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Written Answers

Volume 976: debated on Friday 21 December 1979

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Written Answers To Questions

Friday 21 December 1979

Defence

Service Aircraft And Helicopters (Accidents)

asked the Secretary of State for Defence whether in future he will publish summaries of the causes of accidents involving Services aircraft; and how many (a) Royal Navy, (b) Army and (c) Royal Air Force (i) helicopters and (ii) aircraft have been lost in each of the last five years and in 1979 to date.

It is my intention to make a statement in the House at the earliest opportunity regarding the publication of information about the causes of military flying accidents.The number of Service aircraft lost, that is missing or damaged beyond repair, over the period stated, and broken down between helicopters and fixed wing types, is as follows:

HELICOPTERS
YearRoyal NavyArmyRoyal Air Force
1974631
1975680
1976531
1977530
1978262
1978 to date141
FIXED WING AIRCRAFT
YearRoyal NavyArmyRoyal Air Force
19742011
19750016
19761024
19771114
19782118
1979 to date0124
Figures for recent years may differ from statistics previously published as the categorisation of damage is subject to change after detailed inspection.

Firing Range (Shoeburyness And Maplin)

asked the Secretary of state for depence whether there has been an increase in the testing of ammunition on the shoeburyness and Maplin firing range; and whether this increased activity is likely to continue or be reduced at an early date.

Testing of ammunition at the establishment increased in 1979 compared with 1978, but the total amount of testing required varies from year to year and has been appreciably higher on occasions in the past. The present level of activity is likely to continue.

Royal Air Force (Aircraft Accidents)

asked the Secretary of State for Defence how many lives have been lost, both civilian and military, from accidents involving RAF aircraft in training manoeuvres in the period 1945 to the present.

RAF aircraft accident statistics, which are available only from 1946, do not discriminate between crashes which occurred on training flights and those on operational missions. The information readily available on the number of lives lost as a result of these accidents is as follows:

CivilianMilitaryTotal
1946–63**3,684
196413435
196506969
196613233
196706161
196804040
196902121
197002323
197127375
197212324
197322123
1974156
197511516
197602222
19773710
197802424
1979 to date3811
4,177
* Breakdown between civilian and military not available.

asked the Secretary of State for Defence how many RAF aircraft have been lost during training manoeuvres during the period from 1945 until the present date; and what has been the cost of these losses.

RAF aircraft accident statistics, which are available only from 1946, do not discriminate between crashes which occurred on training flights and those on operational missions. The number of aircraft damaged beyond repair or missing was as follows:

1946–634,720(average 262 per year)
196457(average 31 per year)
196535
196652
196747
196842
196926
197029
197138
197227
197325
197412
197516
197625
197714
197820
1979 (to date)25
Information on the cost of all these losses is not readily available and could not be obtained without disproportionate effort.

Foreign And Commonwealth Affairs

El Salvador (Ambassador)

asked the Lord Privy Seal if an ambassador will now be appointed to El Salvador following the Salvadorean change of policy on Belize.

There has been no discernible change in Salvadorean policy towards Belize. The question of appointing a new British ambassador to El Salvador is still under consideration.

Guyana

asked the Lord Privy Seal what action he proposes to take to protect British citizens in Guyana in view of the civil disorder in that country.

There have been cases recently of crowds getting out of hand in Guyana: for example, at a petrol station waiting for cooking gas, and in lengthy food queues. Our High Commission in Georgetown does not yet consider that there is increased risk to British citizens. The High Commission is ready to offer normal assistance and protection to the British community who would of course be advised if precautions were considered necessary.

asked the Lord Privy Seal how many British citizens were in- jured in the incident which occurred in Georgetown, Guyana on 4 December involving the security forces and the civilian population.

No British citizens are reported to have been injured during the 4 December incident, which was stated in the press to have been a mock exercise by the security forces.

Gibraltar

asked the Lord Privy Seal when it is proposed to commence positive dialogue with the Spanish Government on the Gibraltar question; and if he will make a statement.

When they met in New York in September my right hon. and noble Friend and the Spanish Foreign Minister agreed to continue discussion of ways of resolving the present differences over Gibraltar. Regular contact continues with the Spanish Government through diplomatic channels. My right hon. and noble Friend looks forward to a further meeting in due course with Sr Oreja.

asked the Lord Privy Seal if he will make representations to the Spanish Government for the establishment of a walk-through gate at the border between Gibraltar and Spain during the period of Christmastide in the interests of the people of Gibraltar who have many relations across the border at La Linea.

The Spanish Government are well aware of the British view that normal communication should be restored between Spain and Gibraltar.

Rhodesia

asked the Lord Privy Seal what limitations the Governor will place on election expenditure in Rhodesia; and what accounting procedure will be employed to identify the source of funds by parties contesting the election.

It is not likely to be practicable to control funds to individual parties. The Election Commissioner is considering a requirement for the political parties to disclose their election expenses.

asked the Lord Privy Seal what help will be given to assist the return and rehabilitation of civilian refugees from Southern Rhodesia in neighbouring territories.

We are in touch with the major international organisations with a view to initiating a programme for the return and rehabilitation of Rhodesian refugees as soon as possible.

asked the Lord Privy Seal (1) what steps are being taken by the Governor of Southern Rhodesia to establish the names and whereabouts of persons detained without trial in that territory at the time he assumed authority;

  • (2) if her Majesty's Government will make moneys available to Southern Rhodesia to assist the rehabilitation of persons and their families arrested and detained under martial law;
  • (3) what steps are being taken by the Governor of Southern Rhodesia to give help to the families of political prisoners, some of whom have been in detention for more than a decade;
  • (4) what is his estimate of the number of political prisoners held in Southern Rhodesia on the day the British Government assumed power;
  • (5) if he will instruct the Governor of Southern Rhodesia to stop forthwith the execution of any persons in that territory, and prohibit any further executions so long as it remains under British rule.
  • The Governor is being consulted and I will circulate a reply in the Official Report when it becomes available.

    asked the Lord Privy Seal what representations have been made to the Government of the Republic of South Africa to ensure that South African defence personnel withdraw immediately from Rhodesia.

    There is no question of external involvement in Rhodesia under the Governor. This position has been made clear to all the Governments concerned.

    asked the Lord Privy Seal how the cost of the arrangements leading to independence in Rhodesia will be financed.

    Parliamentary approval to this new service will be sought in a Supplementary Estimate for the International Subscriptions, Special Payments, Etc. (Foreign and Commonwealth Office) Vote. Pending that approval the necessary expenditure will be met by repayable advances from the contingencies fund.

    Uganda (Compensation Commission)

    asked the Lord Privy Seal if the compensation commission proposed to be established by the Ugandan Government to examine the claims for compensation of former residents of Uganda now settled in Great Britain has begun its work; and when he expects it to complete its consideration.

    The Ugandan Government are preparing legislation to establish the compensation commission. We cannot tell how long the commission will take to complete its work.

    Chile

    asked the Lord Privy Seal what criteria which were fulfilled by Argentina for the restoration of relations at ambassadorial level have not yet been met by Chile.

    I have nothing to add to the replies given to my hon. Friend on 15 and 19 November on the question of criteria for the appointment of ambassadors.—[Vol. 973, c. 690: Vol. 974, c. 16.]

    Overseas Development

    Guyana

    asked the Lord Privy Seal (1) if he will take steps progressively to reduce aid to Guyana in view of the limitations placed on democratic freedom in that country;(2) if he will give an assurance that no extraordinary or emergency aid will be made available to the Guyanese Government until such times as human rights are restored and the country is solvent.

    Capital aid to Guyana is presently being provided under the terms of loan agreements signed in 1978. Consideration of any future commitments will in the usual way take due account of the economic and political situation there. All items in the aid programme are necessarily under review at the present time.

    asked the Lord Privy Seal if he will detail the content and out come of the talks held between his officials and Mr. Nascimento, Minister in the office of the Prime Minister of Guyana.

    Mr. Nascimento called at the Overseas Development Administration on 30 November to discuss the progress of an existing ODA-assisted project for vehicle maintenance. Note was taken of his representations.

    Rhodesia

    asked the Lord Privy Seal what discussions have been held with voluntary aid organisations in the United Kingdom about the provision of food, medical, and other help to the victims of the war in Southern Rhodesia.

    Such discussions with voluntary organisations in the United Kingdom and with representatives of multilateral agencies are taking place now.

    asked the Lord Privy Seal what estimate has been made of the humanitarian aid required by the civil population of Southern Rhodesia in areas where the fighting has been most severe.

    No comprehensive estimate is yet possible. I expect the needs to be identified both by the discussions now taking place with voluntary and multilateral aid organisations and by consultation with the Governor.

    Merseyside

    asked the Prime Minister if she has any plans to appoint a Minister for Merseyside; and if she will make a statement.

    I have no plans to make such an appointment for Merseyside or any other region; the Gov- ernment take the difficulties facing particular regions into account in framing their policies generally.

    Nuclear Weapons

    asked the Prime Minister (1) whether the arrangements now in force governing the stationing of United States nuclear weapons in the United Kingdom provide for the explicit agreement of the British Government before such weapons can be used; and, in the absence of such an agreement, whether there is an effective British veto on their use;(2) whether it is the intention of Her Majesty's Government that the arrangements to be entered into with the United States Government, in relation to the proposed siting of United States cruise missiles with nuclear warheads in the United Kingdom, shall include a provision that explicit British Government approval will be obtained before such weapons can be used and an effective British veto on their use in the absence of such an agreement.

    I refer the hon. Member to the reply which I gave to the hon. Member for Harlow (Mr. Newens) on 20 December.

    Energy

    National Coal Board

    asked the Secretary of State for Energy if he will introduce legislation to provide for the breaking up of the National Coal Board into new competitive private companies for sale to private industry.

    asked the Secretary of State for Energy (1) if he will seek to lift the National Coal Board's monopoly of coal production;(2) if he will seek to lift the National Coal Board's monopoly on the exploration of coal.

    I do not propose to amend the National Coal Board's statutory monopoly on coal exploration and production.

    United Kingdom Oil Companies (Profits)

    asked the Secretary of State for Energy what is his estimate of the increase in (a) the gross trading profits of United Kingdom oil companies and (b) Government receipts, resulting from each additional charge of one dollar per barrel in OPEC prices.

    It is not possible in present circumstances to give reliable estimates of the gross trading profits of United Kingdom oil companies and Government receipts following an OPEC price increase. Because of changing patterns of crude oil supply arrangements and in the absence of a uniform OPEC price increase the costs to a United Kingdom company of crude oils will vary according to its sources of supply. Profits will be affected by the extent to which higher costs are recovered from product sales in the market, the impact of currency fluctuations, treatment of stock valuation, variation of remitted profits from overseas operations and other factors. Government receipts will be affected by these factors and the tax position of individual companies; in particular tax receipts for United Kingdom continental shelf operations will be affected by the front end loading of petroleum revenue tax capital allowances, which will mean that price increases may not lead immediately to increased tax from some North Sea fields although in the longer term receipts will rise.

    Civil Service

    Pensions

    asked the Minister for the Civil Service if he proposes to make any changes in the basis upon which the pensions of former public servants who retired between 1976 and 1979 are paid.

    The Government have considered carefully and sympathetically the many representations they have received, both direct from the public service pensioners concerned and from representative organisations acting on their behalf, about the effects of incomes policy on the pensionable pay of those who retired between 1976 and 1979. They recognise that this effect on pensions has been one of the unfortunate results of the last Government's incomes policy. The cost of increasing these pensions to the levels received by those who retired before or after the period of pay restraint would, however, be very considerable. In each case pensions have been calculated strictly in accordance with the rules of the relevant pension schemes and they are fully protected against price inflation. The Government have therefore concluded that they cannot take steps to improve the relative position of those whose pensions have been affected by past incomes policy. They recognise that this decision will be a disappointment to those concerned, but they cannot agree that, at a time of severe restraint on public expenditure, measures to improve these pensions should take priority over many other pressing demands.

    asked the Minister for the Civil Service what was the level of pension for a full general, a permanent secretary and a deputy secretary in 1972; and what is the present level of these same pensions to the latest available date.

    The levels of pension payable to a full general, a permanent secretary and a deputy secretary who retired on 30 November 1972 after a full career are set out in column 1 below. The present levels of these same pensions after the application of pensions increase to 1 December 1979 are set out in column 2.

    1.2.
    pension payable on 1 December 1972pension payable on 1 December 1979
    ££
    General7,010*19,666
    Permanent Secretary7,217†19,531
    Deputy Secretary4,799†12,988
    * Assumes the maximum of 34 years, reckonable service since age 21
    Assumes reckonable service of 37 years, the average service of permanent secretaries and deputy secretaries retiring in 1972 after a full career in the Civil Service.

    Central Computer Agency

    asked the Minister for the Civil Service what changes he proposes in the organisation of the Central Computer Agency.

    The agency is to be re-organised as part of the process of implementing the recommendations of the "Longer Term Review of Administrative Computing in Central Government" published last year. The aim is to make more effective use of the agency's resources in controlling and supporting major Government computer projects; and to improve its ability to handle the growing connection between computers and telecommunications. The name of the agency will be changed to the Central Computer and Telecommunications Agency from 2 January 1980.

    Employment Bill (Sales)

    asked the Minister for the Civil Service how many copies of the Employment Bill have been delivered to and sold at Her Majesty's Stationery Office Bookshop, Birmingham.

    Advertising Expenditure

    asked the Minister for the Civil Service if he will give figures for Government expenditure on advertising in each of the last five years and his estimate for 1980–81.

    The figures for Government expenditure on advertising in the last five financial years and the current year are as follows:

    £million
    1974–7515·6
    1975–7617·5
    1976–7713·9
    1977–7817·6
    1978–7924·2
    1979–80(forecast)28·6
    The estimates for 1980–81 are still under consideration, and it is too early to give any firm forecast of the sum likely to be spent on advertising.

    asked the Minister for the Civil Service how much was spent by central Government on newspaper advertising in the last year for which figures are readily available; and how much was paid for advertising in each major national newspaper in the same year.

    In 1978–79, the sum spent by central Government on press advertising placed by the Central Office of Information was £12,260,000. The amount paid for advertising in the major national newspapers was as follows:

    £
    Daily Mirror1,353,000
    Sunday Mirror364,000
    Sunday People324,000
    Glasgow Daily Record150,000
    Glasgow Sunday Mail24,000
    Daily Express1,051,000
    Daily Mail891,000
    Daily Telegraph622,000
    Financial Times249,000
    The Guardian179,000
    News of the World342,000
    The Observer193,000
    Observer Magazine137,000
    Sun1,306,000
    Sunday Express637,000
    Sunday Telegraph189,000
    Telegraph Sunday Magazine142,000
    The Sunday Times318,000
    The Sunday Times Magazine148,000
    The Tones161,000

    External Appointments

    asked the Minister for the Civil Service how many appointments from outside the Civil Service there have been to his Department in each of the last five years.

    In each of the last five years the number recruited to the non industrial staff of the Civil Service Department has been:

    1975499
    1976185
    1977242
    1978473
    1979(latest figure)373
    If the hon. Member has any specific category of appointment in mind perhaps he would write to me.

    Home Department

    Prisoners (Deaths)

    asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will publish a list of the annual number of deaths of prisoners in each of Her Majesty's prisons over the course of the last 10 years, indicating in each case the number who were deemed to have died from natural causes.

    Violence (Newham)

    asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether he will give, for the longest and most convenient period of time, on monthly, weekly, or other comparable dates, the total number of cases reported to the police of muggings and attacks upon the person; in how many of these cases arrests were made and with what results; how many cases there were of the police arresting persons for having committed these offences on the public highway in the London borough of Newham; and what action has been or is being taken to reduce these types of offences.

    "Mugging" is a term with no legal definition. The most recent numbers of offences of "violence against the person" and "robbery" recorded by the police in England and Wales up to the third quarter of 1979 were published in table 1 of the Home Office statistical bulletin 11/79, a copy of which has been placed in the Library of the House; longer runs of figures are to be found in tables 2.1 and 2.5 of "Criminal Statistics, England and Wales 1978"—Cmnd. 7670. The number of arrests resulting is not collected centrally but the number of persons cautioned, proceeded against in magistrates' courts, and tried at the crown court for violence against the person or robbery, is published annually in "Criminal Statistics, England and Wales"—tables 34, 1(a) and 5(a) of the volume for 1978, Cmnd. 7670I shall write to the hon. Member about the information available relating to arrests in the London borough of Newham.Action to reduce these types of offences in any particular area is primarily the responsibility of the chief officer of police concerned.

    asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether he will give, for the longest and most convenient period of time, the number of cases reported to the police in the London borough of Newham where rape has been alleged, the number of cases where persons have been arrested and charged and the results of charges where prosecution has ensued; and what actions have been or are being taken to reduce these types of offences.

    The information requested is not readily available. I shall write to the hon. Member.

    Police (Newham)

    asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether he will give, for the longest and most convenient period of time, the number of police entering into service in the London borough of Newham who themselves or their parents were born in the former British Colonial and Commonwealth countries; and whether he will give details of the countries in which these police and their parents were born.

    The information is not available in the form requested, but I understand from the Commissioner that there are two officers of West Indian origin stationed within the London borough of Newham.

    asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will arrange to provide as much detailed information as may be readily available, showing for the London borough of Newham the total number of police, man power, cars, panda cars, motor cycles, two-way radios, the increase or shortfall in such men and equipment over the years, to what extent manpower of police on the beat has increased or decreased over this period of time and the action that has been taken to increase men on the beat.

    The London borough of Newham comprises two divisions of K district of the Metropolitan Police. I understand from the Commissioner that its police officer strength is 479, and that 33 police vehicles—including 13 unit beat cars—and 130 personal radios are in use. In addition, there are vehicles used in traffic policing in a larger area which includes these divisions. Police officer strength is slightly lower than two years ago but, in common with the rest of the force area, the district will benefit from recent improvements in recruitment. The Commissioner attaches high priority to measures to make optimum use of available manpower.

    Citizenship

    asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if a British woman, only one of whose parents was born in the United Kingdom, will normally be able to register her minor0 child, born overseas, as a citizen of the United Kingdom and Colonies.

    A woman citizen of the United Kingdom and Colonies who was not born in the United Kingdom is not normally able to have her minor child who was born abroad registered unless the child's father becomes a citizen of the United Kingdom and Colonies and it is clear that the child's future is likely to lie in this country.

    asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if a woman born in the United Kingdom will normally be able to register her minor child, born overseas, as a citizen of the United Kingdom and Colonies.

    Community Relations Councils

    asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether eligible expenditure on specially employed staff dealing with work attributable to differences in language or customs of Commonwealth immigrants includes spending on local community relations councils; and if so, how much of this expenditure comes under this heading.

    Grant is payable under section 11 of the Local Government Act 1966 only on the salaries of staff directly employed by local authorities. Expenditure on community relations councils is eligible for grant only in the case of staff out-stationed by the local authority at the offices of community relations councils.Information is not kept centrally on how much of the total of eligible expenditure comes within this category, but the number of staff out-stationed in this way is very small.

    Drugs

    asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) how many persons have been convicted of unlawful possession of drugs in each of the past five years;(2) what has been the total quantity of (a) heroin and (b) cocaine seized by the authorities in each of the past five years;(3) how many seizures of controlled drugs have been made in each of the past five years.

    The information requested was published in tables 3, 2 and 1 respectively of the Home Office statistical bulletin, issue No. 6/79, a copy of which has been placed in the Library of the House.

    asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many registered addicts are currently receiving narcotic drugs from doctors; and how this figure compares with the number in each of the past five years.

    There is no system of registration of addicts in the United Kingdom. There is, however, an obligation imposed on every doctor by the Misuse of Drugs (Notification of and Supply to Addicts) Regulations 1973 to notify the Chief Medical Officer at the Home Office of details of persons whom he considers, or has reasonable grounds to suspect, to be addicted to any one, or more, of 14 specified narcotic drugs. The number of narcotic drug addicts known to the Home Office at 31 December each year was published in tables 7 to 11 of Home Office statistical bulletin, Issue No. 6/79, a copy of which has been placed in the Library of the House.

    Fourth Television Channel

    asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what representations he has received from the Incorporated Society of British Advertisers and the Institute of Practitioners in Advertising about the need for competition in the selling of air time for the fourth television channel.

    I have received a number of letters and papers from both organisations setting out their view that there should be competitive selling of advertising on the fourth channel. In particular I have received from the ISBA a "Memorandum on the Fourth Television Channel" and from the IPA a paper entitled "The Fourth Television Channel—A possible organisation structure to provide competition in the sale of airtime alongside 'complementarity' of programming".

    Remand Centres (Kent)

    asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will list the male and female remand centre facilities in Kent; whether he considers such facilities adequate; and if he will make a statement.

    There is no remand centre in Kent. The present position is that female prisoners, of whatever age, are remanded to Holloway prison in London; male prisoners under the age of 17 are remanded to Latchmere House remand centre in Richmond, Surrey and those aged 17 to 20 are remanded to Canterbury prison in Kent.The shortage of remand centre places in the South-East of England is being considered in the context of the recommendations of the May committee.

    Young Offenders (Kent)

    asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many young people in Kent between the ages of 14 and 16 years were convicted in each of the last five years for which figures are available.

    Annual figures are available only from 1975 because of the reorganisation of police force areas on 1 April 1974. Summary figures from 1975 for the age group requested are given in the following table. More detailed information for those aged 10 and under 17 years found guilty is published annually by police force area in "Criminal Statistics, England and Wales"—Tables 3(b) and 7(b) of the volume for 1978 (Cmnd. 7670).

    PERSONS AGED 14 AND UNDER 17 FOUND GUILTY AT ALL COURTS
    KENT POLICE FORCE AREA
    Number of persons
    YearIndictable offencesNon-indictable offences (including motoring)Total
    19751,5299332,462
    19761,4769762,452
    19771,3949162,310
    19781,2799512,230

    First Offenders

    asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many first offenders were sentenced to a detention centre in each of the past five years.

    Information is not available in the form requested. How- ever, information on the previous convictions of offenders received into prison department establishments in England and Wales sentenced to a detention centre order is published annually in "Prison Statistics, England and Wales"—Table 3.4 of the issue for 1978, Cmnd. 7626. Some relevant estimates for sentencing in 1977 are also to be found in tables 10.4 and 10.5 of "Criminal Statistics, England and Wales, 1978"—Cmnd. 7670.

    Independent Broadcasting Authority (Monitoring Functions)

    asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will list the responsibilities of the Independent Broadcasting Authority for monitoring the advertising rates charged by individual television companies.

    The Independent Broadcasting Authority's responsibilities in relation to advertising on television are contained in sections 8 and 9 of, and schedule 2 to, the Independent Broadcasting Authority Act 1973. In particular, paragraph 7(1) of schedule 2 provides that charges made for advertisements must be in accordance with tariffs fixed by the programme contractor from time to time, which have to be drawn up in such detail and published in such form and manner as the authority may determine.

    Illegal Immigration

    asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what steps he takes to verify the authenticity of evidence submitted to him against suspected illegal immigrants.

    All the available information, including statements made and evidence submitted about a person believed to be an illegal entrant, is very carefully assessed and investigations made, as appropriate, before a decision to remove him as an illegal entrant is taken. An appeal against the giving of directions to remove a person as an illegal entrant may be made from overseas, when the facts of the case are subject to review by an independent adjudicator.

    Lotteries

    asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether he is considering the representations of charitable bodies, particularly those connected with health and welfare, to amend the present legislation relating to lotteries in order to make it more attractive for major promoters to work with them.

    Yes. I am considering representations that the limits on turn over, prizes and expenses should be raised. But these have to be viewed in the context of the report of the Royal Commission on Gambling, which drew attention to the need for improved controls over lotteries to prevent abuses.

    Boundary Commission (Reports)

    asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department for which local government districts in England he has, since 24 October, received reports from the Local Government Boundary Commission with regard to new electoral arrangements; and for which districts he has made orders under schedule 9 to the Local Government Act 1972.

    Since 24 October we have received reports from the Local Government Boundary Commission for England proposing new electoral arrangements for the districts of Beaconsfield, Brighton, Forest of Dean, Gateshead, North Devon, North Tyneside, Rother, Slough, Suffolk Coastal and Sunderland. We have made orders for Bradford, Cheltenham, East Lindsey, Exeter, Leeds, Leicester, Liverpool, North Bedfordshire, Poole, Portsmouth, Reading, Restormel, St. Helens, Sheffield, Stroud, Tameside, Torbay, Walsall, Welling-borough, Wigan and Wirral.

    Wandsworth Prison

    asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what arrangements exist in Wandsworth prison to consult prisoners about the use made of the compulsory weekly levy for the general purposes fund; and whether he will arrange for regular accounts to be made available to prisoners showing how the fund has been spent.

    There are no formal arrangements for consulting prisoners at Wandsworth but prisoners may put forward suggestions on how the money should be spent. Prisoners are generally aware how the money is disbursed but are not provided with the audited accounts.

    Patrick O'hagan

    asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will make a statement on the serving of an exclusion order on Patrick O'Hagan which followed his detention and arrest at Leeds/Bradford airport on arrval from Northern Ireland on parole from prison.

    Manchester (Television Licences)

    asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many (a) black and white and (b) colour television licences are current in (i) the City of Manchester and (ii) Greater Manchester; and how many under each heading are held by retirement pensioners.

    Overseas Visitors (Overstaying)

    asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department, further to his reply to the hon. Member for Northampton, North of 10 December, stating that only 7 per cent. of inquiries initiated into overstayers result in overstayers being traced; what the probable situations are with regard to the other 93 per cent.; what proportion of overstayers traced are deported; and what are the possible reasons for not deporting overstayers.

    Inquiries are initiated by the special overstayers' section of the Home Office when there is reason to think that the person being sought has remained in the United Kingdom beyond the time permitted by his leave to enter or remain. A person who knowingly remains beyond the time limited by his leave is guilty of an offence under section 24(1)(b) of the Immigration Act 1971. An overstayer may also be deported, either on conviction of such an offence or by exercise of the power in section 3(5)(a) of the Act.The information requested in the second part of the question is not readily available and could be obtained only at disproportionate cost. As to the last part each case of a person liable to be deported as an overstayer is considered on its merits, in accordance with the general principles set out in the immigration rules for control after entry—paragraphs 38 onwards in HC 80 and 45 onwards in HC 82.

    asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if the Government are considering any changes in policy with respect to overstayers.

    My right hon. Friend referred to the Government's policy in this respect during the debate on 4 December. Means of detection and enforcement will be kept under review and developed to the extent that resources allow.

    asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what proportion of overstayers have not been deported for each of the last 12 quarters; what is the total number of overstayers interviewed in each of the last 12 quarters; and for what reason deportation has been set aside in those cases where it has not been applied.

    The information requested in the first two parts of the question is not readily available and could be obtained only at disproportionate cost. With regard to the last part of the question, each case of a person liable to be deported is considered on its merits in accordance with the general principles set out in the relevant paragraphs of the immigration rules for control after entry—paragraphs 38 onwards of HC 80 and 45 onwards of HC 82.

    Abdul Monnam

    asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will make a statement about the case of Abdul Monnam.

    I am reviewing the case in the light of the further representations made to me by my hon. Friend in his letter of 27 November and shall write to him as soon as possible.

    Liverpool St John Shopping Precinct (Fire)

    asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will make a statement on the recent fire in the Liverpool St. John shopping precinct.

    I understand that the fire was discovered by a security guard on patrol who called the fire brigade by direct telephone at 9.36 pm on 17 December. Three fire appliances attended at 9.38 pm. The fire originated in a ground floor shop in one of the main parts of the shopping mall and on the arrival of the brigade had spread to involve the whole of the mall and the adjoining market hall. Twenty-five fire appliances attended the fire and at its height 23 fire fighting jets were used. Two firemen were slightly injured in fire fighting operations, and required hospital out-patient treatment. There were no civilian casualties. The adjacent St. George's hotel and Tower restaurant were evacuated as a safety measure during the course of the fire, which was brought under control at 2.47 am on 18 December. I understand that the police believe that the fire was caused by an electrical fault.

    Overseas Visitors

    asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many visitors to the United Kingdom have been allowed to enter the United Kingdomon the basis of a one-month, two-months, three-months, six-months or one-year stay or for some other period for each of the last 12 quarters.

    The information requested is not available because statistics of those admitted to the United Kingdomas visitors are not recorded by the length of stay granted. The total number of visitors given leave to enter for less than 12 months in each quarter of the years 1976 to 1978 were published in table 6(b) of "Control of Immigration: Statistics, 1978"—Cmnd. 7565; figures for the first three quarters of 1979 are given in the following table.

    Visitors given leave to enter the United Kingdom for less than 12 months
    1979Number of journeys
    First quarter7,37,879
    Second quarter1,491,628
    Third quarter1,967,155

    Independent Broadcasting Authority (Franchise Areas)

    asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what communications he has received from the Independent Broadcasting Authority during the current year relating to the boundaries of independent television franchise areas; and what replies he has given.

    The boundaries of independent television franchise areas are a matter for the IBA and it is not for me to intervene. However, the IBA has kept me informed of representations that it has received on the subject.

    asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what instructions have been given to the Independent Broadcasting Authority concerning the maintenance of present boundaries for all forthcoming franchise area applications.

    Independent Television (Transmitters)

    asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what Home Office regulations govern the pattern of transmitter use by the independent television companies.

    The planning and construction of the UHF television transmitter network is primarily the responsibility of the BBC and the IBA which are engaged on a joint engineering programme designed to maximise population coverage within the respective franchise areas with maximum economy in the use of the limited available frequency spectrum. The UHF transmitting network is now substantially complete; all the main high-powered stations are in operation and the broadcasting authorities are concentrating on a programme to extend the UHF services to all communities with permanent populations of 500 or more through the construction of relay stations. Within this framework it is for the IBA to decide which ITV service should be transmitted from its television transmitting stations.Both the Government and the broadcasting authorities believe that priority should be given within the UHF engineering programme to extending the UHF services to communities which currently do not have one at all.

    Independent Broadcasting Authority (Legislative Review)

    asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will institute a review of the workings of the Independent Broadcasting Authority Acts before new television franchises are granted.

    Prison Pharmacies (Records)

    asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department why he will not allow free access by members of the medical profession into the detailed records of prison pharmacies.

    The responsible doctor has access to the records of prison pharmacies. If the hon. Member has a particular difficulty in mind, perhaps he would let me know.

    Prisoners (Drug Supplies)

    asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department for how long prison orderlies have been able to supply unprescribed drugs to prisoners.

    Prison medical officers have discretion to allow hospital officers or other members of staff to hold stocks of medicines which are freely available to the public without prescription, and, subject to their general instructions, to issue them to prisoners who ask for them.

    Prisoners (Medical Examinations)

    asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department when he will comply with the ruling of the European Court on Human Rights that prisoners should be allowed a medical examination by a doctor of their choice.

    Parkhurst Prison (Drug Prescription)

    asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department why the drug trimerperidine is prescribed to prisoners at Parkhurst prison, in view of the fact that it has not been made available on the National Health Service.

    I am not aware of any occasion on which this drug has been prescribed at Parkhurst prison.

    "Prison Medical Journal"

    asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department why the Prison Medical Journal is not made freely available to the medical profession in the same way as other medical journals.

    The Prison Medical Journalis not published on a commercial basis because the likely demand is insufficient to justify the cost, but it is available, on application, to anybody who would like to receive it.

    National Finance

    Money Supply

    asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer whether he will circulate in the Official Reporta table showing for each year since 1968 to date the percentage increase in (a) sterling M3, (b) the appropriate figure for national product or output, (c) the difference between (a) and (b), (d) the percentage increase in retail prices and (e) the difference between (c) and (d).

    Mid-year data for sterling M3 stock (seasonally adjusted) are given for recent years in Financial Statistics,table 7.1 (the latest issue is for November 1979) and for earlier years back to 1963 in Economic Trends Annual Supplement 1979, page 130. An appropriate national accounts aggregate for comparison is "total domestic expenditure at current market prices" in that it includes expenditure on imports and excludes expenditure on exports, and may be thought of as financed by sterling M3. Annual data for that aggregate from 1957 to 1978 are given in National Income and Expenditure 1979 (the Blue Book), table 1.1. Annual averages of the general index of retail prices and its percentage increase on the previous year for 1968 to 1978 are given in Economic Trends, page 42 (the latest issue is for November 1979).

    Sport And Recreation (Tax Concessions)

    asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer (1) if he proposes to cut corporation tax and value added tax on the cost of equipment and clothing provided for competitors in the Olympic Games, to assist the British Olympic Association in its appeal for £1 million for 1980;(2) if he intends to seek to provide for a special taxation status for non-profit distributing governing bodies of sport and recreation in the United Kingdom such as the Central Council for Physical Recreation and the British Olympic Association.

    Such associations are liable to corporation tax in respect of profits, but not in respect of voluntary donations. I have no plans to change this position.I have no plans to extend the range of reliefs from value added tax.

    Statistics

    asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer if he will circulate in the Official Report,a table showing for each year from 1952 and the current year to date, the percentage increase in the following: output of the whole economy, the output of manufacturing industries, wholesale prices, wholesale prices less food and so on, retail prices, earnings, the money supply and domestic credit expansion, lagged by one and two years.

    Figures from which percentage changes may be calculated are available for the output of the whole economy, the output of manufacturing industries and retail prices for all years from 1952, wholesale prices (output prices of all manufactured products, home sales) from 1954, and earnings (average earnings in Great Britain) and the money supply (M1, sterling M3, and M3) from 1963, in Economic Trends Annual Supplement. Figures from 1954 for wholesale prices less food and so on (output prices of all manufactured products excluding food, drink and tobacco industries) were given by the Under-Secretary of State for Industry on 23 November 1979 to the hon. Member. More recent data are published regularly in Economic Trends, Financial Statistics and the Monthly Digest of Statistics. Comprehensive money supply figures for years earlier than 1963 are not available; however, approximate figures for M3 at the end-of-year back to 1951 are given in the Bank of England Statistical Abstract Number 1 1970. As I have explained in previous answers to the hon. Member, there are no stock figures for domestic credit expansion from which percentage increases may be calculated.

    Income Tax

    asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer if he will publish a table showing the gross income levels, in local currencies and in sterling equivalent, at which income tax becomes

    GROSS INCOME LEVEL AT WHICH INCOME TAX BECOMES PAYABLE ON THE NEXT POUND OF INCOME AT 50 PER CENT. (OR NEAREST RATE) BY A MARRIED COUPLE WITH TWO CHILDREN
    CountryLocal currencySterling equivalentRate
    £Per cent
    United Kingdom16,81650·0
    United States of America$64,00029,63050·0
    France443,845 F49,94049·5
    Germany121,860 DM32,19550·0
    Japan25,223,500 Yen46,49549·5
    Notes:
    1. Conversions to sterling were made at the exchange rates prevailing in London on 26 November 1979. Such conversions may not reflect differences in domestic purchasing power between the United Kingdom and individual foreign currencies.
    2. The income is assumed throughout to be wholly employment income of the husband.
    3. Personal reliefs, minimum expenses, employment income reliefs and other flat rate reliefs have been taken into account, as have deductible social security contributions.
    4. Figures are for the tax year 1979 or 1979–80, except for France (1978) which fixes its rates in arrear at the end of the income tax year.
    5. The figures do not take into account local income taxes.

    asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer if he will publish a table showing the gross income levels, in local currencies and in sterling equivalent, at which income tax plus compulsory social security contributions becomes

    GROSS INCOME LEVEL AT WHICH INCOME TAX PLUS COMPULSORY SOCIAL SECURITY CONTRIBUTIONS BECOMES PAYABLE ON THE NEXT POUND OF INCOME AT 50 PER CENT. (OR NEAREST RATE) BY A MARRIED COUPLE WITH TWO CHILDREN
    CountryLocal currencySterling equivalentRate
    £Per cent.
    United Kingdom16,81650·0
    United States of America$64,00029,63050·0
    France443,845 F49,94050·2
    Germany121,860 DM32,19550·0
    Japan25,223,500 Yen46,49549·7
    Notes:
    1. Conversions to sterling were made at the exchange rates prevailing in London on 26 November 1979. Such conversions may not reflect differences in domestic purchasing power between the United Kingdom and individual foreign currencies.
    2. The income is assumed throughout to be wholly employment income of the husband.
    3. Personal reliefs, minimum expenses, employment income reliefs and other flat rate reliefs have been taken into account, as have deductible social security contributions.
    4. Figures are for the tax year 1979 or 1979–80. except for France (1978) which fixes its rates in arrear at the end of the income tax year.
    5. The figures do not take into account local income taxes.
    6. In the United Kingdom, the United States of America and Germany the marginal rates for income tax plus social security contributions are the same as those for income tax only. This is because there are no additional social security contributions payable at these income levels in these countries.

    asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer if he will publish a table comparing the starting rates and the top rates of income tax in each of payable at 50 per cent. by a married couple with two children, in the United Kingdom, the United States of America, France, Germany and Japan.

    The information requested is given in the table below:payable at 50 per cent. by a married couple with two children, in the United Kingdom, the United States of America, France, Germany and Japan.

    The information requested is given in the table below:the United Kingdom, Germany, Netherlands, Canada, Denmark, the United States of America, Belgium, France and Japan.

    The information requested is given in the table below:

    Starting rate of income taxTop rate of income tax
    United Kingdom25·060·0
    Germany22·056·0
    Netherlands19·272·0
    Canada15·543·0
    Denmark14·439·6
    United States of America14·050·0
    Belgium14·272·0
    France7·260·0
    Japan6·067·5
    Notes:
    1. The rates are those for the tax year 1979 or 1979–80, but the French rates are provisional (French tax rates are fixed in arrear).
    2. All figures relate to national or federal tax only. In Canada, Denmark, the United States of America, Belgium and Japan there are also local income taxes. Sample starting rates and top rates of local income taxes on employment income are:
    Starting rate Per cent.Top rate Per cent.
    Canada (the Ontario rate)2·618·9
    Denmark (the Copenhagen rate)25·525·5
    United States of America (the Californian rate)4·011·0
    Belgium (the rate applicable to the great majority of the population)0·94·3
    Japan (the rate applicable to the great majority of the population)2·416·2
    In the United States of America local income taxes are deductible in computing taxable income for federal income tax purposes.
    3. Figures relate to employment income only. The starting rate of tax on investment income in the Netherlands is 20 per cent. And in France 10 per cent. The top rate of tax on investment income in the United Kingdom is 75 per cent., in the United States of America 70 per cent. (excluding local income tax) and in Japan 75 per cent. (excluding local income tax).
    4. All figures relate to a married man with two children, except for the United States of America where a single man begins to pay tax at the rate shown. The starting rate in the United States of America for a married man with two children is 26·5 per cent. (excluding local income tax) because of the progressive withdrawal of tax credits for such a man at this income level.
    5. The starting and top rates are those applicable, respectively when tax actually becomes payable (excluding, in the case of Belgium the first £160 taxable income which is taxed at an unusually high rate) and when the highest point of the scale of income tax rates is reached. These actual rates, which take account of the operation of employment income reliefs and minimum expenses deductions, differ from nominal rates in some countries.

    asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer if he will detail the increases in the percentage of income paid in tax and national insurance contributions for a single person, a married couple and a married couple with two children when earning (a) two-thirds of average earnings, (b) average earnings, (c) twice average earnings, (d) five times average earnings, and (e) 10 times average earnings from 1964–65 to the latest available date.

    The figures are shown in the following tables.For years up to 1969–70 the average earnings are the annual equivalents of the average weekly earnings of males aged 21 and over in manufacturing and certain other industries at October in each year. For 1970–71 to 1978–79 the figures are based on the averages of the new earnings survey estimates of the average earnings of full time adult male manual workers at the start and finish of each tax year. To give an estimate for 1979–80 the April 1979 NES figure has been updated to September 1979 taking account of movements in a centred three-month moving average of the whole economy index of average earnings of all employees. In the case of the married man with two children, the figures of income include family allowance or child benefit, as appropriate, in addition to earnings.It has been assumed that the employees were not contracted out of the earnings-related or graduated pension schemes.It has been assumed that married men with children would relinquish family allowance between 1968–69 and 1976–77 if on 10 times average earnings and between 1970–71 and 1976–77 if on five times average earnings.

    Figures for a single man are as follows

    Percentage of income paid in Tax and NIC

    Two-thirds average earnings

    Average earnings

    Twice average earnings

    Five times average earnings

    Ten times average earnings

    Year

    Tax

    NIC

    Tax

    NIC

    Tax

    NIC

    Tax

    NIC

    Tax

    NIC

    Per cent.

    Per cent.

    Per cent

    Per cent

    Per cent.

    Per cent.

    Per cent.

    Per cent.

    Per cent.

    Per cent.

    1964–6511·15·917·25·323·62·728·21·139·40·5
    1965–6612·36·618·95·425·52·730·61·144·40·5
    1966–6713·06·619·35·525·72·831·11·144·50·6
    1967–6813·96·820·05·826·02·831·81·145·90·6
    1968–6915·27·420·85·626·52·933·01·148·10·6
    1969–7016·57·521·75·726·93·034·31·250·30·6
    1970–7118·37·122·95·927·53·036·41·254·00·6
    1971–7218·56·822·45·826·23·335·21·348·80·7
    1972–7315·66·620·55·925·33·637·71·453·40·7
    1973–7417·46·421·65·925·83·637·31·452·20·7
    1974–7521·06·225·05·929·03·544·41·460·20·7
    1975–7623·75·527·55·532·650·31·365·40·6
    1976–7724·15·827·85·833·04·052·21·666·90·8
    1977–7821·85·825·95·830·74·050·41·666·30·8
    1978–7920·26·524·56·528·84·548·81·865·50·9
    1979–8018·86·522·56·526·34·439·41·849·70·9

    Figures for married couples without children are as follows:

    Percentage of income paid in Tax and NIC

    Two-thirds

    Twice

    Five times

    Ten times

    average earnings

    Average earnings

    average earnings

    average earnings

    average earnings

    Year

    Tax

    NIC

    Tax

    NIC

    Tax

    NIC

    Tax

    NIC

    Tax

    NIC

    Per cent.

    Per cent.

    Per cent.

    Per cent.

    Per cent.

    Per cent.

    Per cent.

    Per cent.

    Per cent.

    Per cent.

    1964–65 5·45–912·25·321·22·727·21·138·60·5
    1965–66 6·86·614·05·423·12·729·51·143·50·5
    1966–67 7·46·614·75·523·42·829·91·143·60·6
    1967–688·26·815·55·523·82·830·71·145·10·6
    1968–699·37·416·75·624·42·931·91·147·30·6
    1969–7010·77·517·85·725·03·033·21·249·60·6
    1970–7112·47·118·95·825·53·035·21·253·20·6
    1971–7213·46·819·05·824·63·334·11·348·10·7
    1972–7311·26·617·55·923·83·636·61·452·70·7
    1973–7413·66·419·05·924·53·636·41·451·50·7
    1974–7516·46·221·95·927·53·543·11·459·40·7
    1975–7619·05·524·45·530·63·149·01·364·60·6
    1976–7719·05–824·35·830·74·050·71·666·10·8
    1977–7315·25·821·55·828·14·048·51·665·20·8
    1978–7914·26·520·56·526·74·547·01·864·50·9
    1979–8013·16·518·76·524·44·438·01·848·90·9

    Figures for married couples with two children aged under 11 are as follows:

    Percentage of income paid in Tax and NIC

    Year

    Two-thirds average earnings

    Average earnings

    Twice average earnings

    Five times average earnings

    Ten times average earnings

    Tax Percent.

    NIC Per cent.

    Tax Per cent.

    NIC Per cent.

    Tax Per cent.

    NIC Per cent.

    Tax Per cent.

    NIC Per cent.

    Tax Per cent.

    NIC Per cent.

    1964–655·74·55·216·32·625·31·137·00·5
    1965–666·45·95·318·52·727·61·141·80·5
    1966–676·46·55·419·02·727·91·142·10·5
    1967–680·66·77·45·719·62·828·71·143·70·6
    1968–693·17·010·85·421·22·830·21·145·60·6
    1969–704·77·112·55·022·12·930·91·248·00·6
    1970–715·76·814·25·723·33·033·41·251·70·6
    1971–724·96·513·15·621·53·231·81·346·40·7
    1972–733·86·412·35·821·13·534·31·451·00·7
    1973–747·16·214·65·822·23·534·31·450·00·7
    1974–758·96·116·85·824·83·540·71·457·80·7
    1975–7612·75·320·05·427·43·146·91·363·20·6
    1976–7711·65·619·35·627·44·048·21·664·60·8
    1977–7810·05·517·85·625·83·946·81·664·20·8
    1978–7911·06·017·96·125·24·445·81·863·70·9
    1979–8011·75·817·36·023·44·237·41·748·50·9

    Private Health Scheme Contributions (Tax Relief)

    asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer what proposals he has for tax relief on contributions to private health schemes.

    Republic Of Ireland And Northern Ireland

    asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer what the benefits have been per head in terms of net budget receipts or contributions for both the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland for each financial year since 1976–77; what the levels are in the current year; and what they will be in subsequent years to 1981–82.

    The estimated benefits per head in terms of net budget receipts from the EEC by the Republic of Ireland, based on Commission figures, are as follows:

    £
    197638·20
    197783·63
    1978110·52
    1979110·.72
    1980103·73
    I regret that comparable information for Northern Ireland is not available since the overall net contribution for the United Kingdom cannot be apportioned on a regional basis.

    Two-Tier Minimum Lending Rates

    asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer whether there are any countries in the European Economic Community where a system of two-tier minimum lending rates operates, one for regulating private transactions and one for commercial and industrial operations; and whether the system could be suitably adapted for use in the United Kingdom.

    Different institutional arrangements make precise comparisons between countries difficult. There are organisations in France and Italy that extend credit on favourable terms but there is no general system of two-tier rates in the banking system of any EEC country. Broadly speaking, the lending rates of banks in EEC countries, as in the United Kingdom, depend on the length and purpose of the credit and the risks involved.

    Food Imports (Levies)

    asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer what has been the total amount of levies on imported food paid to the European Economic Community since Great Britain joined the Community.

    [pursuant to his reply,20 December 1979]: The total amount of levies on imported food paid by the United Kingdom to the EEC up to the end of 1979 is estimated to be £million. In this period total gross contributions by the United Kingdom and the other acceding member States have been subject to the transitional arrangements provided for in the Treaty of Accession.

    Child Benefit

    asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer if he will adopt the practice of treating an increase in child benefit in the same way as a reduction in direct taxation rather than as an increase in public expenditure for accounting purposes; and if not, if he will make a statement of his reasons for preserving the existing system.

    No. Child benefit is a cash transfer from the public to the private sector which is voted by Parliament as public expenditure and is so treated in national accounting.

    Personal Incomes

    asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer if he will express the changes in money and real terms of the tax-free income of (a) single person, (b) married couple, (c) married couple plus one child, (d) married couple plus two children and (e) married couple plus four children each year since 1974 taking 1974 to equal 100.

    The figures are as in the following table.The price index used is the General Index of Retail Prices (all items), aver aged over the financial years shown, except for 1979–80 where the index for October (the middle of the year) has been used.

    Tax Thresholds

    1974–75=100

    Single

    Married

    Married 1 child aged under 11

    Married 2 children aged under 11

    Married 4 children: 2 aged under 11, 211–16

    Year

    Money terms

    At 1974–75 prices

    Money terms

    At 1974–75 prices

    Money terms

    At 1974–75 prices

    Money terms

    At 1974–75 prices

    Money terms

    At 1974–75 prices

    1974–75100100100100100100100100100100
    1975–761088711089108871078610584
    1976–771188212587125871268812688
    1977–7815192168103154941519214588
    1978–7915889177100160901558714682
    1979–8018690210101183881738315273
    The thresholds represent the amount of income—including family allowances and tax-free child benefit—that can be received before tax is payable. The figures take account of the family allowance deduction—"clawback"—where appropriate.

    asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer, for a married man with two children aged 12 and 9 years, what is his net income, given a gross annual salary of, respectively, £3,000, £5,000, £8,000, £12,000, £17,000 and £25,000, first after taking account of personal tax reliefs, and, secondly, after also taking account of non-personal reliefs which are approximately average for his gross income level.

    [pursuant to his reply, 17 December 1979, c. 58]: The figures are as follows:

    Net incomes (including child benefit)
    Gross annual salaryTaking account of personal allowancesTaking account of all allowances
    ££
    £3,0002,9033,115
    £5,0004,1734,446
    £8,0006,1426,494
    £12,0008,9239,448
    £17,00011,75512,817
    £25,00015,59517,335
    Net income is gross salary plus child benefit minus tax and national insurance at the not-contracted-out rate.In the second column of net income it is assumed that the man qualifies for mortgage interest relief and for relief on superannuation contributions. The figures therefore take account of an estimate of average mortgage interest relief in 1979–80 and superannuation contributions of 5 per cent. of salary, in addition to the married allowance. The estimate of mortgage interest relief is based on the average around the income levels shown for all married couples claiming mortgage interest relief.

    Queen Elizabeth, The Queen Mother (Birthday Coin)

    asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer if Her Majesty's Government have any plans to issue a special coin to celebrate the eightieth birthday in August 1980 of Queen Elizabeth, The Queen Mother.

    The Queen has been graciously pleased to approve the Master of the Mint's recommendation that a special crown piece be issued.The design for the reverse of the coin will be selected from open competition and the first issue of the coin will be on The Queen Mother's birthday.

    Current Cost Accounting

    asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer whether he has any progress to report on the Government's consideration, announced by the Secretary of State for Trade in June, of the application of current cost accounting to the nationalised industries.

    Yes. The Government have considered this question in consultation with the nationalised industries. The Government's position, which has been conveyed to the nationalised industries' chairmen's group. is as follows:

  • (a) Nationalised industries should in general apply the accounting principles as set out in the final standard based on ED24.
  • (b) In particular, the industries should show current cost operating profit in their accounts so that their results can be compared with the financial targets which will be set on that basis wherever possible.
  • (c) Current cost balance-sheets should be published wherever possible, though this may be difficult and not wholly appropriate e.g. in the case of certain transport industries.
  • (d) Those industries which the Government have decided to return to the private sector should adopt the gearing adjustment embodied in the final standard based on ED24.
  • (e) The remaining nationalised industries should not make a gearing adjustment in their accounts, though they should show in a footnote the effect of such an adjustment if it had been made. The Government consider that a gearing adjustment would produce misleading results in view of the special circumstances of the financing of the nationalised industries.
  • Fee-Paying Schools

    asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer what is the total amount of tax relief given to private fee-paying schools; and what is the breakdown of the total into schools in England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland.

    [pursuant to his reply, 3 December 1979, c. 79]: I regret that information on which to base an estimate is not available. Reliefs available to schools are those available to charities or, if the school is not a charity, those available for ordinary business purposes.

    Value Added Tax

    asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer why a local authority that runs adult education courses and youth activities is not liable for the payment of value added tax whilst a community association registered as a charity providing the same courses on the same premises supervised by the same staff and scrutinised by the local authority's adult education officer is liable to value added tax.

    Adult education courses provided by local authorities are outside the scope of VAT if they are provided in fulfilment of a statutory obligation and if they are specifically subsidised from the rates. These considerations do not apply in the case of courses run by non-local authority bodies regardless of where they are run or how they are supervised.Youth activities provided by local authorities are treated in the same way as similar facilities provided by other bodies if a charge is made for them.

    Northern Ireland

    Legislation (Review)

    asked the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland in what form he expects to publish the results of the review of Northern Ireland's legislative needs which the Government have conducted.

    I understand the right hon. Gentleman to be referring to the review in which the Government, on taking office in May, considered what legislative proposals for Northern Ireland should be made to Parliament in the 1979–Session. The results appear in the form of draft legislation presented to Parliament.

    Departmental Officials (Search And Entry Powers)

    asked the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland if he will list every different circumstance in which officials of his Department, and of all public bodies ultimately answerable to himself, have search and entry powers into either the homes or the business premises of British citizens with, in each case, reference to the appropriate statutory authority and the number of such inspectors.

    In addition to the Northern Ireland Office, my right hon. Friend is responsible for the eight Northern Ireland Departments and other public bodies in Northern Ireland. It would require a disproportionate effort to establish every different circumstance in which officials can exercise search and entry powers. However, listed below are the statutory authorities by which officials in Northern Ireland have powers of entry. Certain of these Acts and regulations also authorise, where necessary, the inspection of premises, the taking of samples and the taking and examining of records. It is not possible to give the number of such inspectors with search and entry powers.The Gas (NI) Order 1977Electricity Supply (NI) Order 1972Regulations for Securing the Safety of the Public 1934The Companies (NI) Order 1978Protection of Depositors Act (NI) 1964The Industrial Investment (General Assistance) Act (NI) 1966Industries Development (NI) Act 1966Weights and Measures Act (NI) 1967Weights and Measures Act 1979Trade Descriptions Act 1968Hallmarking Act 1973Fair Trading Act 1973European Communities, Eggs (Marketing Standards) Regulations (NI) 1973Textile Products (Indications of Fibre Content) Regulations 1973Consumer Credit Act 1974Measuring Instruments (EEC Requirements) Regulations 1975Measuring Container Bottle (EEC Requirements) Regulations 1977The Development of Tourist Traffic Act (NI) 1948Control of Pollution Act 1974Quarries Act (NI) 1927Estate Agents Act 1979Mines Act (NI) 1969Mineral Development Act (NI) 1969Minerals (Miscellaneous Provision) Act (NI) 1959Mineral Development (Application Fees and Model Clauses) Regulations (NI) 1970The Petroleum Production (Licences) Regulations (NI) 1965The Education and Libraries (NI) Order 1972The Explosives Act 1875The Northern Ireland Emergency Provisions Act 1978The Miscellaneous Transferred Excise Duties Act (NI) 1978The Rates (NI) Order 1977The Boundary Survey (Ireland) Act 1854The Wages Council Act (NI) 1945The Factories Act (NI) 1965The Offices and Shop Premises Act (NI) 1966The Truck Acts 1831–1940Enterprise Ulster (NI) Order 1976Health and Safety at Work (NI) Order 1979The Selective Employment Payments Act (NI) 1966Forestry Act (NI) 1953Importation of Wood (Prohibition) Order (NI) 1976

    Poultry Improvement Act (NI) 1968

    Destructive Imported Animals Act (NI) 1933

    Agriculture Act 1937

    Agriculture Act 1957

    Agriculture Act 1967

    Agriculture Act 1970

    Livestock Breeding Act (NI) 1922

    Artificial Reproduction of Animals (NI) Order 1975

    Agricultural Wages (Regulation) (NI) Order 1977

    Farm and Horticulture Development Regulations 1978

    Plant Health Act (NI) 1967

    Marketing of Potatoes Act (NI) 1964

    The Non-Marketing of Milk and Milk Products and the Dairy Herd Convertion Premiums Regulations 1979

    Diseases of Animals (NI) Order 1975

    Noxious Weeds (NI) Order 1977

    Seeds Act (NI) 1965

    Diseases of Animals (Amend) (NI) Order 1975

    The Fat Sheep (Protection of Guarantee) Order 1976

    Common Agricultural Policy (Agriculture Produce) (Protection of Community Arrangements) (No. 2) Order 1973

    Agricultural Produce (Meat Regulations and Pig Industry) Act 1962

    Marketing of Poultry Act (NI) 1949

    Slaughter of Animals Act (NI) 1932 as amended by the Slaughter of Animals (Amendment) Act 1956

    Slaughterhouses Act (NI) 1953

    Agriculture (Miscellaneous Provisions) Act (NI) 1970

    Agriculture (Miscellaneous Provisions) Order (NI) 1975

    Eggs (Feed Poultry Allowance) Scheme (NI) 1973

    Poultry Meat Hygiene Regulations (NI) 1977

    Marketing of Eggs (see Transport subvention) Scheme (NI) 1973

    Poultry (Feed Price Allowance) (Amendment) Scheme 1976

    Poultry (Feed Price Allowance) Scheme (NI) 1971

    Eggs (Feed Price Allowance) (Amendment) (NI) 1976

    Agriculture Marketing Act (NI) 1964

    Drainage (NI) Order 1973

    Horticulture Act 1966

    Health and Safety at Work Act (NI) 1978

    Milk Act (NI) 1950

    Marketing of Milk Products Act (NI) 1958

    Prices Act 1974 and 1975

    Diseases of Animals Act (NI) 1958

    Diseases of Animals (Amendment) Act (NI) 1966

    Welfare of Animals Act (NI) 1972

    Bee Pest Prevention Act (NI) 1945

    Fisheries Act (NI) 1966 (Reprint to 1969)

    Foyle Fisheries Act (NI) 1952

    Marketing of Eggs Act (NI) 1957

    Social Security (NI) Acts 1975–77

    Health and Personal Social Services (NI) Order 1972

    Nursing Homes and Nursing Agencies Act (NI) 1971

    Nursing and Midwives Act (NI) 1970

    Mental Health Act (NI) 1961

    Children and Young Persons Act (NI) 1968

    Cruelty to Animals Act 1876

    Pharmacy (NI) Order 1976

    Poisons (NI) Order 1976

    Hydrogen Cyanide (Fumigation of Buildings) Regulations (NI) 1952

    Hydrogen Cyanide (Fumigation of Ships) Regulations (NI) 1952

    Public Health (NI) 1967

    Food and Drugs Act (NI) 1958

    Supplementary Benefits (NI) Order 1977

    Family Income Supplements Act (NI) 1971

    Medicines Act 1968

    Misuse of Drugs Act 1971

    Public Health (Ships) Regulations (NI) 1971

    Public Health (Aircraft) Regulations (NI) 1971

    Housing and Local Government (Misc. Prov) Act (NI) 1946

    Housing Act (NI) 1961

    Housing Executive Act (NI) 1971

    Road Traffic Act (NI) 1955

    Special Road Act (NI) 1963

    Roads Act (NI) 1948

    Local Government and Road Act (NI) 1968

    Planning (NI) Order 1972

    Land Development Values (Compensation) Act (NI) 1965

    New Towns Act (NI) 1965

    Fire Services Act (NI) 1969

    Fire Service (NI) Order 1977

    Transport Act (NI) 1967

    Pollution Control and Local Government (NI) Order 1978

    International Road Haulage Permits Act 1975

    Road Traffic Act (NI) 1970

    Water and Sewerage Services (NI) Order 1973

    Water and Sewerage Services Regulations (NI) 1973

    Water Act (NI) 1972

    Dumping at Sea Act 1974

    Alkali and Works Regulation Act 1906

    Radioactive Substances Act 1960

    Public Health Acts 1878–1967

    Clean Air Act (NI) 1964

    European Communities Act 1972

    Constitution Act 1973

    asked the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland (1) if he will ensure that the Northern Ireland Constitution Act 1973 will not be used as the basis for any future constitutional proposals that he proposes;(2) when the Northern Ireland Constitution Act 1973 will be repealed.

    The aim of the forthcoming political conference is to reach the highest level of agreement on new governmental arrangements for Northern Ireland. It will be for the conference to consider whether any provisions of the 1973 Act should form part of those arrangements.

    Terrorist Incident (Forkhill)

    asked the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland if he will make a statement about the bombing at Fork-hill on Sunday 16 December in which a soldier died, indicating (a) the method of detonation and (b) the type and origin of explosive used.

    On the afternoon of Sunday 16 December, a bomb exploded in a derelict house near Tully donnell, South Armagh. Private Grundy, a member of a patrol from the Parachute Regiment operating in the area at the time, was killed and another soldier injured. The bomb consisted of home made explosive and was remotely detonated. It has not yet been possible to establish the origin of the explosive used. Police inquiries are continuing.

    Mr Patrick O'hagan

    asked the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland if he was satisfied that Patrick O'Hagan was properly released on parole from Belfast Prison on Monday 12 November.

    Parliamentary Commissioners

    asked the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland what arrangements have been made to fill the offices of Northern Ireland Parliamentary Commissioner for Administration and Northern Ireland Commissioner for Complaints on the retirement of the present holder of these offices.

    Mr. Stephen McGonagle, who has held the two offices, will reach the statutory retirement date at the end of this month. The Queen has appointed Dr. R. J. Dickson, at present chief officer of the North-Eastern Education and Library Board, to hold the office of Northern Ireland Parliamentary Commissioner for Administration and Northern Ireland Commissioner for Complaints from 1 January 1980.

    Rates

    asked the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland what is his latest estimate of average local authority rates, including water rates, paid by tenants of local authority housing, distinguishing between single people, married couples and families of different sizes.

    The latest estimated average rate bill, including water rate, paid by tenants of the Northern Ireland Housing Executive is £81·73. It is not possible to make a distinction between single people, married couples and families of different sizes.

    asked the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland what is his latest estimate of the average domestic rate charge, including water rates, by county in Northern Ireland.

    As district council boundaries do not conform to county boundaries, it is not possible to give the average domestic rate charge including water rate on a county basis. However, on a district basis the information is as follows:

    DistrictAverage domestic rate bill £
    Antrim96·91
    Ards102·39
    Armagh82·55
    Ballymena101·55
    Ballymoney88·96
    Banbridge87·62
    Belfast93·08
    Carrickfergus113·62
    Castlereagh110·02
    Coleraine117·00
    Cookstown81·11
    Craigavon108·58
    Down95·11
    Dungannon78·45
    Fermanagh71·82
    Lame96·83
    Limavady86·45
    Lisburn110·33
    Londonderry102·52
    Magherafelt79·49
    Moyle94·71
    Newry82·97
    Newtownabbey122·91
    North Down138·36
    Omagh75·93
    Strabane80·62
    Province
    Highest£138·36 (North Down)
    Lowest£71·82 (Fermanagh)
    Average£96·07

    Scotland

    Exhibition Centre

    asked the Secretary of State for Scotland what discussions he has had regarding the site at the Bridge of Don for a Scottish exhibition centre; and when he expects to announce a decision about Government or Government agency participation in the centre.

    I have had discussions with the convener of Grampian regional council on the council's proposal to develop an exhibition centre at the show-ground site, Bridge of Don, and my officials met the council's officials in November to consider various aspects of the project. The council has been informed that there is no special form of Government assistance currently available to meet the needs of this project. Participation by the Scottish Development Agency is a matter for it in the first instance. The council has requested my consent in terms of section 94 of the Local Government (Scotland) Act 1973 to the council incurring liability to meet capital expenses on this project. I have informed the council that I cannot grant it an additional consent at present.

    Road Accidents

    asked the Secretary of State for Scotland whether he will publish the number of road accident deaths in Scotland in each of the last five years.

    The information is as follows:

    YearFatal Road Casualties: Scotland Number of Casualties
    1974825
    1975769
    1976783
    1977811
    1978820

    Archaeology

    asked the Secretary of State for Scotland if he is satisfied with the adequacy of the provision of archaelogical rescue and excavation services in Scotland; and if he will make a statement about the impact of expenditure cuts on this area of activity.

    Expenditure on rescue archaeology in Scotland has risen significantly in recent years. My right hon. Friend will be considering carefully how far he can maintain the level of resources allocated to it.

    Public Inquiries

    asked the Secretary of State for Scotland if he will list the public inquiries held in Scotland over the last 10 years; what subjects they were on; which had pre-inquiry meetings; and which of these pre-inquiry meetings were advertised publicly.

    The answer to the question cannot be ascertained without incurring disproportionate cost. Pre-inquiry meetings have been held in a very small proportion of cases and, as the purpose is to discuss procedure with parties who have already indicated an interest, it has not been the practice to advertise.

    asked the Secretary of State for Scotland if he will describe the arrangements within the Scottish Office for ensuring that objections for consideration at any public inquiry are passed timeously to the inquiry reporter's office.

    Representations are passed to the inquiry reporter's unit at the time that instructions are given to it to begin arrangements for the inquiry and, if received subsequently, after the related correspondence has been completed.

    Loch Doon (Public Inquiry)

    asked the Secretary of State for Scotland if he will list any organisations which have submitted objections to the proposals to bore near Loch Doon whose names and addresses have not been submitted to the inquiry reporter's office.

    asked the Secretary of State for Scotland which organisations and individuals sent him objections to the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority's proposals to bore near Loch Doon; when each of these objections was received; and when each of them was passed to the inquiry reporter's office.

    In view of the amount of material involved I shall write to the hon. Member.

    Torness

    asked the Secretary of State for Scotland if the existing planning permission for the Torness power station specifies that only an advanced gas-cooled reactor may be established on the site, and that a new public inquiry would have to be held if the Government were to decide to site a pressurised water reactor station there.

    The consent, given under the provisions of section 2 of the Electric Lighting Act 1909, to the construction of a nuclear power station on the Torness site specifies that the station will be of the advanced gas-cooled reactor type and capital expenditure approval has been given for a station of that type. Neither the South of Scotland Electricity Board nor the Government have any intention of changing the reactor system chosen for this station.

    asked the Secretary of State for Scotland when he intends to order the plant for the Torness power station; and if he will make a statement on the progress of this project.

    Preliminary site preparation and manufacturing work for the Torness power station are well in hand. I am informed that the South of Scotland Electricity Board has placed design contracts for the advanced gas-cooled reactor units and the turbo-generator plant, and that the board is in the process of obtaining tenders for the subsequent manufacturing and construction work. It is expected that, once safety and other clearances have been obtained, a start will be made on the construction of the station in 1980.

    National Health Service

    asked the Secretary of State for Scotland how many new staff will be employed in the Scottish Health Service or area health boards arising out of the publication of the consultative document, "Structure and Management of the National Health Service in Scotland"; and if he will make a statement.

    I expect that fewer staff will be employed if the proposals in the consultative paper are put into effect.

    Scottish Transport Group

    asked the Secretary of State for Scotland what financial targets he proposes to set for the Scottish Transport Group for 1980.

    After discussions with the Scottish Transport Group, I have now set the following financial targets for 1980. These are interim targets for 1980 only, in view of the uncertainties facing the industry in that year. Medium term targets will be set for the group for the period beginning in 1981. The targets take account of the need to move towards earning the 5 per cent. real rate of return on new investment, the social objectives which the industry has to meet, and the group's statutory obligations.The target set for the Scottish Bus Group will require the group to break even in 1980 after receiving local authority revenue support and after meeting its obligations in respect of payment of corporation tax, repayment of capital debt and making a contribution to general reserve. The target is to make an operating surplus of £7½million after charging replacement cost depreciation and interest payments.For Caledonian MacBrayne ferry services the target which I have set is to break even after receipt of the grant which I give to support its approved services.For Scottish Transport Investments Limited, the holding company for the Scottish Transport Group's ancillary activities, I have set a target of making a surplus of 8 per cent. on its turnover for 1980, after charging for replacement cost depreciation.

    Trade

    Imports And Exports (Disruption)

    asked the Secretary of State for Trade what contingency plans exist designed to ensure that imports and exports of goods and services are not disrupted by industrial action.

    It would not be desirable to disclose the details of any such arrangements.

    Anglo-American Trade

    asked the Secretary of State for Trade, if he will circulate in the Official Report a table showing for Great Britain and the United States for each half year since 1970 the value, unit value and volume of imports and exports, together with the change in the relative volume and the terms of trade based on 1970=100.

    The available information for the United Kingdom and the United States is given in the following tables:

    UNITED KINGDOM TRADE1

    Value £m

    2

    Unit Value

    5 1970=100 (national currency)

    Volume

    2, 5 1970=100

    Relative

    3

    Volume %change

    Terms of

    4

    Trade 1970=100

    Exports

    Imports

    Exports

    Imports

    Exports

    Imports

    on a year earlier

    1970H14,0164,01199·5100·6100·298·2+4½98·9
    H24,1054,152102·1100·699·8101·8—7101·5
    1971H14,3964,366104·7104·0104·8104·2—1½100·7
    H24,6644,433108·2106·2108·6104·2+6½101·9
    1972H14,6014,831110·5107·4106·8113·6—6½102·9
    H24,8495,341114·5114·1107·4119·7—14100·4
    1973H15,6546,455121·6128·6119·0129·5—2½94·6
    H26,4618,043132·6154·6125·5138·0+1½85·8
    1974H17,77010,392153·5206·6131·3137·4+474·3
    H28,76811,381171·9227·9132·6135·4+7½75·4
    1975H19,27510,866189·2241·2126·3125·0+678·4
    H210,18811,833206·2254·2126·0127·981·1
    1976H111,81413,313226·6280·9135·0130·5+2½80·7
    H213,59715,699254·6319·6138·2138·1+1½79·7
    1977H115,44117,166277·7346·1145·9143·6—280·2
    H216,70716,726291·2350·1150·9141·0+783·2
    1978H117,16117,930
    H218,27118,677
    1979H118,87921,172

    Notes:

    1 Balance of payments basis.

    2 Seasonally adjusted.

    3 Export volume index as a percentage of import volume index.

    4 Export unit volume index as a percentage of import unit volume index.

    5 The 1970 based index numbers for unit value and volume were not compiled for periods after 1977.

    Source:

    United Kingdom Trade Statistics.

    UNITED STATES TRADE1

    Value $m

    Unit Value

    2 1970=100 (national currency)

    Volume

    2 1970=100

    Relative

    3

    Volume % change on a year earlier

    Terms of

    4

    Trade 1970=100

    Exports

    Imports

    Exports

    Imports

    Exports

    Imports

    1970H121,69419,52499·598·5101·099·27101·0
    H221,53020,428100·5101·599·0100·799·0
    1971H122,80622,521103·7104·5101·9108·1—7½99·2
    H221,32323,041103·0106·395·7108·9—1196·9
    1972H124,20327,046105·6110·6106·3122·6—895·5
    H225,55628,536107·9115·3109·3123·9½93·6
    1973H133,21733,269116·4126·1132·4132·01692·3
    H238,12136,204131·6142·1134·5127·32092·6
    1974H148,011