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European Community (Gas And Electricity Prices)

Volume 975: debated on Friday 7 December 1979

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asked the Secretary of State for Energy what is the price charged for natural gas to domestic consumers in pence per therm, including value added tax, in each of the countries in the European Economic Community.

The price of natural gas to domestic consumers varies from region to region in most EEC countries and within regions tariffs vary according to consumption. The latest figures available are based on tariffs in force on 1 January 1978. The domestic tariffs below are for a selected city in each EEC country and for two levels of consumption, 80 and 1,200 therms per annum. VAT is included where appropriate.

Pence/therm*
CityAnnual consumption 80 therms/An 1,200 therms/An
Dusseldorf77·333·5
Paris57·125·9
Rome32·028·6
Rotterdam33·017·9
Copenhagen†68·643·1
Brussels64·927·1
Luxembourg64·922·1
London32·8‡17·3
Dublin†46·134·4
Source: Eurostat Publication—Gas Prices 1976–78.
*National currencies have been converted al the exchange rates current on 1 January 1978
†Prices for town gas only available.
‡Based solely upon the domestic credit tariff

asked the Secretary of State for Energy (1) what is the price charged for electricity to domestic consumers in pence per unit in each of the countries of the European Economic Community;(2) what is the price of electricity to industrial and domestic consumers, respectively, per comparable unit of account in each of the EEC member countries.

The latest figures available for electricity prices for each of the EEC countries are those obtained in a comparative study prepared by the Electricity Council. The study was based on tariffs in force at the beginning of August 1978. Domestic prices include VAT where appropriate. Industrial prices exclude VAT which is recoverable. Price ranges show the likely maximum and minimum over a number of undertakings.Differing national consumption patterns, wide variations in prices that can occur within countries and fluctuating exchange rates all contribute to the difficulty of comparing prices internationally. Comparisons are especially difficult in times of rapidly rising prices.

Pence per kWh.

Domestic tariffs

Industrial tariffs with maximum demand of 500 kW

Unrestricted

Day/Night

0·95 power factor plus annual load factors:

3,300 kWh

7,500 kWh

12,000 kWh

*

20 per cent.

40 per cent.

60 per cent.

80 per cent.

Germany†4·52–5·413·53–4·192·89–3·334·14–5·593·35–3·882·74–3·302·34–3·05
France4·11–4·463·82–4·142·72–2·952·74–2·882·23–2·32l·94–2·021·72–1·78
Italy4·244·122·832·462·282·15
Netherlands†3·69–5·083·41–4·872·68–3·342·49–3·652·05–2·96l·81–2·591·72–2·47
Belgium5·945·513·334·033·272·952·82
Luxembourg3·693·312·313·442·532·071·90
United Kingdom2·74–3·662·54–3·361·59–2·202·45–2·982·10–2·411·86–2·161· 72–2·04
Ireland2·81–3· 052·67–2·771·78–1·842·822·201·931·84
Denmark†3·28–3·822·97–3·682·52‡1·97–3·191·83–2·671·75–2·501·70–2·40

* 3,000 kWh at day rates; 9,000 kWh at night rates.

†Figures for Germany, Netherlands and Denmark arc from a sample of undertakings in those countries.
‡For one undertaking only.

Source: Handbook of Electricity Supply Statistics 1979.

National currencies have been converted at the exchange rate current on 1 August 1978