease and tinnitus; and if he is satisfied with the provision of facilities for sufferers in the West Midlands.

The main Government funded body sponsoring research into these two conditions is the Medical Research Council—MRC. It does so from funds provided by the Department of Education and Science and the health Departments. I understand from my right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Education and Science that the MRC's own hearing and balance unit is currently engaged in research which includes studies on tinnitus and Menières disease. The MRC also supports work at the University of Keele on experimental investigations of tinnitus and cochlear ototoxicity in animals. Other council supported work at the University of Keele, at the University of Birmingham and at the Institute of Laryngology and Otology in the University of London, is relevant to the problems of tinnitus and Menières disease.Research is also being supported by universities and hospital medical schools, but details are not centrally available.I have not had raised with me any particular problems about the provision of facilities in the West Midlands, but will be glad to look into any cases or situations which my hon. Friend may have in mind.

Greaves Hall Hospital, Ormskirk

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services why Greaves Hall hospital, Ormskirk, has the fourth lowest percentage of resident patients engaged in day-time activities of all mental handicap hospitals in the United Kingdom.

The latest relevant figures published by my Department refer to England and relate to 1975. They show Greaves Hall as having the seventh lowest percentage of resident patients engaged in day-time activities.I understand that most patients with less severe mental handicap who are referred to the hospital are discharged into the community and that the permanent residents therefore include a higher than average percentage of multiply handicapped patients and patients with severe behaviour disorders whose capacity to benefit from organised training activities of the kind set out in the statistical tables is limited. Many of these patients will, however, be receiving training on the ward.

Family Planning

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services what is his estimate of the cost in a full financial year of providing free family planning advice and supply of contraceptives.

The estimated out-turn expenditure for the financial year 1978–79 in respect of the provision of family planning services in England and Wales is expected to be £56 million, rising to £58 million in 1979–80, at current pay and price levels.

War Disability Pensions (Disregard)

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services when the present £4 disregard for war disability pensions was established; and whether there are any current plans to uprate it.

The present £4 disregard dates from 1975. The whole question of disregards will be considered in the light of the current review of the supplementary benefits scheme.

Health Clinic (Birmingham)

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services if he will make a statement showing what progress his Department has made in disposing of the personal and child health clinic, Warren Farm Road, Birmingham to the local authority.

Hospital Waiting Lists (Greenwich And Bexley)

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services how many patients were awaiting operations in each of the main surgical specialties at each of the hospitals in the Greenwich and Bexley area at the most recent convenient date.

Following are the figures of patients who, at 31 December 1977, were awaiting admission to the surgical specialties in the NHS hospitals in the Greenwich and Bexley area.

Specialty

Queen Mary's Hospital Sidcup

Erith and District Hospital

St. Nicholas's Hospital Plumstead

Dreadnought Seaman's Hospital

Eltham and Mottingham Hospital

Greenwich District Hospital

Brook General Hospital

Bexley and Welling Hospital

Memorial Hospital London S.E.18

General surgery147733632531234109Nil
Ear, nose and throat1293
Traumatic and orthopaedic89241531359110
Ophthalmology21668
Urology2746Nil
Thoracic surgery14
Dental surgery19119
Neurosurgery20
Gynaecology27111099Nil
Total498984886934506392NilNil
Bexley hospital, Bexley maternity hospital, British hospital for mothers and babies and Goldie Leigh hospital, London S.E.2 have no surgical specialties.

Pharmaceutical Prices

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services (1) if the increase in cost of the National Health Service of 100 tablets of Septrin from £5·94p in January 1977 to £7·43p in January 1978, and of 500 tablets of Septrin from £27 to £33·75p comes within the guidelines of the Government's anti-inflation policies; and if he will place in the Library the evidence which allows these increases within the pharmaceutical price regulation scheme:(2) if the increase in cost to the National Health Service of 100 capsules or tablets of Valium, 2 mg., from 21p in January 1976 to 92p in January 1978, of 500 capsules or tablets of Valium, 5 mg., from £1·23p to £5·42p, of 100 capsules or tablets of Valium, 5 mg., from 30p to £1·31p, and of 500 capsules or tablets of Valium from 83p to £3·65p, respectively, comes within the guidelines of the Government's anti-inflation policies; and if he will place in the Library the evidence which allows these increases within the pharmaceutical price regulation scheme;(3) if the increase in cost to the National Health Service of 100 capsules or tablets of Librium, 2 mg., from 21p in January 1976 to 92p in January 1978 and of the cost of 500 capsules or tablets of from £3·08p to £4·92p comes within the guidelines of the Government's anti-inflation policies; and if he will place in the Library the evidence which allows these increases within the pharmaceutical price regulation scheme;(4) if the increase in cost to the National Health Service of 20 capsules of Penbritin, 250 mg., from £3·93p in January 1977 to £4·52p in January 1978 comes within the guidelines of the Government's anti-inflation policies; and if he will place in the Library the evidence which allows this increase within the pharmaceutical price regulation scheme;(5) if the increase in cost to the National Health Service of 50 capsules of Instal Co from £3·33p in January 1977 to £4·21p in January 1978 comes within the guidelines of the Government's anti-inflation policies; and if he will place in the Library the evidence which allows this increase within the pharmaceutical price regulation scheme;

(6) if the increase in cost to the National Health Service of 100 tablets of tryptizol, 25 mg., from £1·40p in January 1977 to £1·92p in January 1978 comes within the guidelines of the Government's anti-inflation policies; and if he will place in the Library the evidence which allows this increase within the pharmaceutical price regulation scheme;

(7) if the increase in cost to the National Health Service of 100 capsules of indocid, 25 mg, from £3·69p in January 1977 to £4·90p in January 1978 comes within the guidelines of the Government's anti-inflation policies; and if he will place in the Library the evidence which allows this increase within the pharmaceutical price regulation scheme;

(8) if the increase in cost to the National Health Service of 100 tablets of distalgesic from 88p in January 1977 to 110p in January 1978 comes within the guidelines of the Government's anti-inflation policies; and if he will place in the Library the evidence which allows this increase within the pharmaceutical price regulation scheme;

(9) if the increase in cost to the National Health Service of 100 tablets of Aldomet, 250 mg, from £3·50p in January 1977 to £4·20p in January 1978, and of 500 tablets of Aldomet, 500 mg, from £6·80p to £8·20p, comes within the guidelines of the Government's anti-inflation policies; and if he will place in the Library the evidence which allows this increase within the pharmaceutical price regulation scheme.

I can confirm that these price increases, subject to the corrections noted below, were approved within the guidelines of the pharmaceutical price regulation scheme which operates to control public expenditure on medicines supplies for the National Health Service. The guidelines under which the Scheme operates are subject to the Government's overall control of public expenditure as part of general anti-inflation policy.In 1977, price increases approved under the PPRS amounted to 16·1 per cent. of the value of the industry's sales, compared with an increase in the retail price index of 15·9 per cent. Over the four-year period from 1974 until 1977 the increase in medicine prices was 86 per cent. compared with the increase in the retail price index of 94·2 per cent.Under the scheme, price increases are based on financial information, including information on costs profits and capital employed, supplied in confidence. This detailed information, which is not available in published accounts, is of commercial value and could not be published without a breach of confidence. A copy of the scheme is in the Library.The following points might be noted:

  • (a) on 1 January 1976 the prices of 100 and 500 tablets of Septrin were increased from £4·40 and £20, the prices fixed in 1968, to £5·94 and £27 respectively, and on 1 January 1977 these prices were increased to £7·43 and £33·75.
  • (b) there are no 2 mg capsules or tablets of Librium. The price of 92p quoted is the price for 100 2 mg tablets of Valium.
  • (c) Penbritin is not sold in packs of 20. The prices quoted are for packs of 100.
  • (d) the price of 100 250 mg tablets of Aldomet was £6·83 in January 1977 and was increased to £8·20. The corresponding prices of 500 Aldomet 500 mg tablets were £33·56 and £40·30.
  • I will write to my hon. Friend about certain other points of detail.

    Mentally-Disordered Offenders

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services what action is being taken to carry out his Department's responsibilities as laid down in the Mental Health Act 1959 for mentally-disordered offenders.

    The Mental Health Act 1959 does not expressly impose duties on the Secretary of State in relation to mentally disordered offenders. Responsibility for providing treatment, care and services for such offenders through the NHS and the Personal Social Services is part of the more general responsibilities of the Secretary of State and health and local authorities for the mentally disordered as a whole. The Department is, however, conscious of the position of mentally disordered offenders and is seeking in every way it can to improve the situation.

    Benefits (Industrial Dispute)

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services what special arrangements he has made, or proposes to make, to pay social security benefits in respect of families of striking members of the Transport and General Workers' Union, and families of other persons laid-off as a result of the Transport and General Workers' Union strike.

    No special arrangements have yet been made, but the position is being kept under review.

    Nurses (Pension Scheme)

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services what representation he has received from the Royal College of Nursing regarding anomalies in the pension scheme for certain nurses; if he will take urgent steps to relieve this problem; and if he will make a statement.

    Representations have been made to me about the lower pension expectations of nurses, part of whose service has been covered by FSSN policies, as compared with those who have contributed throughout to the NHS scheme; and that this situation has been thrown into relief by an arrangement made in 1977 for NHS staff who were then FSSN or other policy scheme members or had been members in 1974 while employed in the community nursing services by local authorities but were compulsorily transferred into the NHS under the Reorganisation Act 1974. The arrangement was that, on opting to transfer to the NHS superannuation scheme, they would surrender their policies to the Secretary of State in exchange for a back-service credit—in most cases of nine years for 10—as recommended by the Government Actuary; and we have been asked now to allow a once-for-all option for nurses not covered by that arrangement to transfer their service frozen in FSSN into the NHS Superannuation Scheme on a basis to be determined.We have undertaken to look into this request. I think it is only right, however, to say that there may be serious difficulties about it. Membership of the main NHS superannuation scheme is a normal requirement for nurses and past service could be covered by a policy-based scheme such as FSSN only where the person concerned took up employment outside the NHS or where the person concerned had joined the NHS while already a member of such a scheme and had formally elected to remain in membership of it instead of joining the main NHS scheme. Nurses with frozen FSSN policies are in this position, therefore, in consequence of a past decision about employment or about superannuation arrangements freely taken by them and it would be quite out of keeping with normal superannuation principles to allow people who have once exercised a free choice at a later date to change their mind, with retrospective effect, fundamentally on the basis that with hindsight the choice they had originally made was not the right one. In this connection, I stress that the purpose of the 1977 arrangement was in no way to improve the superannuation benefits overall of policy scheme members but to enable such people, like other NHS staff, to be contracted out from the new State scheme from April 1978 and also to avoid the situation that from 1980 they might in consequence of other government legislation lose the tax concessions on their superannuation contributions.

    Secure Accommodation

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services how many community homes have secure places attached; what is the total amount of secure accommodation; and if he will publish the number of secure accommodation places in each region.

    Thirty-four community homes in England have secure places attached, other than single separation rooms. There are 296 long and short-term secure places in community homes; the table shows the number of places in each region.

    Regional Planning AreaTotal
    150
    213
    350
    425
    53
    66
    723
    884
    9
    102
    1140
    Total296
    NOTES:1. Not all places will be available at all times due to repairs, adaptations, staff shortages etc.2. Figures represent the best estimate which could be made at 1 January 1979.

    Civil Service

    Scottish Office (Staff)

    asked the Minister for the Civil Service (1) what are the numbers now employed in those departments of the Scottish Office which will be transferred to the Scottish Assembly.(2) what has been the increase or decrease in numbers of civil servants employed in the Scottish Office since 1974; and what in that time has been the increase or decrease in those departments which will transfer to the Scottish Assembly.

    I have been asked to reply.It is not possible to provide the information in the form requested since the functions to be devolved under the provisions of the Scotland Act, 1978, do not correspond to the present departmental structure of the Scottish Office. The total numbers of civil servants employed in the Scottish Office, including the prison service and the State hospital, on 1 October 1974 and 1 October 1978 respectively were 9,809 and 10,817. The devolved administration would be responsible for about 8,500 staff engaged in the administration of functions at present carried out by the Scottish Office and a further 2,000 in minor Scottish departments.

    Scotland

    Unemployment

    asked the Secretary of State for Scotland what was the percentage increase in Scottish unemployment from July 1975 to July 1978.

    Between July 1975 and July 1978 seasonally adjusted unemployment in Scotland increased by 51·8 per cent. and total unemployment by 56·3 per cent.

    Tayside Health Board

    asked the Secretary of State for Scotland what is the intended impact of SHARE on the capital and revenue resources to be made available to Tayside health board in 1978–79, 1979–80 and 1980–81; and what effect this will have on expenditure on orthopaedic, psychogeriatric, geriatric, mental and cardiac hospital facilities, staff ratios and waiting lists.

    SHARE does not deal with capital.As regards revenue, despite the fact that it is the best funded board in Scotland, gradual re-distribution to less well funded boards still left Tayside with an initial allocation for hospital and community health services for 1978–79 about ¼ of 1 per cent. larger at constant wages and prices—than in the previous year.On present expenditure plans, Tayside will continue to receive a small positive growth rate.The deployment of services in the light of the resources likely to be available is a matter for Tayside Health Board.

    Administrative Jobs (Edinburgh)

    asked the Secretary of State for Scotland what is his estimate of the net gain or loss of administrative jobs in Edinburgh over the past five years.

    Comprehensive information in the form requested is not available.