Skip to main content

Pay Beds

Volume 975: debated on Monday 10 December 1979

The text on this page has been created from Hansard archive content, it may contain typographical errors.

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services what would be the cost to the National Health Service of abolishing the remaining private pay beds.

If the remaining pay beds were abolished, the NHS would lose the income from charges, estimated at about £31 million (England only) in the current financial year. The net loss would depend on how the NHS used any staff resources and facilities thereby available for non-paying patients.

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services what is his Department's estimate of the loss of revenue to the National Health Service as a result of the phasing out of pay beds from the National Health Service in each of the following financial years 1976–77, 1977–78 and 1978–79.

Expressed at 1979–80 levels, pay bed income in England has declined as follows:

Income £ million
1975–7638·0
1976–7736·8
1977–7835·4
1978–7932·8
1979–80 (forecast)31·0
It is not possible to say what effect the phasing out of pay beds had. Over the period 1975–79, the number of pay beds fell from 4,150 to 2,189 but the number of private in-patients treated each year fell only from 96,288 to 92,242.