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Prisoners (Statistics)

Volume 973: debated on Thursday 8 November 1979

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asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) how many people have been in Her Majesty's prisons for (a) five years and (b) 10 years and the latest date for which figures are available; and what was the average cost per annum per prisoner;(2) how many people, at the latest date for which figures are available, have been in Her Majesty's prisons for 20 years; and what is the number classified by offences.

Information in the form requested is not available. On 31 August 1979 881 persons in prison department establishments were serving sentences imposed over five years previously, of whom 232 were serving sentences imposed over 10 years previously and 16 were serving sentences imposed over 20 years previously. Seven of these 16 had been in custody continuously for 20 years or more; the remaining nine had spent some time at liberty on life licence which was subsequently revoked. All of the seven were serving sentences for murder.Details of the cost of maintaining an inmate in custody in the financial year 1977–78 are given in appendix No. 4 of the report on the work of the prison department 1978—Cmnd. 7619.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what is the cost of keeping in Her Majesty's prisons a man considered dangerous to the public.

A person who is a danger to the public is likely to be among those in security categories A or B. Such prisoners are normally held in dispersal prisons, but allocation to a particular type of establishment is also determined by other factors, including a prisoner's needs and the facilities available. As shown in the annual report on the work of the prison department 1978—Cmnd. 7619, para. 16—the average weekly cost in 1977–78 of custody in establishments for adult males was:

£
Six dispersal Prisons187
Other closed Training prisons91
Local prisons and remand centres85

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many adult males, adult females, young males

POPULATION OF PRISON DEPARTMENT ESTABLISHMENTS IN ENGLAND AND WALES (*) HELD ON REMAND OR ON SENTENCE ON 30 JUNE 1979: BY AGE, SEX AND TYPE OF INSTITUTION
AdultsYoung prisoners
Type of institutionMalesFemalesMalesFemalesTotal
Remand centres5571321,6551002,444
Local prisons14,3542362,18010116,871
Training prisons:
open3,104359293,492
closed10,2912591,1174511,712
Borstals:
open1,509401,549
closed3,5081173,625
Detention centres:
open201201
closed1,8391,839
Total28,30698612,00943241,733
* Excluding 570 male and 16 female civil prisoners for whom no age information is readily available

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many (a) untried prisoners, (b) convicted but unsentenced prisoners and (c) civil prisoners were in custody on 30 June.

The information requested is set out in the following table:

Population of unsentenced and non-criminal prisoners in prison department establishments in England and Wales on 30 June 1979 by status:
StatusNo.
Untried3,909
Convicted unsentenced2,212
Non-criminal586
POPULATION OF PERSONS SERVING SENTENCES OF IMPRISONMENT IN PRISON DEPARTMENT ESTABLISHMENTS IN ENGLAND AND WALES ON 30 JUNE 1979: BY AGE AND SENTENCE LENGTH
Sentence lengthAdult prisonersYoung prisonersTotal
Up to and including one month679189868
Over one up to and including six months3,0476693,716
Over 6 up to and including 18 months7,5345798,113
Over 18 up to and including three years6,5838237,406
Over three years up to and including five years3,6613614,022
Over five years—including life sentences and those prisoners detained at Her Majesty's Pleasure3,9071594,063
Total25,4112,78028,191

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) how many adults and young offenders in prison department custody on 30 June were

and young females were in prison department custody on 30 June; how many in each category were in local prisons, remand centres, training prisons, borstals and detention centres; and how many in each of the past three types of institution were in open conditions.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many adults and young offenders in prison on 30 June were serving sentences of (a) one month or less, (b) one to three months, (c) three to six months, (d) six to 18 months, (e) 18 months to three years, (f) three to five years and (g) over five years.

The information available is given in the attached table:imprisoned for (

a) fine default and ( b) maintenance defaults; and how many were imprisoned under the immigration laws:

(2) how many adults and young offenders in prison department custody on 30 June, including fine defaulters, had been convicted of ( a) drunkeness, ( b) offences relating to prostitution, ( c) possession of cannabis, ( d) other drug offences, ( e) breach of a probation order, ( f) breach of a community service order, ( g) breach of a conditional discharge, ( h) breach of a suspended sentence, ( i) criminal damage, ( j) theft, ( k) handling of stolen goods, ( l) robbery, ( m) burglary, ( n) fraud, ( o) forgery, ( p) murder, ( q) other homicide and attempted homicide, ( r) wounding, ( s) assaults, ( t) cruelty to children, ( u) other offences of violence—to be specified—( v) rape, ( w) buggery and indecency between males, ( x) gross indency with children, and ( y) other sexual offences, with details of these offences;

(3) how many people in prison department custody on 30 June were first, second, third, fourth, fifth and more than fifth time offenders.

The information requested is not yet available. I shall reply to the hon. Member as soon as possible.