Skip to main content

Bronchitis

Volume 13: debated on Monday 16 November 1981

The text on this page has been created from Hansard archive content, it may contain typographical errors.

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services how many (a) men and (b) women were certified as having died from bronchitis for the latest year for which figures are available; and what evidence there is to suggest that occupational hazards were the cause of the disease.

The information is as follows:

Death and death rates per million population in England and Wales from bronchitis (ICD 466,490,491) 1980:
NumberRate
Male13,479562
Female5,245208
The death certificate does not enable death from bronchitis to be attributed to occupational hazards. There is some evidence that bronchitis is common in workers in certain occupations but this remains inconclusive and the present state of medical knowledge does not make it possible to determine clinically whether a particular case of bronchitis was due to a person's occupation or whether it was due to other factors.Further information is available from the Registrar General's decennial supplement on occupational mortality 1970–72; but again this does not resolve the question of whether dust exposure specifically effects the incidence of the disease or aggravates existing conditions.

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services how many working days were lost due to bronchitis for the latest year for which figures are available.

The information is not available in the form requested. However, for claims to sickness and invalidity benefit in the year ending 31 May 1980 the days of incapacity certified as due to bronchitis totalled 28·5 million. If those people whose incapacity lasted throughout the year are excluded, the total of days falls to 11·1 million.