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Written Answers

Volume 976: debated on Wednesday 16 January 1980

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Written Answers To Questions

Wednesday 16th January 1980

Overseas Development

Zambia

35.

asked the Lord Privy Seal what additional aid is proposed for Zambia in view of the country's present acute financial problems.

Britain has offered a project loan of £10 million to the Government of Zambia. It is hoped to sign the agreement shortly.

Population (Colombo Declaration)

36.

asked the Lord Privy Seal if he has considered further the Colombo declaration on population matters; and if he will make a statement.

I have studied the declaration. For our part we recognise the link between economic development and the limitation of population growth, but our ability to use aid to promote the objectives of the declaration is limited by the use of constraints on our resources and the fact that many of its recommendations are essentially within the responsibility of national Governments.

India

37.

asked the Lord Privy Seal how much of current British aid to India is tied to British exports.

In 1978–79, 94 per cent. of British bilateral aid to India was tied to British goods and services. The percentage for the current year is expected to be slightly lower because of increased local costs aid expenditure.

Pakistan

38.

asked the Lord Privy Seal what aid was given by Her Majesty's Government to Pakistan in the last financial year.

£21.7 million, consisting of £20.4 million capital aid and £1.3 million technical co-operation.

Trade Union Education

39.

asked the Lord Privy Seal when he will complete his consideration of the continuance of the grant to the Trades Union Congress for trade union education in the developing countries.

International Year Of The Child

asked the Lord Privy Seal if he will make a statement on his Department's participation in the International Year of the Child; what work was carried out by his Department in connection with the International Year of the Child; and what further follow-up studies are being planned for 1980.

During the International Year of the Child we increased our contribution to UNICEF by £1·5 million and subscribed £150,000 towards the cost of the international secretariat set up to handle arrangements for the Year. We provided £40,000 towards the cost of a conference in London organised by the Institute of Child Health as part of a programme to encourage school children in developing countries to concern themselves with the health and welfare of younger children. As a follow-up, £115,000 is being made available over a period of three years to implement ideas from the conference. We provided £90,000 towards two projects sponsored by the United Kingdom Association for the International Year of the Child. One project, in Nepal, was co-financed by Oxfam and Christian Aid; the other, in Swaziland and Lesotho, by the Save the Children Fund. We shall continue to support these and similar projects in 1980.

Oda Personnel (Children's Holiday Visit Passages)

asked the Lord Privy Seal what is the approximate cost of holiday visit passages paid in respect of the children of Overseas Development Administration personnel in receipt of education allowances for the latest year available.

During the financial year 1978–79 the approximate cost of holiday visit passages was £40,000 in respect of the children of Overseas Development Administration personnel and £240,000 in respect of the children of technical co-operation officers. These figures include passages for children in respect of whom education allowances are not paid, such as those undergoing higher education.

Bolivia

asked the Lord Privy Seal whether her Majesty's Government will give support to the re-established constitutional Government in Bolivia by announcing approval of the aid project for Bolivia's mining sector.

We welcome the reestablishment of constitutional Government in Bolivia, but a decision on the aid project for the mining sector must still await decisions on the whole aid programme for next year. The position has been explained to the new Bolivian Government.

Africa (International Red Cross Appeal)

asked the Lord Privy Seal what response Her Majesty's Government have made to the International Committee of the Red Cross appeal from Africa for the seven months June to December 1979.

Her Majesty's Government made a contribution of £500,000 to the ICRC on 28 December in response to this appeal. In view of the urgent needs of the people of Rhodesia, we have earmarked the whole of this contribution for the ICRC's operations in Rhodesia.

Home Department

Immigration Rules

41.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what representations he has received from Commonwealth Governments on the proposed changes in the immigration rules; and what reply he has given.

Some Commonwealth Governments have expressed an interest in our proposals for revision of the immigration rules. We have undertaken to consider their views in reaching final decisions.

Mr Mahmoud Zaid

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he proposes to offer Mr. Mahmoud Zaid political asylum in Great Britain.

Mr. Zaid's application for asylum has only recently been received. I shall inform the hon. Member of the decision when the necessary inquiries are completed.

Firearms Act 1968

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will bring forward amendments to the Firearms Act 1968 to provide stricter criteria for the granting or renewal of shotgun certificates and to give chief officers of police the right to refuse such certificates.

Section 28(1) of the Firearms Act 1968 already authorises chief officers of police to refuse the issue of a shotgun certificate in certain circumstances. I have no immediate plans to introduce amending legislation.

International Year Of The Child

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will make a statement on his Department's participation in the Intenational Year of the Child; what work was carried out by his Department in connection with the International Year of the Child; and what further follow-up studies are being planned for 1980.

My Department is contributing £62,500 to the Government grant to the United Kingdom Association for the International Year of the Child, which undertook responsibility for the main direction of the national response to the Year.Remands of girls under 17 to prison department establishments under certificates of unruliness have been prohibited since 1 March 1979. No follow-up studies are planned.

Immigration

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many interpreters are employed by the immigration division to assist with the questioning by medical inspectors of non-patrials seeking entry clearance.

In addition to members of the immigration service, most of whom are proficient in at least one foreign language, nine interpreters are currently employed. They are available to assist with questioning on any aspect of control on entry work. Other interpreters are used where necessary, on an ad hoc basis.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many people were repatriated under section 90 of the Mental Health Act 1959 in each of the last three years; and to which countries were they repatriated.

The information is as follows:

197719781979
Cyprus1
France3
Germany1
Ghana1
Iran1
Irish Republic2
Italy1
Nigeria11
Norway1
Poland1
St. Kitts1
3102

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many non-patrials seeking entry clearance to the United Kingdom in each of the last three years were permitted entry but required to report to a medical officer of health;

  • (2) how many non-patrials refused entry clearance in each of the last three years have been referred to a psychiatrist by either a medical inspector or an immigration officer;
  • (3) how many non-patrials seeking entry to the United Kingdom in each of the last three years have been referred by an immigration officer to a medical inspector.
  • Statistical information about the port health control is kept by the Department of Health and Social Security. In each of the last three years 373 (1977), 296 (1978) and 264 (1979 provisional) passengers subject to immigration control were given notice in writing by the immigration officer under paragraph 7 of schedule 2 to the Immigration Act 1971 requiring them to report their arrival to a specified medical officer of environmental health. In 1976, 1977 and 1978, 55,537, 45,514 and 43,844 passengers respectively were referred to port medical inspectors. Statistics for 1979 are not yet available. Information is not available about the number of passengers who were refused leave to enter and referred to a psychiatrist.

    Restricted Patients

    asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) how many restricted patients who appeared before mental health review tribunals during 1976, 1977 and 1978 waited (a) less than one month, (b) one to three months, (c) four to six months, (d) seven to 12 months, (e) one to two years or (f) more than two years for a decision from him following their tribunal hearing;

  • (2) in how many of the references considered by a mental health review tribunal in each of the special hospitals and local hospitals during 1976, 1977 and 1978 the tribunal recommended (a) absolute discharge, (b) conditional discharge, (c) transfer from a special to a local hospital, (d) removal of a restriction order, (e) trial leave, and (f) no absolute or conditional discharge, removal of a restriction order, transfer or trial leave; and how many of each of these recommendations he accepted;
  • (3) how many patients who are subject to a restriction order under section 65 of the Mental Health Act 1959 but are no longer detained in a special or local hospital have not been recalled to hospital for less than one year, one to two years, two to five years, six to 10 years, 11 to 15 years or more than 15 years.
  • This information is not readily available in the form requested; but I am looking to see what relevant information it might be possible to provide and I shall write to the hon. Member.

    asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many patients waited (a) less than one month, (b) one to two months, (c) two to three months, (d) three to four months and (e) more than four months between the date of a patient's request for reference by him to a mental health review tribunal and the date of the hearing during 1978.

    The following table gives, in respect of hearings which took place in 1978, the length of time that elapsed between the receipt by the Home Office of a patient's request for his case to be referred to a mental health review tribunal and the date of the hearing.

    Less than one monthOne to two monthsTwo to three monthsThree to four monthsMore than four months
    612313864

    asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what directions have been issued to hospitals concerning the procedures to be followed when a restricted patient absents himself without leave.

    Specific instructions are given in the case of each restricted patient

    1975197619771978
    Conditional discharge14106
    Tranfer63511
    No discharge or tranfer44612
    In addition, there was one case in 1976, two in 1977 and one in 1978 where the advice of the board drew attention to areas requiring further investigation before a final view could be reached. There were no recommendations for absolute discharge or the termination of the restriction order.The board's advice was accepted in all cases except for:

  • (a) one transfer recommendation in 1976;
  • (b) a transfer recommendation in 1975 and a discharge recommendation in each of the years 1976 and 1977. In each of these three cases the patient's relapse led to the withdrawal of the original recommendation before it could be put into effect;
  • (c) a transfer recommendation in 1978 on which no decision was taken because the case had to be referred again to the board in the light of subsequent developments.
  • asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many patients were recalled to hospital pursuant to section 66(3) of the Mental Health Act during 1976, 1977 and 1978; and in how many of such cases conditions of any previous conditional discharge had lapsed.

    The numbers of persons recalled to hospital under section 66(3) admitted to a National Health Service hospital that in the event of the patient's escape or failure to return from leave the local police should be informed at once. Similar action would be taken by the special hospitals.

    asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many of the recommendations of the Advisory Board on Restricted Patients were for (a) absolute discharge, (b) conditional discharge, (c) transfer from a special to a local hospital, (d) lifting of a restriction order, and (e) no discharge, transfer or lifting of a restriction order; and how many of the recommendations in each case were accepted by him.

    The recommendations of the Advisory Board on Restricted Patients in the period 1975–1978 were as follows:of the Mental Health Act 1959 are published annually in "Criminal Statistics, England and Wales"(table 18 of the volume for 1978, Cmnd. 7670). In only one case during the years 1976 to 1978 had the conditions of supervision and residence been discontinued at the time the recall took place.

    asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) in what circumstances he exercises his power under section 66(6) of the Mental Health Act 1959 to refer a conditionally discharged patient to a mental health review tribunal for its advice;(2) how many restricted patients, who have been conditionally discharged from hospital, requested reference to mental health review tribunals in pursuance of section 66(6) of the Mental Health Act during 1976, 1977 and 1978; and how many of these requests he accepted.

    A conditionally discharged patient has no statutory entitlement to require his case to be referred to a mental health review tribunal, but I may myself refer the case of such a patient to a tribunal if I think fit. There has been no occasion to do this in recent years, although I am aware of two such patients who have asked for their cases to be referred, both in 1978. I am, however, always prepared to consider such a request if it appears that the tribunal's advice would be of assistance.

    asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many patients are currently subject to restriction orders under section 65 of the Mental Health Act 1959; and how many of these patients are in (a) special hospitals, (b) local hospitals, and (c) neither local nor special hospitals.

    Information in the form requested is not available.The available information relates to patients who, on 31 December 1978, were subject to restrictions on discharge under section 65 or other equivalent provisions under part V of the Mental Health Act 1959. Of these patients, 1,261 were in special hospitals and 656 were in local hospitals. Information on patients who

    Reasons for absolute discharge197619771978
    Imposition of subsequent restriction order133
    Imposition of sentence of life imprisonment004
    Imposition of finite sentence of imprisonment232
    Repatriation of patient000
    Other reasons why restriction order no longer required for the protection of the public744

    asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department in how many cases in 1976, 1977 and 1978 where patients have been recalled to hospital pursuant to section 66(3) of the Mental Health Act 1959 the Secretary of State has referred the case to a mental health review tribunal within six months of the date of the warrant for recall.

    I regret that the information could be obtained only at disproportionate cost.

    Mentally-Ill Prisoners

    asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) how many people currently in prisons in England and Wales would be more appropriately placed in special or local psychiatric hospitals;(2) how many people currently detained in prisons in England and Wales fit the criteria set out in section 72(1)(

    a) and ( b) of the Mental Health Act 1959.

    were conditionally discharged and still liable to recall under section 66(3) of the Act could be obtained only at disproportionate cost.

    asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many patients who were subject to restriction orders under section 65of the Mental Health Act 1959 were absolutely discharged during 1976, 1977 and 1978; and in how many of such cases the absolute discharge was made (a) on account of the imposition of a subsequent restriction order, (b) on account of the imposition of a sentence of life imprisonment, (c) on account of the repatriation of the patient, and (d) where the Secretary of State was satisfied that it was no longer necessary for the patient to be subject to any of his legal powers of control or recall.

    The available information is as follows:able, 557 people in prison department establishments in England and Wales were suffering from mental disorder which in the opinion of prison medical officers warranted their detention in hospital for medical treatment. Of this number, 206 were unsentenced and four were non-criminal cases. The remaining 347 were convicted prisoners or trainees, of whom 174 were suffering from mental illness and of the remainder 143 from psychopathic disorder.

    Police (Complaints)

    asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what was the total number of complaints made against the police in 1977 and 1978, respectively; in each case, how many were not pursued; what were the reasons, including the numbers in each case, why such complaints were not pursued; and how many were pursued and therefore referred to the Police Complaints Board.

    In 1977 a total of 27,450 complaints were made against members of police forces in England and Wales. Of the 16,935 complaints completed by the end of the year, 7,917 were withdrawn or not proceeded with, the complainants having given written notification that they withdrew the complaints or did not wish any further action to be taken on them. After 1977, for the reasons given in chapter IX of the report of Her Majesty's Chief Inspector of Constabulary, 1978, statistical returns from police forces to the Home Office were made on the basis of complaints completed instead of complaints received. In 1978 a total of 28,234 complaints were completed in England and Wales, of which 12,955 were withdrawn or not proceeded with. The Police Complaints Board came into operation on 1 June 1977 and only complaints relating to police officers' conduct on or after that date had to be referred to the board. The reports of the board show that it dealt with 2,249 complaints in 1977, and 13,079 in 1978.

    asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if, having regard to table VI of the 1978 report of the Police Complaints Board, he will state in how many cases, where charges were preferred under section 2(1) and 2(3) complaints, convictions were obtained, for each type of complaint listed; and what was the range of penalties imposed.

    I refer the hon. Member to the reply I gave to a question by him on 15 January.

    asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department in how many cases, in each of the last three years, where complaints had been made against the police, police officers subsequently took out libel suits against those who had made complaints.

    I have asked chief officers of police for such information as may be available. I shall write to the hon. Member as soon as possible.

    Electoral Reform

    asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether the Government are now prepared to implement the recommendations of the Speaker's Conference on electoral reform on 21 October 1973, which proposed an amendment of section 4(3) of the Representation of the People Act 1949.

    Education And Science

    International Year Of The Child

    asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science if he will make a statement on his Departmeent's participation in the International Year of the Child; what work was carried out by his Department in connection with the International Year of the Child; and what further follow-up studies are being planned for 1980.

    My Department has so far contributed £25,000 towards the expenses of the United Kingdom Association for the International Year of the Child and has also made direct contributions to a number of projects linked to the IYC. These include the preparation of a directory of cultural and artistic opportunities for young persons and a research project on the education of schoolchildren for the role of parenthood. The need for follow-up studies will be considered in the light of a review of the Year's activities.

    Depo Provera (Research)

    asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science what research his Department is undertaking to ascertain the effects on the establishment of the reproductive cycle of female babies whose mothers have received Depo Provera, following post-partum rubella vaccination, during the nursing period.

    The Medical Research Council supports research into the long-term and delayed effects of oral contracentives including progesterone. This research may yield information relevant to injectable contraceptives which contain progesterone, of which Depo Provera is the most widely used. The council, however, is not at present undertaking work specifically related to Depo Provera.

    Public Bodies (Review)

    asked the Prime Minister what further progress has been made in her review of various public bodies.

    At the end of August 1979 Sir Leo Pliatzky was retained in the public service for the time being to help me in carrying this review forward. I received his report on non-departmental public bodies last month and I am presenting it to Parliament today as a White Paper—Cmnd. 7797.A substantial part of the report consists of a factual survey of executive, advisory and judicial bodies. I believe that this information will be of considerable value to Parliament and the public.The report also brings together the ministerial decisions which have so far been taken about the future of individual bodies. The effect of these decisions, including measures taken or announced at earlier stages in the review, will be to reduce the number of executive bodies by 30 and the number of advisory bodies by 211, with a consequent reduction of around 3,700 in the number of public appointments. Five judicial bodies are also to be wound up.The administrative economies from these measures, when fully implemented, will be roughly £11 million in a full year. These will be additional to the financial savings of about £350 million in 1980–81 from reductions made in the previously planned programmes of the largest executive-type bodies as a result of the general public expenditure exercise.The report also suggests some lessons for the future, based on a study of past experience. A general conclusion indicated is that a more cautious and selective approach should be adopted in the future towards the creation of non-departmental bodies, and in particular towards the "hiving off" of departmental functions to such bodies. The Government endorse this view. I can assure the House that we will look critically at all fresh proposals for new bodies and that we should be opposed to a policy of further hiving off of functions to non-Departmental public bodies.Other suggestions relate to control and accountability as regards new and existing non-Departmental bodies. The Government endorse these suggestions also, including the suggestion for taking a fresh look at each of the executive-type fringe bodies from time to time in the future. A stocktaking will be carried out later this year of a number of cases where decisions about individual bodies have still to be taken in the current review, and the Government will also carry out further reviews from time to time in later years.It will remain my objective to encourage the good management of public bodies which continue to serve the country, while dispensing with those for which there is no further need.

    Trade

    Ussr

    asked the Secretary of State for Trade if he will make a statement on the arrangements which he is making for the financing of British-Soviet trade after the credit arranged by the previous Government has been exhausted; and if the policy of Her Majesty's Government has been reviewed in the light of the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan.

    No decision has yet been taken about the arrangements for official support for British Soviet trade after the Anglo-Soviet credit agreement expires. This is one of the subjects that are being discussed with our Allies in the light of events in Afghanistan, in order to arrive at a common position.

    Energy

    Oil Quotas

    40.

    asked the Secretary of State for Energy what consideration has now been given to limiting quotas of oil from third countries by the Council of Ministers; and what progress will be made in achieving greater independence in energy resources for the remainder of this century.

    The EEC Energy Council has not discussed quota restrictions on oil imports from third countries. Member States have, however, agreed individual national targets for 1980 and 1985, within the Council's decision to set a Community net oil import objective of 472 million tonnes for the years 1980 to 1985. The Community and member States have also acted to promote energy conservation and the development of alternative energies through research and demonstration programmes. The vigorous energy conservation policies which are needed across the board will be fundamental to reducing the Community's future dependence on imported oil.

    Offshore Supplies Office (Deep Sea Mining)

    asked the Secretary of State for Energy if he will seek to extend the responsibilities of the Offshore Supplies Office to enable firms wishing to embark on deep sea mining to be assisted with information about opportunities in the new industry.

    Nuclear Power Stations

    asked the Secretary of State for Energy if, in the light of the undertaking given in a letter to the hon. Member for South Ayrshire from the hon. Member for Edinburgh, Pentlands (Mr. Rifkind) that a full public debate should precede any commitment to a major nuclear programme, he will now take steps to initiate such a debate.

    The Government attach great importance to informed public discussion of nuclear power and it is our policy and that of all concerned with the nuclear industry to make as much information available on nuclear safety as is reasonably possible.On fast reactor policy, to which my hon. Friend referred in this correspondence, no decisions have yet been taken, but we have already announced that any decision to build a full-scale commercial demonstration fast reactor would be subject to a full and thorough public inquiry. I have also told the House that an inquiry will be held in due course on the PWR.—[Vol. 976, c. 288.]

    Pressurised Water Reactors

    asked the Secretary of State for Energy whether fuel for the pressurised water reactor will be purchased from the United States of America if this type of reactor is adopted by the Central Electricity Generating Board.

    The procurement of fuel for a PWR station would be a matter for the CEGB. Licence arrangements already agreed between Westinghouse and BNFL would permit fuel to be manufactured in this country.

    asked the Secretary of State for Energy whether fuel for the pressurised water reactor can be enriched by the plant at Capenhurst; whether modifications will be required; and, if so, at what cost.

    Fuel for a United Kingdom pressurised water reactor could be enriched by the Capenhurst centrifuge plant without any modification to the plant. Many of Urenco's existing contracts are for enrichment supplies for PWRs in other countries.

    asked the Secretary of State for Energy whether spent fuel from a pressurised water reactor can be reprocessed by the plant at Windscale; whether modifications will be required; and, if so, at what cost.

    The thermal oxide reprocessing plant currently being designed for construction at Windscale will be able to reprocess PWR fuel elements. There are existing contracts with overseas customers for the reprocessing of such fuels.

    asked the Secretary of State for Energy what will be the type of cladding of fuel rods in a pressurised water reactor; and in what respects this will differ from the fuel rods used in the advanced gas cooled reactor design.

    Material currently used in pressurised water reactor designs for cladding of fuel rods is a zirconium alloy, whereas the cladding used in advanced gas cooled reactors is stainless steel.

    European Community (Imports-Exports)

    asked the Secretary of State for Energy (1) if he will tabulate in the Official Report the quantity, expressed in tons of coal equivalent and value of energy imported into and exported from the EEC, indicating the net position during the 1970s; and if he will indicate from information available to him the estimated situation for the remainder of the century allowing for anticipated expansion of the Community;(2) if he will tabulate in the

    Official Report, from information available to him, the tonnage and value of crude oil and refined petroleum products which

    has been exported from and imported to the EEC, indicating the net position in each year and in total in the last 10 years; and if he will indicate anticipated trends for the remainder of the century allowing for enlargement of the Community;

    (3) from information available to him, if he will tabulate in the Official Report the quantity and value of natural gas, including liquid petroleum gases, which has been imported into and exported from the EEC, indicating the net position for each of the last 10 years and in total; and if he will indicate anticipated trends for the remainder of the century allowing for enlargement of the Community;

    (4) from information available to him, if he will tabulate in the Official Report

    EEC* IMPORTS, EXPORTS AND NET IMPORTS OF ENERGY

    Coal, Coke and Briquettes

    Gas, Natural and Manufactured

    Petroleum and Petroleum Products

    Total Energy‡

    (million tonnes of coal equivalent)
    Imports1969....816816
    197033..934967
    197132..932964
    197232..9941,026
    197331..1,0701,101
    197439..1,0091,048
    197543..858901
    197645..925970
    197749*..883932*
    197848*..879927*
    Total║352..9,3009,652
    Exports1969....92*92*
    19706..103*109*
    19715..102*107*
    19724..117*121*
    19736..123*129*
    19749..98*107*
    19756..86*92*
    19766..89*95*
    19777..106*113*
    197810..120*130*
    Total║59..1,036*1,095*
    Net Imports1969....724*724*
    197027..831*858*
    197127..830*857*
    197228..877*905*
    197325..947*972*
    197430..911*941*
    197537..772*809*
    197639..836*875*
    197742*..777*819*
    197838*..759*797*
    Total║293..8,264*8,557*
    (billion US dollars)
    Imports19690·48·08·5
    19700·59·29·8
    19710·612·112·8
    19720·713·414·1
    19730·70·1§18·919·7
    19741·50·248·249·9
    19752·10·444·847·4
    19761·90·651·554·3
    19772·1*1·052·856·4
    19782·1*2·653·959·0
    Total║12·65·0312·8332·0

    the weight and value of coal and solid fuel products that have been imported into and exported from the EEC in each of the last 10 years, respectively, and in total; and if he will indicate anticipated trends for the remainder of the century.

    The information requested for the nine members of the present EEC for the years 1969 to 1979 is tabulated in terms of million tonnes of coal equivalent and in billions of United States dollars. The uncertainties attached to the determinants of prices and quantities of imports and exports of fuel for the EEC are so great that it would not be helpful to attempt to make forecasts.

    EEC* IMPORTS, EXPORTS AND NET IMPORTS OF ENERGY†

    Coal, Coke and Briquettes

    Gas, Natural and Manufactured

    Petroleum and Petroleum Products

    Total Energy‡

    (million tonnes of coal equivalent)
    Exports19690·11·2*1·4*
    19700·21·4*1·6*
    19710·21·71·9*
    19720·21-9*2·1*
    19730·30·12·7*3·1*
    19740·60·15·1*5· ·8*
    19750·60·25·1*5·9*
    19760·50·25·5*6·4*
    19770·50·27·1*8·0*
    19780·90·27·8*9·0*
    Total║4·01·139·5*45·2*
    Net Imports19690·26·8*7·1*
    19700·37·9*8·2*
    19710·510·4*10·9*
    19720·511·5*12·0*
    19730·516·1*16·6*
    19740·90·143-1*44·1*
    19751·50·239·7*44·6*
    19761·40·446·0*47·8*
    19771·60·845·7*48·4*
    19781·32·446·0*50·0*
    Total║8·64·0273·3*286·7*

    * Trade between the nine countries of the EEC has been excluded as far as possible However, the figures marked * include substantial amounts (up to 40 per cent.) which are not allocated by country and may well contain intra community trade.

    .. Not available on a comparable basis.
    —nil or less than 0·05.
    † Including non-energy products such as lubricants and petro-chemical feed stocks
    ‡The sum of the available items only. Not including electric energy.
    §Estimated.
    ║ The sums of the columns may not necessarily equal totals due to rounding.

    Source:

    OECD Trade Statistics publications.

    Scotland

    Great Line Crews (Unemployment)

    asked the Secretary of State for Scotland what steps he proposes to take to relieve unemployment among former crew members of Great Line fishing vessels in the North and North-East of Scotland.

    No Great Line fishermen are currently registered as unemployed at employment offices in the North and North-East of Scotland.

    Local Government Ombudsman

    asked the Secretary of State for Scotland whether the acceptance by the Local Government Ombudsman that objections on grounds of maladministration to a particular project being proceeded with come within his remit for consideration and judgment should result in work on the project being suspended; and if he will make a statement.

    Section 26(4) of the Local Government (Scotland) Act 1975 makes it clear that there is no obligation on a local authority to suspend action on a matter under investigation by the Ombudsman. A local authority is, however, free to decide to do so in the light of its own judgment of the circumstances of each case.

    Intermediate Centres

    asked the Secretary of State for Scotland how many boys will be catered for in the proposed intermediate centre at Blairgowrie; and where they will come from;

  • (2) what will be the cost to the Scottish Office of opening the intermediate centre in Blairgowrie;
  • (3) how many intermediate centres the Scottish Office plans to open in Tayside during 1980.
  • A voluntary group proposes to provide an intermediate treatment scheme for eight boys from the area of Blairgowrie, Coupar Angus and Alyth. My Department's grant is estimated at £10,000 for the purchase of a van and some building work and £15,000 per year for salaries. Intermediate treatment schemes are provided by local authorities and voluntary organisations, and I am not aware of any other plans to extend existing provision in Tayside.

    Northpress Project, Inverness

    asked the Secretary of State for Scotland if he will make a statement about the delay in proceeding with the Northpress project in Inverness, in view of the public investment involved and the prospects of secure employment.

    I am aware of the difficulties which have prevented Northpress Ltd. from starting a newspaper reproduction process in Inverness. These fall to be resolved by negotiation between the company and the trade unions concerned, and I understand that there are to be further discussions between the parties shortly. I hope that agreement can soon be reached.

    Police (Complaints)

    asked the Secretary of State for Scotland what has been the

    Lecturers/teachersPolice officers and cadetsFiremenAll other employees*
    1976
    March62,60112,9183,823177,408
    June62,82812,8593,830177,631
    September63,00712,7613,888176,281
    December63,87212,6983,868173,265
    1977
    March63,88312,7323,877170,159
    June63,35712,4883,879168,355
    September62,98512,3953,848166,286
    December63,97712,4073,873165,034
    1978
    March63,97712,3773,794165,445
    June63,55212,3163,807168,278
    September64,10612,6113,996170,818
    December64,18312,8424,224170,828
    1979
    March64,17313,0684,325172,273
    June64,12813,2704,441174,865
    September64,53613,6754,446176,193
    * Excluding employment created by the job creation and special temporary employment schemes.

    National Finance

    Trustee Savings Banks

    asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer when he expects to bring forward further legislation affecting the operation of trustee savings banks.

    number of complaints against the police alleging assaults for each year since 1970; in how many cases each year the procurator fiscal recommended prosecution; what percentage is this each year of total complaints; in how many cases each year prosecution led to conviction; what was the range of penalties imposed each year on convicted police officers; and how many police officers were subject each year to each penalty within the range of penalties.

    This information is not readily available. I shall reply to the hon. Member as soon as possible.

    Local Authorities (Manpower)

    asked the Secretary of State for Scotland if he will publish the figures for local authority manpower, in terms of full-time equivalents, for each quarter from March 1976 to date, broken down into figures for teachers and lecturers, policemen and firemen, and other employees respectively.

    Legislation will be introduced in the 1980 Finance Bill which will change the trustee savings banks' status for tax purposes from that of investment companies to bring them into line with other trading concerns. The legislation, with appropriate transitional provisions, will apply to the accounting periods beginning 21 November 1979. The change follows the closing of the ordinary department and continues the development of the trustee savings banks towards full banking status.

    asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer what action he proposes to take to promote further amalgamation of trustee savings banks.

    Bank Of Ireland (British Accounts)

    asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer what steps he proposes to take in connection with the restrictions being placed by the Bank of Ireland on the transfer to the United Kingdom of accounts held in the bank by British account holders; if he has examined the compatibility of such restrictions with EEC rules; and if he will make a statement.

    Tax Repayments

    asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer whether the Inland Revenue has de minim is limits for automatic repayments of tax.

    Where an assessment has been made, and this shows a repayment due to the taxpayer, repayment is invariably made of the full amount. But where the end of year check applied to schedule E taxpayers shows an overpayment or £5 or less, an assessment is not made except at the taxpayer's request; for larger sums an assessment is made automatically. Where an employer has paid over more PAYE tax during the year than the amount shown on his returns, and exceptionally it is not practicable to carry the excess forward to the next year, a repayment is not made automatically if the excess is £5 or less.As regards payment of tax assessed, where a payment to the collector exceeds the amount due, and the discrepancy is not noted before the payment has been processed, the excess is not repaid automatically unless it is greater than £1.For capital transfer tax, assessments which lead to repayments of sums overpaid are not initiated automatically by the capital taxes office if the amount involved is £10 or less.The aim of these tolerances is to minimise work which is highly cost-ineffective; they cannot operate to deny a repayment to a taxpayer who has claimed his full entitlement.

    Environment

    Publicly Owned Land (Disposal)

    asked the Secretary of State for the Environment what representations he has received from local authority associations about the need for local councils to receive early notification about the disposal of surplus publicly owned land; and what steps he is taking to meet this request.

    The London Boroughs Association, the Association of Metropolitan Authorities and the Association of County Councils have asked for early notification of surplus Government land for disposal.As from now this land will be advertised in the

    Estates Gazette under a new special heading "Surplus Government Land", in each case as soon as possible after it has been declared surplus by the Government Department concerned.

    Housing (Homeless Persons) Act

    asked the Secretary of State for the Environment when he expects to complete his review of the Housing (Homeless Persons) Act.

    I am not as yet able to say as not all the interested organsations who have been invited to do so have yet given their views on the operation of the Act.

    International Year Of The Child

    asked the Secretary of State for the Environment if he will make a statement on his Department's participation in the International Year of the Child; what work was carried out by his Department in connection with the International Year of the Child; and what further follow-up studies are being planned for 1980.

    The Department's participation is detailed as follows:

  • (i) Representation on the inter-departmental group concerned with the Inter- national Year of the Child, and contribution to the general work undertaken by the Government in response to questionnaires and other inquiries from the United Nations;
  • (ii) The provision of rent-free accommodation by the Property Services Agency for the United Kingdom Committee for the International Year of the Child;
  • (iii) Representation on the technical committee of the British Standards Institution concerned with the production of a new British Standard on play equipment. (Parts 2 and 3 of the Standard, BS 5696, were published in February 1979;
  • (iv) The publication of a paper (HDD 4/78) surveying the homes and life-styles of handicapped children;
  • (v) An invitation to local authorities in connection with the urban programme 1979–80 to consider in particular the needs of children (the outcome was that the Department allocated £2·4 million in 1979 to 125 child-related projects drawn up by local authorities and voluntary bodies);
  • (vi) Involvement in the organisation and administration of the great children's party which took place in Hyde Park in May 1979, and which was enjoyed by tens of thousands of children from all over the country;
  • (vii) The sponsorship of research on the development of safer playground surfaces, carried out in conjunction with the London borough of Lewisham—this work is approaching completion and the results should be published in due course;
  • (viii) The mounting of a pilot extension of the home accident surveillance survey to cover accidents in playgrounds—jointly with the Department of Trade;
  • (ix) The preparation of a report of an investigation carried out by the Department of the problems of children and their parents living in multi-storey accommodation.
  • Transport

    Cars (Pavement Parking)

    asked the Minister of Transport whether, in view of the fact that the parking of cars on pavements can be a hazard to pedestrians, particularly the blind and disabled, he proposes to bring forward legislation to make the practice illegal.

    Section 7 of the Road Traffic Act 1974 already makes provision for a national ban on footway parking beside urban roads, but, although we are very conscious that such parking can be a hazard to blind and disabled pedestrians, amongst others, my right hon. Friend has decided, for the reasons given in his reply to my hon. Friend the Mem- ber for Harrogate (Mr. Banks) on 27 July—[Vol. 971, c. 631–32]—that it is necessary to defer implementation of section 7.However, yellow line waiting restrictions apply to the footway as well as the carriageway, and there are other powers to control footway parking. Heavy goods vehicles are prohibited from parking on all footways under the Heavy Commercial Vehicles (Controls and Regulations) Act 1973. Both dangerous parking and obstruction are offences, and local authorities have power to ban parking on individual lengths of footway. In addition, we are doing what we can in the present circumstances to discourage footway parking by giving publicity to the inconvenience it causes.

    Heavy Vehicles (Taxation)

    asked the Minister of Transport what was the difference between road costs and tax revenue for a 4-axle 32-ton articulated vehicle in the year 1977-78 based on (a) road expenditure and vehicle taxation as estimated in the annex to the transport policy White Paper 1977 and (b) the actual road expenditure and vehicle taxation in 1977–78.

    To smooth out variations in road expenditure for the purposes of track cost allocations, it is the practice to use the average of three years' expenditure. When the relevant estimates were prepared for the 1977 transport policy White Paper, 1977–78 was the last of the relevant three years. Had forecast expenditure for that year alone been used, the difference between the allocated costs and revenue for the 4-axle 32-ton articulated vehicle would have been £400 compared with the £900 quoted in the 1977 White Paper. Actual expenditure for 1977–78 has proved to be lower than was estimated, and if that figure were used in a restrospective recalculation for 1977–78 the deficit on this vehicle would work out at less than £400. But there are other factors relevant to the size of deficit (for example, vehicle populations, average mileages, vehicle load factors, changed patterns of road expenditure) and a complete and comparable calculation would require a major exercise.The outturn expenditure figure for 1977–78 has of course been taken into account in determining the three-year average of expenditure for the latest track cost calculations (1979–80). I am sending a copy of these to my hon. Friend.

    Road Schemes (Contracts)

    asked the Minister of Transport if, in order to prevent unfair competition from direct labour departments, he will refuse to approve road schemes of over £100,000 unless they have been advertised for contract.

    For trunk road schemes in excess of £100,000 it is my normal policy that the work should be undertaken by direct labour only if competitive tenders have been invited in the normal way and the estimate by the DLO is the most favourable. I have no control over the allocation of work by local authorities on their road schemes, but the Government will produce proposals in the Local Government (Planning and Land) Bill to expose direct labour departments to more competition in appropriate circumstances.

    Employment

    Manpower Services Commission

    asked the Secretary of State for Employment if he will list those changes in services and programmes that the Manpower Services Commission is proposing as a result of the proposed reduction in its staffing levels by approximately 3,400.

    [pursuant to his reply, 14 January 1980]: The Manpower Services Commission has submitted to me its corporate plan 1980–84. This contains details of how the proposed reduction in its staffing levels might be achieved, and the MSC's proposals are summarised below. These proposals are subject to approval by the Secretary of State and he will be discussing them with the commission.In formulating its plans, I understand from the commission that it has adopted three main priorities: safeguarding the provision of skilled manpower, increasing opportunities for training and work experience for young people, and providing a completely modern employment service. The commission, however, considers that, in consequence of the staff reductions, some reductions in present levels of service are inescapable.

    Under the corporate plan proposals, the number of posts in the commission's employment service division would fall by 2,006 in the next two to three years. This would include a reduction of 433 posts in the general placing service, allowing for the effects of the capital computer development and the computerisation of unemployment and vacancy statistics. Smaller reductions in the division's other services and 512 posts saved in recruitment, staff training and reduction in service.

    The training services division would save 1,109 posts. 520 of these would be in the skill centre network, the rationalisation of which is now being considered by the commission. 245 posts would be saved as a result of reductions in clerical, commercial and other non-skillcentre training. 344 posts would be saved in overall head office and regional staff. Numbers trained under the training opportunities scheme would fall from over 70,000 to about 60,000 a year.

    The special programmes division would save 100 posts, and the commission's support services would save 185 posts.

    Civil Service

    Public Servants (Redundancy And Severance Payments)

    asked the Minister for the Civil Service whether he will give for the latest and most convenient stated date the redundancy and severance pay entitlements to those now employed in public service.

    The redundancy and severance pay entitlements of public service employees vary from service to service and with the circumstances in which redundancy occurs. Full details of the provisions currently applying to civil servants are contained in section 10 of the Principal Civil Service Pension Scheme, a copy of which is available in the Library.

    House Of Commons Official Report

    asked the Minister for the Civil Service if he will state the precise reasons for the non-publication of part II of the Official Report of 21 December 1979.

    Part II of the Official Report of 21 December 1979 was pub- lished on Wednesday 9 January 1980. A part II was necessary in the first place because of the amount of matter to be completed and because of shortage of staff at the St. Stephen's Parliamentary Press.

    Public Service Pensions

    asked the Minister for the Civil Service how many retired persons in receipt of a public service pension

    Amount of the increaseNumber of pensionersPercentage of all pensionersCumulative percentage total
    More than £2,500180·0050·005
    £2,000 to £2,500600·0170·02
    £1,500 to £2,0002500·070·09
    £1,000 to £1,5002,9000·80·9
    £500 to £1,00020,5005·96·8
    £200 to £50074,00021·328·1
    Below £200250,00071·9100·0
    I regret that corresponding information on other public service pension schemes is not available centrally.

    Documents (Security Classification)

    asked the Minister for the Civil Service what the criteria are by which documents are currently classified as, respectively, restricted, confidential, secret and top secret.

    a) RESTRICTED

    Information the unauthorised disclosure of which would be undesirable in the interests of the nation;

    ( b) CONFIDENTIAL

    Information the unauthorised disclosure of which would be prejudicial to the interests of the nation;

    ( c) SECRET

    Information the unauthorised disclosure of which would cause serious injury to the interests of the nation;

    ( d) TOP SECRET

    Information the unauthorised disclosure of which would cause exceptionally grave damage to the nation.

    The "interests of the nation" are interpreted broadly, and are not confined to national security in the military sense.

    Industry

    British Steel Corporation

    asked the Secretary of State for Industry if he will publish a table showing the subsidies he estimates received an increase last year in their pension of, respectively (a) more than £2,500, (b) £2,000 to £2,500, (c) £1,500 to £2,000, (d) £1,000 to £1,500, (e) £500 to £1,000 and (f) less than £500.

    The table below shows the approximate number of retired civil servants who will be paid the annual amounts shown as a result of the 16 per cent. increase on 12 November 1979:given to the British Steel Corporation over each of the past five years expressed as an annual sum per person employed by the corporation.

    asked the Secretary of State for Industry if he will publish a comparison of the scale of employment provided by the British Steel Corporation with that of all other major steel producers; and if in his comparison he will include all those indirectly employed by overseas producers in occupations which are carried out by persons directly employed by the British Steel Corporation.

    British Shipbuilders

    asked the Secretary of State for Industry if he will publish a table showing the subsidies given to British Shipbuilders in each year since it was established, expressed as an annual sum per person employed by British Shipbuilders.

    Steel Production

    asked the Secretary of State for Industry what is the profit or loss per ton of steel produced by all steel production companies or organisations within the EEC which produced more than 1 million tonnes of steel in 1978–79; and what dividend, interest or return on capital was paid by each of them.

    Figures for all steel production companies and organisations within the EEC which produced more than 1 million tonnes of steel in 1978–79 are not readily available, nor are comparable figures for dividends, interest or return on capital. The following are the profit and loss figures for some of the largest companies for the latest available year:

    12 months endingProfit/(loss) per tonne
    £
    Arbed31 December 1978(6)
    BSC31 March 1979(17)
    Cockerill31 December 1978(20)
    Estel31 December 1978(6)
    Krupp31 December 1978(3)
    Italsider31 December 1978(21)
    Peine-Salzgitter30 September 1978(10)
    Thyssen30 September 19783
    Usinor31 December 1978(23)

    Source: Published Data.

    Some of these companies have reported improved performances in recent months.

    Social Services

    London Health Planning Consortium

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services whether the independent study groups set up by the London health planning consortium have yet reported on the future pattern of cardio-thoracic, neurological and neuro-surgical services in the Thames regions and when he expects a decision to be reached about the future of the regional units now at the Brooke hospital, Woolwich.

    The study group on cardiology and cardio thoracic surgery reported in October 1979—copies of the report are in the Library; the report of the study group on neurology and neurosurgery is expected in February. Through its parent bodies, the consortium has invited comments on the former report and a similar procedure will be adopted when the latter report is received. In the light of the comments received the consortium will—later this year—reach its own conclusions and make recommendations. Decisions will then be a matter for the responsible health and academic authori- ties or, if need be, by Ministers in the interest of achieving a balanced and compatible provision of services across London as a whole.

    International Year Of The Child

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services if he will make a statement on his Department's participation in the International Year of the Child; what work was carried out by his Department in connection with the International Year of the Child; and what further follow-up studies are being planned for 1980.

    The Department took the lead in co-ordinating the Government's response to the International year of the Child, including regular liaison with the United Kingdom Association for the International Year of the Child, which organised the national programme for the year, with the help of a Government grant of £138,000 over a two-year period for administrative expenses.The year was marked by the following major events organised by the Department:

  • (1) a study conference in May for about 50 people, organised jointly with the Department of Education and Science and the National Children's Bureau, on preparation for parenthood;
  • (2) a conference in July for over 800 people on the intermediate treatment of young offenders in the community;
  • (3) a conference in December for about 250 people, organised jointly with the Children's Committee, on the reduction of perinatal mortality and morbidity.
  • All three conferences were successful in focussing attention on topics to which my right hon. Friend attaches great importance. The proceedings of the first conference have recently been published. Those for the other conferences will be published shortly. The Department approved the following grants in support of projects connected with the Year:

  • (1) £9,900 to the United Kingdom Assocation for a feasibility study on the establishment of a children's legal centre;
  • (2) £15,000 to the National Children's Bureau for the project "The Condition of Children" which has two main objectives: —
  • (a) a compilation of a register of sources of statistical information on children in the United Kingdom;
  • (b) the preparation of detailed commentaries on particular subjects to describe the condition of children in those subject areas;
  • (3) £3,900 to the United Kingdom Assocation to produce a pamphlet "Whose Child" on the rights of children in care.
  • During 1980 the Department will continue to support worthwhile projects in this and similar fields as occasion arises, and to take other initiatives in pursuance of its general responsibilities for children.

    Advice And Information

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services (1) when he expects to publish the annual copy of "Which Benefit? 60 Ways You can get Cash Help", showing the current rates;(2) when he expects to publish the annual copy of "Family Benefits and Pensions", showing the current rates of benefit.

    "Family Benefits and Pensions" and "Which Benefit?" covered a similar range of information on contributions and benefits, although originally intended for different readerships. However, because of its shorter, simpler and more uniform presentation, we believe that nearly all readers will find

    All indices: April 1975=100
    Retirement pensionEarnings*Retail prices
    Month in yearIndexPer cent. increase since last rateIndexPer cent. increase since last rateIndexPer cent. increase since last rate
    April 1975100·0100·0100·0
    November 1975114·714·7111·511·5111·711·7
    November 1976131·915·0126·213·2128·415·0
    November 1977150·914·4137·08·6145·213·1
    November 1978168·111·4155·313·3156·98·1
    November 1979200·919·5180·1†15·9l84·117·3
    *Based on the movements in the seasonally adjusted index of average earnings (older series) from April 1975 to November 1976 and thereafter on movements in the index of average earnings (whole economy), unadjusted, as published by the Department of Employment. The whole economy index, which is more comprehensive than the older series index, did not exist before 1976.
    †'As at October 1979, the latest figure available (provisional).
    ‡ Based on the movements in the general index of retail prices as published by the Department of Employment.

    1981 Census

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services how many representations he has had concerning the proposed question on race in the 1981 census; and if he will list those organisations in favour and those against; and when he expects to make a final decision on the inclusion of a question on race in the 1981 census.

    Representations, made either in writing or orally at consultative meetings, have been received "Which Benefit?" the more useful of the two publications. Preparation of a single leaflet is also more economical in terms of staff resources and production costs. For these reasons, in future we will publish only "Which Benefit?".Printing of the new edition of "Which Benefit?" has been delayed, but delivery from the printers is now expected later this month.

    Earnings And Pensions

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services if he will publish in the Official Report a table listing (a) the value of retirement pensions, (b) gross average earnings and (c) the level of the price index (1945 equals 100) and the percentage increase in each, for every up rating in pensions since 1975.

    The information requested by the hon. Member is given in the following table, which has been prepared on the assumption that he had in mind 1975, not 1945, for the base of 100.from some 70 organisations and individuals. Whilst some have supported and some opposed a question on race or ethnic origin, others have commented without clearly stating their position. It would not be helpful to list the organisations at this stage, but my right hon. Friend will be making a full statement in due course.

    Patients (Psycho-Surgery)

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services how many patients have undergone psych-surgery in each of the years 1975 to 1979.

    Statistics on psycho-surgery operations were not collected centrally prior to 1977, and the 1979 data are not yet available. The number of referrals for psycho-surgery operations reported by NHS hospitals in England and Wales was 44 for 1977 and 44 for 1978.

    Mentally Handicapped Children (Sterilisation)

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services when he plans to issue the guidelines on sterilisation of mentally handicapped children under the age of 16 mentioned in circular DS/333/75.

    Comments from organisations and authorities on the discussion paper circulated with DS/333/75

    Special hospitals
    Sections of Mental Health Act 1959BroadmoorRamptonMoss SidePark Lane
    MaleFemaleMaleFemaleMaleFemaleMaleFemale
    (a) Section 26442811210466394
    (b) Section 60591275124677
    (c) Sections 60 and 6537859309311321339
    (d) Sections 71, 72, 73 and 744294931916
    (e) Sections 29, 25 and 136

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services how many of the patients currently detained in each of the special hospitals are in the following age groups (a) less than 12 years of age, (b) 12 to 14 years, (c) 14 to

    Special hospitals
    BroadmoorRamptonMoss SidePark Lane
    Age groupMaleFemaleMaleFemaleMaleFemaleMaleFemale
    14 to 16 years2
    16 to 18 years1311
    18 to 21 years1442444571
    21 to 65 years5731095971912396564
    65 to 75 years1079332
    More than 75 years2221
    Grand totals5991216352002977667
    There are no patients under 14 years of age in the special hospitals.

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services on how many occasions patients in mental illness and mental handicap hospitals were sterilised during the years 1975 to 1979;

    revealed no general acceptance that a code of practice on this subject was either necessary or likely to be helpful. My right hon. Friend has at present no plans to issue guidance in relation to the sterilisation of mentally handicapped children.

    Mentally-Ill Patients

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services how many patients currently in each of the special hospitals are detained under (a) section 26, (b) section 60, (c) sections 60 and 65, (d) sections 71, 72, 73 and 74, and (e) sections 29, 25 or 136 of the Mental Health Act 1959.

    d) 16 to 18 years, ( e) 18 to 21 years, ( f) 21 to 65 years, ( g) 65 to 75 years, and ( h) more than 75 years of age.

    The information as at 8 January 1980 is as follows:whether he is satisfied that in each case the patient was capable of giving valid legal consent; and if the patient was not capable what form of consent was accepted.

    Sterilisation operations are not carried out in mental illness or mental handicap hospitals. Patients in these hospitals who require to be sterilised are treated in general hospitals which do not record the mental status of the patient. It is for the doctor in charge to ensure that legal and ethical requirements as to consent are observed.

    Patients (Special Hospitals)

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services whether he is satisfied that special hospitals provide an appropriate environment for the care and treatment of children and adolescents requiring special security; what are the alternative facilities for this group of patients; and whether he has any plans for creating new facilities for patients of these kinds.

    The decision to admit to a special hospital is taken only after careful consideration of all the facts, including what other facilities are available. This is particularly so in the case of a young person. Only if there are no other facilities offering the care and treatment required in the degree of security thought necessary is it decided to admit a young person to a special hospital.No new facilities for this small group of young persons are planned.

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services how many patients who were admitted to each of the special hospitals during 1976, 1977 and 1978 had previously been detained in special hospitals.

    The information is as follows:

    197619771978
    Broadmoor161011
    Rampton253417
    Moss Side835
    Park Lane11

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services how many patients from each area health authority are currently detailed in each special hospital.

    I regret that the information is not readily available, and the costs of obtaining it would be excessive.

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services how many patients in each of the special hospitals do not now, in his opinion, require treatment under conditions of special security.

    The information, as at 1 January 1980, in respect of patients who have been recommended by their responsible medical officers for transfer or discharge from the special hospitals is as follows:

    Broadmoor hospital51
    Rampton hospital142
    Moss Side hospital34
    Park Lane hospital9
    236
    Where a patient is subject to the special restrictions set out in section 65 of the Mental Health Act 1959, it is necessary to have the agreement of the Home Secretary before he or she can be transferred or discharged. In a number of cases agreement in principle has already been received and in others action to seek it is in train.

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services how many patients there are in each of the special hospitals currently awaiting transfer to a local hospital; how many of these are restricted patients; and into which area health authorities they are to be transferred.

    At 1 January 1980 there were 169 patients in the special hospitals who were thought by their responsible medical officers to be ready for transfer to local psychiatric or mental handicap hospitals, and of these 86 were restricted patients. Fuller details are given in the following table.

    Broadmoor

    Rampton

    Moss Side

    Park Lane

    Totals

    Regional Health Authority

    Restricted

    Unrestricted

    Restricted

    Unrestricted

    Restricted

    Unrestricted

    Restricted

    Unrestricted

    Restricted

    Unrestricted

    Northern611181
    Yorkshire242246
    Trent167178
    East Anglia11323
    North West Thames34272
    North East Thames157269
    South East Thames4591109
    South West Thames11112
    Wessex2122254
    Oxford22343
    South Western241822820
    West Midlands76421128
    Mersey121132
    North Western1122143
    Wales41353
    TOTALS2247671214528683

    In addition, there are 14 patients (8 Rampton, 6 Moss Side), all restricted, who are awaiting transfer to the East dale unit at Balderton hospital, Newark. Information in respect of the area health authorities to which the patients are to be transferred is not readily available, and an attempt to provide it would be disproportionate in terms of time and cost.

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services how many patients in each of the special hospitals have been assessed as fit to be discharged but remain under detention on account of the absence of suitable community accommodation and local authority supervision.

    I regret that it is not possible to give a numerical answer to this question. The availability of suitable accommodation and support in the community are factors which must be taken into account by those concerned in determining a patient's suitability for discharge into the community, and until such facilities suited to the individual patient's needs can be provided it is usually impossible to say that the patient "has been assessed as fit for discharge". Where for any reason a patient cannot be discharged to his family home it is not always possible to obtain hostel places as quickly as might ideally be desirable. There are, however, only a very few cases in which the delay exceeds six months and these are usually because the patient has very special needs, provision of which is inevitably limited. No difficulties have been experienced in obtaining local authority supervision once accommodation has been obtained.

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services what steps he has taken since 3 May 1979 to facilitate the transfer or discharge of patients from special hospitals in those cases where their detention is no longer necessary in conditions of special security.

    The difficulties in arranging transfers of special hospital patients to NHS hospitals are varied and complex. Officials of the Department are constantly looking for ways of overcoming these difficulties. In recent months, they have continued to visit NHS hospitals for direct discussions with local consultants about particular cases and they have had meetings with representatives of a number of health authorities, with further meetings at present being planned. In an effort to encourage closer and better understanding between the special hospitals and NHS hospitals, they have continued to encourage consultants from NHS hospitals to visit the special hospitals with members of their nursing teams so that they can obtain first-hand knowledge of the patients who have been recommended for transfer to their hospitals. Alternatively, in suitable cases, arrangements have been made for special hospital patients to be taken to the NHS hospitals for assessment by the local clinical team. In order further to reassure hospital staffs the practice has also been adopted in all appropriate cases of giving undertakings that patients will be readily re-admitted to the special hospital should difficulties arise.

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services what discussions he has had since 3 May 1979 with the Confederation of Health Service Employees and the National Union of Public Employees concerning the imposition of bans by staff in local psychiatric hospitals on the reception of patients detained under part V of the Mental Health Act 1959.

    We have not so far discussed this subject with either of these two unions, since I understand that neither union has a national policy against the acceptance of such patients. Any ban at a particular hospital results from a local staff decision and it is primarily the responsibility of local management to resolve such disputes and ensure that the hospital meets its responsibilities.

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services in how many cases in the last five years the power to transfer a patient from a special to a local psychiatric hospital under section 99(2) of the Mental Health Act 1959 has been used; and in what circumstances he would consider its use to be appropriate.

    No patients have been transferred from special hospitals to other hospitals under this section during the last five years. All such transfers have been made with the consent of the receiving hospital under section 41 of the 1959 Act. My right hon. Friend would make directions for the transfer of a patient under section 99(2) only where he was satisfied that this would be in the best interests both of the patient concerned and of other patients.

    Broadmoor Hospital

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services in what ways the guidelines on seclusion recently put into operation at Broadmoor hospital change previous practice at the hospital; and whether the rooms used to accommodate secluded patients are the same as those used prior to the implementation of those guidelines.

    The main effect of the guidelines is to clarify previously unwritten practises rather than to introduce changes. They cover the following aspects: —

    —definition of seclusion, standards for the room used, clothing and amenities which may be provided, toilet and exercise arrangements.
    —arrangements for notifying senior staff and for drawing up a programme of care.
    —records to be kept and reporting arrangements.
    Two single rooms in Somerset House which were the subject of criticism by the European Commission on Human Rights are now no longer used for patient care and the main hospital facility for special care has since been transferred from Somerset House to Norfolk House. Patients may, however, be secluded in any of the single room sin use for patient accommodation.

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services what was the patient population of Broadmoor at the end of each of the last five years; what is the population now; and when he expects that there will be no overcrowding at the hospital.

    The information is as follows:

    1974811
    1975766
    1976769
    1977745
    1978708
    The population at 11 January 1980 was 721.

    It is not possible to forecast with accuracy when the overcrowding at Broadmoor will cease, since there are many possible factors which could affect the situation. It is hoped that the number of patients there will diminish as the the building of the Park Lane hospital progresses and admissions there increase.

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services how many fires have occurred at Broadmoor in the last five years; what was the extent of the damage in each case; and what have been the implications of the fire which occurred on 29 November 1979 for the accommodation of the patients.

    Five fires have occurred in Broadmoor hospital during the last five years. Three were relatively minor, causing little or no damage to patient accommodation. A more serious fire in May 1974 gutted a patients' day room and caused considerable smoke damage to the walls of corridors and some sleeping accommodation. In the fire on 29 November 1979 a small store room was gutted, a portion of the roof above the store room was damaged and there was smoke damage to the walls of adjacent corridors, single bedrooms and day rooms. It was necessary to provide alternative sleeping accommodation for three patients for two nights and alternative dining accommodation for about 20 patients for three weeks.

    Elderly Persons (Heating Allowance)

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services what is his estimate of the number of people over 75 years on supplementary benefit who will receive extra cash for heating, over and above what they already receive, as a result of the new Government measures announced recently to help people with fuel bills.

    I refer the right hon. Gentleman to the statement made by my right hon. Friend on 22 October 1979 in announcing the new measures.—[Vol. 972. c. 35–36.]

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services how many people over 75 years on supplementary benefit already receive an extra heating additional allowance; and what percentage of all pensioners over 75 years are on supplementary benefit.

    For the first part of the question I refer the right hon. Gentleman to my reply to the hon. Member for Birkenhead (Mr. Field) on 29 October 1979.—[Vol. 972, c. 438–43.] As to the second part, it is estimated that, in November 1978, approximately 26 per cent, of all retirement pensioners over the age of 75 were supplementary benefit recipients or the wives of supplementary benefit recipients.

    Special Hospitals

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services how many disciplinary proceedings took place in

    YearBroadmoorRamptonMoss SidePark Lane
    19762 (1)Nil3 (3)2 (Nil)
    19773 (2)Nil2 (Nil)Nil
    197810 (5)Nil4 (Nil)2 (2)

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services what building works are in progress or planned in the special hospitals; and when such works are expected to be completed.

    HospitalWorkLatest expected completion date
    Broadmoor1. Provision of a further staff hostelJune 1980.
    2. Provision of staff changing facilitiesFebruary 1980.
    3. Redevelopment of hospital—1st phase of Advance works (due to commence in August 1980).October 1981.
    4. Redevelopment of hospital—2nd phase of Advance works (due to commence in March 1981).August 1982.
    5. Redevelopment of hospital—Stage 1 (5 wards, Control Centre, Medical Centre, Administration Building, Stores and Kitchens—due to commence in April 1982) (4 subsequent stages follow with a final estimated completion date of 1993).March 1984.
    Park Lane1. Hospital Building—Phase 1 (4 wards)Mid 1980.
    2. Hospital Building—Phase 2 (4 wards and kitchens)Mid 1981.
    3. Hospital Building—Phases 3 and 4 (7 wards, Assembly Hall, Chapel, Medical Centre, Occupation Centre, Education Centre, Recreation Centre, Central Centre).No firm date yet available.
    4. Vehicle Charging BayNo firm date yet available.
    Moss Side1. Farm and Garden ComplexPlanning stage only.
    Rampton1. Rebuilding of Catherine Ward March 1981.
    2 New workshopsPlanning stage only with expected date of start in 1980.
    3. Storage and toilet facilities for existing workshops
    4. New Psychology Building
    5. Modernisation of existing housing stockFeasibility stage only.

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services how many responsible medical officers are currently working in each of the special hospitals; and how many of them have psychiatric qualifications.

    There are currently eight responsible medical officers at Rampton, seven at Broadmoor, four at each of the special hospitals during 1976, 1977 and 1978 involving members of staff; in how many cases members of staff were suspended; and in how many cases professional bodies were notified.

    Formal disciplinary proceedings (as distinct from cases in which staff were warned by supervisors) were taken against staff in the special hospitals as shown in the following table. The figures in brackets represent the number of cases in which staff were suspended. There were no cases in 1976, 1977 and 1978 in which management notified professional bodies following disciplinary proceedings.

    Building work on the maintenance, refurbishment and redevelopment of the special hospital is a continuous process; the table below shows the main work planned or in progress.Moss Side and two at Park Lane. All, except one who is a locum, have postgraduate psychiatric qualifications.

    Secure Units

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services what is the annual cost of maintaining a patient in an interim secure unit in those cases where such units are currently in operation.

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services what in 1979 prices would be the likely annual cost of maintaining a patient in a regional secure unit in each health region (a) taking account of capital costs and (b) discounting, capital costs.

    Plans are not sufficiently far advanced for estimates to be given for each region. However, four regions have provided estimates of running cost per patient ranging from approximately £10,000 to £15,000 per annum at 1978–79 prices, without taking into account capital costs. Information on the effect of capital expenditure on the cost of maintaining patients at these units is not available.

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services whether he is now satisfied that all money allocated for regional secure units is now being spent by regional health authorities for the intended purposes.

    The Department will be writing shortly to regional health authorities for information on how they are using their special revenue allocations for regional secure units in 1979–80 and my right hon. Friend will be considering the position in the light of their replies.

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services what interim secure units are now operating;

    Up to 1 month1 to 2 months2 to 3 months3 to 4 monthsOver 4 months
    1977728410383
    19789225117155
    197922121013521

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services what steps he proposes to take to reduce the length of time between the receipt of a patient's application for, or reference to, a mental health review tribunal and the date of the hearing.

    what regional secure units are now operating; and when he expects all the planned regional secure units to be operating.

    There are no permanent secure units operating at present, but 11 of the 14 regional health authorities have submitted proposals to the Department. I expect that all of the units now being planned should be operational by the mid-'80s.Health authorities advise that interim secure units have been established as follows:

    RegionHospital
    NorthernSt. Luke's
    YorkshireStorthes Hall Stanley Royd High Royds
    WessexKnowle
    West MidlandsColeshill Hall
    MerseyRainhill
    Parkside
    North WesternPrestwich
    There are also other secure facilities available for disturbed mentally handicapped patients at Aston Hall (Trent), Little Plumstead (Fast Anglia), Leavesden (North-West Thames) and Calderstones (North Western).

    Mental Health Review Tribunals

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services how many patients waited (a) less than one month, (b) one or two months, (c) two to three months, (d) three to four months and (e) more than four months between the date of the patient's application for a mental health review tribunal and the date of the hearing during 1977, 1978 and 1979.

    The information related to the first hearing of the case by a tribunal is as follows:early in 1979 have been overcome. I am satisfied that at present the support services which the Department provides are adequate to deal with the work of the mental health review tribunals.

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services how many patients withdrew their applications to mental health review tribunals in 1977, 1978 and 1979; how many of these were special hospital patients; and how many were considered by the tribunal clerks to be withdrawn for unacceptable reasons.

    The information is as follows:

    WithdrawalsBy special hospital patients
    1977435
    19785110
    1979466
    I understand that, after investigation, in accordance with the wishes of the tribunal chairman concerned, no applications were considered to have been withdrawn for unacceptable reasons.
    Applications
    TotalSpecial Hospitals
    BroadmoorMoss SidePark LaneRampton
    19764872573115
    197748844483118
    197849026563108
    References
    197635681635158
    197737885639166
    1978351875811138
    The number of applications determined during 1976, 1977 and 1978 and, of those, the number in which the tribunal discharged the patient, were as follows:

    Applications determinedPatients discharged
    197639348
    197742880
    197836774
    There are a number of cases in which, before an application can be determined, the patient ceases to be detainable under the Act.Information on the number of reclassifications cannot be obtained without disproportionate work, but the numbers are thought to be low.

    Industrial Injuries

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services whether he will extend before 3 September 1978 the time period during which a person must have worked in a qualifying industry to be eligible for industrial injuries benefit in respect of industrial deafness.

    No. The general requirement, that a claim for disablement benefit for occupational deafness must be made within 12 months of the date when the claimant last carried out work in a prescribed occupation, was introduced on the recommendation of the Industrial Injuries

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services how many patients (a) applied for and (b) were referred by the Secretary of State for the Home Department to mental health review tribunals during 1976, 1977 and 1978, and how many of these patients were from each of the special hospitals; how many applications were determined in each of the years; and in how many applications determined in each year the tribunal discharged or reclassified the patient.

    The information is as follows:Advisory Council, whose report in 1973 led to the prescription of occupational deafness as an industrial disease. The council's view was that such requirement was essential if difficulties of diagnosis were to be avoided in the large number of potential claimants who had left or retired from the noisy occupations concerned between 1948 and the date of prescription, and if the number of claimants requiring examination was to be kept within the limited capacity of the NHS audio logical services. The council considered the requirement again in its 1978 report (Cmnd. 7266), all recommendations of which were implemented in September 1979, including extension of occupational coverage. The council concluded that the "12 months" requirement had to be retained if cover was to be extended as widely as possible to those who continued to work in noisy processes.

    Supplementary Benefit

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services if the amount of £2,000 referred to in paragraph 19 of Cmnd. 7773, "Reform of Supplementary Benefits Scheme", will be raised when the general level of benefits is raised.

    The amount of capital to be ignored in determining a person's eligibility for supplementary benefit will be prescribed in regulations, together with the amounts to be disregarded of any income the claimant may have. These amounts will be reviewed from time to time as resources permit.

    Unemployed Persons (Benefit)

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services (1) if he will list the value of flat-rate unemployment benefit for a single person, a married couple and a married couple with one, two and four children as a percentage of gross and net earnings for each year since 1970;(2) if he will list the value of the supplementary benefit payments made to a single unemployed man, a married couple, and a married couple with one, two or four children as a percentage of gross and net earnings for each year since 1970.

    Social Security Payments

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services if he will list the percentage of public expenditure devoted to social security payments for each year since 1948; and if he will estimate the extent to which any increasing proportion of public expenditure on social security benefits is due to (a) an increase in the number of claimants, (b) a real increase in the value of benefits and (c) the introduction of new benefits.

    The percentage of total United Kingdom general Government expenditure devoted to social security payments was as follows:

    Calendar yearPercentage
    194913·43
    195013·57
    195111·93
    195212·61
    195313·60
    195413·76
    195514·47
    195614·20
    195713·73
    195816·00
    195916·21
    196015·73
    196115·82
    196215·87
    196317·20
    196416·52
    196517·16
    196616·90
    196716·48
    196817·33
    196917·85
    197017·77

    197117·35
    197218·36
    197317·13
    197416·48
    197516·17
    197618·00
    197720·18
    197820·95

    The variations in the percentages cannot be separately attributed in the way requested.

    Defence

    Chemical Warfare And Defence

    asked the Secretary of State for Defence if he will state the terms of the quadripartite agreement between the United States of America, Canada, Australia and Great Britain on research into chemical warfare and defence.

    Co-operation between the four countries in research into defence against chemical warfare is conducted under general and long-standing arrangements for technical co-operation in military research and development. These arrangements call for the exchange of information and the identification of common areas of interest and provide a forum for determining new research activities.

    Army Scholarship Scheme

    asked the Secretary of State for Defence what has been the total cost in grants and tuition paid in respect of all boys receiving both grants and tuition in each year for which the Army scholarship scheme for boys aged 15 and 16 years has been operating.

    The Army scholarship scheme has operated since 1959, but the information requested is not available for the years before 1974. Since then the total expenditure on maintenance grants and tuition fees under the scheme has been as follows:

    1974£18,803
    1975£21,035
    1976£21,638
    1977£21,726
    1978£19,100

    asked the Secretary of State for Defence if he will list the schools in respect of which tuition fees were paid and from whose headmasters endorsements of candidatures were received and the numbers of boys from each school who have received awards under the Army scholarship scheme for boys aged 15 and 16 years, in each of the years under which the scheme has been in operation.

    An Army scholarship may be awarded to any boy attending a school which offers A-level courses. A list of the schools attended by current award holders is given below. It would require disproportionate effort to provide a similar list for each year since 1959.

    Aldenham School
    Allhallows School
    Ampleforth College7 boys
    Berkhamsted School
    Birkenhead School
    Brentwood School
    Bristol Grammar School
    Cheltenham College
    Cranleigh School
    Danil Stewarts & Melville College
    Douai School3 boys
    Edinburgh Academy
    Eton College4 boys
    Felsted School
    Forest School
    George Heriots School
    Glasgow Academy
    Haberdasher's Aske's School
    Harrow
    Hurstpierpoint College
    Ipswich School
    Kings College School
    Kings School Bruton
    Kings School Canterbury3 boys
    Kingston Grammar School
    Lancing College
    Leeds Grammar School2 boys
    Lincoln Technology College
    Marlborough College
    Milton Abbey School2 boys
    Nottingham High School
    Oundle School
    Oratory School
    Pangbourne College
    Pocklington School3 boys
    Plymouth College
    Queen Elizabeth Grammar School
    Queens College Taunton
    Ratcliffe College
    Reeds School
    Repton School
    Robert Gordons College
    Rugby School
    St Edmunds School
    St. Edward School, Oxford
    Sherborne School2 boys
    Stonyhurst College
    Stowe School
    Taunton School
    Tonbridge School2 boys
    Trinity College Glenalmond2 boys
    Trinity School
    Uppingham School
    Wellington College2 boys
    Whitgift School3 boys
    Winchester College2 boys
    Worksop School
    Worth School3 boys

    asked the Secretary of State for Defence how many scholarships have been awarded to boys under the Army scholarship scheme for boys aged 15 to 16 years for education up to advanced level since the scheme began; of these awards, how many were for maintenance grant only; and how many were for the grant plus tuition fees.