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Written Answers

Volume 13: debated on Friday 27 November 1981

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Written Answers To Questions

Friday 27 November 1981

Home Department

Immigrants (Medical Examination)

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what are the results of his further consideration of the report of Sir Henry Yellowlees on the medical examination of immigrants.

On 13 November 1980 I announced my conclusions on those matters which immediately gave rise to the review.In my statement of 15 December 1980 I indicated that I did not propose, as a result of the report, to make the entry to this country of the spouses and dependent children of those already settled here dependent on the passing of a medical examination. For the same reason, I have now decided that the entry of the spouses and dependent children of those who settle here in the future should not, as a result of the report, be made dependent on the passing of a medical examination either.I have also come to the conclusion that a system of deferment on medical grounds for spouses and dependent children, as suggested in paragraph 5·8 of the report, is not a practical proposition. Instead I propose to introduce, subject to consultation with those interested, a system of medical examination overseas of all those who come here for settlement, together with improved arrangements for follow-up in this country of those found to be suffering from disease. Such a system would relieve the pressure on the medical facilities at the ports in this country and would allow for more thorough medical examination in a more relaxed environment in the country of origin. A compulsory system of examination overseas for spouses and dependent children will require changes in the immigration rules.When the new systen is introduced, the medical referee system overseas will be strengthened as necessary, and the instructions to medical inspectors and referees redrafted. Further consideration will be given to the other recommendations of the report in the light of the new arrangements.

Prison Population

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the answer given to the hon. Member for Battersea, South, on 12 November relating to the prison population, what is the figure based on those assumptions which corresponds to the figure of 4,000 given in his previous answer to a question from the hon. Member for Battersea, South on 28 October.

A maximum reduction in the prison population for the potential effect of introducing section 47 of the Criminal Law Act 1977 was given, on the assumption of there being no unfavourable factors. The corresponding figure sought by the hon. Member cannot be given because of the wide range of unfavourable assumptions which could in theory be made for the factors indicated in my answer of 12 November—[Vol. 12, c. 124.]

Civil Disturbance (Property Damage)

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what is the value of the damage to property arising from the inner-city disturbances of July 1981, by police force area.

Information is not available in the form requested. The amount of claims submitted to local authorities and to the receiver for the Metropolitan Police district for compensation for damage to buildings arid their contents under the Riot (Damages) Act 1886 are as follows:

Compensation authorityTotal amount of claims
£
Merseyside County Council11,000,000
Receiver for the Metropolitan Police District3,000,000
West Yorkshire County Council1,700,000
Greater Manchester Council1,000,000
West Midlands County Council500,000
Lancashire County Council153,000
Leicestershire County Council85,000
Nottinghamshire County Council60,000
Bedfordshire County Council60,000
Thames Valley Police Authority60,000
Hampshire County Council4,500

Police Forces (Mutual Aid)

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will list the occasions since 1 January 1981 when mutual aid between forces has been employed to deal with public disorder; and if he will list the forces and numbers of officers involved on each occasion.

Mutual aid may be requested for a variety of reasons.The information asked for is not available centrally, and could be obtained only at disproportionate cost.

Public Order Act 1936

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will list the bans on processions under the Public Order Act 1936 imposed since January 1981.

Following is information in respect of banning orders made in England and Wales under section 3(2) or section 3(3) of the Act:

Class of procession banned

Date ban commenced

District(s)

Duration

All public processions other than those of a religious, educational, festive or ceremonial character customarily held5 March 1981Metropolitan Police District27 days
City of London
All public processions other than those of a religious, educational, festive or ceremonial character customarily held.20 March 1981Leicester1 month
All public processions other than those of a religious, educational, festive or ceremonial character customarily held.21 March 1981Wolverhampton14 days
All public processions other than those of a religious, educational, festive or ceremonial character customarily held.21 March 1981Leeds29 days
All public processions other than those of a religious, educational, festive or ceremonial character customarily held.22 March 1981Barnsley7 days
Doncaster
Rotherham
Sheffield
All public processions except those traditionally held on 1 May to celebrate May Day and those of a religious character customarily held.25 April 1981Metropolitan Police District28 days
City of London
All public processions other than those of a religious, educational, festive or ceremonial character customarily held.19 June 1981Coventry23 days
All public processions except those of a religious, educational, festive or ceremonial character.11 July 1981Metropolitan Police District30 days
City of London
All public processions except those of a religious, educational festive or ceremonial character customarily held.17 JulyWalsall10 days
All public processions except those of a religious, educational festive or ceremonial character customarily held.18 JulyOxford11 days
All public processions except those of a religious, educational festive or ceremonial character.18 JulyPlymouth30 days
All public processions except those of a religious, educational festive or ceremonial character.24 JulyScunthorpe17 days
Great Grimsby
Cleethorpes
All public processions except those of a religious, educational festive or ceremonial character customarily held.1 AugustNorth Bedfordshire9 days
South Bedfordshire
Luton
All public processions except those of a religious, educational festive or ceremonial character customarily held.14 AugustNorth Bedfordshire29 days
South Bedfordshire
Luton
All public processions except those of a religious, educational festive or ceremonial character customarily held.21 AugustCrawley17 days
All public processions except those of a religious, educational festive or ceremonial character.21 AugustPeterborough31 days
All public processions except those of a religious, educational festive or ceremonial character customarily held.26 AugustLiverpool43 days
All public processions except those of a religious, educational festive or ceremonial character.28 AugustMetropolitan Police District31 days
City of London
All public processions except those of a religious, educational festive or ceremonial character.4 SeptemberNorthampton25 days
All public processions except those of a religious, educational festive or ceremonial character customarily held.19 SeptemberIpswich9 days
Bury St. Edmunds
All public processions except those of a religious, educational festive or ceremonial character customarily held.26 SeptemberLuton9 days
All public processions except those of a religious, educational festive or ceremonial character customarily held.3 OctoberSheffield2 days
All public processions of a political nature within the London Borough of Croydon16 OctoberLondon Borough Croydon2½days
All public processions except those of a religious, educational festive or ceremonial character.31 OctoberOldham7 days
All public processions except those of a religious, educational festive or ceremonial character, or those customarily held in rememberance of the dead.7 NovemberRochdale7 days

Racial Attacks

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will publish information on racial attacks which is to be collected as a result of the Home Office study "Racial Attacks"; and, if so, in what form and with what frequency.

This is a matter that I shall be pursuing with the police and others concerned.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will make arrangements to reassure the indigenous ethnic majority community with regard to racial attacks.

I hope that the measures that I have announced in the foreword to the report will reassure all members of the community, whatever their racial origins.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether, in his discussions with interested parties on the Home Office study entitled "Racial Attacks", he will satisfy himself that the definition of a racial incident adopted by the study is generally accepted by all those concerned.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department which indigenous majority communities were consulted in the preparation of the Home Office study "Racial Attacks"; and what evidence was obtained.

Very many people of the white majority were consulted in all the areas visited by officials, and the views they expressed have been taken into account in the report.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will publish the evidence for the statements in paragraphs 62 and 74 of the Home Office study "Racial Attacks" relating to hon. Members and prominent public figures.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether violent street crimes were taken into account in the Home Office study "Racial Attacks"; and, if so, in which of the categories listed in pages 7 and 8 they are contained.

Crimes of violence committed on the street were taken into account in the study and are contained in all of the four categories listed.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will publish in the Official Report tables 3 and 4 on pages 10 and 11 of the Home Office study "Racial Attacks" revised to include data from groups C and D mentioned on page 8 of the report.

The information is not immediately available, but I shall write to my hon. Friend.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will publish in the Official Report the names, positions and former positions of those who conducted the Home Office study which has published its report "Racial Attacks".

No. A large number of Home Office officials were engaged on this study at its different stages.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if, in the light of the report of the Home Office study on "Racial Attacks", he will now take measures to halt permanent immigration from the New Commonwealth and Pakistan and initiate a repatriation scheme, including resettlement grants, for all those who wish to take advantage of it.

Table 1—Complaints Against the Police by Outcome
England and WalesNumber of Complaints Received
TotalComplaints Completed
Pending at year endTotal CompletedSubstantiatedUnsubstantiatedWithdrawn
197316,1553,26912,8861,1447,5794,163
197417,4544,08113,3731,1417,6454,587
197519,2054,94714,2581,2548,0574,947
197622,7387,08515,6531,3348,5725,747
197727,45010,51516,9351,1077,9117,917

No, since taking office the Government have tightened the control of primary immigration but have no intention of abandoning the commitments, accepted by previous Administrations, to the wives and children of heads of households lawfully settled in this country and to certain United Kingdom passport holders. Two schemes already exist under which Government funds are available to help people who have failed to settle here and wish to return to their country of origin but lack the means to do so. There are no plans to alter the present arrangements.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will explain the term ''racial disadvantage" as used by him in his foreword to the Home Office study "Racial Attacks".

Racial disadvantage is well described in the Introduction to the recent report on the subject by the Select Committee on Home Affairs (HC 424-I: Session 1980–81).

Mugging

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will publish information collected by the police on those offences which are generally described as mugging, sub-divided by ethnic origin of victim and suspect.

Mugging is a term with no legal definition, and information identifying such offences is not collected centrally. Nor is information relating to the ethnic origin of victims and suspects of serious offences.

Complaints Against The Police

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether he will publish figures showing for the five years before the coming into force of the Police Act 1976 and for each year since, the number of complaints lodged, the number withdrawn and the number found justified, the number resulting in disciplinary proceedings being brought against the officer or officers complained against, and the number of such proceedings which resulted in findings of guilt and similar figures for criminal proceedings against police officers arising from complaints.

The available information, reflecting changes made in 1978 in the basis on which figures are collected, is as follows:

Table 2—Complaints Against the Police by Outcome

England and Wales

Number of Cases Received and Complaints Completed

Complaints Completed

*Cases Received

Total

Substantiated

Unsubstantiated

Withdrawn or not proceeded with

197818,76928,2341,55913,72012,955
197916,92729,3831,33814,10413,941
198018,09631,0091,28814,51615,205

* A case may include one or more individual matters of complaint.

Individual matters of complaint completed in year, irrespective of the year in which received.

The Police Act 1976 and Regulations made under it refer to a complainant indicating in writing that he is withdrawing his complaint or stating that he does not wish further action to be taken on it.

Table 3—Police Officers Convicted of Criminal Offences

England and Wales

Number of Officers

Convictions arising from Complaints by Principal Offence

Convictions arising out of other Circumstances by Principal Offence

Total

Criminal (Other than Traffic)

Traffic

Total

Criminal (Other than Traffic)

Traffic

197343N/AN/A681N/AN/A
197463N/AN/A488N/AN/A
197578N/AN/A715N/AN/A
197644N/AN/A738N/AN/A
197754N/AN/A677N/AN/A
1978784137

*704

*66

*638

197973284583599736
198055282792493831
N/A=Not Available.

* Excluding Metropolitan Police for which figures are unavailable.

Table 4—Police Officers against whom Disciplinary Charges were Brought and Completed

England and Wales

Number of Officers

Charges arising from Complaint

Charges arising out of other Circumstances

Total

One or more Charges Proved

No Charges Proved

Total

One or more Charges Proved

No Charges Proved

1973186N/AN/A614N/AN/A
1974189N/AN/A458N/AN/A
1975248N/AN/A615N/AN/A
1976182N/AN/A563N/AN/A
1977205N/AN/A549N/AN/A
19781351191651447935
19791401162455553520
19801561401653351419
N/A= Not Available.

Magistrates' Court, Stockport

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what progress has been made on the plans to build a new magistrates' court in Stockport.

Forward planning on this scheme has been in hand for some time and the providing authority, Stockport metropolitan district council, is currently reconsidering the proposed scale of courtroom provision that is expected to be needed. My right hon. Friend cannot at this stage give any indication of when it may become possible to offer a specific building start date.

Television Licence Fee

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if, in view of the present high cost of television licences and the possibility of an increase, he will again consider a reduced rate for retirement pensioners.

I would refer the hon. Member to the reply I gave to a question by the hon. Member for Norwood, (Mr. Fraser), on 23 November—[Vol. 13, c. 283–4.]

Immigration

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether he will cease using local registrars as agents in the exercise of immigration control.

Superintendent registrars do not act as agents of the Home Office. They are statutory officers exercising functions under the Marriage and Registration Acts under the direction of the Registrar General.

Vivisection

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to his reply to the hon. Member for Wolverhampton, North-East on 18 November, what action he has taken on the reports about experiments on living animals which have been prepared in the last three years.

Statistics of experiments on living animals are presented annually to Parliament for information. The recommendations of the advisory committee on the LD50 Test have been brought to the attention of all registered places where experiments are carried out, for the guidance of licensees engaged in this work; a standard condition is now attached to all licences giving effect to the recommendation about primates; a uniform code of laboratory practice on toxicity testing is under consideration; and closer liaison between the Home Office and other Departments concerned with the use of toxic substances is being developed. The report of the advisory committee on the framework of new legislation will be taken fully into account by the Government when formulating their own proposals.

Overseas Development

Food And Agricultural Organisation (Conference)

asked the Lord Privy Seal if he will place in the Library a copy of the address given to the Food and Agricultural Organisation biennial conference in Rome by the Minister for Overseas Development.

Pacific Region

asked the Lord Privy Seal when it is proposed to set up a British development division in the Pacific to improve the administration of aid programmes and to make them more effective for countries in that region.

Subject to the required office accommodation being available it is intended to open a small development division in Suva, Fiji, by the middle of 1982.

Employment

Birkenhead And Merseyside

asked the Secretary of State for Employment if he will list the number of firms and the number of employees involved in firms which have closed since May 1979 in (a) the Birkenhead travel-to-work area, (b) Merseyside and (c) the United Kingdom.

There are no comprehensive statistics of closures. The available information on closures, involving redundancies of ten or more employees, reported to the Manpower Services Commission as due to occur is given in the following table.Since the information is often provided in confidence, the identity of the firms may not be disclosed.

Closures reported as due to occur: May 1979 to October 1981*

Number of establishments

Number of employees involved

Birkenhead travel-to-work area341,284
Merseyside Special Development Area22315,434

* Including provisional figures for September and October 1981.

Includes St. Helens up to July 1980.

Corresponding information for the United Kingdom is not available.

asked the Secretary of State for Employment if he will list the unemployment figures by age group in May-June 1979 and at the latest available date in the Birkenhead travel-to-work area.

The numbers unemployed are analysed by age in January, April, July and October. The following is the information at April 1979 and October 1981.

AgeApril 1979October 1981
Under 18 years1,1732,588
18 years7491,915
19 years8441,718
20 to24 years3,1086,123
25 to 29 years2,1673,801
30 to 34 years1,5132,841
35 to 44 years2,0233,771
45 to 49 years9181,635
50 to 54 years9061,672
55 to 59 years9942,151
60 years and over1,2952,387
The October figures for the younger age groups include some of this year's summer school leavers, whereas the April 1979 figures do not even include the Easter school leavers in that year.

asked the Secretary of State for Employment if he will list the total number of registered vacancies in (a) the Birkenhead travel-to-work area, (b) Merseyside and (c) the United Kingdom in May-June 1979 and at the latest available date.

The following table gives the number of notified vacancies remaining unfilled at employment offices and at careers offices in the areas specified at May 1979 and November 1981. The figures are not seasonally adjusted. Vacancies notified to employment offices are estimated to be about one-third of all vacancies in the country as a whole. Because of possible duplication the figures for employment offices and careers offices should not be added together. The number of vacancies unfilled at a particular date takes no account of the flow of vacancies being notified, filled or withdrawn during the preceding month, which would reflect activity more closely. For example, during the 12-month period to September 1,337,622 people were placed in jobs by employment offices and 121,344 by careers offices in the United Kingdom. It is estimated that the public employment service accounts for about one in four of all placings.

Notified vacancies remaining unfilled

May 1979

November 1981 (provisional)

At employment offices

At careers offices

At employment offices

At careers offices

Birkenhead travel-to-work area1,048225587
Merseyside Special Development Area3,8471272,32817
United Kingdom267,91641,265100,9294,472

asked the Secretary of State for Employment if he will list by trade and occupation the registered vacancies in (a) the Birkenhead travel-to-work area, (b) Merseyside and (c) the United Kingdom.

The following table gives an analysis by broad occupational groups of the numbers of notified vacancies remaining unfilled at employment offices in the areas specified at 4 September, the latest date for which the information is available.Vacancies notified to employment offices are estimated to be about one-third of all vacancies in the economy as a whole. The number of vacancies unfilled at a particular date takes no account of the flow of vacancies being notified, filled or withdrawn during the preceding month, which would reflect activity more closely. For example, during the 12-month period to September 1,337,622 people were placed in jobs by employment offices in the United Kingdom. It is estimated that the public employment services accounts for about one in four of all placings.

Birken-head travel-to-work areaMersey-side Special Development AreaUnited Kingdom
Managerial (general management)274
Professional and related supporting management and administration341,693
Professional and related in education, welfare and health191325,950
Literary, artistic and sports211703
Professional and related in science, engineering, technology and similar fields4332,928
Managerial (excluding general management)12723,539
Clerical and related9454717,480
Selling6531516,495
Security and protective service2671,410
Catering, cleaning, hairdressing and other personal service13334524,031
Farming, fishing and related4231,223
Materials processing (excluding metal)3151,367
Making and repairing (excluding metal and electrical)21816,711
Processing, making, repairing and related (metal and electrical)281117,491
Painting, repetitive assembling, product inspecting, packaging and related8303,008
Construction, mining and related not elsewhere classified9952,738
Transport operating, materials moving and storing related9484,117
Miscellaneous (including general labourers)13503,986
TOTAL4262,011104,944

West Midlands

asked the Secretary of State for Employment how many people have been made redundant in (a) the West Midlands, (b) the Black Country areas of the West Midlands and (c) the Walsall travel-to-work area during the course of 1981 or which figures are available; and what are the comparative figures for 1978, 1979 and 1980.

There are no comprehensive statistics of redundancies. The available information on redundancies, involving 10 or more employees, reported to the Manpower Services Commission as due to occur is as follows:

Redundancies reported as due to occur
West MidlandsBlack Country(*)Walsall travel-to-work area
197810,0062,615297
197919,3207,7871,955
198069,43616,2362,998
1981 Jan.-Oct. ‡ **47,52314,3673,466
Notes
* Wolverhampon, Dudley and Sandwell, and Walsall travel-to-work areas.
Prior to January 1980 the local figures relate to redundancies notified within the month concerned rather than redundancies taking place in the month.
Including provisional figures for September and October 1981.
** Figures for February 1981 or later are not fully comparable with those for January 1981 and earlier, because of improvements in data collection designed to secure a better coverage of redundancies actually taking place.

asked the Secretary of State for Employment how many companies have closed down in the West Midlands during 1980 and 1981; and what are the names and locations of the companies and the number of employees made redundant in each closure.

There are no comprehensive statistics of closures. The available information on closures, involving redundancies of 10 or more employees, reported to the manpower Services Commission as due to occur is given in the following table.As stated in my reply of 19 October 1981—[Vol. 10, c. 9]—to a similar question from the hon. Member, since the information is often provided in confidence the identity of the firms cannot be disclosed.

Closures reported as due to occur: West Midlands
Number of establishmentsNumber of employees involved
198018710,864
1981 (Jan.-Oct.)*2179,574
* Including provisional figures for September and October 1981.

asked the Secretary of State for Employment how many registered unemployed there are in the West Midlands whose trade is in building, construction and ancillary work; and how many of these have been unemployed for longer than (a) three months, (b) six months and (c) 12 months.

At 13 August, the latest date for which the information is available, there were 33,130 people registered as unemployed in the West Midlands region who last worked in the construction industry. There is no cross-analysis made by both industry and duration of unemployment.

London (Fares)

asked the Secretary of State for Employment if he will examine the feasibility of introducing a scheme to assist young people who live in the home counties and who are deterred from seeking available employment in London by the level of fares.

Non-Departmental Public Bodies

asked the Secretary of State for Employment whether, in accordance with procedures laid out in the Civil Service Department's guide on non-departmental public bodies, he has recently carried out checks on staff numbers and gradings in the Manpower Services Commission; and whether these enabled him to identify areas for savings in expenditure and manpower in either the Commission or his Department.

[pursuant to his reply, 24 November 1981, c. 344–45.]: The procedures operated by my Department for controlling staff numbers and gradings in the Manpower Services Commission conform with the guidelines laid down in the Civil Service Department's guide on non-departmental public bodies.Under the current corporate plan reductions of 21 per cent. in staff and 17 per cent. in finance at constant prices will be achieved between 1979–80 and 1983–84 in MSC activities other than special programmes; further reviews are in progress.

Scotland

Straw Burning

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland if he will give an estimate of how many tonnes of straw have been disposed of by burning in Scotland during each of the last five years; what area of stubble this represents; and if he intends to take any initiative to promote constructive use of straw as a raw material in any industry.

Accurate information as to the tonnage of straw burned and the area concerned is not available but, with most straw going for feeding and bedding livestock, it may be that only some 10 to 15 per cent. will be burned in Scotland in an average year. This would amount to between 100,000 and 150,000 tonnes, representing 50,000 to 75,000 hectares. Alternative uses of straw, both on and off the farm, continue to be investigated.

Phonic Ear

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland why the fee in Scotland for possession of a phonic ear has been increased from £5·60p to £12·50p; and if to mark the International Year of Disabled People he will abolish the fee.

I am not aware that such charges are levied under the National Health Service or by education authorities.

Highlands And Islands Development Board

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland if he will announce the name of the new chairman of the Highlands and Islands Development Board.

I have announced today the appointment of Mr. Robert Cowan, Director of PA Management Consultants in Hong Kong, as Chairman of the Highlands and Islands Development Board for a five-year period from 1 February 1982. He will succeed Rear-Admiral D. A. Dunbar-Nasmith, who has served as Chairman since 1 February 1981. I am grateful to Rear-Admiral Dunbar-Nasmith for the efficient and effective way in which the board has operated during his period of office; and I have appointed him to part-time membership of the board from 1 February 1982 to 31 October 1983.

Wales

Royal Visit (Cost)

asked the Secretary of State for Wales what was the cost to his Department of the recent Royal visit to Wales.

External costs, excluding any claims that may be made by lord-lieutenants and lieutenants for reimbursement of expenses incurred in connection with their official duties, are likely to be some £730. The cost of staff time spent on work connected with the visit could only be calculated at disproportionate cost.

Northern Ireland

Children And Young Persons

asked the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland what plans he has for implementing the recommendations made by the review group on legislation and services for children and young persons in Northern Ireland.

I have today published a proposal for a draft Order-in-Council providing for the establishment of an independent board to administer the Northern Ireland probation service. This will be the first of the recommendations of the review group, chaired by the late Sir Harold Black, to be implemented, but I hope to make a further statement early in the new year about my plans to give effect to the Black strategy as a whole

Education And Science

Research Projects

asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science (1) if he will list the research projects into rheumatism and arthritis being carried out and the level of funding being awarded in each case;(2) if he will list the research projects into cystic fibrosis being undertaken and the level of finance awarded to each project;(3) if he will list the research projects into the nature of coeliac disease being undertaken and the level of finance associated with each project.

Employment (Future Patterns)

asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science what resources are being devoted within his Department to research into future patterns of employment; what results have been obtained from this research; and if he will place in the Library a list of the research, wherever carried out, of which his Department is aware and considers useful into future patterns of employment.

The responsibility within the Government for research into labour markets lies with the Department of Employment and the Manpower Services Commission. The Department of Education and Science is aware of such research and of studies made elsewhere, but does not itself undertake research in this field.

16-Year-Olds

asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science what percentage of 16-year-olds stayed on at school beyond their sixteenth birthday in 1977–78, 1978–79, 1979–80,and 1980–81.

The information requested for maintained and non-maintained schools, excluding special, in England is as follows:

Numbers of pupils remaining at school in January aged 16 years the previous September, expressed as a percentage of the relevant numbers aged 15 years in the preceding year.
JanuaryPercentage
197827·6
197927·6
198028·1
198128·9

University Courses

asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science (1) how many overseas students have so far applied for university courses next year; how this compares with the number of applications at the same time in 1978, 1979 and 1980; and if he will analyse the figures to show the subjects applied for in each year;(2) how many home students have so far applied for university courses next year; how this compares with the number of applications at the same time in 1978, 1979 and 1980; and if he will analyse the figures to show the subjects applied for in each year.

The available information, which is for applications by home and overseas students in 1981 and 1980, is contained in the recent press notice issued by the Universities Central Council on Admissions. I am sending a copy to the hon. Member. Because of changes in the classification of candidates at home and overseas, comparable information for applications in 1978 and 1979 is not available.

asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science how many (a) men and (b) women undertook full-time university courses in each year since 1960; and what are the figures for the latest applications.

The numbers of men and women on full-time and sandwich univerity courses in Great Britain for each year from 1960–61 to 1980–81 are shown in the following table. By 1 November 1981 there had been 31,980 applications by men for entry to United Kingdom universities in 1982, compared with 30,793 in the same period in 1980. The corresponding figures for women were 24,780 and 22,768 respectively.

Undergraduate LevelPostgraduate Level
MenWomenMenWomen
*1960–6167,02522,83814,3053,531
*1961–6268,81324,96815,6123,750
*1962–6370,90027,31116,7544,039
*1963–6474,38129,50918,2554,300
*1964–6580,17232,97220,2095,358
1965–66101,51938,66022,5685,860
1966–67109,04643,18425,3976,576
1967–68117,47247,18127,4847,535
1968–69123,28950,22129,5078,277
1969–70127,10353,07630,5488,581
1970–71129,53356,33932,5929,492
1971–72130,92259,57134,35610,136
1972–73130,53462,71535,19310,924
1973–74131,15766,10235,28211,553
1974–75132,47970,21635,57112,299
1975–76136,88374,58536,70713,083
1976–77142,66578,82036,63113,663
1977–78148,10783,54735,31413,557
1978–79151,07988,14435,13114,065
1979–80152,01193,08233,47014,175
1980–81153,28497,87033,01314,513
(*) Figures from 1960–61 to 1964–65 exclude students from the former colleges of advanced technology.

asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science how many students undertook university courses in (a) physical science and (b) engineering in 1978–79, 1979–80 and 1980–81; and what are the projected figures for 1981–82, 1982–83 and 1983–84.

The numbers of students on courses in universities in Great Britain in (a) physical science and (b) engineering in 1978–79, 1979–80 and 1980–81 are:

Engineering and TechnologyPhysical Sciences
UndergraduatesPostgraduatesUndergraduatesPostgraduates
1978–7935,0456,98518,3115,866
1979–8035,8176,67219,1185,601
1980–8136,7616,35219,8465,427
Although the University Grants Committee has set the universities student number targets to be achieved by 1984–85, these relate solely to home and European Community students and to three broad subject areas. It is not possible to give projections of the above figures. It is for the universities to decide upon the intake to different courses each year to meet the overall targets.

asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science how many students from Australia, New Zealand and the United States of America, respectively, enrolled at British universities in each of the past 10 years; and if he has comparable figures for the current academic year.

The number of students from Australia, New Zealand and the United States of America enrolled at United Kingdom universities in each of the past 10 years to 1979–80 can be found in the annual British Council publications, "Statistics of Overseas Students in the United Kingdom", copies of which are in the Library. The figures for 1980–81 are as follows:

UK Universities
UndergraduatePostgraduate
Australia50345
New Zealand15113
United States of America1,108921
Figures of enrolments in 1982–83 are not yet available.

asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science how many students from EEC nations enrolled at British universities in each of the past 10 years; and if he has comparable figures for the current academic year.

Enrolments by students from other EC countries, excluding Greece, at United Kingdom universities to 1979–80 are given in the annual British Council publication "Overseas Students in the United Kingdom". Comparisons with 1980 are difficult, because in that year students from EC countries were entitled to pay fees at the home rate. The table below gives estimates of the numbers of overseas fee paying students had the fees entitlement rules not changed:

1979–801980–81(estimate)
Undergraduate1,0781,070
Postgraduate706730
Figures of total enrolments of students at universities analysed by country of domicile will not be available for sometime. However, provisional estimates of overseas new entrants by country are expected for the University Grants Committee during December.

asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science; how many United Kingdom students studied in EEC universities in each of the past 10 years and the current academic year.

The following table shows numbers of United Kingdom students studying in France, Germany, Italy, Belgium, Denmark and Greece for 1970 to 1977, the latest year available, in what is known for the purposes of international comparisons as third level education. This corresponds broadly with higher education in the United Kingdom. Such comparisons are best made across all third level studies rather than for universities only.Information for Netherlands and Ireland and for 1974 for all countries is not readily available.

1970

1971

1972

1973

1975

1976

1977

1,6371,8232,1352,5903,1853,7403,835

asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science if it is his policy to encourage student mobility with Australia, New Zealand and the United States of America, respectively; and if he will make a statement.

Yes, subject to the availability of resources. So far as mobility of students within the Commonwealth is concerned, the Government are currently deliberating on the report of the Consultative Group on Student Mobility within the Commonwealth, which was submitted to the recent Commonwealth Heads of Government meeting in Melbourne.

asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science what estimate he has made of the fees payable by undergraduate and post-graduate students, respectively, commencing studies in the current academic year in the case of students from Australia, New Zealand, France and Germany, respectively.

Following is the information requested:

Fees charged in 1981–82
(a) To students from France and Germany:
Postgraduate£1,320
Undergraduate and equivalent£ 900
(b) To new entrants from Australia and New Zealand (undergraduate and postgraduate):
Universities: full cost as determined by each university, subject to minima as follows:
Arts Courses£2,500
Science courses£3,600
Clinical courses in medicine, dentistry and veterinary science£6,000
Maintained institutions
Classroom-based£2,649
Laboratory or workshop-based£3,672
The fees chargeable at maintained institutions to new entrants from Australia and New Zealand are those recommended by the Council of Local Education Authorities and are calculated to represent average full cost over the maintained sector as a whole.

Open University

asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science how many (a) men and (b) women have taken courses at the Open University since it was established; and what are the estimated figures for the coming year.

I regret that it has not been possible to reply in the time available. I shall write to the hon. Member.

Burnham Further Education Committee

asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science, further to his reply to the hon. Member for Berwick-upon-Tweed (Mr. Beith) on 19 November, Official Report, column 224, why he has not yet completed his consideration of the question of the granting of a seat on the Burnham Further Education Committee to the Association of Polytechnic Teachers; and if he will make a statement.

My right hon. Friend has recently received comments from the Trades Union Congress and the National Association of Teachers in further and Higher Education. He has now invited the Association of Polytechnic Teachers to meet him before he takes a decision on the matter.

Trade

Multi-Fibre Arrangement

asked the Secretary of State for Trade to what extent he expects the new multi-fibre arrangement being negotiated in the current year to alleviate pressures on the British clothing and textile industries; and if he will make a statement.

I said in my statement on 24 November that I believed the groundwork had been laid for a new multi-fibre arrangement which will in many respects be tougher than the current MFA. Agreement to the renewal of the MFA on these terms has, however, still to be negotiated in the GATT textiles committee in Geneva.

Clothing And Textile Industries (Unemployment)

asked the Secretary of State for Trade if he will take steps to reverse the trend of growing unemployment in the British clothing and textile industries, in view of the fact that much of this unemployment is due to external trading pressures.

The industry already has a greater degree of protection against imports than any other sector of United Kingdom industry—some 600 quotas or restraint levels imposed on 60 countries. The Government have made it clear that they are looking for tough and effective arrangements to replace the current agreements with supplying countries, as these expire.

Trade Statistics

asked the Secretary of State for Trade (1) if, in view of the deficit of over £2,000 million in the United Kingdom's manufacturing trade with Germany in 1980, he will initiate a study into the reasons for the deficit and in particular whether there is any evidence of non-tariff discrimination in the United Kingdom's trade with Germany;(2) if he will publish a table showing the exports and imports of manufactures from the United Kingdom to the EEC and the rest of the world, respectively, in respect of those months of 1981 for which figures are available.

Air Travel Reserve Fund

asked the Secretary of State for Trade if he will consider extending the Air Travel Reserve Fund to protect the purchasers of scheduled airline tickets in the event of the airlines concerned going out of business.

Such a proposal would require primary legislation for which my right hon. Friend has no plans.

Self-Employed Commercial Agents (Community Directive)

asked the Secretary of State for Trade what is the Government's policy towards the European Economic Community directive on self-employed commercial agents.

The Government's policy on the draft directive on self-employed commercial agents is to reserve their position on the question of the basic need for a directive in light of the conflicting reactions to it within the United Kingdom. We shall be in a position to make a final decision only when the European Communities' Council working group currently examining the proposal has fully considered it and a clear indication of its likely form is established. Meanwhile, the United Kingdom is seeking to play a full and constructive, though cautious, role in the Council working group with a view to achieving a directive that would prove more acceptable.

asked the Secretary of State for Trade what was the outcome of his discussions with the United Commercial Travellers' Association section of the Association of Scientific, Technical and Managerial Staffs on matters connected with the European Economic Community directive on self-employed commercial agents.

I have held no recent discussions with the United Commercial Travellers' Association section of the Association of Scientific, Technical and Managerial Staffs. My hon. Friend indicated in his reply of 19 October to the hon. Member for Newham, North-West (Mr. Spearing) that I had agreed to meet a deputation from UCTA to discuss developments on the commercial agents draft directive. This meeting has still to be arranged.

Companies (Incorporations And Closures)

asked the Secretary of State for Trade how many new companies are now being incorporated monthly; how many are closing down; and what were the comparable statistics in 1980 and 1979.

[pursuant to his reply, 26 November 1981]: The number of companies registered at the companies registration office on a monthly average is as follows, though registrations do not necessarily indicate that the company has commenced trading:

1979(Jan.-Oct.)5,082
1980(Jan.-Oct.)5,522
1981(Jan.-Oct.)5,730
The number of companies removed from the companies register including those removed following liquidation is as follows, though removals from the register do not necessarily include all companies which cease to trade:

Removals from register
1979:1,993Average for Year
1980:2,159
1981:2,020(Average Jan/Nov)

Helicopter Performance (Code Of Practice)

asked the Secretary of State for Trade when he expects the Civil Aviation Authority to publish the helicopter performance code of practice in its final form and the current proposed changes in the duty cycle hours for helicopter pilots; and what consideration was given to making cabin attendants mandatory on all North Sea sector flights involving passengers.

[pursuant to his reply, 25 November 1981]: A joint industry/BALPA/CAA Working Party is trying to develop a helicopter performance code of practice but has failed to reach agreed conclusions. The authority is now assembling its own proposals which it hopes to put out to consultation shortly.The Flight Time Limitations Board is currently examining proposals for changes to the flight and duty times for helicopter pilots. Its recommendations will be passed to the CAA who will then consider if there is a need for wider consultation before deciding whether to adopt, modify or reject them.The carriage of cabin attendants has been studied by the CAA on a number of occasions in the light of representations made both by operators and BALPA. They concluded that there was no justification for changing the existing legislation which calls for a cabin attendant when 20 or more passengers are carried. The Authority can, by direction, require an attendant to be carried when there are fewer passengers, and this it has done when circumstances warrant, for instance when there is no direct access from the flight deck to the passenger cabin.

National Finance

Northern Ireland (Tax Revenue)

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer what was the total revenue return from all tax sources in Northern Ireland in the last financial year.

The total of Customs and Excise revenue, vehicle excise duty, rates, and national insurance surcharge attributable to Northern Ireland in 1980–81 is estimated to be about £725 million. Because of changes in accounting procedure for years after 1978–79, it is no longer possible to attribute net receipts of Inland Revenue duties between England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland.

Self-Employed Persons

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer if he will estimate the loss to the Inland Revenue from workers classified as self-employed who are really employees.

A worker is an employee for tax purposes if working under a contract of service. No one who falls into this category would be regarded by the Inland Revenue as self-employed.

Taxation (Interest Charges)

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer what is the practice of the Inland Revenue in regard to interest chargeable on overdue payments of tax made to them during the Civil Service strike; whether interest will be charged up to the day on which payment was intended to be made rather than on the basis of the later date when the payment was dealt with by revenue officials; whether it will be the practice to waive charges in cases of doubt; what is the statutory authority under which interest is charged on tax owed; and if he will summarise the advice given to tax officers in the application of this statutory authority.

Interest is chargeable on tax, other than PAYE tax, under sections 86–88 Taxes Management Act 1970. Section 51 of the Finance Act 1981, however, enables businesses which, because of the recent Civil Service industrial action were owed amounts from Government Departments, to claim exemption from interest to the extent that such amounts exceeded their (non-interest bearing) PAYE tax and NIC. For the purpose of charging interest on tax paid by cheque during the industrial action the date of payment will normally be taken as the date on which the cheque was posted or was handed to the Revenue.

Unemployed Persons

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer what is his latest estimate of the total annual average cost to public funds for each unemployed person; whether that estimate includes revenue from value added tax which would have accrued if such persons had been employed at average wages; and to what extent such average estimated annual cost is higher when the total number of unemployed persons exceeds 1 million, 2 million and 3 million persons, respectively.

I refer the hon. Member to the article "Costing Unemployment" in the February 1981 issue of the Economic Progress Report, and to the answer given to my hon. Friend the Member for Macclesfield (Mr. Winterton) on 18 November.—[Vol. 13, c. 158–59.]The estimates given in the

Economic Progress Report article exclude loss of indirect taxes and other indirect effects which would be associated with a change in the level of unemployment.

The figures take account of the average level of total unemployment in the year to which they relate. 'There is, however, no simple relationship between the level of unemployment and the incremental costs.

Tax Return Form

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer whether any improvements are contemplated in the design and information demanded from form AR11 (annual return) in connection with information from building societies; and whether any consultative processes will take place before any changes are implemented.

The form of, and particulars to be contained in, the annual returns to be completed by building societies are kept constantly under review, and certain changes and additions are included in the Building Societies (Accounts and Annual Return) Regulations 1981 (S.I. 1981 No. 1497) which was laid before Parliament on 4 November 1981. These regulations will apply to the annual return for any financial year of a building society ending on or after 31 December 1981. In preparing these revised regulations consultations have been held with the Building Societies Association and the Consultative Committee of Accountancy Bodies.

Northern Ireland (Black Economy)

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer what is his estimate of the size of the black economy in Northern Ireland; what loss of revenue this represents; and what steps he has taken to recover such lost revenue.

No such estimate has been made. An appropriate proportion of the 400 staff that the Inland Revenue are redeploying to tackle the black economy will be based in Northern Ireland.

Personal Taxation

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer if he will estimate the number of taxpayers who will be brought into tax in the current tax year as a result of the decision not to uprate personal allowances in the 1981 Budget.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer by my right hon. and learned Friend the Chief Secretary to the hon. Member for Caernarvon (Mr. Howells) on 26 March 1981—[Vol. 1, c. 1072].

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer if he will publish in the Official Report tables showing the amount, in current prices, and the proportion in percentages of personal income, taken by (a) income taxes, (b) national insurance contributions, (c) value added tax, (d) other central Government indirect taxes, (e) the aggregate of (a) to (d), (f) average domestic rate payments and (g) the aggregate of (a) to (d) and (f) for (i) a single person, (ii) a married couple without children both working, (iii) a married couple with two children, husband in work, wife not working, in each case at 50 per cent., 75 per cent., 100 per cent., 150 per cent and 200 per cent. of average earnings, and child benefits where appropriate, and (iv) a married couple with two children on unemployment and supplementary benefit for each financial year from and including 1978–79 to 1981–82.

European Community (United Kingdom Contribution)

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer what is the latest figure available for the net contribution made by the United Kingdom to the EEC in 1981 to date; and what is now the total of the contributions and receipts from the EEC since the United Kingdom joined the Community.

The latest estimate of United Kingdom net payments to the Community budget in the period 1 January to 30 September 1981 is £495 million.Gross payments made by the United Kingdom to the Community budget from 1 January 1973 to 30 September 1981 amounted to £8,327 million. Taking account of a

Multiple of average earnings
1510
Single
1978–7927·7(100·0)31·7(100·0))52·6(100·067·7(100·0)
1979–8026·5(95·7)29·8(94·0)43·1(81·9)51·6(76·2)
1980–8127·8(100·4)30·8(97·2)44·5(84·6)52·3(77·3)

small correction to the figure previously used for receipts in 1978, receipts from the Community budget in the same period amounted to £4,744 million.

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer if he will ensure that all official estimates of the net cost of the United Kingdom's membership of the European Economic Community include the cost of subsidising European Economic Community students at British universities.

European Monetary System

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer to what extent he considers a decision by the United Kingdom to join the European monetary system exchange rate mechanism would have a significant effect on the freedom of Her Majesty's Government to carry out the economic management of the United Kingdom; and if he will make a statement.

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer if membership of the European monetary system exchange rate mechanism would prevent or otherwise influence decisions by the United Kingdom Government to seek to increase or decrease the exchange rate or if such decisions would require the consent of other members of the European monetary system.

Income Tax And National Insurance

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will construct an index, with 1978–79 equals 100, of the changes in the level of income tax and national insurance contributions for each subsequent year for a taxpayer in (a) two thirds, (b) average, (c) five times average and (d) 10 times average earnings for households where the taxpayer is: (i) single, (ii) married, (iii) married with two children, (iv) married with four childen and in all cases assuming that the wife does not work.

[pursuant to his reply, 20 November 1981, c. 254]. The tables below show income tax and national insurance contributons as a percentage of gross earnings plus child benefit (where appropriate), with changes in those percentages shown in brackets in index number form, taking 1978–79 = 100. Earnings figures for 1981–82 as a whole are not yet available. The calculations assume that the taxpayer has no allowances or reliefs other than the appropriate personal allowances. National insurance contributions are at the no-contracted-out rate.

1

5

10

Married with no children

1978–7922·2(100·0)28·0(100·0)50·9(100·0)66·8(100·0)
1979–8021·4(96·4)26·4(94·3)41·8(82·1)50·9(76·2)
1980–8122·9(103·2)27·5(98·2)43·2(84·9)51·6(77·2)

Married with two children (both under 11)

1978–7918·6(100·0)25·2(100·0)49·7(100·0)66·1(100·0)
1979–8019·3(103·8)24·7(98·0)41·2(82·9)50·5(76·4)
1980–8120·9(112·4)25·8(102·4)42·7(85·9)51·3(77·6)

Married with four children (two under 11, one 11–15, one over 16)

1978–7914·7(100·0)22·2(100·0)48·3(100·0)65·2(100·0)
1979–8017·6(119·7)23·1(104·1)40·6(84·1)50·2(77·0)
1980–8119·2(130·6)24·4(109·9)42·1(87·2)51·0(78·2)
Earnings figures for financial years are derived from estimated average earnings for each month from April to the following March. The figures for April are derived from the New Earnings Survey and represent average gross weekly earnings of full-time adult male employees in all occupations (manual and non-manual). Figures or other months are obtained by updating the April figure, taking account of movements in the centred three-month moving average of the seasonally adjusted whole econnomy index for average earnings

Government Borrowing (Interest)

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer further to his answer to the right hon. Member for Manchester, Wythenshawe, on 13 November, relating to the decision of the High Court on 30 October, when he expects to receive a full transcript of the judgment.

[pursuant to his reply, 23 November 1981, c. 272]: The transcript has now been received and is being studied. I shall write to the right hon. Gentleman in due course.

Retirement Pensioners (Paye Codes)

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer how many (a) male and (b) female retirement pensioners have been sent new or amended income tax PAYE codes due to the uprating of social security benefits on 23 November.

[pursuant to his reply, 25 November 1981, c. 375]: The number of retirement pensioners who have been sent new or amended PAYE codes because of this year's uprating of Social Security benefits is not yet available, but the equivalent figure for last year was just over 2,200,000. The Inland Revenue's records of these figures do not differentiate between male and female pensioners.

Income Tax (Assessments)

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer if the Inland Revenue has sent out all the new income tax assessments required due to the freezing of personal allowances and the uprating on 23 November of retirement and graduated pensions.

[pursuant to his reply, 25 November 1981, c. 376]: The tax codes of those pensioners who have another source of income subject to deduction of tax under PAYE have now been amended to take account of this year's retirement pension uprating. Most of those pensioners whose tax is to be collected directly by instalments will by now have received assessments.

Income Tax Liabilities

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer if, for the convenience of hon. Members, he will place in the Library a list of the changes already announced in respect of income tax liabilities and the administrative changes coming into force in April 1982 and April 1983.

[pursuant to his reply, 26 November 1981, c. 430]: I am making arrangements to do so as soon as possible.

Taxpayers (Statistics)

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer if he will list the number of surtax payers or higher-rate taxpayers for each year since 1945; and if he will also present this data as a percentage of all taxpayers.

[pursuant to his reply, 26 November 1981, c. 430]: Estimates of the number of surtax payers from 1945–46 to 1972–73 and higher rate taxpayers from 1973–74, and the percentage of all personal income taxpayers that these numbers represent, are as follows:

Thousands
YearNumber of Surtax Payers*Percentage of all Taxpayers
1945–461631·1
1946–471871·3
1947–482061·4
1948–492181·5
1949–502301·5
1950–512451·6
1951–522601·6
1952–532701·8
1953–542881·8
1954–553151·9
1955–563422·1
1956–573311·9
1957–583602·1
1958–593932·2
1959–604312·3
1960–614612·4
1961–622851·4
1962–633041·5
1963–643161·8
1964–653601·9
1965–664202·2
1966–674022·0
1967–684522·3
1968–694742·3
1969–703751·8
1970–714032·0
1971–723451·8
1972–733702·0

Year

Number of Higher Rate Taxpayers

Percentage of All Taxpayers

1973–743922·0
1974–757523·7
1975–761,2405·9
1976–771,4306·7
1977–781,0605·1
1978–797633·5
1979–806703·1
1980–817603·6
1981–821,0004·6

* Married couples counted as one.

Provisional.

Capital Gains Tax

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer if he will list the amount of revenue gained from capital gains tax for each year since its inception; and if he will present these data (a) in real terms and (b) as a percentage of total Government revenue.

[pursuant to his reply, 26 November 1981, c. 430]: The figures are as follows:

Revenue from Capital Gains Tax
ActualAdjusted to October 1981 pricesAs a percentage of Central Government Revenue
£ million£ million
1966–677350·1
1967–6816770·1
1968–69472150·4
1969–701285590·8
1970–711395650·;9
1971–721555770·9
1972–732087241·2
1973–743241,0201·8
1974–753821,0201·6
1975–763878301·3
1976–773236001·0
1977–783405550·9
1978–793535320·8
1979–804305590·8
1980–815085680·8
The above figures do not include corporation tax paid on capital gains by the corporate sector. The General Index of Retail Prices has been used to express the revenue in real terms.

Capital Transfer Tax

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer what was the revenue gained from capital transfer tax for each year since its inception (a) in real terms and (b) as a percentage of total Government revenue.

[pursuant to his reply, 26 November 1981, c. 430]: The figures are as follows:

Revenue from Capital Transfer Tax
ActualAdjusted to October 1981 pricesAs a percentage of total Central Government revenue
£ million£ million
1975–761182530·4
1976–772594820·8

Actual

Adjusted to October 1981 prices

As a percentage of total Central Government revenue

£ million

£ million

1977–783115070·8
1978–793234870·7
1979–804015220·7
1980–814254750·6
The General Index of Retail Prices has been used to express the revenue in real terms.

National Economic Development Council

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer whether at his next meeting with the National Economic Development Council chairmen he will be addressing them on the subject of quality assurance; and if he will make a statement.

[pursuant to his reply, 26 November 1981]: Following earlier discussions in the National Economic Development Council, of which I am chairman, NEDO organised a conference on quality and competitiveness which was held on 24 November. The conference was attended by representatives of industry, trade unions and various organisations who are active in this field, and by virtually all members of the National Economic Development Council, which demonstrates the importance all parties attach to the need to improve the quality performance and competitiveness of British companies.We shall be discussing the main lessons of the conference and how they may be followed up at the December and January meetings of the National Economic Development Council. Our aim will be to ensure that the need for improved quality is given prominence in the future work of the Economic Development Council's and sector working party's.

Index-Linked Pensions

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer how many public-sector employees have index-linked wages or salaries; how many ex-public sector employees have index-linked pensions; how many persons receive public-sector index-linked wages, salaries or pensions; and what percentage this last category is of the total work force.

I have been asked to reply.Recent pay settlements for both the police and fire services have been based on links with average earnings data, affecting a total of about 175,000 employees. In 1979, there were approximately 2·3 million public sector pensions in payment, the great majority of which were index-linked. These together amount to some 10 per cent. of the total work force.

Energy

Dungeness "A" Power Station

asked the Secretary of State for Energy if he will make a statement on the return to power of Dungeness "A" nuclear power station.

I am advised by the Nuclear Installations Inspectorate (NII) that it has given formal approval for the resumption of electricity generation from reactor 2 at Dungeness "A" nuclear power station. This reactor has been shut down since January 1980 following the discovery of weld defects in the bellows units associated with the coolant gas ducts at the station as previously reported to the House—[Vol. 976, c. 826–8.] The CEGB has carried out a comprehensive programme of inspection and testing for all the gas circuits on reactor 2 and has completed any necessary repairs. They have demonstrated to the NH that the strength of the affected units provides adequate safety margins and that there will be no significant deterioration during operation. The NII is satisfied that the reactor can now be safely returned to power. Reactor 1 continues to be shut down for similar remedial work. Its return to power will also be subject to approval by the NII.

European Community

Unification

asked the Lord Privy Seal whether he has made any assessment of the consequences for the United Kingdom if the European Economic Community were to approve the proposals from the West German Government to promote greater unification within the EEC.

No. The Government are studying carefully the proposals which have been made by the German and Italian Governments, of which a copy has been placed in the Library of the House. Many points will need clarification and discussion within the Community and the Ten before any conclusions are likely to be reached.

Salaries

asked the Lord Privy Seal what salaries and expense allowances are payable to (a) the President of the European Commission, (b) the Vice-Presidents of the Commission, (c) members of the Commission and (d) Members of the European Parliament; and what rate of tax is applicable to salaries of commissioners.

Since 1973, the salaries of the Members of the Commission have been linked to the top of the Commission's A1 salary scale, which now stands at 282,929 Belgian francs per month. The President receives 138 per cent. of this, Vice Presidents 125 per cent. and Commissioners 112·5 per cent. They also receive a residence allowance of 15 per cent. and household allowance of 5 per cent. These emoluments are subject to Community tax on a sliding scale rising to a maximum of 45 per cent. on income exceeding 50,735 Belgian francs per month. In addition, the President receives a representation allowance of 34,205 Belgian francs per month, Vice Presidents 21,980 and Commissioners 14,655—these were last fixed in 1976.The salary and allowances for British MEPs are:

Salary

£13,950 per annum with effect from 13 June 1981.

(Dual mandate members receive one-third (ie £4,650) in addition to full MPs salary, paid by United Kingdom Government, under s. 1 of the European Assembly (Pay and Pensions) Act 1979.)

Travel Allowances

Allowed for Travel:

  • (a) to each meeting of Parliament for travel between MEPs home address and the seat of Parliament;
  • (b) between place of arrival and place of work, during meetings of the Parliament;
  • (c) other travel, with prior authorisation, to attend meetings of other Community bodies or as a Parliament representative;
  • (d) allowance of up to 400 ECU (£217) month for travel within their home country.
  • Mode of Transport Allowed:

  • (i) normal flat rate of 0·36 ECU per km (about 31½p per mile) for first 400 km and 0·19 ECU per km (about 16p per mile) for subsequent km
  • (ii) Official car from place of arrival to place of work free up to 20 km, thereafter MEP must contribute 0·30 ECU per km (about 26p per mile) or
  • (iii) free taxi, up to 20 km
  • (iv) outside European Community, air fare by most direct route.
  • Subsistence

    92 ECU (£50) per day of registered attendance at meetings of Parliament and its organs and for each day of attendance (or cost of alternative return travel) in between meetings. Outside European Community, 46 ECU (£25) per day plus cost of hotel bills.

    Research and Secretarial Allowances

    Maximum of 34,752 ECU (£18,887) per annum paid on declaration of expenditure by MEP.

    Miscellaneous Allowances

  • (a) free telephone calls from Parliament;
  • (b) reimbursement of the portion of medical costs not paid by the local medical authority for medical treatment required in attending a meeting or journeying to do so up to BF 200,000 (about £2,623) per illness;
  • (c) free accident and property insurance;
  • (d) life assurance premiums paid during MEP's terms of office DM 20,000 (£4,301) and bonuses and interest paid at age 60, or (if later) after 10 years' service;
  • (e) personal accident insurance of up to BF 7,000,000 (about £91,803).
  • The salaries of MEPs from other member States are paid, as in this country, by national Governments at national rates, generally at the same level as for Members of their respective national Parliaments. The scale of allowances is the same for all MEPs.

    Council Of Ministers

    asked the Lord Privy Seal if he will make a statement about the forthcoming business in the European Community Council of Ministers.

    At present seven meetings of the Council of Ministers are planned for December. The usual written forecast was deposited in the House on 26 November.The Environment Council is expected to meet on 3 December to discuss draft directives on major accident hazards in industry, the discharge of mercury into the aquatic environment, and air quality standards for lead; a draft regulation on implementation of the Washington convention on trade in endangered species and proposals on chlorofluorocarbons in the environment and the monitoring of air pollution. Ministers are also likely to discuss the Community environment action programme for 1982–86 and emissions from motor vehicles.The Foreign Affairs Council is expected to meet on 7–8 December to discuss relations with Japan and Cyprus; the Community's external steel regime for 1982; future arrangements for imports of low-cost textiles—including renewal of the Multi-fibre Arrangement—and a new method for reviewing Community staff pay. Ministers may, in addition, discuss restraint arrangements for imports of manioc and a report by the high level North-South working party. There is also likely to be a meeting with the European Parliament under the conciliation procedure to discuss a draft management regulation for food aid.The Labour and Social Affairs Council is expected to meet on 8 December to discuss the draft directive on lead in the work place and amendments to Community social security regulations for migrant workers, implementing their extension to cover self-employed persons, also to extend the unemployment benefit provisions and to provide for the payment of pre-retirement benefits to continue when a beneficiary moves to another member State. Ministers will also consider the social integration of disabled people; the review of the European Social Fund and the latest annual report and the draft directive on asbestos in the work place.The Finance Council is expected to meet on 14 December to continue discussion of the personal allowances for intra-Community travellers and tax relief for temporary imports of vehicles and permanent imports of personal property on a change of residence. Ministers will also consider the proposed annual economic report for 1981–82, a proposal for aid to Greece for the reconstruction of areas affected by the earthquakes in February and March and the draft non-life insurance services directive. The Council may also discuss the extension of the arrangement under which compensation is paid to Greece in respect of its contributions to United Kingdom budget refunds.The Fisheries Council is expected to meet on 14 December to continue discussion of the outstanding issues concerning a revised common fisheries policy.The Transport Council is expected to meet on 15 December to consider a resolution on Community railways policy and possibly rail freight tariffs; measures allowing aid to combined transport and liberalising certain aspects of combined transport journeys and the Community multilateral road haulage quota for 1982 and minor liberalising measures for certain road transport operations. Ministers will also consider a consultation and information procedure for inland transport agreements with third countries; technical requirements for inland waterway vessels; a new system of port State control for visiting ships; relations between member States and third countries in shipping matters and air fares and inter-regional air services.The Agriculture Council is expected to meet on 15 December to discuss proposals for changes in Mediterranean agriculture in the context of the enlargement of the Community, and on various animal health matters including disease notification, brucellosis eradication, amendments to directives on health problems affecting trade in fresh meat, the review of certain non-veterinary qualifications and possibly the welfare of battery hens. Discussion is also expected on the estimates of supply and demand for beef and veal for the processing industry during 1982 and to continue, on the finalisation of GATT import quotas for 1982 on frozen beef and veal, buffalo meat and high quality beef.

    Foreign And Commonwealth Affairs

    Sinai Peacekeeping Force

    asked the Lord Privy Seal if he has now received word from the Governments of the United States of America, Israel and Egypt, respectively, as to whether the United Kingdom's offer to make forces available to the Sinai peace force on the basis of the terms of the offer announced on 23 November is acceptable.

    The United States State Department has issued the following statement in reaction to the announcement of our readiness to participate in the Sinai peacekeeping force:

    "The United States warmly welcomes the decision by the United Kingdom, France, Italy and the Netherlands to participate in the Multinational Force and Observers to be established in connection with the treaty of peace between Egypt and Israel.
    The United States views that treaty as the first step towards a broader, just, endurable peace in the Middle East and remains convinced that negotiations based on the framework agreed at Camp David can help realise that goal.
    The participation of four of our European allies in the MFO will inevitably strengthen that organisation and will enhance its ability to carry out its functions as agreed between Egypt and Israel."
    The Egyptian Government have welcomed the Four's participation as

    "a positive contribution towards establishing a just and comprehensive peace."

    We are still awaiting the official reaction of the Israeli Government.

    Defence

    Working Hours

    asked the Secretary of State for Defence what are the average hours worked per day in his Department by civil servants and service personnel, respectively.

    Because of the wide variation in the task over the whole of the Ministry of Defence, and the differing conditions of service both within the Civil Service and between civil servants and Service men, a comparison of average daily hours worked is not meaningful. Service men are on call 24 hour a day, 7 days a week and their pay recognises this commitment; Ministry of Defence civilians are governed by conditioned hours of work applicable to the Civil Service as a whole but in addition work such overtime as is required, sometimes at weekends. Expressing all these variables as an average per day would be misleading.

    Departmental Staff

    asked the Secretary of State for Defence what is the ratio of non-industrial civil servants compared to Service personnel in his Department.

    At 1 October 1981, the latest date for which strengths of service personnel are available, the ratio of Ministry of Defence non-industrial civil servants to United Kingdom Service personnel was 1:3.

    Scottish Regiments

    asked the Secretary of State for Defence if he will list the locations within Scotland where Scottish regiments are stationed at present, and detail which regiments they are.

    Of two major unit locations in Scotland one is currently occupied by a regular Scottish regiment. This is Ritchie Camp at Kirknewton, occupied by the first battalion The Gordon Highlanders which moved there in July 1980.

    Walvis Bay

    asked the Secretary of State for Defence if, in view of the possible Soviet takeover of the Walvis Bay enclave in the event of a South Western Africa Peoples' Organisation election victory, he will seek to formulate with other North Atlantic Treaty Organisation Defence Ministers a contingency plan to keep the Walvis Bay facilities available for North Atlantic Treaty Organisation shipping in emergencies.

    Gunner Andrew Day

    asked the Secretary of State for Defence when he anticipates that the investigation into the complaint by Gunner Andrew Day of brutality will be complete; and if he will make a statement.

    The investigation into Gunner Day's complaints has now been completed, and disciplinary action is being taken against a number of soldiers. I shall inform the hon. Member of the outcome of these proceeding, which will not be completed until the New Year.

    Agriculture, Fisheries And Food

    Fish Prices

    asked the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food if he is seeking substantial improvements in the 1982 guide prices for fish proposed by the EEC Commission; and if he will make a statement.

    Yes. The Commission's proposals are very disappointing. We are making strenuous efforts to improve them.

    Industry

    International Computers Ltd

    asked the Secretary of State for Industry what progress International Computers Ltd. has made since the guarantee of bank facilities was announced in March.

    In March the Government agreed to guarantee up to £200 million of bank facilities for ICL. The company has made considerable progress since then. The new management team of Mr. Laidlaw as chairman and Mr. Wilmot as managing director are carrying out determined cost-cutting measures, which they believe will bring about a significant improvement in ICL's profitability. I know how deeply they regret the need for major redundancies, but they have concluded that these are essential to secure ICL's long-term future. Messrs Laidlaw and Wilmot have developed an imaginative new product strategy, and have carried out major organisational changes with a number of new appointments to senior management positions. Their achievements have helped to restore the confidence of their customers and the financial community and have established positive targets for ICL's employees. ICL has also reached agreement on important collaborative ventures with the Three Rivers Corporation of America, with the Mitel Corporation of Canada and with Fujitsu of Japan. The collaboration with Fujitsu on mainframe technology is particularly welcome to the Government as a major user of ICL computers.Following these collaborative agreements and other measures, ICL made representations to the Government and its principal bankers about the need to ensure a smooth transition to normal financial arrangements in the longer term. We have accordingly agreed to extend the two-year term of the Government's guarantee, but on a reducing basis. I have informed ICL's chairman that the guarantee will be reduced to £150 million on 31 March 1983; to £100 million on 31 March 1984; to £50 million on 31 March 1985; and will end on 31 March 1986. I have also informed the chairman that, with this tapered extension of the guarantee in place, the company will have to draw up its corporate plan on the basis that no further Government support of this kind will be forthcoming. Mr. Laidlaw has assured me that this arrangement should be appropriate for the company's needs as it consolidates its recovery. We have advised the European Commission of our intention.I am pleased to announce that, as in the case of the original two year guarantee, ICL's four principal bankers have agreed to continue to provide a significant level of committed borrowing facilities over and above the sum guaranteed. For the first year of the extension, to the end of March 1984, the level of £70 million which is currently available from them to ICL will be maintained.

    Plant And Machinery

    asked the Secretary of State for Industry what is the amount spent, respectively, by leasing firms, manufacturing industry and industry generally on plant and machinery in the latest year for which figures are available.

    The figures requested are given in table 10.8 on page 75 of the National Income and Expenditure Blue Book, 1981 edition. Capital expenditure by leasing firms is allocated to the group of industries: insurance, banking, finance and business services. The allocation of leased assets by sector of use is shown in a supplementary table on page 131.

    National Enterprise Board

    asked the Secretary of State for Industry whether he has determined a revised financial duty for the National Enterprise Board; and if he will make a statement.

    The National Enterprise Board has been informed of my determination of its revised financial duty in the following terms:

    "It shall be the duty of the Board to be guided in their investment decisions and in disposing of securities by the aim of achieving from 1 January 1981 a cumulative return on capital invested which is comparable with the return on equity investments in private sector industrial undertakings and meets the cost to the Government of public funds invested by the Board.
    The Board's performance shall be measured by two tests:
  • (a) the movement in the Financial Times Actuaries Industrial Share Index;
  • (b) the cost of Government borrowing."
  • A320 Airbus

    asked the Secretary of State for Industry if he will make a statement regarding the future development of the British Aerospace A320 airbus.

    British Aerospace is still considering the basis for its participation in the proposed Airbus A320 project. The Government have received an approach about launch aid towards development costs. But full information is not yet available and no decision has yet been reached.

    Social Services

    Handicapped Persons

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services, in the light of the conclusions of Dr. Reedy of Newcastle university health unit that the transfer of handicapped people, particularly the difficult mentally handicapped cases, into the community should be carried out carefully and selectively and a pilot scheme evaluated before mass change of policy, if he will make a statement on Government policy on this matter.

    I have not seen Dr. Reedy's conclusions, but I would agree that any transfer of mentally handicapped people from hospital to the community should be done carefully.A variety of schemes is needed to meet different needs and circumstances and many mentally handicapped patients have already been successfully transferred under schemes which have been or are being evaluated.

    Psychogeriatric Patients (Admissions)

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services, in view of the substantial annual increase in the aged population, if he is satisfied that enough beds are available for the admission of psychogeriatric patients, and that enough experienced nurses are deployed to maintain routine round the clock care.

    We recognise psychiatric provision for the elderly as an important and difficult area where the quantity and standard of provision varies across the country. The number of old people, and especially of very old people, has been increasing for many years and will continue to grow for a considerable number of years to come. For these reasons we indicated in "Care in Action" that health authorities should regard it as a priority to provide enough suitable accommodation within each district, and also expressed our concern about the availability of appropriately qualified nurses for mental illness services generally.

    Mental Hospital Staff (Complaints And Appeals Procedure)

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services (1) whether he is satisfied that staff in National Health Service mental hospitals are able freely to complain about any ill-treatment of patients; and if he will make a statement;(2) if he will amend the new health service complaints procedure (HC (81) 5) to include guidance to mental hospital staff on how to make complaints on behalf of patients;(3) if he will issue a circular to district health authorities concerning the development of procedures for handling complaints made by mental hospital staff about standards of patient care and recommend that the details of the circular should be available to all staff;(4) if he will issue a circular to district health authorities about the development of appeals procedures for the use of staff dissatisfied with the way that complaints on behalf of patients have been handled.

    About a year ago the Department discussed the matter of staff complaints procedures in mental hospitals with regional administrators and regional nursing officers. Administrators were asked to satisfy themselves that there are agreed and understood procedures for such complaints in their regions.It is vitally important that all staff—whether they are employed in mental hospitals or not—should have open to them known avenues for complaints. I know that this is the case in some areas, but the Department is still receiving replies from regional health authorities as a result of the meetings last year and the picture is incomplete. When they have all been received we shall consider whether any further action is necessary.

    Senile Dementia

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services, what provision he makes for people suffering from senile dementia; and what steps he proposes to take to improve them.

    Health authorities provide for people suffering from senile dementia mainly in their psychiatric services. For example, about 5,200 first admissions of people with this diagnosis to psychiatric beds were recorded in 1979. I set out the steps being taken to improve care in my reply to the hon. Member for Eccles (Mr. Carter-Jones) on 21 October 1981—[Vol. 10, c. 156–57].

    Electro-Convulsive Therapy

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services (1) what is the extent to which obsolete equipment for electro-convulsive therapy is or has been used in the East Anglian regional health authority; and whether any steps will be taken to scrap such obsolete equipment;(2) whether the proposed working party will review all matters relating to electro-convulsive therapy in the East Anglian area health authority when it undertakes its inquiry;(3) what percentage of medical personnel administering electro-convulsive therapy in the East Anglian area health authority has the required level of qualifications.

    The Royal College of Psychiatrists recently published a research report "ECT Treatment in Great Britain, 1980". In the research, a sample of 165 units administering ECT were visited; in the 13 units visited in the north east Thames and East Anglia health regions (they were not identified separately), seven of the main ECT machines (54 per cent. of their machines in use) and six of the reserve (46 per cent.) were obsolete. More precise information about ECT equipment in specific places is not held centrally.Similarly the qualification of medical personnel administering ECT is not known centrally. The hon. Member may wish to take up such specific matters with the East Anglia regional health authority.The working party we have set up will consider matters relating to suitability, safety and maintenance of ECT machines on a broad basis: it will not be possible to examine the machines in each region. Its report will be made available to health authorities who, in the meantime, will no doubt be reviewing their own facilities.The Royal College of Psychiatrists has itself established a special committee to consider professional practice in the administration of ECT and the Department will keep in touch with its work.

    Mind (Grant)

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services if he will increase the departmental grant to the charity MIND to enable that organisation to overcome the present financial difficulties.

    We have already indicated to the charity in response to an enquiry that, although supplementary grants in the course of a year can be given only very exceptionally, if it submits a detailed case it will be considered on its merits.

    Youth Opportunities Programme

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services if he will exempt young people on youth opportunities programme schemes from prescription charges for dental treatment; and whether people on youth opportunities programme schemes are ineligible for any benefits as a consequence of taking up a place on such a scheme.

    We have no plans to change the wide-ranging exemption and low income remission arrangements from dental charges. About 60 per cent. of courses of treatment are currently provided free of charge. The Government's policy is to help those in greatest financial need; and young people who are not already exempt on age grounds may be entitled to full or partial remission from charges on grounds of low income.People on youth opportunity programme schemes are not entitled to flat rate unemployment benefit, but they may claim supplementary benefit if their resources are insufficient to meet their requirements.

    Dental Therapists

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services whether there will be any schools for training dental therapists remaining if the school at New Cross is closed.

    The school at New Cross is the only one at present training dental therapists in the United Kingdom.

    Parliamentary Constituencies (Census)

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services if he will publish in the Official Report the dates proposed for the publication of the 1981 census for parliamentary constituencies.

    We hope to lay this information before the House before the end of 1982, giving broadly the same detail as in the county monitor series.

    Poverty Trap

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services if he will estimate the number of families in 1979 caught in the poverty trap and the increase in the numbers so caught as a result of the 1980 and 1981 budgets.

    An estimate of the number of families with theoretically high marginal tax rates in 1979 is expected to be available in the next couple of months. This will be based on a Department of Health and Social Security analysis of information recorded by respondents in the 1979 family expenditure survey. The only information that is readily available about possible Budget effects on marginal tax rates was included in the reply given by my right hon. Friend, the former Secretary of State for Social Services, to the hon. Member for Wolverhampton, North-East (Mrs. Short) on 13 April 1981.—[Vol. 3, c. 58–60.] It was estimated that some 10,000 families receiving family income supplement—FIS—and no more than 20,000 recipients of housing rebates—not also receiving FIS—might be drawn into income tax in 1981–82.

    Child Benefit

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services to what level child benefit needs to be raised to maintain its April 1979 value.

    Based on the movement of the general index of retail prices up to October 1981, the latest month for which a figure is available, the current rate of child benefit of £5·25 a week would need to be raised by 42p to maintain the value it had in April 1979.

    Mortality Rates

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services if he will list (a) the perinatal mortality rate and (b) the infant mortality rate for (i) Birkenhead and (ii) England and Wales for each year since 1974.

    Perinatal and infant mortality rates for Birkenhead County Borough and England and Wales 1974 to 1980

    Birkenhead County Borough

    England and Wales

    Perinatal deaths per 1,000 total births

    Infant deaths per 1,000 live births

    Perinatal deaths per 1,000 total births

    Infant deaths per 1,000 live births

    197426·229·120·416·3
    197526·921·219·315·7
    197612·711·217·714·2
    197717·915·217·013·8
    19789·813·115·513·2
    197917·916·414·712·8
    1980NANA13·312·0
    NA—not yet available

    Health Visiting

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services if he will set up an inquiry into the demands on health visiting.

    I am aware that there are shortages of health visitors in many places, and in "Care in Action" we made it clear that health authorities should continue to increase the number of health visitors they employ, though the precise rate of increase must depend on the circumstances of individual health authorities. The Harding report on the primary health care team and the Acheson report on primary health care in inner London both recommended that further research should be undertaken on the workload and staffing levels of health visitors, and we are currently considering what action to take in response to these reports.

    Hospital Waiting Lists

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services how many people were on hospital waiting lists at the latest available date; what were the comparable figures for each year since 1970; and if he will break them down to show the specialities involved and the number of admissions for each speciality in each year.

    The following table shows the total number of persons on hospital in-patient waiting lists at 31 December of each year from 1970 and the total number of deaths and discharges from hospitals in each of those years. The tables showing the breakdown of numbers by specialties and specialist units are of considerable bulk and I am writing with them to the hon. Member.

    YearTotal Numbers on Waiting Lists at 31 DecemberDischarges and Deaths during the year to 31 December
    1970525,9265,011,713
    1971493,7315,170,791
    1972479,1995,222,978
    1973508,6175,132,302
    1974517,4245,171,706
    1975588,4834,975,750
    1976607,1415,254,551
    1977602,0915,544,967
    1978682,4445,370,319
    1979687,6865,400,120
    1980640,1105,670,001

    Occupational Pension Schemes

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services, if he has yet decided the new terms of rebate to occupational pension schemes who contract out of the State system.

    I have received a substantial number of representations on the consultative document prepared by the Government Actuary and I am now considering these.

    National Insurance Contributions

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services what national insurance contributions under classes 1, 2 and 4 will be borne by a self-employed person who earns £50,000 per annum in professional practice, included in the profits of which and assessed by the Inland Revenue under schedule D case II, are fees as a non-executive director of three other companies of £8,000, £7,000 and £6,000, respectively.

    As a director, a person in this position would pay class 1 contributions of £806 for 1981–82, assuming that he had deferred his liability to pay contributions in one of his employments. He would have no class 2 or class 4 liability.

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services which national insurance contributions under classes 1, 2 and 4 will be borne by each of the individuals and employers in each of the following examples: (a) an employee employed full-time by one company at a salary of £50,000 per annum, (b) an employee employed mainly by a company at a salary of £30,000 per annum and as a non-executive director by two other companies not associated in any way with the first company at fees in each case of £10,000 per annum and (c) an employee employed full-time by a company at a salary of £50,000 per annum and as a non-executive director by another company at fees of £10,000 per annum for which he accounts in full to the first company.

    (a)

    (b)

    (c)

    Salary

    £50,000

    (i) £30,000

    (ii) £10,000

    (iii) £10,000

    (i) £50,000

    (ii) £10,000

    Class 1 contributions (not-contracted out)Employee£806£806

    *

    *

    £806

    *

    Employer£1,424·80£1,424·80£1,370£1,370£1,424·80£1,370
    No Class 2 or Class 4 contributions will be payable.

    * Assumes that the contributor will have deferred his liability to pay contributions, in the knowledge that he will be paying the maximum contributions required in his first employment.