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Written Answers

Volume 12: debated on Monday 9 November 1981

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Written Answers To Questions

Monday 9 November 1981

Energy

Petrol Prices

asked the Secretary of State for Energy how the United Kingdom price for a gallon of petrol compares with prices in other Western European countries.

The latest available estimates of typical retail prices for two-star and four-star petrol in Western European countries are given as follows. Prices for European Community countries are based on informal surveys conducted for the Commission on 26 October 1981. Prices for other countries have been obtained from national Administrations. National currencies have been converted at exchange rates current on 26 October 1981.In making international price comparisons, it must be borne in mind that difficulties can arise in times of changing prices and exchange rate fluctuations. There can, moreover, be a wide range of prices within countries and differences in the methods of collecting the data may not always provide comparable figures.

Typical retail price of petrol in Western Europe
Pence/gallon
2-star4-star
Austria164172
Belgium186193
Denmark177180
FinlandNot available
France169178
Federal Republic of Germany156161
Greece156173
Ireland190192
IcelandNot available
Italy184191
Luxembourg135141
Netherlands173180
Norway179185
Portugal191210
Spain158174
Sweden164168
Switzerland173180
United Kingdom165167

Source: EC Commission Oil Bulletin and national Administrations

North Sea Investment

asked the Secretary of State for Energy if he is satisfied that sufficient money is being invested in oilfields in the North Sea; and if he will make a statement.

Orders totalling some £2·4 billion were placed in connection with United Kingdom oil and gas production in 1980, and we believe that orders are being maintained at this level. In addition, a further £375 million was invested by the industry in oil exploration. I have every confidence that the oil industry will continue to invest at the level necessary to ensure full economic recovery of our North Sea oil reserves.

Home Department

Middlesex Probation Service(Exhibition)

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will arrange for an exhibition relating to the Middlesex probation service to be displayed in the Upper Waiting Hall.

I understand that arrangements have been made with the authorities of the House for the exhibition to be held in the Upper Waiting Hall from 7 December to 14 December 1981.

Illegal Immigrants

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what information is available concerning the country of origin of the 670 illegal immigrants granted a right to indefinite stay between 1 April 1979 and 30 June 1981.

Citizens Band Radio

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) if he will list the countries which allow only AM or only FM citizens band transmissions, respectively;(2) if he will list the countries which allow both AM and FM 27 MHz citizens band radio transmissions;(3) if he will list those countries which allow citizens band transmissions on frequencies between 26.965 and 27.405 MHz;(4) if he will list the countries that allow citizens band transmissions with a power of 4 watts and restrict the aerial height to 1·5 metres.

The conditions prescribed in different countries for citizens band radio vary considerably. The September issue of the Telecommunication Journal, published by the International Telecommunication Union, contains a broad summary of many existing national regulations on citizens band radio. A copy is being placed in the Library of the House.

Civil Defence

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will make a statement on the aims and achievements of the civil defence nuclear bomb on Great Britain exercise carried out on and around 1 November; if he will list in the Official Report the number of people involved in the exercise and the total cost; and if he will make a statement.

The exercise held by the United Kingdom Warning and Monitoring Organisation (UKWMO) on Sunday, 1 November was one of a series held each year. The objectives were to practise the UKWMO and the Royal Observer Corps in their wartime operational role, and to evaluate procedures for issuing fallout warnings and providing nuclear burst and fallout information to those with civil defence responsibilities.Some 8,000 volunteers, including members of the Royal Observer Corps, participated in the exercise at an estimated cost of £55,000, mainly out of pocket allowances for people who used their spare time to practise and prove their operational efficiency in a role vital to the protection of the civil population.

Cypriot Immigrants

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will make a statement on the current Government policy on the Cypriots who came to the United Kingdom from Cyprus as a result of the coup and invasion of 1974.

Those Cypriots who were allowed to enter or remain in the United Kingdom outside the immigration rules as a result of the events of 1974 were granted such concessions on the understanding that they would be expected to re-establish themselves in Cyprus in due course. Extensions of stay continue to be granted to those in this category whom it would still be unreasonable to expect to return to Cyprus.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many refugees from both Greek and Turkish communities came to the United Kingdom during or following the coup and invasion of 1974; how many have left voluntarily; how many have been forced to return to Cyprus as a result of his Department's decisions; and how many are still in the United Kingdom.

Chief Charity Commissioner

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many replies were received to the advertisement placed in the national press last August for the post of Chief Charity Commissioner; how many other candidates there were for this post; how many of each of the above two categories were contained in the final short list and how many of each of the above two categories were selected for interview.

I am informed by the Civil Service Commission that 70 candidates applied for this post, of whom 51 indicated that they were responding to an dvertisement in the press, 14 to a Departmental notice, and five did not provide this information. Six candidates were shortlisted and interviewed, for whom the corresponding figures were two; three and one.

Overseas Development

School Hostel, Port Stanley

asked the Lord Privy Seal what advice the Overseas Development Agency has received from the Crown Agents concerning the safety of the corridor roof structure of the new school hostel at Port Stanley, Falkland Islands; if he is satisfied that the structure is safe; and how soon he expects the hostel will be completed and handed over to the Falkland Islands Government.

The Crown Agents have told us that they cannot advise us on the safety of this structure until they have received the results of a further check which the contractors' engineering advisers are being asked to undertake urgently. Until we have this advice it is not possible to say when we will be able to hand over the hostel. I hope, however, that the matter will be resolved satisfactorily very soon.

Wales

Council Houses

asked the Secretary of State for Wales what (a) has been the average selling price of council dwellings by Welsh housing authorities and (b) the average construction costs of new council dwellings in Wales, both figures at the latest available date.

During the second quarter of 1981 the average selling price of a council dwelling was £8,000 and the average construction cost of a new council dwelling was £20,700.

National Finance

Money Supply

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer (1) by what percentage sterling M3 rose in the 12-month periods prior to the beginning of each month from January 1979 to November 1981;(2) by what percentage M1 rose in the 12-month periods prior to the beginning of each month from January 1979 to November 1981;(3) by what percentage M3 rose in the 12-month periods to the beginning of each month from January 1979 to November 1981.

Money supply figures based on the beginning of calendar months are not available. On a banking month basis the 12 month increases in M1, £M3 and M3 over this period are as follows—the latest published data are for banking September 1981:

Change, per centM1M3£M3
1978December15·214·613·6
1979January14·515·114·1
February13·314·112·9
March12·711·411·3
April15·410·111·3
May13·810·111·6
June13·110·611·8
July13·09·611·2
August12·611·812·8
September12·011·712·5
October14·512·913·6
November11·113·413·5
December8·711·611·9
1980January7·610·411·0
February5·110·010·5
March5·812·812·5
April3·212·411·0
May2·513·111·6
June3·812·512·0
July5·517·116·8
August3·718·217·6
September3·617·417·3
October1·517·017·6
November3·717·218·6
December6·919·220·0
1981January5·419·818·6
February8·820·518·6
March7·420·518·3
Change, per cent.M1M3£M3
April11·321·519·8
May12–621·719·6
June12·122·618·7
July11–820·815·4
August9·920·214·4
September11·722·916·6

Industry (Public Investment)

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer what is his estimate of the total public investment in industry.

The information in the Supplementary Statements of the Consolidated Fund and National Loans Fund accounts for 1979–80 was as follows:

£
Public Dividend Capital (Advances)5,704,175,933
Shares and Securities (Nominal Holdings)296,566,300
National Loans Fund (Advances Outstanding)
Loans to Nationalised Industries10,673,899,011
Loans to Other Public Corporations5,823,975,983
Loans to the Private Sector40,318,519
Total22,538,935,746
The accounts for 1980–81 will be presented to the House in December.

Member's Correspondence

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer why it took him until 14 October to reply to a letter from the hon. Member for Bury St. Edmunds which was sent to him five months earlier on behalf of E. Garnham on the subject of parental contributions to student grants; and why his reply was unsigned.

I very much regret the delay which took place. Every endeavour is being made to deal with the backlog of correspondence which built up during the Civil Service dispute. I understand that the letter to Mr. Garnham was, in fact, signed.

Public Expenditure

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer if he will set out in a table (a) capital, (b) current and (c) total expenditure (i) by central Government and (ii) by local government for each of the past 10 financial years, together with his estimate of expenditure under these headings for the current financial year.

The information requested is given in the table below.

£ million
Central Government ExpenditureLocal Government Expenditure
CurrentCapital*TotalCurrentCapital*Total
1971–7216,8911,64820,8455,6292,0707,822
1972–7319,2401,69423,4516,4682,4239,130
1973–7422,5731,94326,4307,7993,31211,472
1974–7530,0442,28435,67010,4073,63914,754
1975–7639,6692,68746,23213,3824,09817,899
1976–7745,8043,02051,22615,1224,06719,246
1977–7851,5803,14056,27016,3373,71320,015
1978–7959,0613,27746,78318,2283,61121,898
Central Government ExpenditureLocal Government Expenditure
CurrentCapital*TotalCurrentCapital*Total
1979–8070,4463,73377,77721,7443,95526,106
1980–8185,9024,43293,60626,2894,17430,748
1981–8295,4344,812105,07726,9732,81130,944
* Current plus capital expenditure plus net lending.

Source: National Accounts (up to 1980–81)

Financial Statement and Budget Report 1981–82

Household Incomes

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer if he will give the most up-to-date available figures for (a) average household income and (b) average household income for council tenants.

The average gross normal income recorded in the family expenditure survey in 1979 for households in England was £116 per week. For households in local authority housing the average was £94 per week. Information from the 1980 survey is not yet available.

Oil Taxation

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer what percentage of the oil companies' profit the Government take in taxes.

Attorney-General

Immunity From Prosecution

47.

asked the Attorney-General if he will make a statement on the rules governing immunity from prosecution.

52.

asked the Attorney-General if he will make a statement on the practice regarding immunity from prosecution.

Immunity from prosecution can only be granted by the Attorney-General or Director of Public Prosecutions because it is only with them that there lies the power to stop any prosecution. Each application made to either the Director of Public Prosecutions or myself is treated separately on its merits, and it is not possible to set out any comprehensive set of rules.The criteria which we apply include

  • (i) whether in the interests of justice it is of more value to have a suspected person as a witness for the Crown than as a possible defendant;
  • (ii) whether in the interests of public safety and security the obtaining of information about the extent and nature of criminal activities is of greater importance than the possible conviction of an individual;
  • (iii) whether it is very unlikely that any information could be obtained without an offer of immunity and whether it is also very unlikely that any prosecution could be launched against the person to whom the immunity is offered.
  • True immunities are uncommon because it is now the practice not to go further than an undertaking that any confession obtained as a result will not be used against the maker. If other evidence to justify his prosecution becomes available then proceedings may be brought.

    51.

    asked the Attorney-General whether he will take steps to ensure that he is informed whenever immunity from prosecution, or what is tantamount to such, is offered by prosecuting authorities to individuals in criminal matters.

    I assume that the right hon. and learned Member's question arises out of the fact that Mr. Long was led to believe that it was unlikely that he would be prosecuted and the right hon. and learned Member's concern that this should not have been allowed to happen as the question of prosecution had not been considered by the proper authorities. I am satisfied that the present procedures of the security service will prevent anything of the sort happening today.As my right hon. Friend the Prime Minister is informing the House in an answer this afternoon, a person suspected of an espionage offence will not be interviewed by the security service on the basis that he need not fear prosecution unless the case has first been referred to the Attorney-General and permission has been given for the interview to be conducted on that basis.

    Mr Leo Long

    50.

    asked the Attorney-General, in view of recent information about the espionage activities of Mr. Leo Long and the fact that he was not prosecuted, in respect of how many other persons it was decided to bring no prosecutions.

    I can only repeat the statement I made on 21 November 1979 that in security cases there has been one immunity granted since the war. There are, of course, other cases where it was decided to bring no prosecution because there was insufficient evidence or the offender was not within the jurisdiction.

    Scotland

    Departmental Responsibility

    asked the Secretary of State for Scotland for which legislative and other measures in the Gracious Speech he will have departmental responsibility; and if he will make a statement.

    As indicated in the Gracious Speech, there will be Scottish Bills in the current session of Parliament relating to local government and civic government. A Civic Government (Scotland) Bill has already been introduced in another place and a Bill about local government in Scotland will be introduced in this House as soon as possible. In addition, a Housing (Amendment) (Scotland) Bill was introduced in this House on 5 November and a Harbours (Scotland) Bill will be introduced in another place on 10 November.

    Foreign And Commonwealth Affairs

    Falkland Islands

    asked the Lord Privy Seal when he expects the next round of talks to take place with the Argentine Government concerning the future of the Falkland Islands; what will be the subject of the talks; and if he will make a statement.

    No dates have yet been arranged but we hope to hold a further round of talks with the Argentines soon. Island councillors have already agreed in principle to send representatives to such talks. No agenda has been agreed, but the objective will be to continue the attempts to resolve the dispute with Argentina in a way which all concerned can accept. I reaffirm that the wishes of the islanders themselves are paramount: no solution could be approved which was not acceptable to the islanders and to Parliament.

    United States Of America (Visa Requirement)

    asked the Lord Privy Seal if he will make a statement on the latest position resulting from the initiative taken by the Government to persuade the Government of the United States of America to end the requirement for British subjects to obtain a visa in order to enter that country.

    Representations were made to the new United States Administration during the visit of my right hon. Friend the Prime Minister to Washington in February this year. In March the State Department introduced into its Appropriations Bill a clause which would allow the United States Secretary of State to waive tourist visas for nationals of some countries including the United Kingdom. I understand that this clause will now be considered separately by the Judiciary Sub-Committee, which has jurisdiction over immigration matters. Hearings have not yet taken place.

    Trade

    Anglian Water Authority

    asked the Secretary of State for Trade whether he has any plans to refer the Anglian water authority to the Monopolies and Mergers Commission.

    My right hon. Friend intends in due course to make further water industry references to the Commission.

    Trade Mark Office (Location)

    asked the Secretary of State for Trade what representations have been made by Manchester city council and the Manchester chamber of commerce and industry requesting support from his Department that the European Economic Community trade mark office be located in Manchester; and whether he will make it his policy to seek for the location of the office in that city.

    The Manchester chamber of commerce and industry, supported by Manchester city council and other local interests, has written to urge that Manchester should be offered as the site for the proposed community trade mark office. At a recent meeting with a representative of the Manchester chamber, I had the opportunity to discuss all aspects of this question.I fully understand and welcome the initiative and efforts to aid a regional centre. Nevertheless, I have to conclude that we must offer our strongest contender if we are to succeed in bringing this office to the United Kingdom against the counter-proposals of The Hague, Brussels and Strasbourg. In my view this remains London, which is the focal point of our trade mark system and is unrivalled in the United Kingdom as a source of professional expertise to help potential applicants for Community trade marks.

    245 Trichlorophenol And 245 Trichlorophenosyacetic Acid (Imports)

    asked the Secretary of State for Trade how much 245 trichlorophenol and 245 trichlorophenosyacetic acid have been imported into the United Kingdom so far this year; and from which countries.

    These substances are not separately distinguished in the United Kingdom Overseas Trade Statistics. I understand that according to Her Majesty's Customs' special chemicals return 166,921 kilogrammes of 2,4,5-trichlorophenosyacetic acid were imported in the period January to September 1981 from the Federal Republic of Germany and Austria.

    South Korea

    asked the Secretary of State for Trade what is his policy with respect to South Korean exports of motor cars to the United Kingdom in the light of the South Korean Government's ban on British exports of cars to that country.

    The South Korean market is not closed to all automotive products. Significant quantities of cars in kit form and some car components are exported to it from the United Kingdom. But we shall continue to press the South Korean authorities to remove restrictions on imports, and we shall keep the level of imports of South Korean cars in the United Kingdom under review.

    Tariff Barriers

    asked the Secretary of State for Trade if he will take steps to assess the extent of the effective tariff barrier imposed by variations of 5 per cent. or more of the £ sterling against a basket of other European Economic Community currencies.

    It is not practicable to calculate with any confidence the effects of particular parity changes on trade flows.

    Laker Airways

    asked the Secretary of State for Trade what assistance Her Majesty's Government have provided in securing extension of loans facilities from financial institutions in the United States of America for Laker Airways.

    Her Majesty's Government have not made, nor been asked to make, any representations to the United States Government on this matter.

    Hotels

    asked the Secretary of State for Trade what has been the movement in British hotel prices compared with the rest of the world in the most recent year.

    Employment

    Industrial Democracy

    53.

    asked the Secretary of State for Employment whether he will seek to promote industrial democracy in publicly owned industries.

    We have consistently encouraged employers in both the public and the private sector to develop arrangements for employee involvement which are appropriate to their particular circumstances.

    Greater London And Brent (Statistics)

    asked the Secretary of State for Employment (1) if he will list the number, names and numbers of employees involved in firms which have closed since May 1979 in (a) the Greater London area and (b) the Brent travel-to-work area;(2) if he will list the number, names and numbers of employees involved in firms which have reduced their work forces since May 1979 in

    (a) the Greater London area and (b) the Brent travel-to-work area.

    The information requested on firms which have closed or reduced their work forces is not available. The available information, which is not comprehensive, on redundancies involving ten or more employees, reported to the Manpower Services Commission as due to occur in the requested areas between May 1979 and October 1981 (inclusive) is as follows:

    Number of firms involved in redundanciesNumber of employees involved
    Greater London1,62386,684
    Borough of Brent553,008

    Note: Including provisional figures for September and October 1981.

    asked the Secretary of State for Employment (1) what are the latest unemployment figures in (a) the Greater London area and (b) the Brent travel-to-work area; if he will give the average period of unemployment and the age breakdown in each case; and what were the figures in May 1979;(2) if he will list by trade and occupation the registered vacancies in

    (a) the Greater London area and (b) the Brent travel-to-work area in May 1979 and at the latest available date in 1981, respectively.

    Bl Cars (Picketing)

    asked the Secretary of State for Employment if he will investigate the working of the Employment Act 1980 with special regard to picketing during the recent dispute at BL Cars; and if he will make a statement.

    The Government totally condemn those responsible for the scenes of disorder which occurred outside some BL plants at the beginning of last week. understand that those present were, in the main, employees of BL and they were not therefore acting unlawfully by reason only of the fact that they were picketing in contravention of the picketing provisions of the Employment Act 1980. Clearly, however, the ordinary civil and criminal law applied. The maintenance of public order and the enforcement of the criminal law are matters for the operational judgment of the chief officers of police concerned.

    Training Opportunities Scheme (Travel Expenses)

    asked the Secretary of State for Employment if he will allow expenses for travel to work for training opportunities programme scheme trainees.

    A contribution towards daily travelling expenses is paid to the majority of trainees attending courses under the training opportunities scheme.

    Manpower Services Commission

    asked the. Secretary of State for Employment whether any change will be made to the cash limit of the Manpower Services Commission.

    Subject to Parliamentary approval of the necessary Supplementary Estimates, the total grant-in-aid to the Manpower Services Commission will be increased from £889·744 million to £992·030 million. The increase will be found from the contingency reserve and so does not add to planned spending totals.An additional £102·832 million is required by the MSC to meet an increase in demand for places under the youth opportunities programme and to support longer-term training of young persons but there are off-setting savings of £0·546 million for jobcentre advertising. The increase in the total grant-in-aid will require consequential adjustments to the following cash limits:

    £ million
    Cash limit 1981–82
    PresentRevised
    Class IV, Vote 16
    Manpower Services Commission734·077826·222
    Class XV, Vote 4
    Manpower Services Commission, Scotland96·963104·543
    Class XVI, Vote 4
    Manpower Services Commission, Wales52·03154·592
    883·071985·357

    Agriculture, Fisheries And Food

    Lime Subsidy Scheme

    asked the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food if he will consider reinstating the 1976 agricultural lime subsidy scheme to all cultivated agricultural land in view of the increasing acidity in soils and poor crop yields; and if he will make a statement.

    I refer my hon. Friend to the reply which I gave him on 21 October.—[Vol. 10, c. 147.]

    Beef (Export Refunds)

    asked the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food what is the total cost to the Community taxpayer of export refunds on beef; and if he will provide a breakdown of the amount of refund on clean beef as distinct from manufacturing beef.

    Export refunds for the whole of the beef sector cost about 715 million ECUs (about £430 million) in 1980. As clean beef and manufacturing beef receive the same rates of export refund and are not separately distinguished in trade statistics, it is not possible to provide a breakdown of this figure.

    Social Services

    Registers Of Births, Marriages And Deaths

    54.

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services if he will make a statement on the steps to be taken to make available registers of births, marriages and deaths for public inspection and research after the expiry of 100 years.

    A proposal is being considered to transfer to the Public Record Office all records over 100 years old of births, deaths and marriages currently held in the General Register Office. The Lord Chancellor is presently awaiting a report following a study of the possibility of bringing together all the records in the custody of the Public Record Office on a single site at Kew, where it is hoped that space will be created for the deposit of the General Register Office records. Once a decision is made it will be possible to estimate the probable length of time before these records can be opened to public scrutiny.

    Depo Provera

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services if he has received the advice of the Committee on Safety of Medicines on the subject of depoprovera; what decision he has reached about licensing this for general use; and if he will make a statement.

    I regret that I can add nothing to the reply I gave to my hon. Friend on 24 July. [Vol. 9, c. 271.]

    Benefits

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services if the next increase in unemployment and other short-term benefits will be in line with the projected inflation rate.

    I cannot add to the reply which I gave to the hon. Member on 22 October 1981 [Vol. 10, c. 183.].

    Nurses

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services if he will list in the Official Report the various qualifications possessed by nurses employed by health authorities together with the added remuneration that additional qualifications command.

    Information about individual NHS employees' qualifications are not held centrally. The nurses and midwives whitley council specifies the basic professional qualifications required for defined posts in the NHS nursing services. Pay levels negotiated by the whitley council are in relation to posts and the duties which their holders are required to undertake and are not directly related to the qualifications required.

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services if he will make a statement on the shortage of especially qualified nurses in the specialties of operating theatres, renal transplants and dialysis and intensive care units.

    In some hospitals these specialised areas are difficult to staff with appropriately qualified nurses. In an attempt to ease the problem, the joint board of clinical nursing studies has devised and published curricula in the specialties named. Since these courses were set up there has been a gradual increase in the uptake each year. To date, 1,657 certificates have been awarded for nurses qualified in operating theatre nursing, 641 in renal nursing and 3,585 in intensive care nursing.Assessment of staffing levels is a matter to be determined by individual health authorities in the light of local needs and priorities. Information about the extent of shortages is not held centrally but in eccouraging recruitment the Department does place emphasis on specialised areas where there are recognised difficulties and provides material for local recruitment campaigns.

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services how a 4 per cent. pay increase on nurses' salaries would affect their take-home pay in relation to the level of male non-manual employees in the National Health Service.

    Information in the form requested is not available centrally. I refer the hon. Member to my hon. Friend's reply to the hon. Member for Fife, Central (Mr. Hamilton) on 27 October, which set out the current basic salary scales for nursing and midwifery grades employed in the NHS. [Vol. 10, c. 328–9].

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services if, in view of the strong feeling expressed by nurses through the medium of nursing journals and through their organisations, he will take steps to safeguard the real value of nurses' salaries.

    I refer the hon. Member to my reply to the hon. Member for Islington, North (Mr. O'Halloran) on 26 October. [Vol. 10, c. 266].

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services if, in his consideration of the method to be adopted in future for determining nurses' pay, account will be taken of the need to differentiate between the scale for a midwife who has qualified as a state certified midwife in addition to SRN who at present receives only the same remuneration as a nurse with the single SRN qualification.

    I am having discussions with both sides of the nurses and midwives whitley council about possible approaches to considering a method for determining nurses' pay for the future. Whatever approach is adopted, it is anticipated that this exercise will take into account all factors relevant to the employment of nurses, midwives, health visitors and district nurses in the NHS, including training and qualification requirements.

    Nurse Tutors And Educational Staff

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services what is the present shortfall in the North-West Thames health region of nurse tutors and educational staff.

    This information is not collected centrally, and I suggest that the hon. Member approach North-West Thames regional health authority, which may be able to provide it.

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services if he will discuss with the Whitley Council concerned the discrepancy between the salary structure for tutors of nurses and teachers engaged in further education.

    This is a matter for the nurses and midwives Whitley council, which negotiates the salary structure for tutorial grades within the NHS nursing services in relation to the salary framework of NHS nursing and midwifery grades generally. The standing comparability commission which reported on nurses and midwives in January 1981 (Cmnd. 7795) took account of the salary of a Lecturer in colleges of further education in making their recommendations on the pay of nurse tutors. Those recommendations were implemented in two stages from 1 August 1979 and 1 April 1980.A further Whitley Council pay settlement with effect from 1 April 1980 gave a general increase of 13 per cent. on all nursing and midwifery grades' basic pay scales with additional increases for tutorial grades as follows:Director of nurse education/Assistant director of nurse education—five per cent. making 18 per cent. in all.Senior tutor/Tutor/Clinical teacher—two per cent. making 15 per cent. in all.With effect from 1 April 1981 all nurses and midwives pay scales were increased by six per cent. at all points so that the current minima and maxima for tutorial pay scales are as follows:

    ££
    Director of nurse education I11,92513,425
    Director of nurse education IV9,03310,394
    Assistant director9,80511,133
    Senior tutor7,3928,660
    Tutor6,8058,073
    Clinical teacher6,2487,551
    Current further education college lecturer pay scales range from:

    ££
    Lecturer I5,0348,658
    Lecturer II6,46210,431
    Senior lecturer9,62412,141

    Fuel Bills (Assistance)

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services if he will give further consideration to allowing all those in receipt of rebates and rent allowances to claim the assistance for payment of fuel bills.

    The Government are already planning to spend some £250 million in the next year to help low-income households meet their fuel costs. To extend these provisions to people in receipt of rent and rate rebates and rent allowances would, at least, mean doubling this expenditure and could not be afforded in present economic circumstances.

    Pensions

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services what would be the saving to the Exchequer of raising the female pensionable age to 61, 62, 63, 64 and 65 years, respectively.

    Estimates are being produced on the same basis as given in my reply to the hon. Member for Cannock (Mr. Roberts) Official Report [Vol. 10, c. 102–3.] and should be available shortly, at which time I will publish them in the Official Report.

    Child Benefit

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services whether his Department has made a more recent estimate of the likely savings resulting from the introduction of four-weekly child benefit than that given in his statement of 12 May 1981; and, if he has done so, what is this estimate.

    We have no more up-to-date information about likely savings than that given in my right hon. Friend's statement on 12 May 1981. [Vol. 4, c. 618–27.]

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services what are the latest figures of the proportions of mothers cashing their child benefit every week, two weeks, three weeks, and four weeks or more.

    It is estimated that in June 1981 about 50 per cent. of mothers were cashing their child benefit weekly, 19 per cent. two-weekly, 7 per cent. three-weekly and 23 per cent. every four weeks or more.

    Industry

    Regional Aid Grants

    15.

    asked the Secretary of State for Industry if he will ensure that regional aid grants are given preferentially to firms which are prepared to build or convert older premises in the major cities into units of less than 2,500 square feet for low cost office and factory space.

    24.

    asked the Secretary of State for Industry if he will ensure that regional aid grants are given preferentially to firms which are prepared to build or convert older premises in the major cities into units of less than 2,500 square feet for low cost office and factory space.

    26.

    asked the Secretary of State for Industry if he will ensure that regional aid grants are given preferentially to firms which are prepared to build or convert older premises in the major cities into units of less than 2,500 square feet for low cost office and factory space.

    40.

    asked the Secretary of State for Industry if he will ensure that regional aid grants are given preferentially to firms which are prepared to build or convert older premises in the major cities into units of less than 2,500 square feet for low cost offices and factory space.

    I believe that the incentives currently available through the tax system and in existing Department of Industry and other schemes already provide sufficient encouragement for such developments, but I would be willing to consider any evidence that my hon. Friend would like to present.

    Assistance To Industry

    16.

    asked the Secretary of State for Industry what was the total amount of central Government regional assistance to industry in the last year for which figures are available.

    In the financial year ended 31 March 1981 expenditure on regional preferential assistance in Great Britain was £731 million.

    British Steel Corporation

    18.

    asked the Secretary of State for Industry if he will make an estimate of the cost to public funds of the present levels of manning and labour productivity in the British Steel Corporation.

    It would be difficult to make a precise estimate of the kind my hon. Friend has in mind. Productivity has improved dramatically in BSC over the past year, but as the chairman himself has remarked, productivity is a moving target.

    23.

    asked the Secretary of State for Industry whether agreement has now been reached with the European Economic Community Commission on the amount of Government finance for the British Steel Corporation.

    Commission agreement has already been given for £370 million for BSC this year, and I expect a decision later this month on the remaining £360 million for 1981–82.

    Small Businesses

    19.

    asked the Secretary of State for Industry what further measures he proposes to give assistance to small businesses.

    We have already done a great deal to help small businesses, which we are publicising at present through the business opportunities programme. Through that programme and in many other ways I am in constant touch with small businesses and regularly consider with them whether further measures are needed. There is to be a debate on the subject of the Government's policy towards small businesses in this House on Friday.

    asked the Secretary of State for Industry how many new small businesses with fewer than 200 employees have been set up each month during the last 12 months; and how many have gone into liquidation.

    This information is not available in the form requested, though work is now being done in the Department on it. Details of insolvencies in England and Wales were publishd in British Business on 16 and 23 October.

    asked the Secretary of State for Industry how many businesses employing fewer than 200 people existed in Great Britain in September of each year since 1976; and how many people those businesses employed.

    The available information relating to manufacturing enterprises in the United Kingdom employing fewer than 200 in the private sector is as follows:

    YearEnterprisesEmployment (thousands)
    197686,2791576·3
    197786,7391552·0
    197887,1681515·7
    197986,8381498·2
    Further details are available from table 12 of Business Monitor PA 1002. Information is not available for subsequent years or for non-manufacturing enterprises.

    De-Industrialisation

    21.

    asked the Secretary of State for Industry what measures are proposed to prevent further de-industrialisation of the economy.

    22.

    asked the Secretary of State for Industry if he proposes to introduce any further measures to assist industrial companies.

    Industry will prosper by becoming efficient, and that means making products of a design and at a cost which attracts customers. The Government can and are helping by fighting inflation, providing incentives and removing obstacles to enterprise.

    Long Term Bank Loans

    25.

    asked the Secretary of State for Industry what representations his Department has received in connection with the availability of long term bank loans to British industry.

    I have recently received the report of the Conservative Party industry committee's study group on the terms and conditions of bank lending in Britain and am studying it carefully.

    Regional Development Grants

    27.

    asked the Secretary of State for Industry when he expects to review regional development grants.

    All aid schemes administered by the Department of Industry are kept under regular review.

    Information Technology Centres

    28.

    asked the Secretary of State for Industry if he will make a statement about the location of information technology centres in the London area.

    The locations of the first 20 centres will be announced in a few weeks' time, as my right hon. Friend the Prime Minister indicated last week.The Manpower Services Commission and the information technology centres consultancy unit are working with potential sponsors on their applications; it would not be appropriate to specify precise locations until these discussions are successfully completed.

    29.

    asked the Secretary of State for Industry if, before approving any extra investment in British Leyland, he will require that the compamy increase its purchases of British-made components.

    The Government believe that component purchasing must be decided by the company on a commercial basis. Overall, BL has a good record in this area.

    35.

    asked the Secretary of State for Industry when next he plans to meet the chairman of British Leyland to discuss investment plans for 1982; and if he will make a statement.

    I meet the chairman of BL whenever the need arises to discuss various topics including if necessary investment plans and the corporate plan. I do not consider a statement to be necessary.

    36.

    asked the Secretary of State for Industry what recent consultations he has had about Government investment in British Leyland.

    I discuss such matters with the chairman of BL when the need arises, and expect to consult my colleagues in the Government about BL's 1982 corporate plan as soon as officials have had an opportunity to study it.

    39.

    asked the Secretary of State for Industry what decisions on the future of BL taken by the board require the approval of Her Majesty 's Government.

    I, in my capacity as Secretary of State for Industry, own over 99 per cent. of the shares in BL. I therefore have all the rights of any majority shareholder, but, having confidence in Sir Michael Edwardes and the board of BL, am concerned to leave the responsibility for day-to-day commercial matters with BL. I consider BL's annual corporate plan and any consequent funding requirements, and give approval for major investment proposals.

    asked the Secretary of State for Industry if he will publish in the Official Report the total amount of public subsidies given to BL Ltd in each year since it was constituted.

    I refer my hon. Friend to the answer given to my hon. Friend the Member for Bath (Mr. Patten) on Friday, 23 October 1981 [Vol. 10, c. 193.]

    Mechanical Engineering Industry

    30.

    asked the Secretary of State for Industry if he will give the index of production for the mechanical engineering industry for the second quarters of 1979, 1980 and 1981, respectively.

    The index of production for the mechanical engineering industry for the second quarters of 1979, 1980 and 1981 was 94·4, 86·8 and 76·3 respectively.

    Wool Textile Industry

    31.

    asked the Secretary of State for Industry if, in the light of the European Commission's view that assistance to the textile industry should now be harmonised rather than prohibited, he will make a statement on Her Majesty's Government's policy on assistance to the wool textile industry in the United Kingdom.

    It is the Government's policy to create the right long-term environment in which all manufacturing industry can become more efficient. The wool textile industry has already received substantial aid under the temporary short-time working compensation scheme and under two specific sectoral schemes under section 8 of the Industry Act 1972. I have no plans to introduce any further specific schemes for the industry.

    Northern Region

    32.

    asked the Secretary of State for Industry what representations he has received from Cumbria and the Northern region on further support for industry in the Northern region.

    My hon. Friend the Minister of State met the North of England County Councils Association on 2 November to discuss its third "State of the Region" report. In addition, I expect to meet a deputation led by the hon. Member for Workington (Mr. Campbell-Savours) shortly to discuss the circumstances of Workington.

    Carpet Industry

    33.

    asked the Secretary of State for Industry what discussions he has had about the state of the United Kingdom carpet industry with unions and employers in the industry.

    My Department has observer status at the Joint Carpet discussions between representatives of trade unions and the British Carpet Manufacturers' Association. The last meeting was held on 12 October.

    Nationalised Industries (Subsidies)

    34.

    asked the Secretary of State for Industry if he will make a statement about the level of public subsidies to the nationalised industries for which he is responsible.

    Only BS and BSC receive subsidies and these are being progressively reduced.

    Manufacturing Output

    37.

    asked the Secretary of State for Industry what is the latest level of manufacturing output; and how this compares with the level at May 1979.

    In the three months to August 1981 the index of production for manufacturing industry was 89·7 compared with 107·4 in the second quarter of 1979. The second quarter of 1979 was a period of "catching up" in production after the road haulage dispute and the abnormally bad weather in the first quarter of 1979.

    38.

    asked the Secretary of State for Industry if he will make a statement on the output of manufacturing industry in 1981.

    The fall in manufacturing output was halted earlier this year, and the latest indications are that activity is now increasing, having risen by some 2 per cent. between the three months ended August and the previous three months.

    Space Technology

    41.

    asked the Secretary of State for Industry what progress he is making in the commercial application of space technology.

    This is essentially a matter for the space industry itself, but the Government are actively encouraging the possibility of private sector investment in satellite services.

    Assisted Areas (Grants)

    42.

    asked the Secretary of State for Industry if he intends to continue the programme for reducing the number of grades of assisted areas qualifying for automatic grants.

    My right hon. Friend intends to continue with the Government's programme for concentrating regional aid on the areas of greatest need, which was announced on 17 July 1979 and is due to be completed by 1 August 1982.

    Iron Foundries

    43.

    asked the Secretary of State for Industry how many iron foundries in the United Kingdom closed (a) during 1980 and (b) up to the latest available date.

    The information available to my Department is as follows:

    • 1980—40 closures
    • 1981 to date—39 closures.

    Concorde

    44.

    asked the Secretary of State for Industry whether construction plans and calculations for the Concorde aircraft were at any time supplied to the Russian aircraft industry.

    Mercury Consortium (Network Licence)

    asked the Secretary of State for Industry what is the date by which the Mercury Consortium will receive a licence to operate the second telecommunications network.

    The licence will be granted when its technical details have been agreed between the Department and the consortium and after consultation with British Telecom. The Department's wish is for Mercury to be in operation in about two years' time.

    Engineering Council (Membership)

    asked the Secretary of State for Industry when he will announce the membership of the Engineering Council and the confirmation of Sir Kenneth Corfield as its chairman.

    I shall announce the membership of the Engineering Council as soon as possible, and intend formally to appoint Sir Kenneth Corfield as chairman of the council once the Royal Charter has been granted.

    Bank Loans

    asked the Secretary of State for Industry whether he has any evidence that branch bank managers are discouraged from giving loans under the loan guarantee scheme by their central or regional headquarters.

    No. I have been impressed by the way the banks are actively encouraging their branch managers to consider the scheme as an important addition to the service they offer to small businesses.

    Education And Science

    European University Institute

    asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science if he is satisfied that the £60,000 spent for each student at the European University Institute represents value for money; and what plans the Government have with regard to future use of this institution having regard to its policy towards higher education in the United Kingdom.

    As the primary objective of the institute is research to which the students contribute only a part, it is not meaningful to relate the institutional cost to the number of students. The Government are continuing, in co-operation with other signatories of the institute's convention, to promote its academic development and improve its cost-effectiveness.

    Student Places

    asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science what is the total number of student places to be lost in 1983, 1984 and 1985 and the expected annual cash savings for these years, excluding redundancy payments; and what is the expected number of redundancies and estimated cost of redundancy payments.

    The University Grants Committee recently announced target student numbers, which were based on its allocations of recurrent grant for 1981–82 and its provisional indications of universities' grant for later years. These targets assumed that the total number of home and EC students in universities in Great Britain would fall to 248,700 by 1983–84 or 1984–85. This compares with a total of 267,500 such students in 1980–81.The Government's Expenditure Plans 1981–82 to 1983–84 (Cmnd. 8175) provide for a reduction in expenditure on higher education by 1983–84 of rather more than 8 per cent. below the level planned in Cmnd. 7841, and the continued withdrawal of the subsidy for overseas students will further reduce the total level of public expenditure on higher education.For planning purposes the University Grants Committee was asked to assume that the universities would bear a proportionate share of the reduction in funding for home students but no decisions have yet been taken about the precise allocation of the resources to universities in 1982–83 and later years. It is too early to say how many redundancies there will be or what they will cost.

    Defence

    Naval Dockyards (Annual Reports)

    asked the Secretary of State for Defence if he will place in the Library the annual reports of the naval dockyards.

    Hms "Swiftsure"

    asked the Secretary of State for Defence what is the latest planned date for HMS "Swiftsure" to complete refuelling and refit and to rejoin the Fleet; and on what date she entered Devonport.

    HMS "Swiftsure" entered Devonport in January 1979. It is not our usual practice to reveal details of Fleet or ship movements, but the refit is expected to be completed in the second half of next year.

    Transport

    A19 (Teesside)

    asked the Secretary of State for Transport what are the reasons for the need to repair at this time the A19 road in the Teesside area, the length of road involved, the estimated cost of the repairs and their estimated date of completion; what traffic safety precautions are being taken during the period; and who will bear the cost.

    There is a need to carry out repairs to the A19 trunk road in Cleveland in order to strengthen the carriageway to withstand the heavy traffic that has been attracted on to the Teesside diversion. The opportunity is being taken at the same time to improve the effectiveness of the drainage system in places where this is now considered necessary and to renew surfacing over some of the bridge joints on the Tees viaduct. Cracks that have appeared in certain piers of the Tees viaduct are also being sealed and deflects in the bearings of the viaduct are being investigated.In this financial year carriageway repairs are being carried out on the southbound carriageway over a length of two miles (3·2km), from A66 Stockton road interchange to A174 Parkway interchange. In the next financial year it is planned to carry out similar repairs over the same length on the northbound carriageway.The lowest tender price for this year's work was submitted by Tarmac Roadstone (Northern) Ltd in the sum of £529,478, and contract completion is expected at the end of November 1981. In the next financial year the works are estimated to cost a similar amount and are planned to be carried out between April and August 1982.Traffic safety precautions have been the subject of careful pre-planning between my Department and Cleveland county council as agent authority and highway authority for the local roads. The precautions consist essentially of contraflow traffic arrangements on the open carriageway of A19 together with selected closures of slip road accesses as and when required. The necessary safety arrangements are being carried out by the contractor.The whole of the cost of these trunk road repairs are a charge on central Government funds.

    Environment

    Housing Investment Programme

    asked the Secretary of State for the Environment what special factors he will take into account in his consideration of the housing investment programme submissions from local authorities for 1982–83, particularly those from inner city areas; and if he will make a statement.

    Final decisions on the methods to be used in determining the housing investment programme allocations for 1982–83 have not yet been taken.

    London Borough Of Brent (Grant)

    asked the Secretary of State for the Environment, pursuant to his reply to the hon. Member for Brent, South (Mr. Pavitt) on 26 October, if he is yet in a position to reimburse the London borough of Brent the £611,000 grant he withdrew for 1981–82.

    I have written to the right hon. Member explaining that my Department has now written to the London borough of Brent and the other authorities whose grant was reduced inviting them to make further representations if they wish to do so, as the court indicated. It is clearly in the interests of all parties that if neither side to the High Court case appeals I should be able to proceed to a new decision as soon as possible. We have therefore asked for any fresh representation to be submitted by 4 December if possible.I consider that it would be best that any question of additional grant should be held over until any appeal has been decided, or until all parties have agreed not to appeal and I have taken a new decision in this matter.

    Preston Borough Council (Housing)

    asked the Secretary of State for the Environment what sum he will be able to authorise the Preston borough council to spend on new house building during 1981–82.

    It is for the borough council to decide what resources it can devote to new house building, in the light of its housing investment programme allocation and its capital receipts. Local authorities were given formal notification of their HIP allocations for 1981–82 on 19 March.

    Water Supply (Cost)

    asked the Secretary of State for the Environment what is the marginal cost to the water authorities of the provision of one cubic metre of water.

    The marginal cost of water, whether in the short term or the long term, will vary widely from one part of the country to another, depending on the sources of water, distances, power costs and other factors.The National Water Council, in its report last year on leakage control policy and practice, quotes estimates of the long-run marginal cost of supplying water from 4·5p to 5·6p per cubic metre, based on three case studies. But other estimates have been made well outside this range. The NWC, in its report "Paying for Water" published in 1976, also estimated a national long-run marginal cost of combined water supply and disposal of 21 pence per cubic metre (at 1975 prices).

    New Town Development Corporations (Public Meetings)

    asked the Secretary of State for the Environment if he will list in the Official Report those new town development corporations whose board and committee meetings are open to the press and public.

    This is a matter for the board of each new town development corporation to determine.

    Local Authority Rents

    asked the Secretary of State for the Environment what increase in local authority rents is expected by the Government in the next financial year arising from Government decisions.

    I cannot anticipate my right hon. Friend's determination of reckonable income for 1982–83 under section 100 of the Housing Act 1980.

    Right To Buy

    asked the Secretary of State for the Environment what is the basis on which he is proposing to use his powers under section 23 of the Housing Act 1980 against the city of Norwich, bearing in mind that the council is now issuing 60 section 10 notices per month and is implementing the Act.

    In accordance with section 23(1) of the Act, my right hon. Friend is taking steps to establish whether tenants of Norwich city council have or may have difficulty in exercising the right to buy effectively and expeditiously.

    asked the Secretary of State for the Environment (1) what is the record of local authorities in implementing the Housing Act 1980; and how Norwich compares with other authorities;(2) if he will now list the local housing authorities which are issuing section 10 notices under the Housing Act 1980 at a rate less than 60 a month.

    Listed Buildings

    asked the Secretary of State for the Environment what is the minimum age of buildings which, under present arrangements, may be considered for listing under section 54 of the Town and Country Planning Act 1971.

    Normally 42 years, since the criteria approved by my right hon. Friend for selecting buildings to be listed extend to the period 1914–1939. However, some of the buildings designed during this period were actually built after the war.

    Overseas Earnings

    asked the Secretary of State for the Environment whether, pursuant to his answer of 9 April, Official Report, c. 349, he will now give detailed information for 1980 for the total overseas earnings of British consulting engineers, architects and surveyors remitted to the United Kingdom.

    The latest estimates of overseas earnings remitted to the United Kingdom for 1980 are, consulting engineers £425 million; architects and surveyors £71 million.

    Cornwall (Local Authority Expenditure)

    asked the Secretary of State for the Environment what is the tourist factor and the total grant-related expenditure assessment that Caradon district council, Restormel borough council and North Cornwall district council will receive in 1981–82 in support of any given level of actual expenditure they undertake.

    The overall grant-related expenditure assessments for these authorities, together with that part of the total attributable to assessed additional costs in the provision of environmental health and parks services on account of overnight visitors are as follows:

    Total GRE (£000Attributable to overnight visitors (£000)
    Caradon district council2,45843·953
    North Cornwall district council2,69594·153
    Restormel borough council3,166154·431

    Rate Support Grant

    asked the Secretary of State for the Environment what are the latest available figures for the amount of rate support grant in total for England for the financial year 1980–81 and his estimate in comparable prices for the year 1981–82; and if he will provide figures on the same basis for each local authority in England for each of the two above-mentioned financial years giving the figures for 1981–82 (a) be fore holdback and (b) after holdback.

    I attach a table showing the latest available figures at estimated 1981–82 outturn prices. Column (1) shows the grant so far paid; it is not an estimate of final entitlements. Columns (2) and (3) are exemplifications based on settlement data and the revised budgets submitted to my Department during July. They do not show the effects of any later budget revisions or of any data changes or grant increase that may be proposed at Supplementary Report stage. Column (3) exemplifies grant entitlements based on the proposals that I announced on 3 September. All the columns take into account adjustments made under section 66 of the London Government Act 1963.

    I should emphasise that the figures are not directly comparable because of the changes introduced this year by the Local Government, Planning and Land Act 1980. In particular, grant is now calculated separately for the metropolitan counties, the GLC, ILEA and the Metropolitan Police; while a considerable part of the grant now paid direct to non-metropolitan counties was formerly paid to their districts, and was passed on to the counties as part of their precept.

    Rate Support Grant

    Estimated 1981–82 outturn prices

    1980–81 Col (1)

    1981–82 Col (2)

    1981–82 with holdback Col (3)

    £ million

    £ million

    £ million

    SHIRE COUNTIES
    Avon93·410133·319123·897
    Bedfordshire57·01960·54256·285
    Berkshire67·75364·17755·115
    Buckinghamshire48·03154·72347·243
    Cambridgeshire48·37472·21865·966
    Cheshire98·266139·273128·185
    Cleveland90·595110·325103·576
    Cornwall43·54768·24568·245
    Cumbria59·18394·36390·660
    Derbyshire98·083151·466146·686
    Devon88·715138·852138·852
    Dorset46·78169·23569·235
    Durham75·736123·709119·014
    East Sussex57·74369·17067·326
    Essex142·921155·057155·057
    Gloucestershire48·27271·28570·048
    Hampshire148·598189·115185·208
    Hereford and Worcester56·62686·11386·113
    Hertfordshire98·38590·27790·277
    Humberside120·425168·855161·491
    Isle of Wight10·46918·74917·711
    Kent145·007208·483208·483
    Lancashire176·659264·158253·882
    Leicestershire97·492126·156126·156
    Lincolnshire61·31992·25992·259
    Norfolk66·79291·79691·796
    Northamptonshire51·85473·87373·873
    Northumberland35·88355·16254·517
    North Yorkshire71·868113·114109·692
    Nottinghamshire134·923175·297163·978
    Oxfordshire44·24158·78257·231
    Shropshire41·05462·12262·122
    Somerset38·71764·85662·545
    Staffordshire100·076157·551151·686
    Suffolk47·29976·30072·726
    Surrey72·25873·55270·401
    Warwickshire43·33760·77960·779
    West Sussex46·59360·56860·568
    Wiltshire46·67783·05183·051
    METROPOLITAN COUNTIES
    Greater Manchester106·14798·732
    Merseyside74·08768·398
    South Yorkshire72·29467·192
    Tyne and Wear68·15264·207
    West Midlands79·54368·902
    West Yorkshire95·43590·870
    Greater London Council48·27813·323
    Inner London Education Authority5·517
    Metropolitan Police99·22199·222
    SHIRE DISTRICTS

    Avon

    Bath8·1614·0844·084
    Bristol32·76619·00718·466

    Estimated 1981–82 outturn prices

    1980–81 Col (1)

    1981–82 Col (2)

    1981–82 with holdback Col (3)

    £ million

    £ million

    £ million

    Kingswood10·4132·6772·677
    Northavon11·0012·9612·961
    Wansdyke8·3642·4672·467
    Woodspring16·4115·3435·282

    Bedfordshire

    North Bedfordshire9·0883·5673·567
    Luton5·2945·4495·449
    Mid Bedfordshire9·9512·3762·376
    South Bedfordshire4·0902·9422·942

    Berkshire

    Bracknell4·0671·8001·754
    Newbury8·9653·9173·917
    Reading4·6954·0173·454
    Slough3·7133·0283·028
    Windsor and Maidenhead5·1054·2304·230
    Wokingham8·4524·0044·004

    Buckinghamshire

    Aylesbury Vale8·2153·0743·074
    South Bucks2·3351·7901·790
    Chiltern3·5732·4402·440
    Milton Keynes8·8552·7522·752
    Wycombe4·9552·9642·964

    Cambridgeshire

    Cambridge2·9353·0703·070
    East Cambridgeshire6·2351·3441·344
    Fenland7·3822·1352·135
    Huntingdon13·4313·3773·377
    Peterborough10·4294·3853·981
    South Cambridgeshire7·9872·4892·489

    Cheshire

    Chester8·9063·6503·375
    Congleton8·5502·0672·067
    Crewe and Nantwich11·8984·5664·566
    Ellesmere Port and Neston2·4312·2021·960
    Halton10·9854·2834·132
    Macclesfield12·8044·8444·844
    Vale Royal10·7153·3003·300
    Warrington15·0634·7014·701

    Cleveland

    Hartlepool12·7974·4534·354
    Langbaurgh12·6335·4944·877
    Middlesbrough21·5959·8119·562
    Stockton-on-Tees12·0525·5095·005

    Cornwall

    Caradon8·0052·2522·252
    Carrick7·6323·1133·113
    Kerrier9·5122·7932·793
    North Cornwall7·4132·3512·268
    Penwith6·2112·5552·555
    Restormel6·9792·3202·320

    Cumbria

    Allerdale12·9733·6553·655
    Barrow in Furness10·3423·2303·230
    Carlisle11·8773·5013·273
    Copeland9·5002·7102·710
    Eden5·3281·3311·331
    South Lakeland10·9263·7043·704

    Derbyshire

    Amber Valley11·6623·9133·913
    Bolsover10·0202·8112·761
    Chesterfield10·6033·5403·540

    Estimated 1981–82 outturn prices

    1980–81 Col (1)

    1981–82 Col (2)

    1981–82 with holdback Col (3)

    £ million

    £ million

    £ million

    Derby18·8826·8496·849
    Erewash11·4163·6713·671
    High Peak8·6332·7952·795
    North East Derbyshire12·4263·4293·394
    South Derbyshire3·6541·4461·446
    West Derbyshire7·7382·4732·473

    Devon

    East Devon10·7973·9203·920
    Exeter6·4612·9302·930
    North Devon9·2122·9972·941
    Plymouth25·9589·6359·635
    South Hams7·0362·7782·778
    Teignbridge10·6093·7823·782
    Mid Devon6·8811·6481·648
    Torbay7·3044·5274·333
    Torridge6·6542·0472·036
    West Devon5·2841·4811·481

    Dorset

    Bournemouth7·9996·4166·416
    Christchurch2·2591·2591·259
    North Dorset5·8291·1951·195
    Poole6·5944·3444·344
    Purbeck3·3451·1921·192
    West Dorset9·0842·5702·570
    Weymouth and Portland7·0192·3372·337
    Wimborne6·0432·3242·324

    Durham

    Chester-le-Street7·3872·1952·148
    Darlington9·6363·9463·946
    Derwentside11·6543·7923·581
    Durham11·7923·5773·532
    Easington17·3434·9514·927
    Sedgefield14·8035·4415·307
    Teesdale3·4030·7140·708
    Wear Valley10·2113·3983·398

    East Sussex

    Brighton10·1247·6817·681
    Eastbourne3·4843·7583·693
    Hastings6·9643·7563·756
    Hove4·9644·2004·200
    Lewes5·6883·1333·133
    Rother5·8963·3453·345
    Wealden12·1163·6383·638

    Essex

    Basildon10·1666·2915·793
    Braintree9·4463·3163·316
    Brentwood2·8522·1292·129
    Castle Point8·1632·7442·744
    Chelmsford7·6042·8782·878
    Colchester11·5923·4003·400
    Epping Forest6·3023·0123·012
    Harlow3·9031·7041·286
    Maldon2·9111·3751·375
    Rochford5·7082·6332·633
    Southend-on-Sea7·7497·7157·715
    Tendring9·7184·4244·424
    Thurrock4·7583·6593·659
    Uttlesford3·9292·1442·144

    Gloucestershire

    Cheltenham4·6242·9652·965
    Cotswold6·4282·3152·315
    Forest of Dean8·8832·1972·197
    Gloucester7·0632·4652·465
    Stroud10·3772·6502·650
    Tewkesbury6·7221·9781·978

    Estimated 1981–82 outturn prices

    1980–81 Col (1)

    1981–82 Col (2)

    1981–82 with holdback Col (3)

    £ million

    £ million

    £ million

    Hampshire

    Basingstoke and Deane9·8262·9722·972
    East Hampshire7·7943·4983·498
    Eastleigh5·9862·2072·207
    Fareham8·3343·1673·167
    Gosport8·1302·9382·938
    Hart7·5752·2382·114
    Havant11·1794·4504·450
    New Forest8·3404·3694·369
    Portsmouth17·3219·8739·873
    Rushmoor6·6573·3223·322
    Southampton15·9648·4818·481
    Test Valley7·8772·6972·697
    Winchester7·1442·7702·770

    Hereford and Worcester

    Bromsgrove6·8452·2392·239
    Hereford3·5741·0041·004
    Leominster4·7461·1071·107
    Malvern Hills9·3532·6042·604
    Redditch4·1722·0381·994
    South Herefordshire5·7271·3811·381
    Worcester3·4021·8831·668
    Wychavon7·3712·8842·884
    Wyre Forest7·9593·5193·246

    Hertfordshire

    Broxbourne5·3223·5653·565
    Dacorum5·7712·7062·706
    East Hertfordshire7·6823·1233·123
    Hertsmere3·6092·7762·776
    North Hertfordshire3·9432·2122·212
    St. Albans5·5122·9752·975
    Stevenage2·8021·3601·360
    Three Rivers4·4632·4922·492
    Watford3·0493·3193·169
    Welwyn Hatfield3·2691·7011·701

    Humberside

    Beverley11·7963·0263·026
    Boothferry8·3092·5912·488
    Cleethorpes6·8772·6732·572
    Glanford6·3391·8741·718
    Great Grimsby9·0193·8773·746
    Holderness5·2921·4271·413
    Kingston upon Hull34·09213·30812·742
    East Yorkshire10·0982·9942·930
    Scunthorpe4·6713·1192·885

    Isle of Wight

    Medina7·4132·4072·382
    South Wight5·5821·9631·963

    Kent

    Ashford7·5563·0333·033
    Canterbury12·5674·8074·807
    Dartford7·9563·6853·635
    Dover11·6704·7164·716
    Gillingham9·6222·7592·759
    Gravesham8·5913·4643·464
    Maidstone12·5994·5824·582
    Rochester upon Medway10·1385·3905·390
    Sevenoaks11·4623·5273·527
    Shepway7·6023·6933·693
    Swale11·9584·1584·158
    Thanet12·6596·4376·437
    Tonbridge and Mallins8·4972·5712·571
    Tunbridge Wells9·6473·0993·003

    Lancashire

    Blackburn19·7309·0998·913
    Blackpool14·4977·1587·084

    Estimated 1981–82 outturn prices

    1980–81 Col (1)

    1981–82 Col (2)

    1981–82 with holdback Col (3)

    £ million

    £ million

    £ million

    Burnley13·2955·3295·126
    Chorley10·8753·2403·142
    Fylde6·7382·5842·584
    Hyndburn11·1504·0683·951
    Lancaster15·1135·2885·288
    Pendle13·0544·5914·479
    Preston12·7575·4875·487
    Ribble Valley6·3451·8991·881
    Rossendale9·7233·3003·300
    South Ribble11·8733·0503·050
    West Lancashire11·1343·9763·976
    Wyre11·1233·7203·685

    Leicestershire

    Blaby7·7162·0002·000
    Charnwood9·5873·8543·854
    Harborough5·7111·8801·880
    Hinckley and Bosworth7·4462·2522·252
    Leicester20·18412·90212·221
    Melton4·1031·2321·232
    North West Leicestershire6·8552·1412·014
    Oadby and Wigston4·4711·2541·254
    Rutland3·1820·7470·747

    Lincolnshire

    Boston5·3261·6311·631
    East Lindsey10·6783·5053·505
    Lincoln6·7502·3372·337
    North Kesteven9·8982·4252·425
    South Holland7·4562·6122·612
    South Kesteven10·1172·9142·914
    West Lindsey9·9952·6492·649

    Norfolk

    Breckland9·7092·7272·727
    Broadland10·3482·6622·662
    Great Yarmouth6·3642·9992·999
    North Norfolk7·6422·8532·853
    Norwich3·7824·8744·486
    South Norfolk10·1153·0093·009
    King's Lynn and West Norfolk10·8604·0144·014

    Northamptonshire

    Corby2·7200·9330·933
    Daventry4·0081·1791·179
    East Northamptonshire6·4951·4631·463
    Kettering7·7893·1523·152
    Northampton8·5416·6796·679
    South Northamptonshire6·4251·6731·626
    Wellingborough6·0612·0472·047

    Northumberland

    Alnwick3·9431·2521·252
    Berwick-upon-Tweed3·2950·7700·770
    Blyth Valley11·3714·0233·957
    Castle Morpeth5·1841·4681·468
    Tynedale6·7492·1492·149
    Wansbeck6·9132·2402·240

    North Yorkshire

    Craven5·9381·6401·624
    Hambleton8·7451·9621·962
    Harrogate14·5995·4915·187
    Richmondshire5·9801·5961·596
    Rydale10·6942·3332·333
    Scarborough12·1053·9913·991
    Selby4·2491·7521·752
    York11·4383·7553·755

    Estimated 1981–82 outturn prices

    1980–81 Col (1)

    1981–82 Col (2)

    1981–82 with holdback Col (3)

    £ million

    £ million

    £ million

    Nottinghamshire

    Ashfield12·1683·8113·688
    Bassetlaw4·8362·3122·312
    Broxtowe9·6223·5793·579
    Gedling10·5353·0203·020
    Mansfield11·7184·7214·592
    Newark10·3203·2233·223
    Nottingham20·15410·82410·824
    Rushcliffe6·4752·4452·455

    Oxfordshire

    Cherwell8·4692·8112·811
    Oxford6·0654·3354·335
    South Oxfordshire11·9813·6153·615
    Vale of White Horse4·4491·9261·926
    West Oxfordshire7·7952·1922·192

    Shropshire

    Bridgnorth4·7231·2221·205
    North Shropshire6·2541·4481·448
    Oswestry3·9530·9370·937
    Shrewsbury and Atcham6·8552·1812·181
    South Shropshire4·4861·1741·174
    The Wrekin13·0034·7154·423

    Somerset

    Mendip9·8482·3542·354
    Sedgemoor9·6082·6662·666
    Taunton Deane8·6942·8682·868
    West Somerset0"7351·0511·051
    Yeovil14·0493·3093·309

    Staffordshire

    Cannock Chase7·7172·8352·835
    East Staffordshire7·8172·3312·331
    Lichfield7·5741·9551·955
    Newcastle-under-Lyme14·4633·7463·746
    South Staffordshire9·5222·4542·454
    Stafford9·2803·1012·987
    Staffordshire Moorlands11·6362·3392·339
    Stoke-on-Trent26·2338·4078·407
    Tamworth6·9832·7052·705

    Suffolk

    Babergh6·9702·5132·485
    Forest Heath6·6981·4741·474
    Ipswich7·6504·1413·798
    Mid Suffolk7·7552·0822·082
    St. Edmundsbury7·4282·1122·112
    Suffolk Coastal9·1772·9972·997
    Waveney11·3944·1394·139

    Surrey

    Elmbridge4·1603·9333·933
    Epsom and Ewell4·2082·8592·859
    Guildford3·5853·5423·542
    Mole Valley4·2362·3442·344
    Reigate and Banstead6·1553·3463·346
    Runnymede4·0812·3112·311
    Spelthorne2·6612·3272·327
    Surrey Heath3·3211·9551·915
    Tandridge7·2392·1302·130
    Waverley7·8403·5063·506
    Woking2·9533·2243·224

    Warwickshire

    North Warwickshire4·9971·8801·852
    Nuneaton and Bedworth13·1745·1044·823
    Rugby7·7612·5292·529
    Stratford on Avon7·1912·2042·204
    Warwick7·6463·8273·827

    Estimated 1981–82 outturn prices

    1980–81 Col (1)

    1981–82 Col (2)

    1981–82 with holdback Col (3)

    £ million

    £ million

    £ million

    West Sussex

    Adur4·3092·0041·843
    Aran9·6105·4485·448
    Chichester7·5803·5933·593
    Crawley2·1380·9440·944
    Horsham7·6483·0273·027
    Mid Sussex8·7733·7443·744
    Worthing5·7984·0334·033

    Wiltshire

    Kennet8·6721·9271·927
    North Wiltshire13·3243·1153·115
    Salisbury10·0852·8012·801
    Thamesdown15·8045·8875·887
    West Wiltshire10·6442·7672·767
    METROPOLITAN DISTRICTS

    Greater Manchester

    Bolton63·35252·97451·815
    Bury40·75532·93031·421
    Manchester142·342117·139108·585
    Oldham58·01851·50751·507
    Rochdale58·42150·39248·531
    Salford69·79157·74757·747
    Stockport54·87745·16345·163
    Tameside58·06048·25847·829
    Trafford34·23328·68928·689
    Wigan75·97964·42162·963

    Merseyside

    Knowsley48·46341·22539·595
    Liverpool152·597125·074119·493
    St. Helens43·92336·73836·258
    Sefton66·81651·68551·685
    Wirral77·76460·19960·200

    South Yorkshire

    Barnsley65·63150·83349·870
    Doncaster77·43760·46460·464
    Rotherham68·05156·09756·097
    Sheffield128·275100·44698·629

    Tyne and Wear

    Gateshead57·27444·50043·440
    Newcastle upon Tyne67·55147·69746·517
    North Tyneside53·13141·24241·242
    South Tyneside50·69341·36841·054
    Sunderland83·36566·69864·431

    West Midlands

    Birmingham218·572179·574172·402
    Coventry70·76059·79656·409
    Dudley42·26835·19535·195
    Sandwell55·70444·86340·675
    Solihull32·41927·56227·562
    Walsall51·05342·33138·904
    Wolverhampton53·13542·90439·288

    West Yorkshire

    Bradford126·501102·992102·992
    Calderdale52·08942·82342·507
    Kirklees98·11480·76878·278
    Leeds152·653123·467117·307
    Wakefield70·50558·00858·008

    London Boroughs

    City of London-2·713-38·176-38·176
    Camden39·88816·40116·401
    Greenwich46·74834·32632·735
    Hackney52·82343·11441·121
    Hammersmith and Fulham42·26834·32434·324

    Estimated 1981–82 outturn prices

    1980–81 Col (1)

    1981–82 Col (2)

    1981–82 with holdback Col (3)

    £ million

    £ million

    £ million

    Islington49·92627·88825·848
    Kensington and Chelsea39·99518·66918·670
    Lambeth65·70155·03551·373
    Lewisham66·03449·77247·623
    Southwark62·64244·17144·171
    Tower Hamlets39·77327·96525·453
    Wandsworth68·94949·41349·413
    Westminster48·062-8·556-8·556
    Barking and Dagenham33·76926·14226·142
    Barnet53·77440·04840·048
    Bexley48·81942·60942·609
    Brent66·13951·72146·776
    Bromley60·72648·64948·649
    Croydon66·31451·92051·920
    Ealing59·05051·13451·134
    Enfield51·80541·39341·393
    Haringey66·96854·59252·257
    Harrow37·32431·35631·356
    Havering49·50442·64642·646
    Hillingdon39·85525·63225·632
    Hounslow38·71025·64021·641
    Kingston-upon-Thames24·93318·66818·669
    Merton35·73929·31429·314
    Newham65·33760·19456·641
    Redbridge47·86139·12239·122
    Richmond-upon-Thames30·91324·24124·241
    Sutton33·81027·72827·728
    Waltham Forest58·96953·41050·152
    Isles of Scilly0·6810·6260·595
    Total England9,7639,0148,703

    Housing Subsidy

    asked the Secretary of State for the Environment what was the total amount of housing subsidy for English local authorities for the financial year 1980–81 and, in comparable prices, the amount for the financial year 1981–82; and if he will state the amounts for each local housing authority in England for each of those financial years.

    Prime Minister

    Mr Leo Long

    asked the Prime Minister whether she intends taking any new steps in view of recent information about the espionage activities of Mr. Leo Long.

    Early in 1964, Leonard Henry Long was named to the Security Service by Mr. Michael Whitney Straight, the United States citizen who identified Mr. Anthony Blunt, as someone else whom Mr. Blunt might have attempted to recruit as an agent for the Russian Intelligence Service. When Mr. Blunt made his confession in April 1964, he admitted to having recruited Mr. Long before the war and controlled him during it.Mr. Long was then seen by the Security Service. He asked for immunity from prosecution; this was refused, but he was told that he was not likely to be prosecuted if he co-operated in the Security Service's inquiries. He then made a detailed confession.

    Mr. Long was an undergraduate at Trinity College, Cambridge, and a member of the Communist Party, before the Second World War. While at Cambridge, he was recruited by Anthony Blunt as a potential Soviet agent. From 1940 to 1944 he served in MI 14, the section of the War Office responsible for analysing German military intentions. He had access to analyses based on intelligence derived from secret sources, but not to the sources themselves. He passed information obtained from these analyses to Anthony Blunt, knowing that Mr. Blunt would pass them to the Russians. He has said, and there is no reason to disbelieve, that he passed information obtained from official documents but not the documents (or copies of the documents) themselves, and that he passed all his information to Mr. Blunt, who was his controller.

    After the war, from 1945 until his contract expired in 1952, Mr. Long was an intelligence officer in the Control Commission in Germany. He has all along said that he did not pass information to the Russians during this period. He left the public service in 1952, and has had no access to classified information since then.

    Neither the Attorney-General nor the Director of Public Prosecutions was consulted before Mr. Long was interviewed in 1964. It has to be remembered that he had been out of the public service for twelve years; that, in the wake of Mr. Blunt's confession, the Security Service's main concern was to obtain as much information as it could about other possible spies, and in particular about any that might still be in the public service and have access to classified information; and that Mr. Long could not have been expected to co-operate in the Security Service's inquiries if he had believed that he was likely to be prosecuted if he did so.

    It is true that a confession obtained as a result of the sort of indication given to Mr. Long would be inadmissible as evidence for the prosecution in court; but the Security Service did not have any other evidence which could be used against him and which would be likely to secure a conviction. There was thus a good deal to gain and little to lose from obtaining Mr. Long's co-operation in the way that was done.

    As my right hon. and learned Friend the Attorney-General told the House in the debate on 21 November 1979, the only person who has been granted immunity from prosecution if he confessed to espionage activities and co-operated in the Security Service's inquiries is Mr. Blunt. I am aware of only one case other than that of Mr. Long since the beginning of 1964 (records are not available before that) in which someone suspected of espionage offences was or may have been induced to make a confession by an indication that he was unlikely to be prosecuted if he co-operated in the Security Service's inquiries. My right hon. and learned Friend the Attorney-General referred to this matter in his reply of 20 November 1979.

    I am satisfied that the present procedures of the Security Service would prevent anything of the sort happening today without the knowledge of the prosecution authorities. In my speech in the House on 21 November 1979 I set out in some detail the procedures for applying the principles governing the relationships between the Security Service and Ministers.

    I can assure the House that a person suspected of an espionage offence would not now be interviewed by the Security Service on the basis that he need not fear prosecution unless the case had first been referred to the Attorney-General and permission had been given for the interview to be conducted on that basis.

    In the wake of Mr. Long's public admission of his treachery, a number of people are being named in the press as having been suspected of being involved in espionage activities or as having been interviewed in the course of the Security Service's inquiries. I believe that we have to be very careful to avoid the risk of creating a climate of guilt by association. The contacts of those who are known to have acted as agents of the Russian Intelligence Service have been extensively and exhaustively investigated; and many people have been interviewed over the years.

    As I said in my statement in the House on 26 March, the fact that somebody has been the subject of investigation or has been interviewed does not necessarily or even generally mean that he has been positively suspected. Many people have been investigated simply in order to eliminate them from the inquiry. Others have been interviewed not because they themselves were suspected but for any information they might be able to give about those who were.

    I felt able to make a statement about Mr. Blunt because his guilt was known and admitted, and because there was no question of prosecuting him. I have been able to give this answer today about Mr. Long because he has publicly admitted his guilt.

    As a general rule, however, it would in my view be totally wrong for me, under cover of Parliamentary privilege, to name people who were suspected but against whom the evidence available was not sufficient to justify a prosecution; and it would be no less wrong for me to name people who were interviewed in the course of the Security Service's inquiries, when to do so might be held to suggest, often erroneously, that they had themselves been suspected. I do not therefore propose to comment on, either to confirm or deny, the stories which have appeared in the press recently.

    Nor have I seen anything in those stories which in my judgment calls for a new inquiry into the events of the past, which have been very thoroughly investigated. None of those named or implicated in recent allegations is still in the public service, and most of them have long since retired or died. We need to concern ourselves with the future, and with making sure that the arrangements for guarding against penetration are as good as they possibly can be. That is the purpose of the review which the Security Commission are now conducting.

    asked the Prime Minister what pensions or other emoluments from public funds have been received by Mr. Leo Long since he confessed to being a traitor in 1964.

    Mr. Long has received no pensions or other emoluments since 1964 in respect of his wartime service, nor, so far as it has been possible to ascertain the details, in respect of his post-war contract with the Control Commission in Germany. He is entitled to a State retirement pension as provided for under social security legislation.

    Espionage

    asked the Prime Minister (1) whether, in view of her reply to the hon. Member for West Stirlingshire on 18 January 1979, Official Report, columns 869–70, and of recent information about the espionage activities of Mr. Leo Long and the fact that he was not prosecuted, how many people still living have not been prosecuted after confessing to having been involved in espionage activities;(2) how many people who, since 1945, have confessed to espionage activities have been prosecuted, and how many have not been prosecuted; and whether she will name them.

    asked the Prime Minister (1) what is the total number of those who having confessed to spying for a foreign Power were either given immunity from legal action or informed that such action was not likely to be taken; and if she will make a statement;(2) if it has been the consistent practice for Law Officers to be notified when immunity from legal action has been given or when persons have been informed that such action was not likely to be taken in cases where individuals confessed to spying for a foreign Power.

    Since 1945, 32 people have been prosecuted for offences contrary to section 1 of the Official Secrets Act 1911. Their names are, of course, on record, but I do not propose to list them, since some of them were acquitted. It would not be possible without disproportionate effort to extract information about how many of those found guilty had previously admitted some involvement in espionage activities.It would not be in the public interest to disclose the number or names of people who have admitted to the security authorities some involvement in espionage activities, but have not been prosecuted.

    Palestine Liberation Organisation

    asked the Prime Minister whether, pursuant to her press conference in Kuwait on 27 September, she intends to permit any British meeting at ministerial level with the terrorist leader Yasser Arafat or any other senior spokesman of the Palestine Liberation Organisation which she described at that press conference as being associated with terrorism and wishing the destruction of the State of Israel.

    In the period since he took over the Presidency of the EC, my right hon. and noble Friend the Foreign and Commonwealth Secretary has made it clear that he would be ready to meet Yasser Arafat if, but only if, such a meeting was likely to further the cause of peace. I and other ministers will continue to urge the PLO to make clear their abandonment of any association with terrorism and readiness to accept Israel's right to live in peace.