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Supplementary Benefit

Volume 972: debated on Thursday 25 October 1979

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asked the Secretary of State for Social Services if the wording on his Department's form BO 3TD has been changed during 1979.

No, but a reprint is due in the next two or three months, when the point which the hon. Member raised with my right hon. Friend's predecessor, the right hon. Member for Salford, West (Mr. Orme) will be taken into account.—[Vol. 961, c. 532–3.]

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services if he will list for each year since 1974 the number of families with children and the number of persons in these families living below, on and up to 110 per cent., 120 per cent, and 140 per cent of the supplementary benefit level according to the standard employment status groupings.

[pursuant to her reply, 22 May 1979, c. 112]: The information is as follows:

Numbers living above supplementary benefit level but less than 10 per cent, above, analysed by employment status
(Thousands)
1974197519761977
StatusFamiliesPersonsFamiliesPersonsFamiliesPersonsFamiliesPersons
Full time work[30]13080380120550110460
Sick[10][40][10][20][10][20][10]*[50]
Unemployed[10]*[10][10]*[10][20]100[10][40]
Others[10][50][10][30][10]*[10][10]*[20]
*Under 10,000 cases.
Numbers living above supplementary benefit level but less than 20 per cent, above, analysed by employment status
(Thousands)
1974197519761976
StatusFamiliesPersonsFamiliesPersonsFamiliesPersonsFamiliesPersons
Full lime work1004601707803401,5203201,350
Sick[20]80[10]60[20]80[40]170
Unemployed[10][40][10][40][30]150[20]80
Others[10]80[30]110[10][40][30]100
Numbers living above supplementary benefit level but less than 40 per cent above, analysed by employment status
(Thousands)
1974197519761977
StatusFamiliesPersonsFamiliesPersonsFamiliesPersonsFamiliesPersons
Full lime work3801,7906702,9709103,9708203,430
Sick[40]190[40]180[30]14060250
Unemployed[10]60[30]120[50]200[30]100
Others[30]10060190[40]140[50]190
Notes on the tables:
1. All figures arc rounded to the nearest 10,000
2. The estimates for those not receiving supplementary benefit are based on the DHSS analysis or incomes and other information recorded by respondents to the family expenditure survey The estimates arc subject to statistical error Those figures in square brackets are subject to very considerable proportionate statistical error Estimates of those receiving supplementary benefit are derived from the annual statistical inquiry of supplementary benefit claimants.
3. These estimates relate only to the population living in private households: families and persons in institutions are not sampled in the family expenditure survey.
4. The supplementary benefit level is taken as being the supplementary benefit scale rate(s) appropriate to the family, using the long-term rates for pensioners only. Income refers to net income—Sdingall benefits—less housing costs, work expenses, income tax and national insurance contributions is appropriate.
5. The comparison is based on the family's normal income in the normal employment of the family head For example, where the head of the family had been off work due to sickness or unemployment for less than three months at the time of the survey, the family's normal income when the head was at work was used in determining the level of income.
6. The estimates for numbers of families with income below the supplementary benefit level do not indicate unclaimed entitlement to supplementary benefit. For example, those who are in full-time work or undertaking full-time further education would not normally have entitlement to supplementary benefit For others not precluded from claiming, no regard is had in these estimates to factors such as affect income, treatment of capital or exceptional circumstances additions, each of which can affect payment of supplementary benefit.
7. Separate estimates of families with apparent unclaimed entitlement to supplementary benefit are mow made annually. Those for 1976 were published in the annual report of the Supplementary Benefits Commission for 1977 Cmnd. 1976 Estimates for 1977 will be published in the Commission's report for 1978

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services how many children in each year since 1974 were living in families (a) below, (b) on, (c) up to 110 per cent., (d) 120 per cent, and (e) 140 per cent, of the supplementary benefit level; and in each case how many of these families had a head: (i) in full-time work or self-employed and (ii) unemployed.

[pursuant to her reply, 22 May 1979, c. 112]: The information is as follows:

ESTIMATED NUMBERS OF FAMILIES AT VARIOUS INCOME LEVELS
Numbers below the supplementary benefit level, showing numbers of children; analysed by full-time work (including self-employed) and unemployed status of family head
(Thousands)
1974197519761977
StatusFamiliesChildrenFamiliesChildrenFamiliesChildrenFamiliesChildren
Full-time work60160110280170400120260
Unemployed[10][30][20][40][20][40][40]90
All families100260180400230500200420
Numbers receiving supplementary benefit, showing the numbers of children
Note: The figures available do not break down the number of unemployed families with children receiving supplementary benefit. The table gives the total number of families with children in receipt of supplementary benefit and the total families including those with no children, who are unemployed.
(Thousands)
1974197519761977
StatusFamiliesChildrenFamiliesChildrenFamiliesChildrenFamiliesChildren
All families with children340730380810460960470980
All families unemployed280420290720410910420980
Numbers above the supplementary benefit level but less than 10 per cent, above, showing numbers of children; analysed by full-time work (including self-employed) and unemployed status of family head
(Thousand)
1974197519761977
StatusFamiliesChildrenFamiliesChildrenFamiliesChildrenFamiliesChildren
Full-time work[30]7080220120320110240
Unemployed[10][10]*[10]*[10]*[20]60[10][20]
All families[50]14090250150400140310
* Under 10,000 cases.
Numbers above the supplementary benefit level but less than 20 per cent, above, showing numbers of children; analysed by full-time work (including self-employed) and unemployed status of family head
(Thousands)
1974197519761977
StatusFamiliesChildrenFamiliesChildrenFamiliesChildrenFamiliesChildren
Full-time work100270170450340840320630
Unemployed[10][30][10][20][30]80[20][40]
All families1403802205804101,000410930
Numbers above the supplementary benefit level but less than 40 per cent, above, showing numbers of children; analysed by full-time work (including self-employed) and unemployed status of family head
(Thousands)
1974197519761977
StatusFamiliesChildrenFamiliesChildrenFamiliesChildrenFamiliesChildren
Full-time work3801,0506701,6609102,1808201,820
Unemployed[10][30][30]60[50]110[30][50]
All families4601,2507901,9501,0302,4409702,140
Notes on the tables:
1. All figures are rounded to the nearest 10,000. Consequently the sum of the component parts may not equal the totals.
2. The estimates for those not receiving supplementary benefit are based on the DHSS analysis of incomes and other information recorded by respondents to the family expenditure survey. The estimates are subject to statistical error. Those figures in square brackets are subject to very considerable proportionate statistical error. Estimates of those receiving supplementary benefit are derived from the annual statistical inquiry of supplementary benefit claimants.
3. These estimates relate only to the population living in private households. Families and persons in institutions are not sampled in the family expenditure survey.
4. The supplementary benefit level is taken as being the supplementary benefit scale rate(s) appropriate to the family, using the long-term rates for pensioners only. Income refers to net income including all benefits, less net housing costs, work expenses, income tax and national insurance contributions as appropriate.
5. The comparison is based on the family's normal income in the normal employment of the family head. For example where the head of the family has been off work due to sickness or unemployment for less than three months at the time of the survey the family's normal income when the head was at work was used in determining the level of income.
6. The estimates of numbers of families with income below the supplementary benefit level do not indicate unclaimed entitlement to supplementary benefit. For example those who are in full-time work or undertaking full-time further education would not normally have entitlement to supplementary benefit, for others not precluded from claiming, no regard is had in these estimates to factors such as disregarded income, treatment of capital or exceptional circumstance additions earn of which can affect payment of supplementary benefit.
7. Separate estimates of families with apparent unclaimed entitlement to supplementary benefit are now made annually. Those for 1976 were published in the annual report of the Supplementary Benefits Commission for 1977. Cmnd. 7392 Estimates for 1977 will be published in the Commission's report for 1978.
8. The 1977 estimates of families with incomes below the supplementary benefit level art directly comparable with those for 1974, 1975 and 1976 but not with those for 1972 and 1973. In earlier years it had been assumed that the income distribution of the self-employed was the same for employees. Self-employed sample records were included in the analysis in 1974 for the first time and this has been repeated since. The figures on the self-employed are specially liable to error because their incomes recorded in the family expenditure survey tend to be particularly low in relation to their recorded expenditure. This discrepancy is partly due to the incomes of the self-employed being recorded in many cases for a much earlier period than that to which their expenditure relates and the data in the tables for 1975, 1976 and 1977 have been adjusted to take account of this The 1977 data contained more information so a finer adjustment was possible for that year.