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Written Answers

Volume 975: debated on Monday 3 December 1979

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Written Answers To Questions

Monday 3 December 1979

Industry

Nationalised Industries

18.

the Secretary of State for Industry when next he expects to meet the chairmen of the nationalised industries for which he is responsible.

Advance Factories

19.

asked the Secretary of State for Industry what additional steps he proposes to take to offer advance factories to their tenants, and to use the funds realised for further factory construction.

In appropriate cases, the tenants of the English Industrial Estates Corporation now have the opportunity to purchase their freeholds or obtain a long lease of 125 years instead of the 99 years granted previously. Mortgages are available where desired. The proceeds will enable the Government to reduce the net costs of the factory programme.

Million square metres
197719781979
Q1Q2Q3Q4Q1Q2Q3Q4Q1Q2
Cotton cloth1181069310911211898112120109
Man-made fibre cloth203184170189182175156181196184
Source:Textile Statistics Bureau—converted from liner metres.
Comparable information by value is not available. Figures collected by the Business Statistics Office relate to sales of cloth in the loom state and finished.
£ million
197719781979
Q1Q2Q3Q4Q1Q2Q3Q4Q1*Q2*
Cotton cloth29302730282826293130
Man-made fibre cloth80747183888376919591
* Small change in classification of cloth.
Source: Business Monitor PQ 413.

asked the Secretary of State for Industry what was the level of import penetration as a percentage of domestic sales, by volume and by value in each quarter of 1977, each quarter of 1978 and the three quarters of 1979 in

Regional Aid

20.

asked the Secretary of State for Industry if he will bring forward proposals to provide relief for those firms in mid-Wales which have entered into binding contracts on the strength of regional aid grants which have been cancelled retrospectively.

Regional development grants have not been cancelled retrospectively. The present transitional arrangements are fair and there is no intention to vary them.

Textile Industry

asked the Secretary of State for Industry what was the level of home production in each quarter of 1978, each quarter of 1977 and the three quarters of 1979, by colume and by value, in the Lancashire cotton and man-made fibre woven fabric industry, taking cotton and man-made fibres separately.

Production by the Lancashire cotton and man-made fibre weaving industry, from the first quarter of 1977 to the second quarter of 1979, was as follows:They exclude cloth used within establishments. Sales by United Kingdom establishments with over 50 employees were as follows:the Lancashire cotton man-made fibre woven fabric industry, taking cotton and man-made fibres separately.

man-made fibre cloth, in terms of square metres, from the first quarter of 1977 to

Percentages

1977

1978

1979

Q1Q2Q3Q4Q1Q2Q3Q4Q1Q2
Cotton cloth60636456656267646468
Man-made fibre cloth43444742485053545153

Domestic sales are defined as total sales by United Kingdom manufacturers plus imports minus exports.

Source: Textile Statistics Bureau, Overseas Trade Statistics.

Percentages

12 months ending

197719781979
MarchJuneSeptemberDecemberMarchJuneSeptemberDecemberMarch
MLH 413616163636465677071

Shipbuilding

asked the Secretary of State for Industry how many people were employed in shipbuilding in each of the EEC countries during 1978; and how many tons of ships were completed in each country in that year.

The information is as follows:

MERCHANT SHIPBUILDING
Numbers employed in new building work September 1978 '000Completion (ships 100 gross tons and over) in 1978 '000 compensated gross tons
Belgium5·1155
Denmark11·5379
France24·4*440
West Germany33·51,060
Irish Republic0·9
ItalyNot available283
Netherlands23·6†455
United Kingdom40·0‡709
* In establishments employing 150 or more persons.
†March 1978; includes some employment on non-merchant ships.
‡Estimated figure.
Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development.

Post Office (Monopoly)

asked the Secretary of States for Industry whether he has any plans to relax the statutory letter monopoly of the Post Office during the period

the second quarter of 1979, were as follows:

Comparable figures by value are not available. Import penetration figures relating to the whole of the cotton, linen and man-made fibre weaving industry, MLH 413, in terms of value, published in the Business Monitor MQ12, are as follows:

up to Christmas in order to allow voluntary organisations to undertake charitable collections and deliveries of Christmas cards.

No. However, my right hon. Friend announced in the House on 2 July 1979–[Vol. 969, c. 916–24]—that he was calling for reports on possible modifications to the postal letter monopoly, their practicability and their implications. These reports are to reach him by the end of the year.

Cobalt Mining

asked the Secretary of State for Industry what study he is making of the practicalities of mining cobalt in current economic circumstances in the Lake District and Scotland; and if he will make a statement.

The Department of Industry funds a comprehensive programme of minerals investigation designed to promote the economic development of our indigenous resources. This includes mapping and reconnaissance programmes carried out by the Institute of Geological Sciences—IGS—which aim to provide information on which minerals exploration by companies can be based; and the Mineral Exploration and Investment Grants Act 1972, under which the Department is empowered to pay contributions of not more than 35 per cent. towards expenditure incurred on searching for or discovering and testing certain mineral deposits—including cobalt—in Great Britain and on the United Kingdom Continental Shelf. The IGS operations in the Lake District and in Scotland have not yet detected any indications of economic deposits of cobalt.

Japanese Steel

asked the Secretary of State for Industry what evidence he has that the Japanese Government are subsidising the steel used in the fabrication of North Sea oil jacket components being ordered by companies operating in the North Sea and assembled in the United Kingdom; and if he will make a statement.

None, but I should be glad to take up with my right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Trade any evidence that the hon. Member may have.

Steel Industry

asked the Secretary of State for Industry how many jobs have been lost in the steel industry since 1970 as a result of increased imports from other member States of the European Economic Commission.

British Leyland

asked the Secretary of State for Industry if he will issue a direction to the National Enterprise Board that it shall provide separate guarantees in respect of contacts between BL Ltd. and its suppliers.

European Community (Regional Development)

asked the Secretary of State for Industry on what date his Department advised the EEC Commission on the specific areas within the United Kingdom that should be included in draft regulation 9808/79, specific Community regional development projects under article 13 of the ERDF regulation.

The areas within the United Kingdom included in the proposed regulations for specific Community regional development projects under article 13 of the European regional development fund regulation, which were sent to the Council of Ministers by the EEC Commission on 16 October 1979–document 9808/79–were selected by the Commission. Informal discussions on the Commission's proposals between Commission officials and officials of the United Kingdom Departments primarily concerned have been in progress since the summer of this year. The proposals are currently being studied by the Council working group on regional policy.

Terrorists (Trials)

asked the Attorney-General how many court trials against suspected terrorists have been dropped because of the non-availability of key witnesses in Northern Ireland.

House Of Commons

Members' Pensions

asked the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster whether he will request the Boyle committee to investigate the pension rights of hon. Members to see to what extent they should be placed on the same basis as civil servants and other public servants; and whether he will request that an examination be made to ascertain to what extent Members' redundancy payments compare with workers generally and those in executive positions in particular.

The pension arrangements for honourable Members were reviewed by the Top Salaries Review Body in 1975 and 1976, and the changes it recommended were implemented in the Parliamentary Pensions Act 1978. The review body is fulfilling a remit to review the pension position of former Members who left the House before 2 August 1978 and the arrangements for severance pay for Members. The Government have no plans at present to invite the review body to undertake further studies of these matters.

Minister Of Transport

asked the Prime Minister what are the precise functions of the Minister of Transport.

The responsibilities of my right hon. Friend the Minister of Transport cover the following:

General policy on inland surface transport industries, including British Railways, the bus industry, freight and ports; but not their day-to-day management; the national motorway and trunk road network; overall responsibility for local transportation, including transport policies and programmes and transport supplementary grant, and other matters concerning local authorities in respect of their transport functions; road safety; vehicle regulation and inspection; bus and road freight licensing; driver and vehicle licensing; research and international aspects of the above.
Certain of these responsibilities are exercised in Scotland and Wales by the Secretary of State for Scotland and the Secretary of State for Wales respectively.

Family Life

asked the Prime Minister (1) if she will designate a Minister to be specifically responsible for the scrutiny of proposed legislation, with a view to advising her on its effects on the quality and stability of family life;(2) what administrative arrangements she has made for the monitoring and evaluation of the overall effects of legislation on the quality and stability of family life.

No special administrative arrangements have been made. Ministers collectively and individually have the quality and stability of family life in mind when dealing with all relevant issues whether or not they involve legislation; and I do not think that a special Minister would be able to improve on this.

Israel

asked the Prime Minister whether the question of Israeli settlement on the West Bank of Palestine was discussed at her meeting with the Board of Deputies of British Jews on 27 November; and, if so, what views she expressed on this issue.

That discussion was private. Our view that Israeli settlements in the occupied territories are illegal and an obstacle to peace is well known. We have appealed to the Government of Israel to halt their expansion on several occasions.

President Of France

asked the Prime Minister when she plans to meet the President of France.

I expect to meet President Giscard d'Estaing at the next meeting of the European Council.

European Community (Budget)

asked the Prime Minister if she will give an assurance that Her Majesty's Government will use every endeavour to ensure that the powers of the European Assembly in relation to the EEC budget are reduced and not increased.

The budgetary powers of the European Parliament are laid down in the treaties. To change those powers would require the unanimous agreement of the Council of Ministers and, in the case of the United Kingdom, the agreement of Parliament. At present there is no formal proposal for treaty revision to change the European Parliament's powers, and I see no reason to seek such a change.

Home Department

Borstal

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many borstals are now in the planning stage; when are these likely to be opened; for how many offenders in each case; and what will be the likely cost of this programme.

The current prison building programme for England and Wales includes provision for two new young offender establishments, each for a population of 300; their precise use in the system has yet to be decided. They are expected to open in 1985 and 1986. The likely total cost is £23 million at current prices.

Detoxification

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will list, by year since 1973, the total number of occasions a constable has used the power under section 34 of the Criminal Justice Act 1972 and taken a person to a detoxification centre.

The first experimental detoxification centre in England and Wales was set tip in 1976. The number of admissions to detoxification centres from that year is published annually in "Offences of drunkenness, England and Wales"(table 1 of the volume for 1978, Cmnd. 7707).

Deportation

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many people have been deported subsequent to conviction of offences punishable by imprisonment for each of the last 10 years; and in each year what proportion this represented of those who commited offences for which deportation can be ordered.

The available information is as follows:

Recommendations for deportation made by a Court under section 3(6) of the Immigration Act 1971Deportation enforced following a Court recommendation
1973677392
1974638233
1975875305
19761,190418
19771,175564
1978980485
1979*828424
*To 31 October 1979.
The number of deportation orders enforced in a calendar year do not all relate to court recommendations made in that year. Figures showing the total number of persons subject to immigration control and not exempt from deportation who were convicted of offences punishable with imprisonment are not available.

Vietnamese Refugees

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department when the commitment to 10,000 refugees from Vietnam will have been fulfilled; and what will be the rights of settlement of relatives of the 10,000 refugees who will not have arrived with the 10,000 refugees.

It is not yet possible to say when the commitment will have been fulfilled. As far as possible, the selection of refugees keeps family groups together. No decision has yet been made on the position about claimed relationships after the quota has been fulfilled.

Fourth Television Channel

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what proposals he has received concerning the fourth television channel and Scotland.

I have received representations to the effect that there should be access to the fourth channel for programmes by Scottish independent producers and also programmes transmitted only in Scotland. These options would he possible under my proposals.

Television (Welsh Language Programmes)

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many letters he has received asking him to reconsider his proposal to place Welsh language programmes on two channels rather than establishing a Welsh language service on the fourth channel; and if he will make a statement.

Immigration

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what powers the immigration service has concerning security at ports and airports.

Immigration officers act in accordance with powers contained in the Immigration Act 1971. They also have certain powers derived from the Prevention of Terrorism (Supplemental Temporary Provisions) Order 1976, as amended.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many unmarried men of marriageable age have come to the United Kingdom from the Indian sub-continent to settle since 1 January 1973 (a) with the purpose of marriage and (b) for other purposes.

Admissions of men for marriage and total admissions analysed by citizenship/nationality are published annually in the Command Paper "Control of Immigration: Statistics" (tables 1 and 9(a) of the issue for 1978, Cmnd. 7565). Information is not available by age, or, in the case of total admissions, by sex or marital status.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what nationalities were the 356 foreign-born husbands who were refused permission to enter or remain on the basis of marriage to a woman settled in the United Kingdom in the two years ending 31 March 1979.

The available information is as follows:

Commonwealth citizens
Australia2
Bangladesh5
Cyprus8
Ghana3
Hong Kong2
India112
Jamaica4
Kenya1
Malta1
Mauritius6
Nigeria5
Sierra Leone3
Singapore1
Sri Lanka8
Tanzania2
Trinidad1
Zambia2
Total166
Foreign nationals
Algeria3
Brazil2
Egypt66
Greece3
Indonesia1
Iran25
Iraq2
Israel5
Jordan2
Lebanon2
Morocco12
Norway1
Pakistan3
Philippines1
Portugal2
Somali4
South Africa1
Spain1
Syria5
Thailand3
Tunisia1
Turkey23
USA2
Yemen2
Yugoslavia2
East European16
Total190

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will consider in detail a scheme for providing the families of excludees with financial assistance.

I have considered carefully the arguments for such a scheme and have concluded that the provision of assistance to the families of excluded persons would not be justified.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many elderly persons over 65 years were admitted for settlement from the Asian sub-continent between May and the present time.

The information requested could be made available only at disproportionate cost.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will give an estimate as to how many women, born to British parents overseas, would face discrimination under the proposed new legislation on immigration and nationality.

I do not accept the hon. Member's assumption. I cannot give a reliable estimate of the number of women born to British parents overseas.

Pornography

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what has been the cost to the taxpayer of the Williams inquiry on pornography.

As stated in the committee's report, the estimated cost of its preparation is £99,692, of which £38,692 represents the estimated cost of printing and publication.

Grey Seal

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what advisory machinery he has available to him in relation to the problems of the grey seal; and if he will make a statement.

Under the Conservation of Seals Act 1970, the Natural Environment Research Council is statutorily responsible for providing my right hon. Friend with scientific advice on matters relating to the management of seal populations.

Television Licence (Pensioners)

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) if he plans any action to equalise the level of television licence fee paid by retirement pensioners in warden-controlled accommodation with others living on their own;(2) if he will introduce a subsidy to bring down the cost of television to retirement pensioners.

Political Rally (Police Costs)

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will call for a report from the Commissioner of Police of the Metropolis on the number and cost of the extra police officers who were required for the Labour and Communist Parties' rally on 28 November.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will call for a report from the Commissioner of Police of the Metropolis regarding police supervision and marshalling of the demonstration on 28 November organised by the Labour Party against public spending cuts; how many police were involved, and of what ranks; and what was the cost of the operation to public funds.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will call for a report from the Commissioner of Police of the Metropolis on the cost of police operations necessary for the lobby of Parliament arranged by the

A. GREAT BRITAIN
ArmyPoliceCiviliansTotals
1968–71No figures available
1972718
197311
19744343
197511810
197622
197755
197844
1979 (to 28 November)11
Totals916474

Labour Party on Wednesday 28 November.

The policing of this demonstration was an operational matter for the Commissioner, who informs me that a total of 4,037 officers were on duty. The cost could be calculated only at disproportionate expense.

Prisoner Patients (Experiments)

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what were the side effects on the prisoner patients who were experimented on with Depixol or Modecote as described by Dr. McCleery in the latest issue of the Prison Medical Journal.

Prisoners were not experimented upon. Dr. McCleery's article in issue No. 18 (June 1978) and subsequent letter in issue No. 19 (Winter 1978) of the Prison Medical Journal, copies of which have been placed in the Library of the House, described the study of the treatment given to a small group of prisoners in 1976. There is nothing to add to Dr. McCleery's article and letter in which he says that side effects were minimal.

Terrorism

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will publish statistics for the deaths due to terrorism in Great Britain and Northern Ireland, respectively, from 1968 to the present, of Army personnel, the police and civilians, respectively.

The following tables give figures of deaths resulting from terrorist activities in Great Britain and Northern Ireland.

B. NORTHERN IRELAND

Army/UDR

Police (RUC and RUC reserves)

Civilians (including Prison officers)

Total
1968No figures available
1969011213
1970022325
19714811115174
197212917322468
19736613171250
19743515166216
19752011216247
19762923245297
1977291469112
197821105081
1979 (to 28 November)431346102
Totals4201301,4351,985

Commission For Racial Equality

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will now announce the revised budget for the Commission for Racial Equality for 1979–80; if he will state what change this is over 1978–79; and what effects he expects the revised budget to have on the work of the Commission for Racial Equality.

The Commission's expenditure in the present financial year is expected to be £6·08 million. This represents an increase in real terms of some 5½ per cent. over the budget for 1978–79. The Commission's plans for expanding its activities will be restricted to a more modest level than originally projected.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department when he expects to announce the budget for the Commission for Racial Equality for 1980–81.

The estimate will be included in the Supply Estimates which will be published in normal course next year.

Prison Service (Inspectorate)

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will establish an independent inspectorate for the prison service that will be able to mount thorough investigations and ad hoc spot checks and lay an annual report before Parliament.

May committee, but I have nothing to add at present to the statement I made to the House on 31 October.

Prisoners (Drugs)

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he has any evidence of prisoners being addicted to drugs as a result of drugs prescribed while in prison; and, if so, if he will publish it.

Fines

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what action he is taking to ensure that the scale of fines imposed by the courts is adjusted in the light of inflation; and if he will make a statement.

Section 61 of the Criminal Law Act 1977 makes provision for certain maximum fines to be increased by order in the light of changes in the value of money. I am satisfied that the maxima introduced by the 1977 Act are high enough to make it unnecessary for us to take any action under that section at the present time. Within the statutory maxima, it is for the courts to decide the appropriate fine in any particular case.

Civil Service

Manpower

asked the Minister for the Civil Service what is his latest estimate for reduction of persons employed in the Civil Service for 1980, 1981 and 1982.

I hope to make a statement on Civil Service manpower in the near future.

Employment

asked the Minister for the Civil Service what are the comparable figures for Civil Service jobs in Manchester, Newcastle, Glasgow, Swansea, Leeds, Birmingham, Liverpool and London.

[pursuant to his reply, 20 November, c. 127]: The table below gives the number of non-industrial civil servants in the locations listed at 1 July 1979, the latest date for which figures are available:

LocationStaff in post at 1 July 1979
Manchester9,167
Newcastle17,428
Glasgow11,285
Swansea6,394
Leeds7,673
Birmingham8,788
Liverpool7,540
London141,168
Notes:
1. Part-timers are counted as half units.
2. The area defined for each location is the metropolitan district in each case with the exception of London (which consists of the GLC area) and Glasgow (which consists of Glasgow city).
Information on the number of industrial civil servants' jobs in the locations listed is not held centrally.Civil Servants (Costs)

asked the Minister for the Civil Service what is the current annual average cost of a civil servant of, and above, the executive officer grade, but excluding prison service grades, based on annual salary, pension and other benefits, plus accommodation, office equipment and heating and lighting.

asked the Minister for the Civil Service what is the current annual average cost of a civil servant of, and below, the clerical officer grade, but excluding prison service grades, based on annual salary, pension and other benefits, plus accommodation, office equipment and heating and lighting.

European Community

Research Council

asked the Lord Privy Seal what is the nature of the research council of the EEC due to meet in Brussels on 20 December; which Minister will represent Her Majesty's Government; and which Department is responsible.

The research council due to meet on 20 December 1979 will discuss a number of items concerned with Community research projects, including the 1980–83 programme of the joint research centre, the 1979–83 Community fusion programme and the 1980–84 radiation protection programme. On this occasion, and given the nature of the agenda, my hon. Friend the Under-Secretary of State for Energy will represent Her Majesty's Government.The Community's research work as a whole is the responsibility of a number of Government Departments.

Legislation

asked the Lord Privy Seal if he will notify all the Governments of EEC member countries that Her Majesty's Government consider that EEC legislation should be limited to those matters which cannot be handled adequately on a national basis and on which there is a clear case for adopting a common or uniform approach that can only be given practical effect by means of a legislative instrument at the Community level; what steps he has taken to ensure that public money is not expended on considering matters which can be adequately handled, where necessary, on a national basis; and whether he has notified the Governments of other EEC countries of this change in policy from that of the previous Government.

No. Community Governments are well aware of our policies. No change in procedures is required.

Foreign And Commonwealth Affairs

Rhodesia (Oil Supplies)

asked the Lord Privy Seal whether the assurances given to the Foreign and Commonwealth Office by Shell and British Petroleum Limited that no company in the Shell or British Petroleum Group should be involved in the supply of oil to Rhodesia, whether direct, indirect or by participation in marketing arrangements related to the supply of oil by others to Rhodesia, still continue to be valid.

The British oil companies gave assurances to the previous Government that neither they nor their South African subsidiaries are or would in future be involved in supply to Rhodesia, either directly or indirectly or by participation in marketing arrangements related to the supply of oil by others to Rhodesia. The oil companies have recently told us that these assurances, and the procedures for monitoring their validity, remain fully in force.

Zimbabwe-Rhodesia (Conference)

asked the Lord Privy Seal what is the total of non-accountable subsistence allowances that have been paid to Mr. Mugabe and Mr. Nkomo's delegations since their arrival in London; and whether he is satisfied that this money has been spent in a satisfactory way.

Payments up to 28 November amounted to £40,125. As the non-accountable allowances are intended for the subsistence of members of the delegation, the way in which the money is spent is a matter for the recipients.

Council Of Europe (Resettlement Fund)

asked the Lord Privy Seal what would be the cost to the United Kingdom if it were to join the resettlement fund of the Council of Europe.

As one of the principal contributors to the Council of Europe, the United Kingdom would be expected to subscribe to the resettlement fund US$1·84 million (£858,000) and to pay part of the administration costs of the partial agreement on the resettlement fund. In 1980 the contributions of France, the Federal Republic of Germany and Italy towards the administration costs will be Ff243,692·37 each (£27,000).Additionally, the United Kingdom would be invited to join the majority of participating States in pledging, though not actually paying, a further amount equivalent to the original subscription.

asked the Lord Privy Seal whether consideration will be given to the United Kingdom joining the resettlement fund of the Council of Europe in view of the possible increase in the scope of its activities; and if he will make a statement.

Careful consideration has been given to the United Kingdom joining the resettlement fund of the Council in Europe. But the Government have decided against joining the fund for the time being.

Employment

Regional Variations

asked the Secretary of State for Employment whether he will take steps to reduce the increasing regional imbalance of unemployment.

The Government's taxation, regional and other policies are designed to encourage employment throughout the country.

Official Stoppages

asked the Secretary of State for Employment if he has any statistics of the number of official stoppages over the most recent convenient period which have been caused by the dismissal of employees who have the legal right to put their case to industrial tribunals under the Employment Protection Act.

The precise information requested is not available. However, the detailed analysis by cause of stoppage available for 1978 shows there to have been 10 industrial stoppages over the dismissal of employees known to be official.

Research

asked the Secretary of State for Employment if he will publish a table showing all moneys expended by his Department in each year since 1974 on research, showing in each year the organisations to which funding

DEPARTMENT OF EMPLOYMENT GROUP (INCLUDING MANPOWER SERVICES COMMISSION AND HEALTH AND SAFETY COMMISSION)
£000's
Gross expenditure on research and developmentGross expenditure on external research and development included in columns (1) to (3)
DEMSCHSCDEMSCHSC
(1)(2)(3)(4)(5)(6)
1974–751,646454191,0862752
1975–765121,2673,0523201,0211,257
1976–776811,3543,2284348851,430
1977–787511,4193,8205069291,448
1978–799261,4954,2457109431,607
A breakdown of the figures in columns (4) to (6) of the table by organisations and titles of the projects funded could be provided only at disproportionate cost. A joint report on research by the Department of Employment and the Manpower Services Commission and a similar report by the Health and Safety Executive are, however, published annually by HMSO. The last reports available at present are for 1977–78 and 1977 respectively.

Disruptive Dismissals

asked the Secretary of State for Employment what is the annual rate of referrals to industrial tribunals in the case of disruptive dismissals; and what is the percentage of reinstatements and financial compensation awards.

Information is not available on the proportion of dismissals which cause industrial disruption and are subsequently referred to an industrial tribunal. In 1978, of those cases which result in a decision of unfair dismissal by industrial tribunals, 3 per cent. resulted in reinstatement and 97 per cent. resulted in financial compensation.

Political Levy

asked the Secretary of State for Employment if he is satisfied with the arrangements for opting out of the political levy.

was made available and the titles of the projects funded.

The following table gives the overall gross expenditure on research and development and how much of the total was spent on external research and development in the financial years 1974–75 to 1978–79:to opt out, and the independent certification officer is empowered under the Act to hear complaints that this right has been infringed. The certification officer's annual reports and his decisions on recent complaints do not indicate the need for immediate action on the part of the Government. The Government have no plans to amend the Act, but will, of course, consider any representations made to them on the subject.

Baking Industry

asked the Secretary of State for Employment whether he will direct the Wages Inspectorate to prosecute all those companies currently in breach of the Baking Industry (Hours of Work) Act 1954; and if he will make a statement.

So long as the Act is on the statute book, the Wages Inspectorate will take such enforcement action as is necessary.

Wages Inspectorate (Dundee)

asked the Secretary of State for Employment when the Wages Inspectorate last visited Dundee; and in how many instances it discovered earnings guaranteed by wages councils not being paid in full.

During the month of October, infractions of wages orders involving 10 workers were identified by the inspectorate at six establishments in Dundee.

Factory Inspectors (Dundee)

asked the Secretary of State for Employment how many workplaces in Dundee and Tayside have been inspected by factory inspectors in each year since 1976; what percentage of the total number of factories in both areas this represents; and how many violations of the Factories Act were discovered.

I am advised by the chairman of the Health and Safety Commission that this information is not available without making special counts from a large number of documents. Following reorganisation of the Factory Inspectorate in 1976, Dundee and Tayside have been inspected as part of the Scotland East area, and local figures of this kind are no longer kept. The Health and Safety Executive's computer project will make information about the number of workplaces and the number of visits paid by factory inspectors in each local authority available in due course. Details are not kept of the numbers of violations discovered by HM factory inspectorate.

asked the Secretary of State for Employment how many factory inspectors are employed by the Health and Safety Commission in Dundee and Tayside.

Four inspectors are permanently stationed in Dundee. Some of their work is outside Tayside region, but inspectors from other groups in Scotland and East area inspect workplaces in particular industries in Dundee and Tayside.

Clegg Commission

asked the Secretary of State for Employment what is the total cost to public funds of the Clegg Commission; and whether he has any proposals for its abolition.

The direct cost of the Standing Commission on Pay Comparability up to 31 October, including salaries and expenses of members, totalled £16,303. The costs of servicing the Commission fall on the Office of Manpower Economics, which provides similar services to other bodies. It is difficult to attribute these costs accurately between the Commission and other bodies, particularly as the work load for each body is not constant throughout the year. The indirect costs clearly attributable to the Commission are estimated at £300,000 to date. I have no proposals for abolition of the Commission, whose work the Government continues to keep under review.

Codes Of Practice

asked the Secretary of State for Employment what new codes of practice he expects to be published by the Advisory, Conciliation and Arbitration Service during 1980.

I am advised that ACAS has no current plans for publishing further codes of practice.

Advisory, Conciliation And Arbitration Service

asked the Secretary of State for Employment if he has had any discussions with members of the Advisory, Conciliation and Arbitration Service about their future role.

Redundancies

asked the Secretary of State for Employment if he will update the redundancy statistics for Great Britain as a whole and Scotland in particular which he gave in a written answer on 29 October, Official Report, c. 403, to the hon. Member for Glasgow, Maryhill, up to the latest available date.

With reference to my earlier answer, the number of proposed redundancies which have been notified to my Department in the period May-October 1979 is as follows:

Great BritainScotland
258,67141,071
(4,158 Establishments)(512 Establishments)
During the same period the total number of proposed redundancies which have been formally withdrawn is as follows:
Great BritainScotland
60,5389,155
(754 Establishments)(99 Establishments)
The provisions do not apply to Northern Ireland.

Job Creation

asked the Secretary of State for Employment what will be the reduction in the number of places on the youth opportunities programme and the special temporary employment programme as a result of the reduction in the Manpower Services Commission budget.

Disabled Persons

asked the Secretary of State for Employment how many applications have been made by employers for grants towards the cost of adaptations to their premises or equipment to enable disabled people to obtain or retain employment since October 1978.

Employers' National Insurance

asked the Secretary of State for Employment (1) if the reduction in the employment protection element of employers' national insurance contribution is to be a substitute for an increase of redundancy rebates or if he intends to introduce an order to increase rebates during the current Session of Parliament;(2) how the reduction in the employment protection element of employers' national insurance contributions is to be apportioned between the redundancy fund and the maternity pay fund; and what is the current surplus or deficit in the maternity pay fund;(3) if, in view of his declared intention to reduce the employment protection element of employers' national insurance contributions, he will now revise the forecasts of the levels of surplus in the redundancy fund given in his written reply of Monday 5 November.

Pneumoconiosis

asked the Secretary of State for Employment when he will lay before the House regulations under the Pneumoconiosis etc. (Workers' Compensation) Act 1979.

asked the Secretary of State for Employment how many pay- ments have so far been made in respect of claims under the Pneumoconiosis etc. (Workers' Compensation) Act 1979; how many claims have so far been received; and when is it expected that these will be paid.

I will reply to the right hon. and learned Gentleman as soon as possible.

School Leavers (Bassetlaw)

asked the Secretary of State for Employment how many school leavers have registered as unemployed in the Bassetlaw constituency in the last 12 months; how many of these have accepted training or work experience courses; and how many are still unemployed.

Equal Opportunities Commission

asked the Secretary of State for Employment how many cases in the 12 months ended 30 September have been brought into industrial tribunals on the recommendation of the Equal Opportunities Commission; and in what percentage of those cases judgment was given against the employer.

[pursuant to his reply, 30 November 1979, c. 809]: Any person who feels that he has been discriminated against can take a case to an industrial tribunal without reference to the Equal Opportunities Commission, though that body may give advice or assistance. In the period 1 January 1978 to 31 December 1978, the last period for which published figures are available, 67 cases under the Sex Discrimination Act 1975 and 80 cases under the Equal Pay Act 1970 were heard by tribunals. The tribunals found in favour of the applicant in 14 and 24 cases respectively. I do no know in how many the Equal Opportunities Commission had been concerned. I am asking the chairman of the Commission to write to my hon. Friend.

Construction Industry (Safety)

asked the Secretary of State for Employment what further steps he is taking to reduce the number of workers killed and injured in the construction industry.

[pursuant to his reply, 26 November 1979, c. 362]: I will continue to encourage and support the Health and Safety Commission and Executive in their work with the industry to reduce risks to the work force.I am informed by the chairman of the Commission that the Commission has very recently approved a further programme of work for its construction industry advisory committee, which will include projects relating to safety training, health and safety services for small firms, and protective clothing. In addition this committee will follow up recently published reports on safety in demolition and steel erection and a recently published discussion document on the wearing of safety helmets.The Commission and Executive will also continue to be engaged in a wide range of other relevant policy work, including the negotiation of EEC directives, the development of British and international standards, and the preparation of guidance publications, films and other training aids.Her Majesty's Factory Inspectorate will continue to develop and carry out a planned programme concentrated on selected matters of particular concern, with the general aim of promoting self-regulation in the industry.

asked the Secretary of State for Employment what recommendations he has made to employers about the number of workers killed and injured in the construction industry.

[pursuant to his reply, 26 November 1979, c. 362]: Responsibility for making such recommendations is exercised by the Health and Safety Commission and Executive. Information, including recommendations, on safety in construction work produced by the Commission and the Executive over the last six months includes:

  • 1. "Safety in Demolition Work—Report of the sub-committee of the Joint Advisory Committee on Safety and Health in the Construction Industries" (published 23 May).
  • 2. "Construction—Health and Safety 1977–78" (published 12 June).
  • 3. "Fatal Accidents in Construction 1977" (published 12 June).
  • 4. "Safety in Steel Erection—Report of a sub-committee of the Joint Advisory Committee on Safety and Health in the Construction Industries" (published in June).
  • 5. "Safety helmets on construction sites—Recommendations of the Construction Industry Advisory Committee on their provision and use" (published 23 October).
  • Further publications of this kind are in preparation.

    Trade

    Cotton Thread

    asked the Secretary of State for Trade if he will set out the quantities of cotton thread imported into the United Kingdom from Turkey for each of the previous five years.

    The information for cotton yarn and thread is as follows:

    Tonnes
    197419751976
    3,3662,4853,240
    Tonnes
    19771978January-September 1979
    2,2315,7874,663
    Source: United Kingdom Overseas Trade Statistics (SITC (Rev. 2) Sub-Group 651.3 and SITC (Rev. 1) Sub-Group 651.3 and 651.4).

    Dual Pricing

    asked the Secretary of State for Trade what evidence is available to demonstrate the abuse of dual pricing.

    I understand that the hon. Member is referring to comparisons of selling prices with recommended retail prices. As a study of the newspapers will show, there is ample evidence of abuse in relation to electrically powered and similar domestic appliances, consumer electronic goods, carpets and furniture. I have therefore decided to ban such comparisons in these sectors from 10 December.

    Chemicals And Man-Made Fibre Products

    asked the Secretary of State for Trade whether he will circulate a table in the Official Report showing the value and volume of (a) chemicals and (b) man-made fibre products imported from and exported to the Six original EEC members and other

    TRADE IN CHEMICALS AND RELATED PRODUCTS
    £million
    Imports (c.i.f.)Exports (f.o.b.)
    EEC (6)Rest of WorldEEC (6)Rest of World
    SITC (R)SITC (R)
    1970219324161623
    1971235334185699
    1972283369220742
    1973418479323950
    19748507286511,491
    19757077046051,573
    19761,1068949112,134
    19771,4401,0221,1572,706
    SITC (Rev 2)SITC(Rev 2)
    19771,4039581,1422,675
    19781,6741,0851,3782,823
    January-October 19791,8421,0081,5252,502
    Source: United Kingdom Overseas Trade Statistics (SITC Section 5).
    Notes:
    (a) From January 1978 the United Kingdom has adopted the second revision of the Standard International Trade Classification. Figures for earlier years were compiled under the previous classification (SITC (R)). For purposes of comparison, figures for 1977 have been provided on both bases.
    (b) Similar information on the value or volume of trade in man-made fibre products and the volume of trade in chemicals could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

    Safety At Sea

    asked the Secretary of State for Trade how many British seamen have suffered fatal accidents in the course of their employment for each of the years since 1972; and how many British seamen there were for each of those years.

    The information in respect of seamen on United Kingdom registered ships is as follows:

    YearDeaths on-boardDeaths ashore abroad
    19737131
    19745929
    19757727
    19765814
    1977523
    1978846
    The above figures include all deaths other than those due to disease, homicide and suicide, and those dealt with by a coroner or procurator fiscal within the United Kingdom.There are no accurate figures for the number of seamen employed on United Kingdom registered ships, but about 100,000 seamen are estimated to have served on such vessels in each of the above years.

    asked the Secretary of State for Trade how many seamen have countries, respectively, in each of the years 1970 to 1978 and 1979 to date.

    The available information is as follows:died while in access to or from British merchant navy vessels for each of the years since 1975; and what this represents as a proportion of 10,000 seamen.

    The following are the latest available figures of seamen who have been killed or drowned coming aboard from ashore:

    YearTotal deathsDeaths per 10,000 seamen (estimated)
    197630·5
    197770·7
    1978101·0
    The number of deaths while in transit from ship to shore have never been shown to be significant, have not therefore been separately recorded, and could be extracted only at prohibitive cost.

    Bank Charges

    asked the Secretary of State for Trade whether, if a clearing bank charges 20 per cent. on overdrafts and debits its customer twice a year with interest charges, the total annual charge on an initial borrowing of £100 shown at the year end should be £20 or £21.

    The banks' charging arrangements are a matter for the banks. However, on the assumptions that the interest charges are capitalised at half-yearly intervals and that the customer does not increase the initial borrowing of £100 but repays it in full after one year, the total annual charge could vary between £21 and £21·28 according to when in the charging period the borrowing was made.

    Airports Policy

    asked the Secretary of State for Trade (1) whether the Study Group on South-East Airports has calculated that 2,000 hectares of agricultural land will be required for the site of a third London airport at the five inland locations reviewed.(2) whether the Study Group on South-East Airports has recommended the closure of Luton airport if Hoggeston, Langley or Stansted is chosen as the site of London's third airport;(3) where, other than at Luton airport, the Advisory Committee on Airports Policy estimates that passenger traffic will fall short of the figures envisaged in the 1978 White Paper;(4) why the passenger capacity of Luton airport, which was estimated to have an upper limit of five million a year in the 1978 White Paper, has been reduced to three million in the report of the Advisory Committee on Airports Policy;(5) what estimate the Study Group on South-East Airports has made of the cost of constructing an airport to handle 25 million passengers a year at Stanstead; and what estimate it has made of the amount that would have to be spent to expand its handling capacity from this level to 50 million passengers a year;(6) what assessment the Study Group on South-East Airports has made about the need for a four kilometer road link between Stansted and the M11 south of Bishops Stortford before passenger capacity reaches 25 million a year;(7) what road improvements the Study Group on South-East Airports considers to be necessary at Stansted within its £35 million estimated expenditure before passenger capacity reaches 25 million a year; and what further improvements the study group envisages to account for the £20 million to be spent on roads as passenger traffic rises from 25 million to 50 million passengers a year in the event of this being the site chose for London's third airport;

    (8) what is the estimate made by he Study Group on South-East Airports at the cost of a rail link between Stansted and the London to Cambridge line on the basis of an airport handling 25 million passengers a year; and how much will need to be spent on this rail link if passenger capacity rises to 50 million a year;

    (9) what estimate the Study Group on South-East Airports has made of the cost of constructing an airport handling 25 million passengers a year at Stansted; if the study group has calculated the cost of expansion from this level to a capacity of 50 million passengers a year; and, if so, what the figure was;

    (10) what estimate the Study Group on South-East Airports has made of the number of people likely to suffer from noise nuisance if Stansted is chosen as the site of London's third airport by the time its passenger handling capacity reaches 25 million a year; and what estimate it has made of the number affected by the growth of its capacity to 50 million passengers a year;

    (11) what estimate the Study Group on South-East Airports has made, in the event of Stansted being chosen as the site of London's third airport, of the number of dwellings covering what area of land that would need to be built by the time the airport handled 25 million passengers a year; and what estimates it has made on a similar basis if its passenger capacity rose to 50 million people a year;

    (12) what estimate the Study Group on South-East Airports has made of the numbers of dwellings and the numbers of caravans that would need to be destroyed; and the number of people who would be displaced if a decision to site London's third airport at Stansted should be taken; and if he accepts these estimates;

    (13) what were the reasons why the Study Group on South-East Airports concluded that four years will be required for planning purposes and a further four years from the start of construction to opening if a decision should be taken to site London's third airport at Stansted; and if he accepts this estimate;

    (14) if he will give the reasons why the Study Group on South-East Airports concluded that the lead time for opening London's third airport at Stansted would be seven years; and how many passengers a year the study group estimated could be handled per year in 10 years' time.

    The information sought by my hon. Friend is contained in the reports of the Advisory Committee on Airports Policy and the Study Group on South-East Airports, which will be published shortly. Copies will be placed in the Library of the House as soon as they are available.

    asked the Secretary of State for Trade whether the Government intend to take a formal decision on the site of the third London airport without further consultation with interested parties.

    UNITED KINGDOM CRUDE BALANCE OF TRADE*
    £ million OTS basis
    FranceFederal Republic of GermanyNether—landBelgium and Luxem—bourgItalyJapanUSAEEC(8)
    1970—28—47—79+95—6+14—242—80
    1971—53—115—102+116—33—44—26—264
    1972—97—251—160+81—71—142+26—588
    1973—301—561—307+159—125—172—112—1,185
    1974—425—877—648+107—215—252—475—2,184
    1975—457—704—755—26—243—363—532—2,366
    1976—374—920—934+108—277—436—622—2,221
    1977—528—1,082—346+158—557—594—600—2,019
    1978—682—1,408—269+371—811—741—746—2,481
    *Exports (fob) less imports (cif)

    Gatwick Airport

    asked the Secretary of State for Trade if Her Majesty's Government are a party to the agreement entered into between the local authority concerned, and the British Airports Authority, concerning a second runway at Gatwick; and what is the nature of the agreement.

    The main effect of the agreement is that the British Airports Authority has undertaken not to build a second main runway at Gatwick airport within the next 40 years and that West Sussex county council has granted planning permission for an emergency runway which is to be used only when the main one is not operational. The Government are not a party to the agreement.

    asked the Secretary of State for Trade what would be the current cost of building a second runway at Gatwick airport.

    The Government will take account of the views expressed by interested parties in reaching their conclusions. Any proposal for airport development will be subject to statutory procedures before a formal decision is taken.

    Balance Of Trade

    asked the Secretary of State for Trade if he will list the balance of trade, whether adverse or favourable, for the years 1970 to 1978 inclusive for the following countries: France, Germany, Holland, Belgium, Italy, Japan, the United States of America and for the EEC as a whole.

    The information is as follows:required and the construction of the runway itself would probably cost more than £100 million at current prices.

    Steel (Imports And Exports)

    asked the Secretary of State for Trade what has been the annual tonnage of steel imports from other countries in the EEC since 1970; and what have been the average exports to those countries.

    Clothing Imports (Labelling)

    asked the Secretary of State for Trade whether he will introduce legislation requiring the accurate labelling of country or countries of origin and manufacture for all garments sold in the United Kingdom.

    Imported goods sold here under a United Kingdom name or mark, or anything likely to be taken for such name or mark, are already required by the Trade Descriptions Act 1972 to be accompanied by a conspicuous indication of the country in which they have been manufactured or produced. Unbranded goods are not presently required to be origin marked. However, as I announced on 25 July 1979–[Vol. 971, c. 273–4]—I am undertaking a review of policy in this area. I will be making a statement to the House as soon as possible after I have considered the results of two independent surveys carried out for me by the National Consumer Council and the National Union of Townswomen's Guilds to identify the consumer interest in the origin of goods.

    New Zealand Lamb

    asked the Secretary of State for Trade if he will list the monthly imports of New Zealand lamb into the United Kingdom for each of the last 12 months.

    Aviation Security Levy

    asked the Secretary of State for Trade if he will announce the rate of aviation security levy for 1980.

    The levy rate will be increased to £1·60 from 1 February 1980. Draft amendment regulations will be laid before Parliament shortly. A small deficit was carried forward from the financial year 1978–79, when the levy was 80p. A far larger deficit is building up during the current financial year, for which the levy rate of 85p was announced on 14 December 1978, mainly because of a substantial increase in unit labour costs arising from the last round of pay settlements. The levy has to be increased before the end of the financial year to prevent the fund's borrowing facilities being exhausted. 1978–79 costs would have been covered by a levy rate of 83p. It is now estimated that the 1979–80 levy should have been set at £1·16 to meet the costs incurred during the full financial year. It is estimated that costs in the financial year 1980–81 would be covered by a levy rate of £1·34. The increase to £1·60 from 1 February 1980 is therefore largely necessary to recover the current year's shortfall in the levy rate of 31p.

    Wales

    Interest Rates

    17.

    asked the Secretary of State for Wales what estimate he has made of the impact of current interest rates on business in Wales.

    While high interest rate are unwelcome to business, they are an essential means at this stage of controlling the money supply and reducing inflation, which in the end will benefit business and the country as a whole.

    School Meals

    asked the Secretary of State for Wales how many representations he has received concerning the decision to cut expenditure on school meals; what reply he has sent; and if he will make a statement.

    Nine letters. In reply, I have explained our view that the necessary expenditure savings should, as far as possible, be secured in areas not directly related to teaching in the classroom.

    Valuation Disputes

    asked the Secretary of State for Wales if, in view of the concern to many leaseholders in Wales, he will include in the forthcoming Housing Bill proposals for simplifying the procedures for settling the valuation of freeholds under the Leasehold Reform Act 1967.

    Yes. My right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for the Environment and I are proposing measures by which valuation disputes may be referred in the first instance to local leasehold valuation tribunals whose members will be drawn from existing rent assessment panels.Where a leaseholder serves a notice claiming his freehold and the landlord does not propose a price within two months or the price is in dispute, either party would be able to ask the leasehold valuation tribunal to decide the price.This should produce speedy decisions and there would be no provision for one party to bear the other's costs. There will be a subsequent right of appeal to the Lands Tribunal.

    School Building

    asked the Secretary of State for Wales if he will publish detail of expenditure or recast expenditure by

    £ million
    1974–751975–761976–771977–781978–79
    Clwyd8·05·03·82·62·6
    Dyfed3·43·22·11·81·6
    Gwent6·66·75·63·62·7
    Gwynedd2·31·81·81·91·1
    Mid-Glamorgan5·25·86·75·57·1
    Powys0·71·00·61·01·1
    South Glamorgan3·13·32·21·31·4
    West Glamorgan3·43·83·61·51·5

    Education And Science

    Fifth-Year Pupils (Release)

    asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science what is the estimate of the likely loss of pupils in fifth year classes which leads him to believe that their release to follow apprenticeships or permanent employment would be sufficient to cause the disruption of teaching referred to in his answer to the hon. Member for Rugby on 9 November.

    As the present law does not allow early leaving there is no practical experience on which estimates of numbers could be based. The volume of inquiries regularly received in the Department involving requests that pupils be allowed to leave school early to take up employment including apprenticeships gives the Government reason to believe that substantial numbers would take advantage of such a concession.

    Teachers

    asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science if he will publish his Department's survey of secondary school teachers undertaken in 1977.

    My Department intends to publish the major results of the survey next year.

    University Teachers (Pay)

    asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science what representations he has received from the hon. Member for Uxbridge as to when each education authority in Wales for education building projects in each of the last five years at November 1979 prices.

    The information, at November 1978 prices, the latest available common price base, is as follows:he intends to make an offer to the Association of University Teachers and the University Authorities Panel in relation to the pay settlement which was due on 1 October; and if he will make a statement.

    A letter has been received from my hon. Friend on this subject and I have today written in reply to him. Negotiations are being resumed this afternoon and I shall make a further statement as soon as agreement has been reached.

    Burnham Committee

    asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science whether he will take steps to admit the Professional Association of Teachers to the Burnham committee.

    Representations by the Professional Association of Teachers for admission to the Burnham primary and secondary committee will be considered during the forthcoming review referred to in my reply to a question on 7 November from my hon. Friend the Member for Burton (Mr. Lawrence).

    Youth, Community And Adult Services

    asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science if he is satisfied that reductions in the youth, community and adult education services will not be especially damaging in rural areas, such as Teesdale.

    It is for the local education authorities, in rural as in other areas, to determine how and to what extent they should support these important services. They can best judge local needs and circumstances, and they must decide where savings in educational expenditure should fall.

    University Teachers (Pay)

    asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science what settlements in pay have been effected for university staff over the past 10 years; if

    196919701971197219731974
    Lecturer:
    Minimum1,3551,4911,6411,7641,9292,264
    Maximum3,1053,4173,7054,1434,5485,042
    Senior Lecturer:
    MinimumVariedVaried3,8524,1434,3684,853
    Maximum4,0004,4014,7345,2475,4966,122
    Professor:
    Permitted Average5,1005,6106,0036,5286,7777,403
    19751976197719781979 interim
    Lecturer:
    Minimum3,1743,3333,6604,2324,333
    Maximum6,4466,6557,3088,4528,992
    Senior Lecturer:
    Minimum6,2346,4437,0748,1828,698
    Maximum7,7427,9518,73010,09710,775
    Professor:
    Permitted Average9,2809,48610,41912,05012,862

    School Services

    asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science what are the current subsidies for (a) school meals, (b) school transport and (c) school milk in the Wolverhampton education area.

    The net cost to public funds of these services in 1978–79 was £1·7 million, £0·2 million and £0·1 million respectively.

    Northern Ireland

    Benefits

    asked the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland if he is satified with the co-ordination between the Supplementary Benefits Commission and the Department of Finance, Northern Ireland, in respect of affording information and assistance to those who may not qualify for both supplementary benefit and rate rebate and who wish to obtain the higher amount of benefit.

    Yes. But I am aware of the complexities of dealing with such cases, and improvements to the existing arrangements are being examined.

    he will list the settlement for each respective grade; and if he will relate it to Scotland.

    I set out below details of the salaries for non-clinical university academic staff over the past 10 years. These salaries apply to Scottish universities as well as those in England and Wales.

    Exclusion Orders

    asked the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland how many exclusion orders he has revoked following the three-year reviews under the Prevention of Terrorism Act.

    Scotland

    Building Industry (Manpower)

    asked the Secretary of State for Scotland what estimate he has made of the effect of a 17 per cent. minimum lending rate on the ability of the building construction industry to maintain its current level of manpower and to meet the demands placed upon it in the coming year.

    The present level of the minimum lending rate is necessary to bring inflation under control. Output and employment would suffer more in the longer term if this objective were not achieved.

    Regional Health Boards

    asked the Secretary of State for Scotland whether he will issue a directive to health boards that they should enable local health council secretaries to represent complainers at hearings until the new amending regulations come into force.

    asked the Secretary of State for Scotland what control and monitoring there is of regional health boards' spending in Scotland.

    Apart from expenditure financed out of trust funds, health boards may incur expenditure only within the limits of the allocations made by my right hon. Friend. Day-to-day management and control of expenditure is a matter for the boards within the general framework of Government policy. Monitoring returns are submitted to my Department each month.

    Local Health Councils

    asked the Secretary of State for Scotland what representations he has received from the Association of Scottish Local Health Councils in 1978–79 regarding review of the procedures and functions of local health councils.

    asked the Secretary of State for Scotland whether he will issue a direction to allow representatives of local health councils to be in attendance during visits of the Scottish Hospital Advisory Service to hospitals in their area.

    No. The Scottish Hospital Advisory Service already makes itself available for discussion with representatives of the local health councils when visiting hospitals.

    Elastic Support Hose

    asked the Secretary of State for Scotland what representations have been made to him for elastic support hose to be prescribed under the drug tariff regulations; and if he will make a statement.

    I have received one letter on the subject.A range of surgical elastic hosiery giving the medically required degree of support for the treatment of most varicose conditions is already prescribable by general practitioners, and any other type of support garment required on clinical grounds may be supplied through the hospital service.Support hosiery of the kind generally sold over the counter to the public is not prescribable. Any change in the arrangements would be likely to result in additional expenditure for the Health Service without clinical justification.

    Surgery Premises

    asked the Secretary of State for Scotland what representations have been made to him regarding the need to upgrade National Health Service premises to provide confidentiality during consultations; and if he will provide loans or grants to general practitioners for this purpose.

    I have not received any representations on this subject, but if the hon. Member has a particular case in mind I have no doubt the appropriate health board will be happy to look into it. Grants are available for certain improvements to surgery premises and the General Practice Finance Corporation has power to make loans to provide new or improved premises.

    Spectacle Frames

    asked the Secretary of State for Scotland if he will take steps to ensure that opticians stock the full range of National Health Service frames.

    Discussions are in progress with the bodies representing opticians on the question of introducing a specific obligation to display the various types of NHS frames.

    asked the Secretary of State for Scotland what representations he has received about the need to modernise the existing range of National Health Service spectacle frames.

    None; but I have noted and share the view of the Royal Commission on the NHS that

    "it would be difficult to show that the existing range of NHS frames was unsatisfactory so far as patients' vision was concerned; and fashions in spectacle frames may change. A larger range of frames is likely to mean greater cost and should not be given much priority."

    Research

    asked the Secretary of State for Scotland if he will publish a table showing all moneys expended by his Department in each year since 1974 on research, showing in each year the organisations to which funding was made available and the titles of the projects funded.

    Information on expenditure by Government Departments on research is published in table 7 of an annual Command Paper, the most recent being Cmnd. 7524 "Supply Estimates 1979 to 1980: Memorandum by the Chief Secretary to the Treasury".Titles of published projects are to be found in Her Majesty's Stationery Office booklet "Government research and development—A guide to sources of information".

    Pay Beds

    asked the Secretary of State for Scotland how much income has been derived from pay beds within the National Health Service in Scotland in each of the past three years.

    The information is set out in the table below:

    1976–77£481,000
    1977–78£482,000
    1978–79£455,000

    School Meals

    asked the Secretary of State for Scotland if he will set up a special unit to monitor the nutritional levels of schoolchildren in regions where the school meals service will be reduced.

    The committee on the medical aspects of food policy already has a sub-committee on nutritional surveillance, which has initiated a number of surveys to study the nutrition of schoolchildren. These surveys are continuing and the committee will be asked to consider whether the present programme should be extended to monitor the possible effects of any change in the pattern of provision of school meals by education authorities.

    Geeratric Beds

    asked the Secretary of State for Scotland how many geriatric beds are available in each health board area; and what is the waiting list in each area.

    The information is set out in the table below:

    Health boardGeriatric beds* at 31 March 1979Number on waiting list at 31 March 1979
    Argyll and Clyde995155
    Ayrshire and Arran628
    Borders22980
    Dumfries and Galloway28227
    Fife498190
    Forth Valley552194
    Grampain82439
    Greater Glasgow2,325269
    Highland40675
    Lanarkshire1,164217
    Lothian1,448251
    Orkney5143
    Shetland87
    Tayside902105
    Western Isles9214
    10,4831,659
    * Bed complement figures in NHS hospitals, joint user hospitals and institutions with which health boards have contractual arrangements.

    Houses (Municipalisation)

    asked the Secretary of State for Scotland what was the amount spent on municipalisation housing measures in Scotland in each year since 1975.

    The amounts spent by local authorities in recent years on the acquisition of houses from the private sector for improvement are estimated to have been:

    1976–77£0·984 million
    1977–78£1·806 million
    1978–79£2·368 million
    No figures are available for 1975–76.

    Toxic Waste Disposal (Dundee And Tayside)