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Written Answers

Volume 974: debated on Thursday 29 November 1979

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Written Answers To Questions

Thursday 29 November 1979

Prime Minister (Engagements)

Q7.

asked the Prime Minister if she will list her official engagements for Thursday 29 November.

Q8.

asked the Prime Minister if she will list her official engagements for 29 November.

Q11.

asked the Prime Minister if she will list her official engagements for Thursday 29 November.

Q13.

asked the Prime Minister if she will list her official engagements for Thursday 29 November.

Q14.

asked the Prime Minister if she will list her official engagements for 29 November.

Q17.

asked the Prime Minister if she will list her official engagements for Thursday 29 November.

Q18.

asked the Prime Minister if she will list her official engagements for 29 November.

Q19.

asked the Prime Minister if she will list her official engagements for Thursday 29 November.

Q20.

asked the Prime Minister if she will list her official engagements for 29 November.

Q21.

asked the Prime Minister what are her official engagements for 29 November.

Q24.

asked the Prime Minister if she will list her official engagements for 29 November.

Q25.

asked the Prime Minister if she will list her official engagements for Thursday 29 November.

Q28.

asked the Prime Minister if she will list her official engagements for Thursday 29 November.

Q30.

asked the Prime Minister if she will list her public engagements for 29 November.

Q33.

asked the Prime Minister whether she will list her official engagements for 29 November.

Q34.

asked the Prime Minister if she will list her official duties for 29 November.

Q36.

asked the Prime Minister if she will list her official engagements for 29 November.

I have been asked to reply.I refer my hon. Friends and the hon. Members to the reply which I gave earlier today to the hon. Member for Oldham, East (Mr. Lamond).

Home Department

Fine And Maintenance Defaulters

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many fine and maintenance defaulters were discharged from prison in 1978 following upon the payment of their debts.

The information requested could be obtained only at disproportionate cost. However, the proportion of fine defaulters discharged in 1978 after serving less than three days was published in table 7(c) of "Prison Statistics, England and Wales, 1978" (Cmnd. 7626).

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many fine and maintenance defaulters were sent to prison in 1978; and what was the average length of sentence.

Information on receptions into prison department establishments in England and Wales in default of payment of a fine and for non-payment of affiliation or maintenance orders is published annually in "Prison Statistics, England and Wales"—tables 7.1 and 6.1 of the issue for 1978, Cmnd. 7626. The average length of sentence of those received in 1978 in default of payment of a fine was 31 days and of those received for non-payment of affiliation or maintenace orders was 37 days.

Public Order Act 1963

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department when he expects to announce the results of his review of the Public Order Act 1963; and what representations he has received on this issue.

I refer the hon. Member to the reply I gave to a question from him on 22 November.—[Vol. 974, c. 285.] I have had no representations specifically about the 1963 Act.

Sexual Offences Act 1967

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) how many prosecutions there were for indecency between males in 1978; and how this compares with the years since 1967;(2) how many convictions there were for indecency between males in 1978; and how this compares with the years since 1967.

The information is published annually in "Criminal Statistics, England and Wales", tables 1(a) and 10(a) of the volume for 1978, Cmnd. 7670.

Special Branch

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many police officers are presently assigned to the special branch.

There is no national special branch. The complement of the Metropolitan Police Special Branch is 409. The special branches of other forces in England and Wales comprise about 850 officers, including some 300 employed at the ports.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department how much money has been allocated for use by the special branch in the next four financial years.

Since there is no national special branch, the information requested is not available centrally.

Concessionary Television Licence

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will consider extending the concessionary television licence scheme to homes for the disabled, such as Cheshire Homes.

Second Commercial Television Channel

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether the second commercial television channel will be offering a choice in the cost of advertising and contractual obligations.

I ask my hon. Friend to await the legislation on broadcasting which I hope to introduce in the next couple of months.

Iran

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many Iranians and how many other persons entered the United Kingdom from Iran in each of the last 12 months and in the current month to date; and what are the reasons for the increase.

Iranians

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what estimate he has made of the number of Iranians who have entered the United Kingdom illegally since the revolution led by the Ayatollah Khomeini; whether any of these are being considered as refugees from the Khomeini régime and if so, what proportion; and what estimate he has made of the numbers of those Iranians who have entered illegally from the United States of America.

The available figures show that between 1 January and the middle of November 1979, eight Iranian illegal entrants were detected. None claimed to be a political refugee.

Prisoners (Release)

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will set out in the Official Report the procedure for the temporary release of a prisoner to visit a relative suffering from a terminal illness.

An application explaining the circumstances must be made to the governor, by the prisoner or another interested party. The governor, or in certain cases prison department headquarters, can grant temporary release for a visit on medical evidence that an incurable illness has reached the terminal stage, and again when death is near.

Civil Defence

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether he proposes any changes in civil defence policy; and if he will make a statement.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will set out the expenditure at the constant 1979 value on civil defence for each of the previous 11 years, the current year and the expected budget for 1980–81.

Home defence expenditure for Great Britain in the years 1974–75 to 1978–79 was as follows:

YearNet Expenditure £ million at 1979 Survey prices
1974–7527·2
1975–7627·1
1976–7722·0
1977–7814·8
1978–7914·6
The estimated outturn for 1979–80 is £32·9 million which includes £13 million to replenish the food stockpile. The estimated expenditure for 1980–81 is £22·9 million.Details of expenditure for earlier years, updated to 1979 survey prices, could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Civil Service

Thames Flooding

asked the Minister for the Civil Service how many computers operated by Government Departments, and Government-funded statutory and non-statutory bodies, located near the River Thames would remain operational in the event of the river bursting its banks; and what implications that would have on the work of those Departments and bodies.

My Department does not hold details of any computers operated by Government-funded statutory or non-statutory bodies, other than Government Departments, which might be within the London flood risk area. There are 21 computers in Government Departments which would probably cease to be operational in the event of the River Thames bursting its banks, because electricial mains power would be discontinued, standby generators may be flooded and staff may be unable to reach their place of work. For vital work standby facilities with installations outside the flood risk area would be invoked or work performed by alternative means. Work of a less critical nature would, in general, have to be discontinued until computer facilities were again available.

House Of Commons

Information Bulletins

asked the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster what is the number of paid subscriptions to the House of Commons and House of Lords Weekly Information Bulletins, respectively.

asked the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster what is the current loss on the House of Commons and House of Lords Information Bulletins, respectively.

asked the right hon. Member for Midlesbrough (Mr. Bottomley) as representing the House of Commons Commission, what is the cost to the Library of providing editorial matter to the House of Commons Weekly Information Bulletin.

European Community Business

asked the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster what proportion of parliamentary time has been spent on EEC business since the Government took office; and if he will examine ways in which this can be reduced, in order to provide time for the Government's own legislative programme.

The proportion of parliamentary time spent in this House on EEC business since the Government took office is about 6 per cent. In view of the importance of EEC affairs, it seems doubtful whether this can be reduced.

Parliamentary Questions

asked the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster how many questions in the present Parliament have not been answered on the grounds that the information was not readily available or other words to that effect; what percentage this represents of total questions asked; and if he will give a breakdown between Departments.

I am having the information assembled and will provide the hon. Gentleman with a full reply as soon as possible.

Foreign And Commonwealth Affairs

British Council (Guides)

asked the Lord Privy Seal (1) how many guides are employed by the British Council in the United Kingdom;(2) what are his plans for the future of guides employed by the British Council.

In London the British Council employs about 30 guides on a casual basis during the course of a year. Outside London guides are employed as and when required. Casual work will continue to be available to guides as hitherto, but on the reduced scale resulting from the reductions in the Council's expenditure in 1980–81. The estimated reduction in work involving guides is 25 per cent.

Brussels Treaty

asked the Lord Privy Seal what recent discussions he has had with other parties to the Brussels Treaty about the possible revision of the terms of this treaty.

Overseas Development

Tanzania

asked the Lord Privy Seal what response he intends to make to Tanzania's emergency appeal to a number of industrialised nations, including Great Britain, for £178 million to help support the Tanzanian economy following its military expenditure on the removal of Idi Amin.

The possibility of additional assistance for Tanzania's balance of payments will be considered in consultation with international institutions and other donor countries, subject of course to our own financial constraints.

Dominica

asked the Lord Privy Seal if the Government will contribute to the national appeal for Dominica; and, if not, whether any additional aid is being given to Dominica following Hurricane David.

Her Majesty's Government fully support the aims of the appeal, but official aid to Dominica will continue to be administered separately. Disaster relief immediately following the hurricane totalled about £150,000 including the help given by HMS "Fife". A grant of £1 million is being provided for rehabilitation projects in addition to the £10 million development aid agreed when Dominica became independent. £100,000 has already been approved for banana rehabilitation and a 13-man team from the Royal Engineers is now in Dominica to help improve water supplies and to identify other projects. Special financial assistance of about £175,000 due early next year has also been advanced.

Scotland

Industrial Rentals

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland whether he will publish a breakdown by district of the commercial and industrial rentals being charged for factories and warehousing units in Glasgow North, South, East and West, and a similar breakdown for Cumbernauld, East Kilbride and Irvine.

This information is not held centrally; nor is it readily available.

Scottish Development Agency

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland whether he will permit the Scottish Development Agency to lease empty factory space to non-

Staff required to meet the recommended staffing levelsActual staffing levels (Full time equivalents)Actual staffing levels as a percentage of the recommended levels
Border1820·8116
Central8493·3111
Dumfries and Galloway1315·2117
Fife207278·0134
Grampian145180·8125
Highland2620·077
Lothian443528·3119
Strathclyde8751171·7134
Tayside134157·1117
Orkney61·728
Shetland43·075
Western Isles98·594

National Health Service

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland if he will estimate the extra cost to the National Health Service in Scotland of the increase in value added tax from 8 per cent. to 15 per cent. in a full year.

It is estimated that the increase in VAT will add about £8 million—at November 1978 prices—or 0·9 per cent. to the cost of the National Health Service in Scotland in a full year.

"Are We Being Conned"

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland whether the film "Are We Being Conned", produced by the

manufacturing firms where there is a commitment to provide employment.

The Scottish Development Agency is responsible for the selection and approval of tenants for the factory space which it owns. It is not precluded from leasing to non-manufacturing firms and has in fact done so.

Nursery Schools

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland what are the recommended staffing levels in nursery schools; and what are the staffing levels of each regional and island authority expressed as a percentage of the recommended levels.

On the recommended staffing levels in nursery schools, I would refer the hon. Member to the reply which I gave him on 24 May. [Vol. 967, c. 260.] At September 1978, the latest date for which information is available centrally, the staffing requirements and actual numbers in education authority nursery schools were as follows:Scottish Health Education Unit, was made with his authority; whether the content of the film is consistent with the aims of the unit; and if he will make a statement.

The film is one of a series called "Teenage Talk-in" which is available on loan as teaching material for pupils in the 14–16 age range. The series explores a number of personal and social issues which are important to young people. It was prompted by analyses of research into the factors which influence adolescents to start smoking cigarettes and drinking alcohol.I recognise that the straightforward presentation of information about health risks may not by itself alter the behaviour of some people. I therefore support a complementary approach designed to encourage young people to think for themselves about the social pressures which can lead them to adopt unhealthy habits.In accordance with my general policy of not exercising detailed control over the executive bodies in the health field, the unit does not need my specific authority for every film. I have not seen this film; but from the information I have about it I believe its aims to be generally consistent with the aims of the unit.

Education And Science

School Meals And School Transport

asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science what proportion of local authorities will use eligibility for supplementary benefit and family income supplement as the criterion for free school meals and free school transport.

This will not be known until local education authorities have each decided how to use the powers contained in the Education (No. 2) Bill, in which the wording in the relevant clauses is

"in receipt of supplementary benefit or family income supplement."

asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science (1) what is the estimate of the numbers of children who will qualify for free school meals under the Education (No. 2) Bill, even though their families are not in receipt of supplementary benefit or family income supplement; and if he will state the assumptions on which this estimate is made;(2) what assumptions he used to enable him to make the estimates contained in his answer to the hon. Member for Nuneaton (Mr. Huckfield) on 20 November,

Official Report, c. 117 and 118.

The assumption underlying the estimate given on 20 November was that the overall result of LEA decisions about the provision of school meals would be a reduction in the number of pupils taking a free school meal of between 20 per cent. and 30 per cent. No estimate is possible of the number of children who will qualify for free school meals under arrangements which have yet to be determined by local education authorities under the provisions of the Education (No. 2) Bill.

asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science how many children were receiving free school meals on the day of the autumn census in 1979.

asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science how many children qualify for and receive free school meals because they are in families in receipt of (a) supplementary benefit and (b) family income supplement.

The latest available information relates to 1978. In October 1978, 1·074 million children at maintained schools in England received a free school meal on the day of the census. It is estimated that, in the final quarter of 1978, 9 per cent. of schoolchildren belonged to families receiving supplementary benefit and 1 per cent. to families reciving family income supplement, and that about 80 per cent. of these children were taking free school meals.

Direct Grant Grammar Schools

asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science what arrangements he proposes to make in respect of direct grant grammar schools which opted to become maintained by a local education authority under the provisions of the Direct Grant Grammar Schools (Cessation of Grant) Regulations 1975, but may now wish to reconsider their position in the light of the proposed assisted places scheme.

The Direct Grant Grammar Schools (Cessation of Grant) Regulations 1975 provided that a school might receive grant in respect of pupils admitted in any educational year after 1976 only if on 1 January preceding that year the Secretary of State was satisfied that it continued to be the intention of the proprietors that the school should become a comprehensive school maintained by a local education authority Some schools which have opted to become maintained under these provisions but have not yet done so may wish to reconsider their position in the light of the proposed assisted places scheme, but the establishment of the scheme is subject to the passage of the Education (No. 2) Bill through Parliament and any school wishing to join the scheme will have to satisfy the conditions of membership and be accepted for the scheme by the Secretary of State. I have therefore made amending regulations which will allow the Secretary of State to pay grant to such schools in respect of pupils admitted in the educational year beginning in 1980 so that they will not lose grant for that intake if they wish to consider applying for membership of the scheme. These regulations will shortly be laid before Parliament.

Polytechnic School Of Music, Birmingham

asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science what representations he has received from the Birmingham local education authority regarding its wish to reinstate the Polytechnic school of music in the 1980–81 further education capital programme at the expense of phase 3 of the extension and development of Handsworth technical college; and if he will make a statement.

The chief education officer wrote to my Department on 6 November asking that consideration should be given to the inclusion of the school of music scheme in the further education building programme for 1980–81 and that, if the necessary resources could not otherwise be made available, the possibility of deferring the Hands-worth project until a later financial year might be discussed. This approach is being urgently considered and the chief education officer was informed on 20 November that the authority will be sent a full reply as soon as possible.

Employment

Working Mothers (Maternity Pay)

asked the Secretary of State for Employment how many working mothers have been granted maternity pay during each 12-month period since the commencement of the maternity pay system; how many and what percentage of such mothers declared their intention to return to work after childbirth; and how many and what percentage of working mothers actually did return to work after pregnancy or childbirth in each of the above periods.

The numbers of women who have received maternity pay and in respect of whom rebate has been paid to the employer by my Department are as follows:

April 1977-March 197867,366
April 1978-March 1979107,953
April 1979-September 197955,139
No figures are available for the number of women who have declared their intention to return to work after childbirth or for the number of women who actually returned to work after pregnancy or childbirth.

Sheltered Workshops

asked the Secretary of State for Employment if he will publish full details of those Government contracts which have been secured by sheltered workshops through the revised priority suppliers' arrangements put into practice last April; how many tenders from sheltered workshops were rejected in that period; if he will give the number of Government contracts and total expenditure involved for the preceding six months; and what steps have been taken to draw the attention of sheltered workshops to these revised arrangements through the sheltered employment procurement and consultancy services or other means.

River Tyne Area

asked the Secretary of State for Employment how many apprentices there are employed in the River Tyne area in (a) the shipbuilding industry, (b) the ship repairing industry and (c) the marine engineering industry.

I am informed by the Manpower Services Commission that at the most recent date for which information is available the estimated numbers of craft and technician apprentices employed in the River Tyne area in the shipbuilding, ship repairing and marine engineering industries were 983, 390 and 116 respectively.

asked the Secretary of State for Employment (1) how many persons employed in the marine engineering industry in the Tyne area are in the following age groups (a) under 24 years, (b) 25 to 34 years, (c) 35 to 44 years, (d) 45 to 54 years and (e) 55 years and over;(2) how many persons employed in the ship repairing industry in the River Tyne area are in the age groups (

a) under 24 years, ( b) 25 to 34 years, ( c) 35 to 44 years, ( d) 45 to 54 years and ( e) 55 years and over;

(3) how many persons employed in the shipbuilding industry in the River Tyne area are in the age groups ( a) under 24 years, ( b) 25 to 34 years, ( c) 35 to 44 years, ( d) 45 to 54 years and ( e) 55 years and over.

My Department's employment statistics are analysed according to the minimum list headings (MLHs) of the Standard Industry Classification—1968 edition—which does not separately identify shipbuilding, ship repairing and marine engineering. In these three industrial activities combined—MLH 370—there were 21,700 employees in employment in the North Tyne and South Tyne travel-to-work areas and 48,200 in the Northern region as a whole at June 1976, the latest date for which such local area employment figures are available. These employment figures are taken from the census of employment which does not provide details of the age of employees.From the 1977 EEC labour force survey it is estimated that in the shipbuilding, ship repairing and marine engineering industries, in the Northern region, 38 per cent. of employees were aged under 30 years, 37 per cent. were aged 30–49 and 25 per cent. were aged 50 or over. A more detailed age breakdown is not available.

asked the Secretary of State for Employment (1) how many persons who have left the marine engineering industry since July 1977 in the River Tyne area were still out of work in October;(2) how many persons who have left the ship repairing industry since July 1977 in the River Tyne area were still out of work in October.(3) how many persons who have left the shipbuilding industry since July 1977 in the River Tyne area were still out of employment in October.

I regret that the information is not available. The numbers unemployed are analysed (a) according to the industry in which they last worked and (b) by the length of time for which they were unemployed, but there is no cross-analysis by both industry and duration.

Shipbuilding And Ship Repairing

asked the Secretary of State for Employment (1) how many persons who have left the marine engineering industry since July 1977 have been retrained for other jobs;(2) how many persons who have left the shipbuilding industry since July 1977 have been retrained for other jobs;(3) how many persons who have left the ship repairing industry since 1977 have been retrained for other jobs;(4) how many persons who have left the ship repairing industry since July 1977 in the River Tyne area have been retrained for other industries;(5) how many persons who have left the marine engineering industry since July 1977 in the River Tyne area have been retrained for other industries;(6) how many persons who have left the shipbuilding industry since July 1977 in the River Tyne area have been retrained for other industries.

Textile And Clothing Industries

asked the Secretary of State for Employment how many redundancies have been notified to him in each month since January 1978 in the United Kingdom and West Yorkshire, for the wool textiles—MLH 414—carpets—MLH 419—and men's outerwear—MLH 442—sectors of the textiles and clothing industries; and if he will introduce as a matter of urgency additional measures directed at the provision of retraining facilities and alternative job opportunities in the textile and clothing areas of the United Kingdom.

The information requested is given in the table below. I am informed by the Manpower Services Commission (MSC) that it is aware of the problems facing the textile and clothing industries and is keeping the situation under review. Local discussions between the training services division of the MSC and the wool jute and flax industry training board about the pending redundancies

REDUNDANCIES IN UNITED KINGDOM AND WEST YORKSHIRE IN MLH 414,419 AND 442 BETWEEN 1 JANUARY AND 31 OCTOBER 1979
MLH 414MLH 419MLH 442
United KingdomWest YorkshireUnited KingdomWest YorkshireUnited KingdomWest Yorkshire
January 1978141425216
February1391395321848
March1622490169018
April11553324407334
May621738560
June479591,189
July36788111362
August2521432393935826
September2461866416959
October3391228925
November420178421243
December805670915224
January 197985831492525
February31312131
March16012469249
April21020289393
May65574822
June3239999
July514834245214
August3408810121280
September2611901011013739
October45135743743568
Total3,5692,1283,0071485,190857

River Tyne (Apprentices)

asked the Secretary of State for Employment how many apprentices were taken on in the River Tyne area in the ship repairing industry in the years 1977, 1978 and 1979.

I am informed by the Manpower Services Commission that the estimated intakes of craft and technician apprentices to the ship repairing industry in the River Tyne area in the 1977–78 and 1978–79 training years were 151 and 106 respectively. A combined figure only, covering ship repairing and shipbuilding, is available for the 1979–80 training year, the estimated intake figure being 384.

asked the Secretary of State for Employment how many apprentices were taken on in the River Tyne area in the marine engineering industry in the years 1977, 1978 and 1979.

I am informed by the Manpower Services Commission that the estimated intakes of craft and technician apprentices to the marine engineering in West Yorkshire are taking place. More generally, the Government are seeking to create the economic climate in which industry and commerce can expand and create the new jobs which are needed not only in the textile and clothing areas but throughout the United Kingdom.industry in the River Tyne area in the 1977–78, 1978–79 and 1979–80 training years were 23, 38 and 18 respectively.

asked the Secretary of State for Employment how many apprentices were taken on in the River Tyne area in the shipbuilding industry in the years 1977, 1978 and 1979.

I am informed by the Manpower Services Commission that the estimated intakes of craft and technician apprentices to the shipbuilding industry in the River Tyne area in the 1977–78 and 1978–79 training years were 271 and 362 respectively. A combined figure only, covering shipbuilding and ship repairing, is available for the 1979–80 training year, the estimated intake figure being 384.

Construction Industry (Safety)

asked the Secretary of State for Employment what consultations he has had with trade unions about workers killed and injured in the construction industry.

[pursuant to his reply, 26 November 1979, c. 362]: None. I am assured by the chairman of the Health and Safety Commission that the trade unions concerned are appropriately represented on the commission's construction industry advisory committee, and that its programme of work adequately reflects the views expressed by the trade union members.

asked the Secretary of State for Employment what is his estimate of the number of workers likely to be killed and injured in the construction industry in the next five years in the absence of improvements in safety.

[pursuant to his reply, 26 November 1979, c. 362]: I have not made any such estimate.

asked the Secretary of State for Employment if he will publish in the Official Report the number of people who have been killed and injured in the construction industry in each of the past five years.

[pursuant to his reply, 26 November 1979, c. 362]: I am informed by the chairman of the Health and Safety Commission that the numbers are as follows:

ACCIDENTS IN THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY, 1974–78
Accidents to employees reported under the Factories
ActDeathsInjuries*
197416634,432
197518235,397
197615635,983
197713032,685
1978†11933,681
These figures are only consistent series for accidents in the construction industry. However, figures on a wider definition, including the self-employed, are available for 1978, and these show 151 deaths and 34,408 injuries.
* Injuries resulting in more than three days absence from normal work.
† Figures for 1978 are provisional.

Industry

Semi-Conductors

asked the Secretary of State for Industry how much he estimates is spent per person in the United Kingdom on semi-conductors; and how this compares with the figures for France, West Germany, Japan and the United States of America.

Estimates of expenditure on semi-conductors per person on a comparable basis for the various countries listed in the question are not readily available from official sources. However, an informed private estimate for 1980 was published on 19 November 1979 in the Financial Times and gave the following information:

Estimated semi-conductor market, per head of population 1980
$
UK11·0
France8·70
West Germany18·30
Japan24·80
USA20·30
(the above figures do not include systems)

Telephones (Installation)

asked the Secretary of State for Industry what the current waiting period for the installation of a telephone in a private house is for (a) Bournemouth, (b) Southern England and (c) nationally.

Blackburn

asked the Secretary of State for Industry what plans the Government have to increase employment in the manufacturing and textile industries in the Blackburn area.

The Government's economic policies are designed to encourage industry throughout the country to become more competitive and expand. As far as textiles are concerned, we are helping the industry by doing all we can to ensure that the European Communities' arrangements under the multi-fibre arrangement are implemented as effectively as possible.

British Leyland

asked the Secretary of State for Industry if it is the policy of Her Majesty's Government that if a certain level of pay award is made, the Government will not recommend to Parliament that more funds are made available to British Leyland; and, if so, what the level of that pay award is.

asked the Secretary of State for Industry (1) whether Her Majesty's Government will act as guarantor for commercial debts incurred by the British Leyland Corporation;(2) whether Her Majesty's Government still stand as guarantor of British Leyland unsecured and other loan stocks.

The Government have given no legal guarantee to any of BL Limited's creditors. However, I refer the hon. Member to the statement to the House made by my right hon. Friend's predecessor, the right hon. Member for Chesterfield (Mr. Varley) on 26 May 1977, when he was asked to explain the operation of paragraph 10 of the schedule to the National Enterprise Board (Guidelines) Direction 1976 in respect of British Leyland.My right hon. Friend's predecessor said that, in the light of the first sentence of that paragraph, the NEB, with his approval, had informed British Leyland with regard to this provision that in its judgment a company in the private sector, whose relationship with British Leyland was the same as that of the NEB, by virtue both of the size of its shareholding and the closeness of its involvement in the affairs of British Leyland, could not allow British Leyland to be left in a position where it would be unable to meet its obligations.This remains valid.

Rolls-Royce (1971) Ltd

asked the Secretary of State for Industry whether it remains his intention that Rolls-Royce (1971) Ltd. will be required to secure a 10 per cent. rate of return on capital employed by 1981 and to maintain progress toward the achievement of that rate in the interval.

The present financial duty is placed on the National Enterprise Board. When the Department monitors Rolls-Royce directly it will make clear the financial requirement against which the company's performance will be judged. At present Rolls-Royce is still planning to achieve the 10 per cent. rate of return by 1981.

Wool Textile Industry

asked the Secretary of State for Industry whether he will take steps to ensure the continuance of the Wool Textile Economic Development Committee which is currently under review by the National Economic Development Council; and whether he will also ensure that a second Atkins report on the future of the wool textiles industry is prepared in view of the considerable changes affecting the industry since 1969.

The decision about the continuance of the Wool Textile Economic Development Committee is a matter for the National Economic Development Council. There has been no recent discussion in the Wool Textile Economic Development Committee of the need for a further report on the strategic future of the wool textile industry on the scale of the 1969 report, and I have no plans for commissioning such a report.

asked the Secretary of State for Industry where the 28 firms, from which the wool textile industry scheme—stage 1—grant of £130,239 was reclaimed, are located in the United Kingdom; where and why the grant was reclaimed; how many redundancies there were; and, in view of the results of this policy, if he will ensure that the industry is not in the future forced to dispose of valuable assets as a consequence of unfair trading conditions.

The following is the regional location of the 28 firms from which grant of £130,239 was reclaimed under the first stage wool textile scheme:

Yorkshire and Humberside17
Northern Region6
North-West Region2
Scotland3
The reasons for reclaiming the grants were:—

(1) Items in projects not qualifying3
(2) Assets disposed of8
(3) Assets taken out of use for wool textiles9
(4) Assets scrapped1
(5) Company liquidation or receivership3
(6) Machinery returned to manufacturer1
(7) Overcharge in claims2
(8) Assets exported1

Grants were reclaimed at various dates between January 1975 and September 1979. No figure is available of redundancies due to the events which caused grant to be reclaimed nor is it possible to say if such redundancies as may have occurred were due to grant reclamation. The policy of reclaiming grants made under industry schemes is related to the use and retention of the assets and not directly to unfair trading.

asked the Secretary of State for Industry if the Wool Textile Economic Development Committee has recently undertaken a research investigation into the trade and industry problems of the industry.

The Wool Textile Economic Development Committee and the National Wool Textile Export Corporation recently commissioned a study of buying attitudes to wool textile products from the United Kingdom in West Germany, France and Italy, and resources needed by the wool textile industry for exporting. The report of the study is being considered by the Wool Textile Economic Development Committee.

asked the Secretary of State for Industry, in view of the fact that 90 per cent. of the projects under the wool textile industry schemes were completed before this year, to what reasons he attributes the present substantial loss of jobs in the wool textile industry.

No assessment has yet been possible of the second wool textile scheme and so no conclusion can be reached about redundancies arising from the scheme in 1979. Of the 268 projects in the two schemes, 58 had not been completed by December 1978. The loss of jobs in the industry during 1979 has been variously attributed to falling demand for worsted fabrics; shifts in demand from wool to lighter fibres; fashion changes to less formal clothing; imports of fabrics and made up garments from EEC and low cost sources and loss of exports, particularly for worsteds, in the Middle East.

Textiles And Clothing Industry

asked the Secretary of State for Industry (1) if the Government have accepted in whole or in part the general objectives, means of action, and policies contained in the "Commission Communication to the Council on General Guidelines for a Textiles and Clothing Industry Policy", which was issued on 20 July 1978; and whether his Department has issued a memorandum outlining the effects of the proposal on the United Kingdom textiles and clothing industry; and to whom such a memorandum was issued;(2) whether he has taken action on any of the recommendations contained in the 16th report of the House of Lords Select Committee on the European Communities—Session 1978–79—on the Commission communication on general guidelines for a textiles and clothing industry policy—R 2118/78; and what pressure he has put on the European Commission to eliminate all barriers to trade whether tariff or non-tariff within the Community and to ensure that existing agreements are enforced.

Profitability And Productivity

asked the Secretary of State for Industry what has been the level of profitability and the increase in productivity of (a) wool textiles, (b) clothing firms and (c) manufacturing industry as a whole in each year since 1970 in the United Kingdom, France, Belgium, Italy and Germany.

Northern Ireland

Terrorism

asked the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland how many convictions for terrorist offences have been obtained since the publication of the Bennett report; and how many were obtained in the same period in 1978.

The Bennett report was published on 16 March 1979, but statistics are available only in respect of complete months. In the period 1 April 1979 to 31 October 1979, 422 persons were convicted at Belfast Crown Court of offences which are scheduled under the Northern Ireland (Emergency Provisions) Act 1978. In the corresponding period in 1978, 411 persons were convicted of similar offences.

Minors (Alcohol Prosecutions)

asked the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland if he will make a statement concerning the level of prosecutions which have resulted from serving alcohol to minors in Northern Ireland.

While, as the hon. Member will be aware, the actual number of prosecutions for this offence could be obtained only at disproportionate cost, all those concerned are alive to the fact that under-age drinking is a very real problem and the Chief Constable in particular is alert to the need to control it as effectively as he can.

Housing Executive

asked the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland what estimate has been given to him by the Northern Ireland Housing Executive of the cost of converting its houses from gas to other fuels in the event of a closure of the Northern Ireland gas industry.

The Northern Ireland Housing Executive estimates that, if the Northern Ireland gas industry were to close down completely, the cost of converting its homes from gas to other fuels would be in the region of £25 million, at current prices.

De Lorean Car Company

asked the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland if any part of the Department of Commerce equity investment in the De Lorean car company has yet been purchased back.

Social Services

Unemployment Benefit (Overseas Residents)

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services if it is normal practice to send social security cheques for unemployment benefit to persons who are resident outside the United Kingdom; and if he will make a statement about this.

United Kingdom unemployment benefit is normally payable only to persons who are available for work in the United Kingdom. Under EEC regulations on social security, however, people who have been unemployed and entitled to benefit for four weeks or more who go to another EEC country to seek work can continue to receive United Kingdom unemployment benefit for up to a further three months if they register with the employment services of the other country. Payment is normally made on behalf of the United Kingdom by the unemployment benefit institution of the EEC country in which they are seeking work.Payments of unemployment benefit may be sent direct to a person living abroad where they represent arrears of benefit due for a period when the person was living in this country.

Supplementary Benefit

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services if he will state by reference to any convenient period (a) the number of women who apply for supplementary benefit on the ground that they have been deserted and (b) in how many cases his Department attempted to contact the husband in order to recover a due proportion of the liability.

I regret that information in the form requested is not available. My hon. Friend may wish to know, however, that in 1978 about 233,000 claims for supplementary benefit were made in which the question of liability for maintenance under the Supplementary Benefits Act 1976 was involved. Most of the claims were by separated wives, divorced women or single women with dependent children, but no record is kept to show the number in each category. On the basis of information obtained annually, it is estimated that in November 1978 there were about 342,000 cases in receipt of supplementary benefit, where it was necessary to pursue the question of liability to maintain, and of these about 140,000 were separated wives.When supplementary benefit is paid to a separated wife who is not receiving maintenance from her husband and who has not already initiated action to obtain maintenance, it is the policy of the Supplementary Benefits Commission to contact the husband as soon as possible so that any action appropriate can be taken to ensure that he meets his maintenance liability under the Act as far as he is able to do so. No statistics are maintained of the number of cases in which this action is taken.

Benefits

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services if he will update his reply to the hon. Member for Norfolk, North, Official Report 15 November, column 744, in line with the November uprating of all social security benefits except child benefit.

Family circumstancesNet weekly spending power
Unemployed and receiving:
a. unemployment benefit plus earnings-related supplement with former earnings of:—
1. £50†£51·42
2. £70£51·85
3. £90£53·54
b. supplementary benefit£44·65
Working and earning:
(a) £50†£53·49
(b) £70£56·20
(c) £90£64·59
† Includes entitlement to family income supplement

Child Benefits

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services what would be the cost of replacing all existing children's benefits and allowances by a single scale of age-related child benefits equal in value to children's supplementary benefit rates.

Juvenile Justice

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services if he will recommend that a Royal Commission be appointed to examine the current system of juvenile justice.

Parkinson's Disease

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services (1) what research is funded by his Department into the prevention of Parkinson's disease; and if he will make a statement;(2) what research is being funded by his Department or the Medical Research

Only the table given in the reply to my hon. Friend on 15 November needs to be amended following the November uprating of social security benefits. The information on income tax refunds and the assumptions quoted in the reply of 15 November are unchanged, except that the £50 level of earnings there will be entitlement to family income supplement after the November uprating In comparing the net weekly spending power of a person in and out of work following the uprating, it is of course necessary to bear in mind that the table does not reflect the increases in earnings which have taken place since benefit rates were previously increased in November 1978.Council into the causes and possible cure of Parkinson's disease; and if he will make make a statement.

The main Government-funded body supporting research into Parkinson's disease and in fields relevant to the disease is the Medical Research Council from funds provided by the Department of Education and Science and by the health departments.The health departments have identified this condition as justifying priority in research.Other research supported by Government funds is also conducted in the universities and hospital medical schools.I understand from my right hon. and learned Friend the Secretary of State for Education and Science that the Medical Research Council is supporting research as follows:

Professor J. S. G. Miller: Newcastle-upon-Tyne University.
Analysis of patterns of locomotor activity in the cat.
Dr. P. B. C. Matthews: Oxford University.
The tonic vibration reflex in the cat and the effect of input patterning.
Professor J. H. Wolstencroft: Birmingham University.
Supraspinal influences on the flexor withdrawal reflex.
Dr. D. M. Armstrong: Bristol University.
A study of the activity of red nucleus neurones and cerebellar purkinje cell during locomotion in cats.
Dr. J. F. Stein: Oxford University.
The role of the basal ganglia in the control of movements in trained rhesus monkeys.
Dr. Brenda Costall: Bradford University.
Dopaminergic and serotonergic control of dyskinetic phenomena in the rodent.
Dr. D. M. Armstrong: Bristol University.
Computer facilities for ananysis of neuronal discharges during locomotion in cats.
Dr. J. J. B. Jack: Oxford University.
Spinal motor mechanisms in experimental spasticity.
Dr. P. G. Spenner: Institute of Psychiatry, London.
The function of the strio-pallidal encephalin pathway in motor behaviour in rodents.
Professor C. D. Marsden: Institute of Psychiatry London
Development of pro-drugs of levodopa for the treatment of Parkinson's disease.
The biochemical basis of some neurological disorders.
Characterisation of adenylate cyclase dependent and independent dopamine receptors in the brain of animals and man.
The physiological basis of motor disorders.
The function of long-latency "trancoritical" responses to muscle stretch in health and disease.
Human motor physiology in health and disease.
Dr. P. W. Nathan, Institute of Neurology London.
The Mechanisms of clonus.
Dr. P. M. H. Rack, Birmingham University.
Human and simian stretch reflexes, their variability and their abnormalities.
Dr. Gerta Vrbova, University College London.
Mechanisms involved in the development of different types of motor units.
Dr. M. C. Smith, Institute of Neurology London.
Pathways associated with normal control and movement and tone and their dysfunction in disease.
MRC Brain: Metabolism Unit Edinburgh.
Clinical, biochemical and pharmacological studies in Parkinsonism, other movement disorders and dementia.
MRC Brain Metabolism Unit Edinburgh.
Mapping of transmitter systems in human brain—schizophrenia, manic depressive illness, movement disorder, dementias.
MRC Environmental Physiology Unit London.
Studies of temperature control with reference to genetic factors, certain clinical conditions including Parkinson's disease) and control of heat stroke.
MRC Neurochemical Pharmacology Units Cambridge.
Neurophysiological studies of transmitter receptors in mammalian CNS; actions of pshychoactive drugs.
MRC Neurochemical Pharmacology Unito Cambridge.
Microchemical and histochemical studies of distribution of transmitters in CNS.
MRC Neurochemical Pharmacology Unit Cambridge.
Uptake, storage and release of transmitters from neurones and glia; effects of drugs.
MRC Neurochemical Pharmacology Unit Cambridge
Effects of anti-psychotic and other psychoactive drugs on dopamine receptors in CNS.

Disclosure Of Files

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services, pursuant to the reply to the hon. Member for Keighley of 7 November on disclosure of files, if he will now define departmental or public interest as the criterion for disclosure of social security files.

There is no definition of departmental and public interest in this context, requests for disclosure being considered on their individual merits. However, the following examples of information that may be disclosed were included in the Department's evidence to the Committee on Data Protection and are reproduced on page 60 of the committee's report—Cmnd. 7341, which was presented to Parliament in December 1978.1. Addresses may be disclosed

to the courts, on request, for the purpose of maintenance proceedings; to the police, on request, in cases where more than trivial crime is involved;
to local authority social service departments where parents have absconded;
from 1979, to occupational pension schemes for the purpose of paying pensions as required by the Social Security Pensions Act 1975;
to the Customs and Excise where they are investigating serious offences;
to the Inland Revenue where they are seeking tax arrears which include arrears of national insurance contributions;
to service Departments in cases of desertion from HM Forces.

2. Benefits information may be passed to employing central Government Departments to enable them to afford correct tax relief to civil servants who have elected not to claim sickness benefit and to the social service departments. It may also be passed to both sides in a personal injury case and to the National Coal Board in connection with the colliery workers supplementary scheme. That scheme has now been wound up, but inquiries may still arise.

3. Contributions information, including in some cases the employee's age or a woman's marital status where this affects the rate of contribution may need to be passed to employers to enable them to comply correctly with national insurance contribution requirements. Similar information may need to be passed to occupational pension schemes for the purpose of their financial requirements.

One-parent or two-parent family with

Prescribed amount from 14 November 1978

Prescribed amount from 13 November 1979

££
One child46·0056·00
Two children50·0060·50
Three children54·0065·00

The number of one-parent families receiving FIS was estimated to be about 38,700 at the end of August 1979, made up as follows:

One-parent family with

Number of families

One child20,600
Two children11,800
Three children4,400
Four or more children1,900

These, the latest available figures, have been derived from a sample of recipients of FIS and are subject to statistical error.

Census

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services if he will now make a statement as to the success or otherwise of the Haringey census test; and if he intends to include ethnic questions in the 1981 census.

My right hon. Friend is at present considering this matter. An announcement about the plans for the census will be made in due course.

Benefits (Payment)

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services (1) what plans he has to alter the payments of social security benefits now made weekly to a fortnightly or monthly basis;

Family Income Supplement

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services what are the net income levels for eligibility for family income supplement for a single-parent family with (a) one child, (b) two children and (c) three children; and how many such families receive family income supplement.

Family income supplement (FIS) is payable when the family's gross income, excluding child benefit and the one-parent family premium (child benefit increase), is below the "prescribed amount". The following table shows the prescribed amounts, which are the same for one-parent and two-parent families, before and after this month's uprating.(2) whether he is taking any steps to persuade claimants to receive their social security payments by direct credit transfers to a bank account;(3) whether he has had any discussions with the Post Office on the likely effects of changing social security benefits now paid weekly to a fortnightly or monthly basis; and if he will make a statement.

I refer the hon. Member to my reply to the hon. Member for Berwick-upon-Tweed (Mr. Beith) on 27 November.

Drug Rehabilitation Centres

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services (1) if he will list in the Official Report the number of drug rehabilitation centres supported by his Department;(2) if he will list in the

Official Report the number of drug rehabilitation places in institutions supported by his Department made available annually in each of the last five years, respectively, and the number of applications in each of those five years;

(3) by how much, in terms both of cash and of places available, the drug rehabilitation programme is expected to be cut by the present cuts in public expenditure.

Disablement (Costs Allowance)

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services what representations he has received from the Disablement Income Group concerning the publication by the Government of a Green Paper or other discussion or consultative document on a disablement costs allowance; what reply he has sent; and if he will make a statement.

My right hon. Friend wrote on 22 August to Mr. Peter Large of the Disablement Income Group about this and will be writing to him again shortly. I shall send a copy of the replies to the right hon. Gentleman.

Transfer Payments (Cost)

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services what will be the aggregate cost of transfer payments carried on his departmental budget in 1980–81 on the basis of the inflation and employment projections in the latest Treasury short-term economic forecast.

The Government's plans for expenditure on the social security programme in 1980–81 are set out in Cmnd. 7746. These plans were taken into account in the Treasury's economic forecast published on 22 November 1979.

Pay Awards

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services what further increase is being made to the cash block for Vote XI 1, Health and Personal Social Services, England, 1979–80, to cover the excess costs of pay awards.

£141,735,000, which will increase the block total from £5,097,716,000 (Cmnd. 7604) to £5,239,451,000. The winter Supplementary Estimates published yesterday take account of the increase announced in Cmnd. 7604 and part of the present increase.

Mobility Allowance

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services what repre- sentations he has received from the Joint Committee on Mobility for the Disabled concerning the need for the mobility allowance to have been raised to £12 a week immediately following the Budget last June in order to restore its value in terms of motoring to the £10 it was worth in July 1978; what reply he has sent; and if he will make a statement.

My right hon. Friend wrote to the chairman of the Joint Committee on Mobility for the Disabled on 9 November about the rate of mobility allowance and I shall send a copy of the reply to the right hon. Gentleman.

Trade

Price Increases (Notifications)

asked the Secretary of State for Trade if he will end the requirement to notify price increases in such items as beer to the Office of Fair Trading.

There is no general requirement to notify price increases to the Office of Fair Trading. In a limited number of cases the parties to a monopoly situation notify price increases to the Office as a consequence of undertakings they have given following adverse findings by the Monopolies and Mergers Commission in a report on a monopoly investigation. No such arrangements apply to beer.

Liquefied Gas (Sea Transportation)

asked the Secretary of State for Trade what specific steps have been taken by him since his statement of 2 July in answer to the hon. Member for Essex, South-East, to find ways of ensuring that if a liquefied gas tanker is involved in a serious accident in the Thames Estuary, with risk of a spillage of cargo, it will not be brought to the British Gas terminal on Canvey Island, for unloading close to a residential population of 34,000; and what equipment or standby vessels are available in the estuary to deal safely with such a situation.

Liquefied gas tankers are designed and constructed to the highest safety standards, as their operating record shows.

At present such tankers can only be unloaded at a shore terminal, or into a compatible gas tanker elsewhere using well proven techniques and the equipment already on board.

In these circumstances my Department does not maintain additional facilities or vessels specifically for unloading a liquefied gas tanker which has been involved in a serious accident.

Research has, however, been initiated for the development of a hose suitable for the unloading of a stranded LNG tanker for use when the receiving ship cannot be brought alongside.

Advertising (Children)

asked the Secretary of State for Trade if he will initiate a study into advertising and promotion campaigns directed at children; and if he will take steps to curb this form of advertising.

It would be premature to take any action until there is some objective analysis of the problem, if there is a problem. A number of studies are now going on. The effects of advertising directed at children are a subject of present study by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development. The Advertising Standards Authtority has commissioned a controlled research experiment in the South-East—to be followed by studies by other regions in the country. The Consumers Association is studying sales promotion techniques and practices and looking particularly at the effects of sales offers on children. Reports from OECD and the Consumers Association are expected shortly and the ASA report in mid-1980. In addition I have asked the National Federation of Womens Institutes to let me have its views on the more general issue of children and advertising.

Textile And Clothing Products

asked the Secretary of State for Trade (1) in view of the considerable negotiating delay that was experienced in the 12 months before the renewal date of 1 January 1978 for the present 1978–82 multi-fibre arrangement and the delay in implementing detailed quota and growth rates for textile products which led to a considerable weakening of the competitive position of domestic textile industries, if he will reconsider his view that there is no need to initiate negotiations with the European Commission and with the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade Textiles Committee before 1981 for the renewal of the multi-fibre arrangement for 1982 onwards;(2) if he will raise with the European Commission the need to shift the responsibility for proving dumping of textile and clothing goods from the domestic industry and trade associations to the importer;(3) if he intends to agree to the European Commission proposal, dated 10 August, adjusting the national shares in respect of certain quantitative limits on imports of textile products originating in third countries; and if he will make a statement on how this affects the negotiations for the 1982 multi-fibre arrangement;(4) how many investigations into alleged subsidised, unfair or illegal trade practices in textiles and clothing products have been initiated and completed by his Department and the European Commission since 1 January 1978, if he will give details of source of complaint, date of commencement, date of completion, and action as a result for each product; and if he will press upon the Commission the need for all such investigations to be completed within one month;(5) what informal arrangements have been agreed with Premier Hua of China, and his trade delegation, on his recent visit to the United Kingdom, regarding compensatory trade in textiles and clothing goods for export to the United Kingdom;(6) what progress has taken place on the proposed new General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade clause authorising emergency safeguard action against selected suppliers of disruptive imports; and what action his Department has taken to press the need for such a clause with the European Commission in view of the disruption caused to domestic textiles industries from increased levels of textile imports;(7) if he will veto the EEC direction on outward processing of textile goods at present before the Council of Ministers, in view of the lack of any justification and research into its overall effects on the locational patterns of the European clothing industries;(8) if any discussions and negotiations on the renewal of the multi-fibre arrangement have begun within the EEC Commission.

Man-Made Fibres And Products

asked the Secretary of State for Trade (1) if he will make a statement on the decisions made at the meeting of the Council of Ministers held on 20 November regarding the curbing of the upsurge of imports of man-made fibres and products from the United States of America;(2) what was the volume of United Kingdom imports of man-made fibre sheets and pillowcases in 1977, 1978 and in the first nine months of 1979, respectively;(3) what was the volume of United Kingdom imports of man-made fibre tufted carpets in 1977, 1978 and in the first nine months of 1979, respectively;(4) what was the volume of United Kingdom imports of polyester filament yarn from the United States of America

PER CAPITA EXPENDITURE
Area Health AuthorityRevenueCapitalTotal
£££
South Glamorgan153·097·83160·92
Gwent97·084·74101·82
Powys91·014·2795·28
Mid Glamorgan91·453·2894·73
West Glamorgan87·185·0292·20
Clwyd84·884·7689·64
Dyfed85·992·9788·96
Gwynedd84·403·1087·50
Notes:
1. The variations in per capita expenditure largely reflect differences in the provision by Authorities of all-Wales and supra-area services and specialties and movements of patients across area boundaries.
2. The expenditure of South Glamorgan also reflects the provision of clinical teaching facilities.
3. The figures exclude expenditure on capital schemes costing in excess of £150,000 which is charged to the accounts of the Welsh Health Technical Services Organisation.

Public Bodies (Appointments)

asked the Secretary of State for Wales how many appointments to public bodies he has made; on how many occasions he has had consultations

in 1977, 1978 and in the first nine months of 1979, respectively;

(5) what was the volume of United Kingdom imports of polyester textured yarn from the United States of America in 1977, 1978 and in the first nine months of 1979, respectively.

Balance Of Trade

asked the Secretary of State for Trade if he will break down the figures given to the hon. Member for Grimsby (Mr. Mitchell) on 13 November by the Chancellor of the Exchequer, showing the balance of trade in goods other than oil, to show the balance with, respectively, the EEC Eight and the EEC Six.

Wales

Area Health Authorities (Expenditure)

asked the Secretary of State for Wales if he will publish a table ranking the area health authorities in Wales by expenditure per head of population in 1978–79.

The information is as follows:with outside bodies about such appointments; and if he will give details of persons appointed and the organisations.

The information relating to appointments for which I am solely responsible is as follows:

Name of BodyNo. of AppointmentsNamesOutside bodies consulted
Agricultural Dwelling House11Mr. D. R. DuttonNone
Advisory CommitteesMr. E. Rogers
Mr. T. E. Davies
Dr. J. Bradley Jones
Mr. O. P. Jones
Mr. B. Keohane
Mr. L. W. Thomas
Mr. I. O. Davies
Mr. T. M. Wynne
Mr. W. C. Davies
Mr. J. B. Murphy
Agricultural Regional Panels:7Mr. B. N. EvansNone
North and South WalesMr. H. J. Tamplin
Mr. D. C. Thomas
Mr. O. T. Owen
Mr. R. Ll. Pugh
Mr. A. R. Rowland
Mr. E. Howard
Agricultural Wages Committees5Mr. J. R. EvansNone
Mr. T. E. Davies
Mr. B. Keohane
Mr. T. M. Wynne
Mr. W. C. Davies
Area Health Authorities:
Dyfed1Councillor J. N. S. Allen-MirehouseSouth Pembrokeshire District Council
Mid Glamorgan1Councillor E. SalathielRhondda Borough Council
South Glamorgan1Provost H. L. DuthieUniversity of Wales
Community Health Councils:
Clwyd North1Mrs A. RobinsonNone
Arfon-Dwyfor1Mr. E. T. JonesNone
Meirionnydd1Mr. J. A. DaviesNone
Name of BodyNo. of AppointmentsNamesOutside bodies consulted
Careers Service Advisory15Prof. G. Davies (Chairman)National Union of Teachers, National Association of Schoolmasters' Union of Women Teachers, Welsh Confederation of Head Teachers, National Association of Teachers in Wales, Assistant Masters and Mistresses Association, Secondary Heads Association, Welsh Secondary Schools Association, National Association of Teachers in Further and Higher Education, Manpower Services Commission, Welsh Joint Education Committee, Welsh Counties Committee, Wales TUC, CBI (Wales) Welsh Council for the Disabled, Institute of Careers Officers.
Council for WalesMrs. A. Jones
Councillor G. Jones
Mr. M. Long
Mr. J. L. Brace
Mr. H. Loudon
Mr. H. Thomas
Mr. F. Gilbert
Mr. D. Gregory
Mrs. S. Jones
Mr. D. B. Layton
Miss J. Sollis
Mr. G. Donaldson
Mr. W. J. Robinson
Court and council of the National4Mr. D. G. Evans
Library of WalesMr. J. Beverley-Smith (Court)None
The Hon. J. Davies (Court)
Dr. E. Gwynn (Court)
Mr. J. Beverley-Smith (Council)
Historic Buildings Council for WalesMr. W. L. EvansNone
Mr. J. B. Hilling
Lord Gibson-Watt
Mr. J. Eynon
Prof. G. Williams
Earl Lloyd George
Library Advisory Council for WalesDr. D. JenkinsNone
Mr. G. Ewin
Mr. G. Davies
Mr. A. R. Edwards
Mr. H. A. Prescott
Local Government Boundary Commission for Wales3Lady Crawshay (Chairman)None
Mr. I. Davey (Deputy Chairman)
Mr. D. W. C. Morgan
Name of BodyNo. of AppointmentsNamesOutside bodies consulted
National Parks Committees:5Mr. M. PorterCountryside Commission
Brecon BeaconsMr. K. A. Powell
Major R. D. Raikes
Mr. S. E. Biddescombe
Mr. D. W. Jenkins
Pembrokeshire Coast4Dr. M. DaviesCountryside Commission
Mr. C. H. Pemberton
Col. J. A. Sulivan
Mrs. J. Asby
Snowdonia5Mr. R. S. ChapmanCountryside Commission
Prof. W. S. Lacey
Mr. R. E. M. Rees
Mrs. B. G. Williams
Mr. I. Edwards
Saundersfoot Harbour Commission2Mr. J. P. ThomasNone
Col. D. Bruton
Welsh Development Agency4Mr. S. A. R. Gray (Chairman)None
Mr. D. G. Badham (Deputy Chairman)
Mr. H. Rees
Mr. D. Walters
Welsh Health Technical Services Organisation5Mr. T. H. Davies (Chairman)None
Mr. C. Roberts
Dr. E. W. Jones
Mr. D. R. Evans
Prof. W. N. Williams
Welsh Industrial Development Advisory Board8Mr. A. J. Kirkwood (Chairman)None
Mr. Z. Brierley
Mr. W. E. Evans
Mr. J. Griffiths
Mr. G. M. Metcalf
Mr H. W. Morris
Mr. D. R. Ross
Mr. H. E. Williams
Wales Tourist Board2Miss R. HowellNone
Mr. G. Saunders
Welsh Water Authority1Mrs. C. M. LeeNone
Total98

Research

asked the Secretary of State for Wales if he will publish a table showing all moneys expended by his Department in each year since 1974 on research, showing in each year the organisations to which funding was made available and the titles of the projects funded.

This information is contained in the annual reports "Research, Wales" published by HMSO on behalf of my Department. Copies are available in the Library.

Agriculture, Fisheries And Food

National Farmers Union

11.

asked the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food when next he will meet the president of the National Farmers Union of England and Wales.

Grimsby Fish Docks

19.

asked the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food if he has any plans to visit Grimsby fish docks.

Yes. I have today written to the Grimsby and Immingham chamber of commerce and shipping accepting an invitation for 1982.

Common Fisheries Policy

21.

asked the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food if he will make a statement on the renegotiation of the common fisheries policy.

51.

asked the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food what is the current state of negotations towards a common fisheries policy for the European Economic Community.

The meeting of the Fisheries Council on 29–30 October established a constructive atmosphere for continued negotiation, and useful discussions have since taken place at both ministerial and official level. The Council will meet again on 3–4 December and will then, I hope, make further progress towards a satisfactory settlement on all elements of a revised common fisheries policy.

43.

asked the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food what representations he has had from the British Fisheries Federation with regard to the EEC fisheries negotiations.

My right hon. Friend has received written representations from the director general of the British Fishing Federation, dated 15 October and 5 November 1979, giving the views of the federation on the internal and external aspects of the EEC fisheries negotiations.

Apples

23.

asked the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food what were the total imports of dessert applies from the European Economic Community for each of the last three months for which figures are available.

Information on dessert apple imports is not separately available. But apples imported from the rest of the Community in July, August and September this year were 16,378, 18,701 and 24,489 tonnes respectively.

42.

asked the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food if he will propose to his fellow Agriculture Ministers in the EEC that they should divert the sums spent by the Community on apple intervention so as to assist the apple-processing industry for a limited number of years.

My approaches to EEC Agriculture Ministers will depend on talks that I am having with our apple growers.

Dairy Industry

22.

asked the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food if he is satisfied with the state of the dairy industry; and if he will make a statement.

I am aware that milk producers are currently under pressure as a result of depressed yields and increasing costs, and I am keeping the position under review. In the meantime, the two devaluations of the green pound made since the Government took office, together with the recent increase in the maximum wholesale price for liquid milk, will be of benefit to the industry.

Fat Lamb Trade

24.

asked the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food if he is satisfied with the progress of the Commission towards a solution to the problems of fat lamb trade within the European Economic Community.

The Commission takes the view, as we do, that the French should not continue to defy Community law. It is the responsibility of the Commission to ensure compliance and it is

(tonnes)
Public InterventionAided Private StorageTotal
Butter297,140201,567498,707
Skimmed milk powder291,765291,765
Sugar(a)
Breadmaking wheat1,737,0901,737,090
Rye538,629538,629
Notes:
(a) Sugar eligible for storage refunds has not been included because refunds relate to an orderly marketing, rather than intervention buying and storage, measure.
(b) Commodities in short term seasonal surplus and those where the Community is a net importer are not included in the table.

Country Landowners Association

25.

asked the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food when next he will meet the president of the Country Landowners Association.

My right hon. Friend hopes to be meeting the new president of the Country Landowners Association informally on 17 December, and formally on 5 February.

Horticulture

26.

asked the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food if he is satisfied with the prospects for the horticultural sector of the United Kingdom agriculture industry.

38.

asked the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food if he is satisfied with the prospects for the horticulture industry of the United Kingdom.

Provided that United Kingdom horticulturists continue to make use of the latest technology, and ensure that the production and presentation of produce meets the needs of the market,

taking the necessary steps under the Treaty of Rome.

Surplus Stocks

28.

asked the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food which items of food are in surplus; and what are the quantities of such surplus held in the EEC at the present time.

The following table lists items of food in structural surplus within the EEC and shows stocks at recent dates of such commodities where these are held in public intervention and aided private storage.the horticulture industry should have a healthy future.

46.

asked the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food if he is satisfied with the competitive equivalence of the United Kingdom horticulture industry with its European counterparts.

I am confident that efficient, progressive growers in the United Kingdom are capable of competing with any of their European counterparts.

Farmers (European Community Assistance)

27.

asked the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food whether he will quantify the financial benefits that he expects British farmers to receive from the EEC budget this year.

Of expenditure by the agricultural departments and by the intervention board in 1979–80, an estimated £440 million will be offset by receipts from the EEC budget. However, much of this expenditure benefits farmers only indirectly, and some of it is largely or wholly for the benefits of consumers, traders, manufacturers or overseas exporters.

Timber Diseases

29.

asked the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food if he is satisfied his Department is taking the measures necessary to control the spread and minimise the risk, of timber diseases, including oak wilt.

I am satisfied with the measures being taken by the Forestry Commissioners, which is the competent authority under the Plant Health Act 1967 for diseases of forest trees and timber.

Milk (Imports)

30.

asked the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food if he will make a statement on the negotiation regarding the import of milk from EEC countries into the United Kingdom.

32.

asked the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food if he will take action to protect the British dairy industry from the importation of French milk.

Fruit (Intervention Buying)

33.

asked the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food how much fruit has been purchased during 1979 by the United Kingdom Intervention Board for Agricultural Produce; at what cost; and how this fruit has been disposed of.

Community support arrangements for fresh fruit do not provide for intervention purchasing, but for the payment of compensation to producers' organisations withholding produce from the market when prices fall to low pre-determined levels. From 1 January to 16 November 1979 8,431 tonnes of apples were withdrawn under these arrangements. £161,002·57 has been paid in compensation in respect of 4,503 tonnes; claims in respect of the balance are still awaited. Of the total, 6,047 tonnes have been destroyed, 1,311 tonnes have gone for animal feed, and 18 tonnes for human consumption; the remainder has yet to be accounted for. During the same period 1,757 tonnes of pears, all of which have been destroyed, were withdrawn from the market; claims are still awaited.

European Community Council Of Agriculture Ministers

31.

asked the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food whether he will report on his negotiations with the EEC; and if he will make a statement.

I refer the hon. Member to the statements made to the House following meetings of the Council of Ministers (Agriculture).

Fishing Fleet

34.

asked the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food what steps he is taking to restructure the fishing fleet.

Mr. Buchanan-Smith