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Written Answers

Volume 978: debated on Tuesday 12 February 1980

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Written Answersto Questions

Tuesday 12th February 1980

Home Department

Civil Defence

45.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he is satisfied with current levels of civil defence, with particular reference to emergency planning.

I am in the process of reviewing the present home defence arrangements.

1974–751975–761976–771977–781978–79
Department of Health and Social Security1·00·90·80·90·7
cottish Home and Health Department1·01·10·90·91·0
Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food12·213·48·63·43·3
Department of the Environment0·10·10·1
Property Services Agency0·20·91·40·60·4
Department of Transport0·40·50·30·10·2
Department of Industry0·1
Home Office12·310·310·08·88·8
Total27·227·122·014·814·6
The figure are £1 million at 1979 survey prices. Actual figure cannot be produced in the time available.The main items on which the money has been spent are the United Kingdom warning and monitoring organisation, war emergency communications and associated accommodation, strategic reserves of food and medical supplies, and grants to local authorities and the police for home defence planning and training.

Prisoners (Terrorists)

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what is the total of men and women at present held in prisons in England and Wales who have been convicted of terrorist offences in the United Kingdom.

Of the 28 persons who had been convicted up to 31 December 1979 of an offence under the Prevention of Terrorism (Temporary Provisions) Acts 1974 and 1976 and sentenced to imprisonment, none was on that date in a prison department establishment in England and Wales. Information on those in custody for other criminal offences associated with terrorism is not readily available because prisoners are clasified in terms of the legal category of

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will set out the actual sums of money spent on civil defence for each of the last five years, and how those sums have been expended.

Home Defence expenditure in Great Britain incurred by Government Department during the last five years was as follows:the offence not the circumstances in which the offence was committed.

Press And Public Relations Officers

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many press and public relations officers are currently employed in his Department; what is the total cost; and what are the comparable figures for June 1970, October 1974 and May 1979.

The number and cost of information officer group staff in my department's press office on the dates below were as follows:

Staff in post
July 197010
October 197411
May 197913
February 198014
Estimated annual salary cost
£000
July 197031
October 197454
May 1979125
February 1980146

Police (Complaints)

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) in each of the police forces in England and Wales, how many police officers are engaged full-time in investigating allegations under the police complaints procedure; and at what cost;(2) how many police officers of the Metropolitan Police are engaged full-time in investigating allegations under the police complaints procedure; and at what cost.

There are 91 full-time posts on the Metropolitan Police establishment and 156 on establishments of other forces in England and Wales—listed below—for complaints and internal discipline investigation work. In addition, the Metropolitan Police is forming district complaints units in which 83 officers are at present serving full-time. The cost assuming maximum rent allowance, but excluding overtime and overheads is estimated to be:

£
Metropolitan Police—established posts1,100,000
—district staff900,000
Other forces1,750,000
3,750,000
ForceEstablished Posts
Avon and Somerset4
Bedfordshire2
Cambridgeshire1
Cheshire1
Cleveland3
Cumbria3
Derbyshire3
Devon and Cornwall3
Dorset1
Durham2
Dyfed Powys1
Essex5
Gloucestershire1
Greater Manchester8
Gwent1
Hampshire3
Hertfordshire2
Humberside5
Kent4
Lancashire4
Leicestershire3
Lincolnshire2
Merseyside6
Norfolk2
Northamptonshire1
Northumbria5
North Wales1
North Yorkshire2
Nottinghamshire5
South Wales2
South Yorkshire15
Staffordshire2
Suffolk2
Sussex3
Surrey3
Thames Valley3
Warwickshire
ForceEstablished Posts
West Mercia4
West Midlands 19
West Yorkshire17
Wiltshire1
City of London1
Total156

Police (Assaults)

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many police officers were assaulted in the execution of their duties in 1979; and on how many respective occasions officers were detained in hospital, suffered permanent injury, and were retired on pension as unfit for further police duty; and if he will make a statement.

Comprehensive information is not held centrally, but I am asking chief officers to let me have the figures available for their forces.

Borstal Detention

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many of those sentenced to borstals in 1979 were awaiting trial for other offences (a) when their training began, (b) within six months of their release, (c) within three months of their release and (d)on the day of their release.

The information requested is not recorded centrally. However, the hon. Member may be interested in the reconviction rates of borstal trainees within two years of discharge which are published annually in "Prison Statistics, England and Wales" (Tables 8.4 and 8.6 of the volume for 1978, Cmnd. 7626).

Air Weapons

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what is the total number of indictable offences connected with firearms in each of the last 10 years and the number and percentage of them that involved air weapons.

The numbers of indictable offences recorded by the police in which firearms were reported to have been used and the numbers in which the firearm reported was an air weapon were published in table 3.3 of "Criminal Statistics, England and Wales 1978", (Cmnd. 7670). The percentages requested are given in the following table. Air weapons are the firearms most used in offences of criminal damage and the increases in the proportion of offences in which air weapons were used are partly attributable to inflation resulting in smaller amounts of damage being valued at over £20.

Indictable offences* recorded by the police in which an air weapon was reported to have been used, expressed as a percentage of all indictable offences* recorded by the police in which firearms were reported to have been used
England and WalesPercentage of total
196945
197049
197151
197262
197366
197466
197565
197668
197769
197875
* For 1969–71 offences of criminal damage are included when the damage was estimated at over £100; for 1972–77 they are included when the damage was estimated at over £20.

Diplomatic Immunity (Vehicles)

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to his reply to the hon. Member for Paddington on 30 January, if he will provide, for the most convenient and recent 12-month period, the amount of money lost to the public, in relation to the claim of diplomatic immunity in regard to vehicles attracting a fixed penalty or excess charge notice within the Metropolitan Police district.

In the 12-month period 2 December 1978 to 3 December 1979, 54,766 fixed penalty notices were cancelled on grounds of diplomatic immunity in the Metropolitan Police district. The amount of the fixed penalty specified in each notice was £6.Corresponding information about excess charge notices is not available.

Squatting

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many representations he has received asking him to introduce legislation to make squatting of any kind illegal.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he has any plans to make squatting of any kind illegal.

Squatting usually amounts to trespassing, in respect of which civil proceedings can be taken, and under the Criminal Law Act 1977 it is an offence for a trespasser to fail to leave residential premises when asked to do so by an occupier. I have no present plans to change the law.

Mr A Mady

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department how much public money is being expended upon investigating the complaint against PC Hibben made by Mr. A. Mady, currently in Pentonville prison.

I understand from the Commissioner of Police of the Metropolis that to date the cost of the investigation in terms of the time spent by his officers is about £1,200.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what is the cost of keeping Mr. A. Mady in Pentonville prison.

The cost of keeping a particular prisoner in custody is not separately recorded. During the financial year 1978–79 the average weekly cost of keeping a prisoner in a local prison or remand centre was £104.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether, in investigating Mr. A. Mady's complaint against PC Hibben under section 49 (1) of the Police Act 1964, Mr. Mady is being considered a member of the public within the meaning of the Act for the purposes of the consideration of the Act.

Elections (Voting Rights)

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will publish in the Official Report a list of those countries whose nationals are allowed to vote in United Kingdom elections and which extend the same privilege to British nationals.

Citizens of the Irish Republic and British subjects who are citizens of Commonwealth countries other than the United Kingdom are entitled to vote in United Kingdom elections if they are resident here. United Kingdom nationals resident in the Irish Republic may vote in local and European Parliament elections in that country. Information about the voting rights of United Kingdom nationals resident in other countries is not readily available and could be obtained only at disproportionate cost.

1976–771977–781978–79
£££
Brixton180,00080,00075,000
Pentonville130,00094,000163,000
Wandsworth92,00084,000136,000
Wormwood Scrubs124,000137,000142,000

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will list the present works programmes which have been approved for each

£
Brixton:Gate alteration432,000
Gander Device400,000
Replacement of Boilers342,000
Provision of dormitory accommodation416,000
Holloway:Completion of rebuilding6,653,000
Pentonville:Renewal of cell block heating23,000
Sanitation improvements89,000
Fire Mains53,000
Kitchen and Store30,000
New Showers30,000
Wandsworth:Security Measures538,000
Redevelopment of F wing862,000
Officers Mess99,000
New Mains distribution700,000
Gander Device456,000
Wormwood Scrubs:Fuel storage144,000
Laundry modifications250,000
Security Measures485,000
Gander Device and Lighting1,711,000
Hospital Improvements188,000
New Kitchen896,000
New Visits block460,000

Murder (Life Sentences)

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many people are currently serving life sentences for murder.

1,115, including persons detained during Her Majesty's pleasure under section 53(1) of the Children and Young Persons Act 1933 but excluding persons who had previously been released on licence and subsequently recalled to prison.

London Prisons

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what was the financial expenditure for each of the London prisons on its prison quarters contract, for each of the last three years.

Maintenance on the Holloway staff quarters is not the subject of an outside contract. The figures in respect of the other London prisons for the last three financial years are as follows:

The approved programme of major works up to 1984–85, with the current cost estimate, is as follows:

Young Offenders

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department, in view of the fact that it now costs £11,000 a year to keep a young offender in a community home school, whether the Government are considering making alternative cheaper provision for the care of young offenders; and if he will make a statement.

The Government are already expanding the system of attendance centres and are encouraging the development of intermediate treatment, not primarily on financial grounds but because we believe it is right that as many young offenders as possible should be dealt with in the community.

Prison Officers

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what is the estimated cost of training a prison officer.

If, as I assume, the hon. Member has in mind the eight-week residential phase of a prison officers' initial training, the current estimated cost of this is about £1,100 per officer.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will list the grades of the 1,322 prison officers who have resigned from the prison service during the last three years.

The information is as follows:

Officers1,276
Senior Officers23
Principal Officers13
Chief Officer II1
Engineers II4
Engineers I4
Foreman of Works1
Total:1,322

Detention Centre Training (Medical Reports)

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) on what medical criteria doctors making court reports judge boys fit for detention centre training; and if they invariably include an assessment of the boy's mental stability;(2) in what percentage of cases sentencing courts had a medical report before them when committing boys to Send detention centre in 1978 and 1979.

Prison medical officers making reports to court consider whether there is any aspect of a young offender's physical or mental health which makes it undesirable that he should go to a detention centre, and report accordingly, taking into account the nature of regimes operated at the centres. Home Office circular 179/1972, a copy of which was placed in the Library of the House, offers guidance to other medical practitioners who are invited by a court to report on medical fitness for detention centre training, and indicates that they may seek advice from prison medical officers. Information about the proportion of cases in which medical reports or certificates of fitness were prepared could be obtained only at disproportionate cost.

Television Licences

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he is satisfied that the system of notification of purchasers of television sets bought for their personal use by members of the public in cash and carry or discount stores is operating adequately, compared to the system operated by ordinary retailers; and if he will make a statement.

Yes. Cash and carry and discount stores which trade in television sets are legally required to notify all transactions to the National Television Licence Records Office in exactly the same way as other television dealers.

Bomb Shelters

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what guidelines his Department issues to local authorities regarding bomb shelters.

The principal guidance is to be found in Home Office circular No. ES 1/1976 a copy of which is in the Library of the House. However, the current review of home defence arrangements covers all aspects of public protection, including shelter. I will make an announcement on the conclusions of the review as soon as possible.

Prisoners (Psychiatric Treatment)

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many men or women at each prison in England and Wales have been certified under the Mental Health Acts and are waiting for accommodation in a psychiatric hospital.

On 31 January 1980 there was a total of 43 prisoners in respect of whom the reports specified in section 72 of the Mental Health Act 1959 had been received who were still waiting for admission to a hospital. The following table identifies the sex of those prisoners and the prison in which they were held; it also distinguishes those cases in which there has been an agreement in principle

PRISONERS AWAITING HOSPITAL VACANCIES AT 31 JANUARY 1980
PrisonVacancy still being soughtAdmission agreed in principle by hospitals managers
(1)(2)(3)
MalesFemalesMalesFemales
Birmingham4
Cardiff1
Dartmoor21
Gartree2
Holloway2
Leicester1
Lincoln1
Liverpool11
Norwich1
Parkhurst33
Wakefield3
Wandsworth2
Winchester1
Wormwood Scrubs95
Total29212*
Grand Total43
* 10 of these are awaiting admission to Broadmoor and 2 to local psychiatric hospitals.

Immigration

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what is the annual cost to the taxpayer of seeking to detect illegal immigrants and overstayers.

The detection of illegal entrants and overstayers is part of the general functions of the immigration and nationality department of the Home Office, and of the police, and it is not possible to distinguish expenditure so incurred.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what is the number of people detained as a result of overstaying for each of the last five years.

Detention as an overstayer may occur pending charge and trial; pending consideration of a court recommendation for deportation; and pending the making and execution of a deportation order. Information about the numbers so detained is not available.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many Humberside residents have been detained or removed from the United Kingdom as illegal immigrants or overstayers in each of the last five years.

by the hospitals managers that the prisoners will be admitted form those in which a vacancy is still being sought.

Taxi And Car Hire Businesses

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he proposes to relax the licensing restrictions on the operation of taxi and car hire businesses.

Equal Opportunities Commission

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether, in the light of the investigation by the Equal Opportunities Commission into the "Harold Hare" case, he will introduce legislation to close down the commission.

Steel Dispute (Picketing)

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many pickets have been arrested to date in England and Wales in the steel strike.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many pickets have been arrested since the steel strike commenced; how many charges have been made and of what kind; and what sentences have been awarded.

136 arrests have been made up to 9 February. The rest of the information requested is not available centrally, and could be obtained only at disproportionate expense.

19751976197719781979
For naturalisation4,3883,9453,8896,2165,812
For registration34,75430,97028,50231,79442,766

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what was the average waiting period for dealing with applications for (a) registration and (b) naturalisation over the past five years to the latest available date; and if he will make a statement.

The average times taken to deal with applications for naturalisation were:

197516 months
197618 months
197719 months
197821 months
197925 months
Applications for registration are of different types, some needing more inquiries and consideration than others. Some can be completed within three or four months but others require considerably longer. The current average time taken to deal with all types of applications for registration is approximately 12 months. Comparable figures for previous years are not available.The staff of the nationality division is being increased in view of the delays in dealing with applications for naturalisation and registration but the need to contain public expenditure limits what can be done.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what is the number of applications for (a) registration and (b) naturalisation outstanding at the latest available date.

Nationalisation And Registration

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many applications he has received for (a) naturalisation and (b) registration, over the past five years to the latest available date.

Applications were received as follows:naturalisation and 36,126 applications for registration outstanding.

Telephone Tapping

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether the methods used in electronic surveillance are covered by the procedures authorising telephone tapping.

I have already made clear that the procedures for the interception of communications are conducted on the basis of the recommendations contained in the report of the Birkett committee (Cmnd. 283).

Prevention Of Terrorism (Temporary Provisions) Act

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will list the organisations which have written to him objecting to the Prevention of Terrorism (Temporary Provisions) Act to the latest available date.

In the past year the following organisations have written either objecting to the Prevention of Terrorism (Temporary Provisions) Act 1976 or objecting in general to the way in which it operates:Amalgamated Union of Engineering Workers,North West Divisional Conference,Communist Party of Great Britain.Council of Irish County Associations,Ealing Community Relations Council,Keele University Students Union,National Union of Journalists Athlone Branch,Oxford Student Liberal Society,Stalybridge and Hyde Constituency Labour Party,Women's International League for Peace and Freedom.

Suspected Persons (Metropolitan Police District)

asked the Secretary of state for the Home Department what is the number of persons arrested and proceeded against for being suspected of frequenting

Metropolitan Police District: Fourth Quarter 1979Number of offences
Ethnic Appearance
DistrictWhite Skinned EuropeanDark Skinned EuropeanBlack Skinned (including West Indian/ African)Indian/ PakistaniChinese/ JapaneseArabian/ EgyptianNot knownTotal
PERSONS ARRESTED* FOR BEING SUSPECTED OF FREQUENTING A PUBLIC PLACE WITH INTENT TO COMMIT AN ARRESTABLE OFFENCE BY DISTRCT AND ETHNIC APPEARANCE
A726100016
B12123001037
C2378311043
D12224100039
E21019000040
F40100005
G625000013
H703000010
I00000101
J1407000021
K1100000011
L13032100046
M1505000020
N31500009
P50000005
Q508000013
R20100003
S20400006
T50200007
V40400008
W8120000029
X1200000012
Y61200009
Z40500009
TA00000000
MPD201171846130412
* Persons proceeded against by means of a charge, referral to a juvenile bureau, a caution or in some other way; arrests not followed by any action are not included.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many of the 48 persons detained on Merseyside under the Prevention of Terrorism (Temporary Provisions) Act and subsequently convicted of criminal offences, were capable of being charged under other existing legislation.

Mr. Whitelaw: Of the 48 persons detained in Merseyside under the Prevention of Terrorism (Temporary Provisions) Acts 1974 and 1976 between 29 November 1974 and 31 December 1976 and subsequently convicted of criminal offences, four persons were charged and convicted of offences under Prevention of a public place with intent to commit an arrestable offence, by Metropolitan Police district and ethnic appearance, for the last quarter of 1979.

The information relating to the fourth quarter of 1979 is given in the following table:Terrorism legislation only; the remaining 44 persons were convicted of offences under other legislation.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many persons have been convicted under the Prevention of Terrorism (Temporary Provisions) Act on Merseyside at entry or exit to the port to the latest available date.

Of the four persons who were detained and convicted in Merseyside under the Prevention of Terrorism (Temporary Provisions) Acts 1974 and 1976 between 29 November 1974 and 31 December 1979, three had been detained on entry or exit at the port of Liverpool.

Olympic Games

Q6.

asked the Prime Minister if she has made any estimate of the increase in the public sector borrowing requirement which would be necessary to meet the cost of locating the Olympic Games or certain events of the Olympic Games in the United Kingdom.

No. But we have sought to identify the Olympic events for which we have facilities of the required standards.

Prime Minister (Engagements)

Q7.

asked the Prime Minister if she will give her public engagements for Tuesday 12 February.

Q8.

asked the Prime Minister if she will list her official engagements for Tuesday 12 February.

Q10.

asked the Prime Minister if she will list her official engagements for 12 February.

Q11.

asked the Prime Minister if she will list her engagements for 12 February.

Q13.

asked the Prime Minister if she will list her official engagements for Tuesday 12 February.

Q14.

asked the Prime Minister if she will list her official engagements for Tuesday 12 February.

Q17.

asked the Prime Minister if she will list her official engagements for 12 February.

Q18.

asked the Prime Minister if she will list her official engagements for 12 February.

Q21.

asked the Prime Minister if she will list her engagements for 12 February.

Q22.

asked the Prime Minister if she will state her engagements for Tuesday 12 February.

Q24.

asked the Prime Minister if she will list her official engagements for Tuesday 12 February.

Q25.

asked the Prime Minister if she will list her official engagements for Tuesday 12 February.

Q27.

asked the Prime Minister if she will list her official engagements for 12 February.

Q28.

asked the Prime Minister if she will list her official engagements for Tuesday 12 February.

Q29.

asked the Prime Minister if she will list her official engagements for 12 February.

Q31.

asked the Prime Minister if she will list her official engagements for 12 February.

Q32.

asked the Prime Minister if she will list her official engagements for 12 February.

Q33.

asked the Prime Minister if she will list her official engagements for 12 February.

Q34.

asked the Prime Minister if she will list her official engagements for 12 February.

Q35.

asked the Prime Minister if she will list her engagements for Tuesday 12 February.

Q36.

asked the Prime Minister if she will list her official engagements for 12 February.

Q37.

asked the Prime Minister if she will list her official engagements for 12 February.

Q38.

asked the Prime Minister if she will list her official engagements for Tuesday 12 February.

Q39.

asked the Prime Minister if she will list her official engagements for Tuesday 12 February.

Q40.

asked the Prime Minister if she will state her official engagements for 12 February.

Q41.

asked the Prime Minister if she will list her official engagements for 12 February.

Q44.

asked the Prime Minister if she will list her official engagements for 12 February.

Q45.

asked the Prime Minister if she will list her official engagements for Tuesday 12 February.

Q46.

asked the Prime Minister if she will list her official engagements for 12 February.

Q47.

asked the Prime Minister if she will list her engagements for 12 February.

Q49.

asked the Prime Minister if she will list her official engagements for 12 February.

I refer my hon. Friends and the hon. Members to the reply which I gave earlier today to my hon. Friend the Member for Uxbridge (Mr. Shersby).

President Carter

Q9.

asked the Prime Minister when next she intends to meet the President of the United States of America.

I expect to meet President Carter at the Venice economic summit on 22 and 23 June.

Prime Minister (Official Visits)

Q12.

asked the Prime Minister if she will list the official visits she has made to engineering research and development establishments.

I have visited a number of firms engaged in research and development in engineering and technology. I have also visited Dounreay and the Tricastin centre in France.

Nato

Q19.

asked the Prime Minister when she expects next to visit the headquarters of the North Atlantic Treaty Organisation.

Ussr (Learned Society Contacts)

Q23.

asked the Prime Minister what advice she has given to the Royal Society about contacts with the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics scientists and engineers following the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan.

The Government's policy is to curtail high-level and ministerial contacts with the Soviet Union for the time being. Other contacts may proceed if they are in the British interest, I am sure that the Royal Society, which is an independent and responsible body, is well aware of the Government's views and will take them into account in making its own decisions about its contacts with Soviet scientists and engineers.

Civil Aviation Authority

Q30.

asked the Prime Minister when she expects next to meet the chairman of the Civil Aviation Authority.

Steel Industry

Q43.

asked the Prime Minister if she will make a statement on the current situation in the steel industry.

I deplore the continuation of the present dispute in the steel industry. I welcome the progress made with some of the unions over the weekend, and hope that negotiations may soon be resumed with the other unions so that an early settlement to the dispute may be reached on terms BSC can afford.

Postal Services

Q50.

asked the Prime Minister whether she will designate a Minister with specific responsibility for postal services.

My right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Industry has the sponsorship responsibility for the Post Office Corporation including the postal business. By virtue of the Post Office Act 1969 operational matters affecting postal services are for the Corporation itself.

Members Of Parliament (Secretarial And Research Assistance)

Q137.

asked the Minister when she now expects to receive the report of the Boyle committee on secretarial and research assistance for Members of Parliament.

As the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster said in the House on 7 February, I received the Review Body on Top Salaries'13th report on 15 January.

Dog Licence

asked the Prime Minister why the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland does not have powers, corresponding to those of the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food and Her Secretaries of State for Scotland and Wales, to alter the level of the dog licence fee.

Fees for dog licences in Northern Ireland comprise a licence duty and a registration fee. The Secretary of State for Northern Ireland has powers to prescribe the amount of the latter but at present possesses none in respect of the licence duty, which is fixed by statute—currently by the Dogs Regulation (Ireland) Act 1919. My right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland intends to introduce legislation in due course which will, inter ailia, enable him to alter the level of the licence fee.

Ellon

asked the Prime Minister if she has any plans to visit Ellon and district in the East Aberdeenshire constituency.

Raw Materials (Supply)

asked the Prime Minister if she will secure raw material flows to industry by opening Her Majesty's dockyards to steel imports and by calling in the Armed Forces to assist in the internal movement of supplies.

Arms Exports

asked the Prime Minister whether she has received a letter dated 14 January from the chairman of the British section of Amnesty International, relating to control of the export to repressive regimes of equipment capable of being used for regressive purposes; and what answer she has sent.

Yes. In my letter of 24 January to the chairman of the British section of Amnesty International, I explained that the introduction of legislation to widen the scope of existing export licensing controls would present the Government with considerable practical difficulties.

Education And Science

School Meals

asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science what he envisages as the lowest standard that a local authority will consider requisite for feeding children in its schools whose parents are on supplementary benefit, as set out in clause 22(2) of the Education (No. 2) Bill.

Polytechnic of Central LondonCity of London PolytechnicNorth-East London Polytechnic
Part-time lecturers in full-time equivalents1068635
Full-time lecturers engaged in teaching526431744
Other academic and research (including sponsored research) staff303847

School Population

asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science what is his estimate of the school population in England for each of the next five years, divided between infant, primary and secondary schools; and if he will publish comparable figures for Bury metropolitan district education authority.

I envisage that in the majority of cases authorities will provide an appropriate midday meal for pupils from families in receipt of supplementary benefit or family income supplement. However, an authority would have fulfilled its duty under clause 22(2) if it had assessed the needs of a pupil and had provided what was necessary to meet those needs—whatever that involved.

Press And Public Relations Officers

asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science how many Press and public relations officers are currently employed in his Department; what is the total cost; and what are the comparable figures for June 1970, October 1974 and May 1979.

The number and cost of information officer group staff in my Department's press office on these dates was as follows:

NumberCost (£)
1 June 1970833,000
1 October 1974840,000
1 May 1979879,000
1 February 1980886,000

Universities And Polytechnics

asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science how many part-time and full-time lecturers, respectively, are employed at (a) the Central London polytechnic, (b) the City of London polytechnic and (c) the North-East London polytechnic.

Numbers of part-time staff are not collected but it is possible to derive approximate figures for these staff expressed in full-time equivalents. The figures for spring 1979 were:

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave to the hon. Member for Eastleigh (Mr. Price) on 5 February 1980.

Teachers

asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science what is his most recent estimate of the number of teaching vacancies in mathematics, physical sciences, craft design and technology; and how this compares with the situation a year previously.

In January 1979, local education authorities reported vacancies as follows:Mathematics: 463.Physical sciences: 431.Craft, design and technology: 294.Information about vacancies in January 1980 is being collected and will be available in about a month.

asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science what is his most recent estimate of the number of teachers without appropriate qualifications currently teaching mathematics, physical sciences, craft design and technology.

The most recent information comes from the secondary school staffing survey, carried out in the autumn of 1977. That showed that there were some 12,500 teachers of mathematics, 6,600 teachers of the physical sciences and 5,200 teachers of craft, design and technology whose initial or in-service training did not include these subjects. They were responsible for only a minor proportion of all tuition in them: 16 per cent. of mathematics, 10 per cent. of chemistry, 22 per cent. of physics and 15 per cent. of craft design and technology.

Overseas Students

asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science whether he has reached a conclusion about the effect of the non-discrimination provisions in the new Lomé convention on the fees chargeable to sandwich course students from African, Caribbean and Pacific countries in British institutions of further and higher education.

The provisions of the convention have no relevance in this context. The definition of an overseas student for fee purposes is based on residence criteria not nationality.

asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science if he will publish the regulations by which children of United Kingdom parents employed overseas are classified as overseas students when attending United Kingdom universities and other higher education establishments; what criteria are followed in defining these categories; and if he will make a statement.

The classification of students as home or overseas, whether or not they are the children of United Kingdom parents, is based on residence status. I will write to my hon. Friend giving details of this rather complex matter.

Depo Provera

asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science if he will initiate research into the reproductive cycle of children whose mothers received Depo Provera during the nursing period when these children reach reproductive age; and if he will make a statement.

Owing to the limited scale on which Depo Provera is used in this country, the Medical Research Council is of the opinion that it would not be feasible at present to undertake a properly controlled investigation of the reproductive cycle of children whose mothers received Depo Provera during the nursing period. The council will, however, continue to keep this matter under review.

Civil Service

Public Service Pensions

asked the Minister for the Civil Service if he will list public service pensions which are (a) self-financing and (b) not self-financing; and how much those which are not self-financing have received from public funds in 1977, 1978 and 1979, respectively.

Because of the wide diversity in the financial arrangements of of the various public service pension schemes, it is not possible to answer the question as it has been put. I shall be glad to give my hon. Friend information about particular schemes if he will write to me.

asked the Minister for the Civil Service what is the number of index-linked pensions to retired civil servants, including local government, health service, police and prison service, which exceed (a) £15,000 per annum (b) £10,000 per annum and (c) £5,000 per annum; and in how many cases the pension exceeds the present pay for the post to which the pension relates.

I regret that information in the form requested is not held centrally for all public service pension schemes. However, the numbers of Civil Service pensioners in receipt of pensions in the range specified are approximately as follows:

Pension £ per annumNumber of Civil Service Pensioners
less than 5,000337,000
above 5,00010,800
above 10,000630
above 15,00067
I know of no case in which the pension exceeds the present pay for the post to which the pension relates.

Manpower

asked the Minister for the Civil Service how many of the 63,000 non-industrial Civil Service jobs vacated in the 12 months ended 30 September 1979 have been filled.

At 1 October 1979 there were 552,000 non-industrial civil servants in post compared with 564,000 at 1 October 1978, a reduction of 12,000. Information is not available centrally on the filling of vacant posts.

Parliamentary Papers

asked the Minister for the Civil Service when he anticipates the general production in machine readable form of Hansard, the Vote and other parliamentary papers; and if he will make a statement.

Plans are well advanced for the production of the Official Report of the proceedings of the House of Commons using modern techniques. I hope that a machine-readable form will begin during the 1980–81 Session. It is hoped that the Vote and other parliamentary papers will become available in this form approximately three years later.At present the only parliamentary publication available from HMSO in this form is Statutes in Force, the new edition of which will be completed in 1981–82.

Foreign And Commonwealth Affairs

Zambia

asked the Lord Privy Seal if he will publish in the Official Report Her Majesty's Government's response to United Nations Security Council resolution 455 (1979).

Her Majesty's Government's response to United Nations Security Council resolution 455 (1979) is contained in paragraph 50(j) of the report of the Ad Hoc Committee (513774) of 31 January 1980, a copy of which has been placed in the Library of the House.

Rhodesia

asked the Lord Privy Seal if he will make a statement on the surveillance techniques currently being used by the Rhodesia security forces.

asked the Lord Privy Seal what special arrangements are being made to monitor those fire force units of the Rhodesian forces which are made up entirely of South Africans.

The Rhodesian forces are monitored throughout their command structure down to company level.The composition of individual units has no bearing on the monitoring arrangements.

Overseas Development

Overseas Development Administration

asked the Lord Privy Seal if he will make a statement on his policy concerning the number of development divisions in the Overseas Development Administration.

Dominica

asked the Lord Privy Seal what reconstruction aid he proposes to provide to the new Government of Dominica.

I refer the hon. Member to my reply of 18 January to the hon. Member for Belfast, South (Mr. Bradford). [Vol. 976, c. 867.] The second phase of the Royal Engineers operation is now in progress.

Uganda

asked the Lord Privy Seal what aid is planned for Uganda in 1979–80 and 1980–81 for reconstruction purposes.

£2 million in capital grants has been provided to Uganda in 1979–80 in addition to the training

AGRICULTURE
Capital Aid
Tubewell linings.
Sind Land Levelling Programme: supply of earthmoving equipment.
Salinity Control and Reclamation.
SCARP Programme: supply of earthmoving equipment for canal rehabilitation.
Punjab Tubewell Drilling.
Technical Co-operation
Agricultural Development Bank of Pakistan: consultancy in accounting, training and organisation.
Left Bank Outfall Drain feasibility studies.
INDUSTRY
Capital Aid
Kamalia Sugar Mill: equipment and installation.
Pakistan Industrial Credit and Investment Corporation: equipment for industrial development projects.
EDUCATION
Technical Co-operation
Allama Iqbal Open University: experts and equipment.
United Kingdom programme (various subjects).
COMMUNICATIONS
Capital Aid
Baluchistan Road Construction.
North-West Frontier Province Road Construction.
Pakistan Railways Development Plan.
PORTS AND SHIPPING
Capital Aid
Port Qasim Development.
Three Cargo Ships for Pakistan National Shipping Corporation.
Technical Co-operation
Port Qasim Authority:
Management Study.
Cargo Handling Training School.
Port Operations Adviser.

asked the Lord Privy Seal if increased aid to Pakistan is being provided from the reduced aid programme or from contingency funds.

European Development Fund

asked the Lord Privy Seal what is the estimated contribution from the aid budget to the European development fund in 1980–81.

of police instructors in the United Kingdom and the continuing refugee student awards scheme. Levels of aid for 1980–81 are still under consideration but a further £4 million of capital aid has already been pledged.

Pakistan

asked the Lord Privy Seal if he will indicate the sectors and projects to be assisted under the increased aid programme to Pakistan.

At present the major projects of the increased 1980–81 programme are expected to be:

On the basis of estimates for calendar year 1980 provided by the EEC Commission, the United Kingdom contribution to the fourth European development fund in the financial year 1980–81 is likely to be about £64 million. The exact amount will depend on the actual pattern of expenditure, and on the exchange rate. At present it is not possible to estimate at all accurately how much we shall contribute to the fifth European development fund, which will be established when the second Lomé convention comes into force, probably during the second half of 1980; but expenditure in 1980–81 will be limited.

Indonesia

asked the Lord Privy Seal if he proposes increases in aid to Indonesia.

It is not the practice to announce detailed planning figures for individual countries. But in any case no decision has yet been taken about the future levels of aid to Indonesia.

Chilean Refugees (Education Grants)

asked the Lord Privy Seal what decisions have been taken with regard to education grants for Chilean refugees following his Department's recent discussions with the World University Service.

We have informed the World University Service that we can provide no new awards for Chilean refugees after the end of this financial year. Earlier undertakings to provide up to 100 awards in 1979–80 have been honoured; and, subject to parliamentary approval, we expect to provide funds to enable the existing award holders to complete their courses of study.

Employment

"Employment News"

asked the Secretary of State for Employment what is the purpose of Employment News produced by his Department; how many people it employs; to whom it is distributed; and what is the total cost to public funds per annum.

Employment News provides information about current employment matters and is produced by two staff who also have other duties occupying half of their time. 108,000 copies are distributed on request only, to companies, unions, employers associations and others at a total cost, currently of £89,154 per annum.

One-Parent Families

asked the Secretary of State for Employment which index provides an adequate guide to the impact of inflation on one parent families; and which will reflect school transport charges.

The general index of retail prices provides a good guide to the impact of price changes on most households, including one-parent families. The index relates to practically all household expenditure including transport.

Tate And Lyle, Liverpool

asked the Secretary of State for Employment if he will make a statement about the employment situation at Tate and Lyle, Liverpool.

I know there have been, and still are, problems in the cane sugar refining industry and that these have been particularly felt at the Tate and Lyle refinery in Liverpool. The current renegotiation of the EEC sugar regime is adding to the uncertainties. The current proposals do, however, recognise the continuing commitment to import raw cane sugar from the third world.My right hon. Friend the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food is well aware of these problems and will have the possible effects on employment at Tate and Lyle in mind during the negotiations.

Urban Development Corporations (Merseyside And London)

asked the Secretary of State for Employment whether he plans to seek to exempt the Merseyside and London urban development corporations from the provisions of the Equal Pay Act.

No, there are no plans to exempt these organisations from the provisions of the Equal Pay Act 1970, as amended.

Job Release Scheme

asked the Secretary of State for Employment in what form it is intended to continue to receive applications for the job release scheme after 31 March; and when he expects to make an announcement.

My right hon. Friend hopes to make an announcement about the job release scheme very shortly.

Skillcentres

asked the Secretary of State for Employment when the last major campaign for the recruitment of skillcentre instructors was carried out by the Manpower Services Commission; what was the overall cost of the campaign including all items of promotional material; and how many instructors were recruited as a result.

I am informed by the Manpower Services Commission that the last major campaign for the recruitment of skillcentre instructors took place in the period September to December 1978. The total cost of the campaign including promotional material used was £434,718. There were 3,085 applicants, and from these 59 instructors were recruited.

Redundancies (Manchester)

asked the Secretary of State for Employment how many redundancies have been declared since 4 May 1979, and how many more are in prospect in the Manchester travel-to-work area; and if, where possible, he will break these figures down into sex, age, below 21 years and below 18 years, trade and ethnic origin.

Apprenticeships

asked the Secretary of State for Employment how many apprenticeships were made available in the Manchester travel-to-work area for the latest available month, broken down into trades and where possible sex and ethnic origin, and the corresponding month back to and including 1979.

[pursuant to his reply, 8 February 1980]: I am informed by the Manpower Services Commission that the information requested is not available.

Unemployed Persons

asked the Secretary of State for Employment if he will publish in the Official Report a table showing for each year since 1967 (a) the number of unfilled vacancies in each region, (b) the numbers of wholly unemployed and (c) the number of vacancies as a percentage of those wholly unemployed.

The following tables give the numbers of vacancies remaining unfilled and the numbers of people registered as unemployed in each standard region at January each year from 1967. The vacancy figures relate only to those notified to employment offices and careers offices; vacancies notified to employment offices are estimated to be about one-third of all vacancies in the country as a whole.Because of this, and of possible duplication between the separate figures for employment offices and careers offices, the two series should not be added together and cannot be used to provide the proportions requested.

NOTIFIED UNFILLED VACANCIES SOUTH EAST
At employment officesAt careers offices
January 196768,12222,471
January 196866,17624,075
January 196974,95727,172
January 197075,85626,781
January 197164,80120,931
January 197246,24713,801
January 197386,76020,409
January 1974134,34935,989
January 1975*....
January 197633,7757,130
January 1977*....
January 197866,2069,027
January 197998,44314,890
January 198085,48911,568
East Anglia
At employment officesAt careers offices
January 19673,6951,272
January 19684,3631,649
January 19695,2101,738
January 19704,9441,553
January 19713,491338
January 19723,148929
January 19736,6221,743
January 19749,6923,535
January 1975*....
January 19762,462564
January 1977*....
January 19784,690522
January 19796,217801
January 19806,263584
SOUTH WEST
At employment officesAt careers offices
January19678,6882,815
January 19688,7733,419
January 196910,0313,904
January 19709,6183,441
January 19718,9672,798
January 19727,8922,395
January 197314,2653,186
January 197420,6435,466
January 1975*....
January 19765,1171,019
January 1977*....
January 19788,494706
January 197912,9811,291
January 198011,942866
WEST MIDLANDS
At employment officesAt careers offices
January 196715,7416,555
January 196813,8286,122
January 196916,7668,260
January 197015,3026,651
January 197111,5374,522
January 19727,1822,603
January 197314,1134,760
January 197423,57210,345
January 1975*....
January 19764,5181,471
January 1977*....
January 197811,3951,612
January 197913,5882,027
January 198011,8491,200
EAST MIDLANDS
January 196711,3614,837
January 196811,3934,270
January 196912,2215,340
January 197010,9284,118
January 19719,0862,807
January 19727,2721,832
January 197312,5972,987
January 197418,2456,847
January 1975*....
January 19765,7101,295
January 1977*....
January 197810,3591,070
January 197915,4241,370
January 198011,2981,154
YORKSHIRRE/HUMBERSIDE
January 196714,0957,385
January 196812,3566,635
January 196914,1286,703
January 197015,3465,383
January 197111,3914,351
January 19728,4902,452
January 197313,6914,419
January 197420,6659,213
January 1975*....
January 19765,9291,457
January 1977*....
January 197812,1061,202
January 197914,9391,455
January 198011,033967
NORTH WEST
January 196719,4026,662
January 196821,3026,110
January 196923,9617,648
January 197022,7096,085
January 197116,1494,819
January 19729,4122,989
January 197314,2333,927
January 197423,3708,187
January 1975*....
January 19768,0301,741
January 1977*....
January 197813,1741,050
January 197916,9411,458
January 198014,6211,324
NORTH
At employment officesAt careers offices
January 19676,4181,636
January 19686,5382,009
January 19697,1092,712
January 19707,8692,298
January 19716,4952,068
January 19724,5081,215
January 19737,9821,574
January 197411,2983,792
January 1975*....
January 19765,762854
January 1977*....
January 19788,775531
January 19799,604480
January 19807,984306
WALES
January 19675,8641,362
January 19684,6201,635
January 19695,0772,113
January 19705,6631,851
January 19715,3741,733
January 19723,8141,204
January 19735,3171,735
January 19747,8212,508
January 1975*....
January 19763,845552
January 1977*....
January 19786,279341
January 19797,344434
January 19807,323391
SCOTLAND
January 196710,6954,772
January 19689,8444,835
January 196911,4745,741
January 197011,1414,704
January 19717,1973,326
January 19724,7581,814
January 19739,3712,017
January 197415,7026,419
January 1975*....
January 197611,6361,817
January 1977*....
January 197815,686824
January 197918,108961
January 198016,824787
GREAT BRITAIN
January 1967164,08159,767
January 1968159,19360,759
January 1969180,93471,331
January 1970179,37662,866
January 1971144,48848,693
January 1972102,72331,234
January 1973184,95146,757
January 1974285,35792,301
January 1975*....
January 197686,78417,900
January 1977*....
January 1978157,16416,885
January 1979213,58925,167
January 1980184,62619,147
* Not available.
Note: There were minor changes in the boundaries of some regions in April 1974 and for this reason the figures for January 1974 and earlier dates ate not strictly comparable with those for later dates

Registered Unemployed
South EastEast AngliaSouth WestWest MidlandsEast MidlandsYorkshire and HumbersideNorth WestNorthWalesScotlandGreat Britain
January 1967133,15114,1023',75238,66423,67637,06666,36150,42140,85484,303527,350
January 1968146,36613,63338,44948,92227,52451,93377,56361,06942,06992,123600,387
January 1969135,88013,59138,00442,70528,99655,60173,84867,54641,40686,436584,013
January 1971144,72918, 05£44,79352,89435,71364,90191,76066,83342,104113,037647,815
January 1972186,90523,27056,30787,19848,00490,967140,37189,55255,296149,750926,615
January 1973150,65216,58844,94666,946129,70072,721129,70076,44545,772127,523769,429
January 197411',79312,89141,90447,96032,89355,51695,23259,33038,05695,116597,691
January*154,40019,00060,00061,30041,'0065,900118,40067,90047,400102,300738,000
January 1976296,34233,446100,899129,59971,553109,314189,31994,08377,199150,0721,251,826
January 1977342,76436,916113,119129,13076,270115,126202,963107,14083,273183,4181,390,218
January 1978348,91738,312119,161130,84482,224127,646217,317123,52593,112203,6291,484,687
January 1979305,37336,235106,336126,00178,521125,478208,842121,64792,300190,3001,391,220
January 1980294,30934,05699,869133,28779,713127,733215,530125,79690,864203,2321,404,389

* Estimated

Job Vacancies

asked the Secretary of State for Employment what were the number of job vacancies notified to jobcentres in the parliamentary constituency of Macclesfield in January; and how this figure compares with January 1978 and 1979.

The following table gives the numbers of notified vacancies remaining unfilled at the dates specified in the area covered by the Macclesfield and Congleton employment offices, which closely corresponds to the Macclesfield parliamentary constituency. Vacancies notified to employment offices are estimated to be about one-third of all vacancies in the country as a whole. Because of possible duplication the figures for employment offices and careers offices should not be added together.

JANUARY 1978
At Employment OfficesAt Careers Offices
15547
January 1979January 1980
RegionAt Employment OfficesAt Careers OfficesAt Employment OfficesAt Careers Offices
South East98,44314,89085,48911,568
East Anglia6,2178016,263584
South West12,9811,29111,942866
West Midlands13,5882,02711,8491,200
East Midlands15,4241,37011,2981,154
Yorkshire and Humberside14,9391,45511,033967
North West16,9411,45814,6211,324
North9,6044807,984306
South East98,44314,89085,48911,568
East Anglia6,2178016,263584
South West12,9811,29111,942866
West Midlands13,5882,02711,8491,200
East Midlands15,4241,37011,2981,154
Yorkshire and Humberside14,9391,45511,033967
North West16,9411,45814,6211,324
North9,6044807,984306
Wales7,3444347,323391
Scotland18,10896116,824787
Great Britain213,58925,167184,62619,147

Kirklees And Oldham

asked the Secretary of State for Employment how many persons in the Kirklees area and the Oldham area (a) have been given temporary employment subsidy since its

Temporary Employment Subsidy: TESTemporary Short-Time Working Compensation Scheme: TSTWC Numbers currently supportedJob Release Scheme: JRS
Numbers supported since its inceptionPotentially redundant jobsWorkers on Short timeNumbers supported since its inception
Kirklees7,5972,4426,3451,319
Oldham7,9686591,4291,193
JANUARY 1979
At Employment OfficesAt Careers Offices
26091
JANUARY 1980
At Employment OfficesAt Careers Offices
18856

asked the Secretary of State for Employment what were the number of job vacancies notified to jobcentres in each region in January compared with the figures for January 1979.

The following table gives the numbers of notified vacancies remaining unfilled at employment offices and careers offices in each region at the dates specified. Vacancies notified to employment offices are estimated to be about one-third of all vacancies in the country as a whole. Because of possible duplication the figures for employment offices and careers offices should not be added together.inception, (

b) are receiving support from the temporary short-time working scheme and ( c) are taking advantage of the job retirement scheme since its inception.

Manpower Services Commission (Publication's)

asked the Secretary of State for Employment (1) how many publications in the Network and Actions campaigns have been published to date by the Manpower Services Commission; what is the average number of each issue produced; and what is the total cost of their compilation, production and distribution;

  • (2) what evidence he has that the Network and Actions publications produced by the Manpower Services Commission have produced results which would not have been obtained without the expenditure of taxpayers' money involved;
  • (3) how many names and addresses are on the mailing list for the Network and Actions publications produced by the Manpower Services Commission; and how the list was compiled;
  • (4) how many business reply cards enclosed with the recent issues of Network and Actions have been returned to the Manpower Services Commission;
  • (5) what is the total cost of the current promotional campaign involving the
  • GROSS WEEKLY EARNINGS (£) OF FULL-TIME MALE EMPLOYEES AGED 21 AND OVER IN APRIL*
    19751976197719781979
    Humberside (including Hull)
    Mean59·169·575·986·298·9
    Standard deviation24·925·728·131·636·3
    Median55·065·871·581·495·3
    Staffordshire (including Stoke)
    Mean57·267·374·584·696·7
    Standard deviation19·122·626·330·935·0
    Median53·563·269·479·189·8
    Great Britain
    Mean60·871·878·689·1101·4
    Standard deviation26·630·631·838·340·8
    Median55·965·872·382·093·9
    Source: New Earnings Survey.
    * Excluding employees whose earnings were affected by absence.
    Differences in average and median earnings between areas may reflect differences in industrial and occupational structure and do not necessarily imply differences in earnings for comparable jobs.

    Short-Time Working Compensation Scheme

    asked the Secretary of State for Employment whether he has now decided to renew the short-time working compensation scheme when it expires at the end of March.

    "People at Work" series of booklets; how many of each booklet in the series has been produced; what was the total cost of their production; how many of the booklets have been sold; and what is the total income to date from sales;

    (6) when the production and distribution of Network and Actions by the Manpower Services Commission commenced; and what is the target readership for these publications.

    Personal Incomes