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Written Answers

Volume 24: debated on Tuesday 25 May 1982

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Written Answers To Questions

Tuesday 25 May 1982

Trade

Textiles And Clothing (Imports)

asked the Minister for Trade (1) if the continuing delays in the availability of statistics on imports of textiles and clothing has affected his ability to assess if action under an anti-surge mechanism is required;(2) what assessment he has made of increased levels of imports of textiles and clothing since mid-1981 as part of his policy of implementing an anti-surge mechanism should the need arise:(3) on what dates statistics on imports of textiles and clothing for each of the months from September 1980 to June 1981 were made available to the British Textile Confederation;(4) on what dates statistics on imports of textiles and clothing for each of the months since September 1981 were made available to the British Textile Confederation;(5) if he has received any representations concerning the delays in publishing statistics on the imports of textiles and clothing products;(6) what is now the latest month for which data are available on imports of textiles and clothing products;(7) what was the percentage change in value and in volume of imports of textiles and clothing from

(a) low cost sources, (b) the European Economic Community and (c) other sources in each of the last four months for which data are available, compared with the same months a year previously.

Nuclear Materials (Transportation)

asked the Minister for Trade if he will list the regulations which govern the transport of nuclear materials by air.

Machine Tools

asked the Minister for Trade if he will list in the Official Report the balance of trade in machine tools for 1979, 1980, 1981 and 1982 to the most recent practicable date.

Textiles

asked the Minister for Trade if he will list in the Official Report the balance of trade in textile goods for 1979, 1980, 1981 and 1982 to the most recent practicable date.

Motor Vessel "Jemrix" (Collision)

asked the Minister for Trade if he will make a statement about the collision of the motor vessel "Jemrix" with the British Gas methane terminal jetty at Canvey Island on 20 May.

British Airports Authority

asked the Minister for Trade (1) if he is considering allowing the British Airports Authority to enter into leasing arrangements with private sector contractors to assist in financing the authority's investment programme;(2) if he will make a statement on the possibility of introducing private funding into the British Airports Authority.

[pursuant to his reply, 20 May 1982, c. 150]: In January I invited the British Airports Authority to consider ways in which the private sector might be closely involved with the development of the authority's airports. In particular, I invited suggestions as to how private sector funds might be introduced. I have now received from Mr. Norman Payne, chairman of the BAA, initial suggestions as to how, under certain conditions, this might be achieved. I regard this as a most important initiative. I am very grateful to the BAA for the speedy and practical way in which it has responded. My Department is now urgently considering these suggestions.

Trade Descriptions Act 1968

asked the Minister for Trade if he will consider amending the Trade Descriptions Act 1968 in accordance with recommendations made by the review undertaken by the Director General of Fair Trading and others in 1974.

[pursuant to his reply, 24 May 1982, c. 218]: I have no plans at present to do so.

Scotland

Mineral Exploitation

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland what minerals he envisages exploiting under the provisions contained in the Western Islands integrated development programme, paragraph 11.7 (J).

I refer my hon. Friend to paragraph 8.13 of the programme, copies of which are available in the Library, in which specific reference is made to the possibility of exploiting a number of indigenous mineral resources.

Pest Control

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland what species may be subject to the pest control measures for which £100,000 is budgeted under the Western Islands integrated development programme; and what control measures are envisaged to be used for this purpose.

I refer my hon. Friend to paragraph 3.10 of the programme, copies of which are available in the Library, in which specific reference is made to the problems caused by rabbits and mink. The precise control measures have yet to be determined.

Teachers (Pay)

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland whether he will accept the award made by the arbitration body set up to consider the pay claim for teaching staff in schools in Scotland.

I am today notifying the Scottish joint negotiating committee for teaching staff in school education that, in terms of section 97B of the Education (Scotland) Act 1980, I have decided to accept the award by the arbitration body of a 6 per cent. increase in the salaries of school teachers in Scotland as from 1 April 1982. As has already been made abundantly clear in the course of the negotiations which led to the reference to arbitration, I am not prepared to accept any additional commitment by way of rate support grant as a result of pay awards which exceed the average of 4 per cent. for which provision has been made in the public sector.

Industry

Steel Workers (Payments)

asked the Secretary of State for Industry why all benefits under the European Communities (Iron and Steel Employees' Readaption Scheme) Regulations 1979 are paid four weeks in arrears.

Benefits payable under this scheme vary with the individual circumstances of the beneficiaries. Amounts payable can be correctly assessed only after confirmation, as appropriate, of employment status, attendance at training courses, the level of new earnings and the amount of any other State benefits in payment. Four weeks is the minimum time needed to enable this information to be obtained from other Government Departments, new employers, and training establishments.

Small Engineering Firms (Investment Scheme)

asked the Secretary of State for Industry if he will give an assessment of the success of the small engineering firms investment scheme; and if he will make a statement about its likely future.

The scheme has been a considerable success and will provide a much needed boost to the small engineering sector over the next three years. The 1,000 applications so far received indicate that we shall achieve our objective of accelerating the acquisition by small firms of technologically advanced and more highly productive equipment. In view of the overwhelming response a further £10 million is being made available over the life of the scheme, by adjusting the Department's industrial support priorities. This raises the total allocation for the scheme to £30 million.As I have made clear throughout, applications are being treated on a first-come first-served basis. With such a substantial early response, even the increased allocation will shortly be committed. However, all eligible applications received by 5 pm on 28 May 1982 should receive an offer of assistance in due course. The scheme will then be closed for applications.

Private Steel Manufacturers (Public Contracts)

asked the Secretary of State for Industry what is the policy of Her Majesty's Government towards awarding public purchasing contracts for steel to private steel manufacturers.

[pursuant to his reply, 24 May 1982, c. 232]: Government policy is that public procurement should be used wherever possible to improve industrial competitiveness in both the public and private sectors. Contracts are awarded on the basis of best value for money, as explained in the third report from the Committee of Public Accounts—Session 1981–82—and this is applicable to private steel manufacturers as to other suppliers.

Home Department

Live Animal Experiments

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department when he expects to publish the statistics of experiments on live animals for 1981.

Publication is not expected before the end of the summer, but will be as soon as practicable.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if, now the full text of the draft Council of Europe convention for the protection of vertebrate animals used for experimental and other scientific purposes has been finalised, he will bring forward legislation to replace the Cruelty to Animals Act 1876.

Although agreement has now been reached by the ad hoc committee of experts on a substantial part of the draft convention, some matters remain to be settled and the complete draft will then have to be adopted by the Committee of Ministers. It is still too soon to say when it will be possible for the Government to bring forward proposals for legislation.

Metropolitan Police

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many persons employed in the Metropolitan Police have incomes in excess of that paid to hon. Members.

Information about total incomes is not available. Five hundred and sixty-five persons in the Metropolitan Police are on salary scales of which the minima exceed the salary of an hon. Member. In addition 134 are on salary scales which straddle the salary of an hon. Member.

Irish Citizens (Voting Rights)

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether he will bring forward legislative proposals to ensure that citizens of the Republic of Ireland shall no longer enjoy the right to stand and vote in United Kingdom elections; and if he will make a statement.

My right hon. Friend has no plans to do so. The rights accorded to citizens of the Republic of Ireland resident in the United Kingdom reflect the close historical relationship between the two countries.

Copyright (Prosecutions)

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many prosecutions have been undertaken under section 21(1) of the Copyright Act 1956 in 1979, 1980, 1981 and 1982 to the most recent practicable date; and what was the average fine imposed.

Prime Minister

Engagements

Q5.

asked the Prime Minister if she will list her official engagements for Tuesday 25 May.

Q6.

asked the Prime Minister if she will list her official engagements for 25 May.

Q7.

asked the Prime Minister if she will list her official engagements for Tuesday 25 May.

Q8.

asked the Prime Minister if she will list her official engagements for Tuesday 25 May.

Q9.

asked the Prime Minister if she will list her official engagements for Tuesday 25 May.

Q10.

asked the Prime Minister if she will list her official engagements for 25 May.

Q11.

asked the Prime Minister if she will list her official engagements for 25 May.

Q12.

asked the Prime Minister if she will list her official engagements for Tuesday 25 May.

Q13.

asked the Prime Minister if she will list her official engagements for Tuesday 25 May.

Q14.

asked the Prime Minister if she will list her official engagements for 25 May.

Q15.

asked the Prime Minister if she will list her official engagements for Tuesday 25 May.

Q16.

asked the Prime Minister if she will list her official engagements for Tuesday 25 May.

Q17.

asked the Prime Minister if she will list her official engagements for 25 May.

Q18.

asked the Prime Minister if she will list her official engagements for 25 May.

Q19.

asked the Prime Minister if she will list her official engagements for Tuesday 25 May.

Q20.

asked the Prime Minister whether she will list her official engagements for 25 May.

Q21.

asked the Prime Minister if she will list her official engagements for 25 May.

Q22.

asked the Prime Minister if she will list her official engagements for Tuesday 25 May.

Q23.

asked the Prime Minister if she will list her official engagements for 25 May.

Q24.

asked the Prime Minister if she will list her official engagements for 25 May.

Q25.

asked the Prime Minister if she will list her official engagements for 25 May.

Q26.

asked the Prime Minister if she will list her official engagements for 25 May.

Q27.

asked the Prime Minister if she will list her official engagements for Tuesday 25 May.

Q28.

asked the Prime Minister if she will list her official engagements for Tuesday 25 May.

Q29.

asked the Prime Minister if she will list her official engagements for Tuesday 25 May.

Q30.

asked the Prime Minister if she will list her official engagements for 25 May.

Q31.

asked the Prime Minister if she will list her official engagements for Tuesday 25 May.

Q32.

asked the Prime Minister what are her official engagements for 25 May.

Q33.

asked the Prime Minister if she will list her official engagements for Tuesday 25 May.

Q34.

asked the Prime Minister if she will list her official engagements for 25 May.

Q35.

asked the Prime Minister if she will list her official engagements for Tuesday 25 May.

Q36.

asked the Prime Minister if she will list her official engagements for Tuesday 25 May.

Q37.

asked the Prime Minister if she will list her official engagements for Tuesday 25 May.

Q38.

asked the Prime Minister if she will list her official engagements for Tuesday 25 May.

Q39.

asked the Prime Minister what are her official engagements for 25 May.

Q40.

asked the Prime Minister if she will list her official engagements for Tuesday 25 May.

Q41.

asked the Prime Minister if she will list her official engagements for 25 May.

Q42.

asked the Prime Minister if she will list her official engagements for Tuesday 25 May.

Q43.

asked the Prime Minister if she will list her official engagements for Tuesday 25 May.

Q44.

asked the Prime Minister if she will list her official engagements for Tuesday 25 May.

Q45.

asked the Prime Minister if she will list her official engagements for Tuesday 25 May.

Q47.

asked the Prime Minister if she will list her official engagements for 25 May.

Q49.

asked the Prime Minister if she will list her official engagements for Tuesday 25 May.

Q50.

asked the Prime Minister if she will list her official engagements for 25 May.

Q52.

asked the Prime Minister if she will list her official engagements for 25 May.

Q53.

asked the Prime Minister if she will list her official engagements for Tuesday 25 May.

asked the Prime Minister whether she will list her official engagements for 25 May.

This morning I presided at a meeting of the Cabinet and had meetings with ministerial colleagues and others. In addition to my duties in the House I shall be having further meetings later today, including one with the Australian Foreign Minister.

European Community (Reform)

Q46.

asked the Prime Minister, if she is satisfied with the progress made by Her Majesty's Government in achieving reforms in the structure of the European Economic Community; and if she will make a statement.

Early this morning my right hon. Friend reached agreement with the other Community Foreign Ministers on a rebate of Britain's budget contribution in respect of 1982. Decisions on longer-term arrangements are to be taken by the end of November this year.

Turriff (East Aberdeenshire)

Q48.

asked the Prime Minister if she will make an official visit to Turriff in the East Aberdeenshire constituency.

Southampton

Q51.

asked the Prime Minister if she will make an official visit to the city and port of Southampton.

Energy

Power Stations (Closures)

asked the Secretary of State for Energy how many power stations closed in 1979, 1980 and 1981 or scheduled for closure in 1982 are situated either in or close to urban centres; and if he will assess how many would be suitable for combined heat and power schemes.

National Finance

Building Societies

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer what is his policy, from the point of view of the control of credit, towards any scheme by building societies to give loans to elderly people on the security of their homes for their life time with the interest rolled-up.

If building societies have specific proposals we would be quite prepared to consider them.

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer what was the total number of building society directors as at 1 January 1982; how many of these were originally co-opted by the boards of directors concerned; and how many were nominated by the membership at large.

There are probably between 1,500 and 2,000 building society directors. The exact number and the answers to the second and third parts of the question are not readily available.

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer if he will take steps to require the Chief Registrar of Friendly Societies to monitor the conduct of elections in building societies.

The Chief Registrar has a statutory function in respect of the election of directors to a building society if, and only if, a dispute arises which is referred to him for arbitration. He has neither the locus nor the staff to monitor elections more generally.The responsibility for conduct of elections rests with the directors of societies. As my right hon. and learned Friend the Chancellor of the Exchequer said in his speech on 18 May to the Building Societies Association, it should make arrangements to ensure that the conduct of the election is not only fair but is manifestly seen to be fair.

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer whether he will take steps to investigate the use of proxy forms in building society elections.

The present use of proxy forms in elections is a matter for the rules of the society. As my right hon. and learned Friend the Chancellor of the Exchequer said in his speech to the Building Societies Association on 18 May, it is important that the boards of societies should make arrangements to ensure that the conduct of elections is not only fair but is manifestly seen to be fair.I hope that societies will heed this advice. If, when the time next comes for building society legislation, the way in which proxy forms are used is still a cause for concern, it would be for consideration whether to include provisions regulating the use of proxies.

Oil Recovery

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer whether he has assessed the effect of the tax changes in the Finance Bill upon the recovery of oil by secondary recovery methods.

In nearly all North Sea oilfields currently under development, secondary recovery methods—such as gas or water injection—are used from the outset. This is something of which we took full account when we examined the likely effect on both present and likely future developments of this year's Finance Bill changes to oil taxation. Our conclusion was that, under our proposals, the general level of return on investment should continue to make further development of the North Sea worth while.In addition, a specific benefit of the abolition of SPD and the introduction of APRT is that the post-tax return to additional expenditure on a field after the initial development—including expenditure on both additional secondary recovery and tertiary recovery—will be improved.

Corporate Bodies (Building Society Advances)

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer how many advances to bodies corporate made by building societies in the last three years have gone to enterprises that have subsequently become insolvent or bankrupt.

I am afraid that the answer to the hon. Member's question could be obtained only at a totally disproportionate cost.

Development Land Tax

asked the Chancellor of the Exchquer how much revenue was raised by the development land tax in each of its years of operation.

The information is as follows:

£ million
YearDevelopment Land TaxNet of tax benefit to local authorities
1976–7714
1977–7877
1978–79138
Full time equivalents.*
At 1 January
197719781979198019811982
Non-industrials569,852567,015566,059548,421542,790532,805
Industrials176,309170,969167,117159,199152,280142,619
Total746,161737,984733,176707,620695,070675,424

Source: Quarterly Staff Return.

* Part time staff counted as half units.

Entrant and leaver figures for industrial staff are not held centrally; numbers for the non-industrial Home Civil Service are:

1977

1978

1979

1980

1981

Entrants (rounded)57,50064,90048,70048,60032,200
Leavers by cause
Age retirement16,54512,82712,67515,47815,226
Voluntary resignation37,64048,20149,40533,89122,905
Voluntary early retirement1910612130
Redundancy637483137244734
Premature Retirement3,0242,9262,6902,5472,822
Dismissal687655576613516
Other2,5562,5492,5742,2432,118
Total (rounded)61,10067,70068,10055,60044,500

Source: PRISM, Central Records.

It is known, however, that there were over 2,300 redundancies amongst industrial civil servants in 1981.

The annual changes shown in the two tables differ because of differences in their coverage and in the counting of part-time staff.

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer how many civil servants are in receipt of salaries in excess of that paid to hon. Members.

About 20,500 non-industrial civil servants at present receive salaries greater than £13,950 per annum, which is the current basic pay of hon. Members.

Year

Development Land Tax

Net of tax benefit to local authorities

1979–802713
1980–812710
1981–82392

Civil Servants

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer if he will give for each of the last five years the total number of industrial and non-industrial civil servants at the beginning of each year; and, during the year, if he will List (a) the number who left the service on reaching retirement age, (b) the number who voluntarily left the service before reaching retirement age, (c) the number who were made involuntarily redundant, (d) the number who were dismissed and (e) the number who entered the service

Nationalised Industries

Lewis asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer if, taking into account the practice of increasing the salaries of the chairman and board members of nationalised industries and certain publicly owned bodies such as British Leyland and Rolls-Royce, in line with those agreed for top civil servants and judges, he wall estimate the total increase in public expenditure and its effect on inflation as measured by the retail price index.

As my right hon. Friend the Prime Minister told the House on 7 July 1980, nationalised industry board members have been removed from the TSRB's remit. Their salaries are thus no longer determined in the same way as those of senior civil servants or judges. The Government have not yet taken decisions about pay increases for them this year.The cost of the increases for the judiciary, senior civil servants and senior officers of the Armed Forces announced by the Prime Minister on 12 May will be contained within existing cash limits except in the case of those judges whose salaries are paid directly from the consolidated fund. The effect on public expenditure will therefore be minimal.

NameAddressYear of birthBusiness occupation and other director-ships
E. W. Argent, FCA, FCBSINew House, Whiston, Northampton1923Building Society Director
Building Societies Training College Ltd.
Fanhams Hall Services (Ware) Ltd.
CBSI Ltd.
J. B. Corrin, FCATynwald, Sandy Lane, Church Brampton, Northampton1922Chartered Accountant
F. CravenMisterton Hall, Lutterworth, Leicestershire1910Building Consultant Craven Builders Ltd.
Belvoir Property Company Ltd.
Advance Property Company Ltd.
G. D. Dean, MA, FCAMarch House, Littleworth Avenue, Esher, Surrey1937Chartered Accountant Electra Risk Capital PLC
R. Duncombe, VRDWestways, Barton Road, Market Bosworth, Nuneaton, Warwickshire1925Company Director Ferry Pickering Group PLC
A. Pickering, JP14D Lillington Avenue, Leamington Spa, Warwickshire1917Building Society Director Sparkenhoe Properties Ltd.
I. Pickering, AFC, AE, FGS, FSAThe Outwoods, Hinckley, Leicestershire1915Master Printer H. Cave & Company Ltd.
J. A. Porter, MA, FRICS, JPLeaders, Hodsoll Street, Above Wrotham, Kent1916Chartered Surveyor Gravesend & District Real Estate Co. Ltd.
Gravesend & Dartford Reporter Ltd.
Westwood Educational Trust Ltd.
B. SykesNeedles Reach, Marine Drive East, New Milton, Hampshire1920Company Director (Retired)
P. W. Wilkinson, MC, FCA, ACBSIThe Malt House, East Haddon, Northampton1922Building Society Executive W. Wilkinson Ltd.
No change in the membership for the board has been notified to the registry following the annual general meeting on 20 April 1982.

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer whether he has completed his investigations into the special corporate advance by Anglia building society to Thornton Baker Nominees; and whether he will make a statement.

Inquiries have been made by the Chief Registrar of Friendly Societies and I have written to the hon. Member in reply to his letter on this matter.

Industrial Production

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer if he will publish in the Official Report for each year from 1945 to 1981 the proportion of both industrial production and manufacturing output which was undertaken by (a) private United Kingdom firms, (b) private non-United Kingdom firms, (c) nationalised industries and (d) other State-owned firms.

I regret the information requested is not available. The index of industrial production and the supporting statistics upon which it is based are classified according to activity, not ownership. Where there is a direct correspondence between activity and ownership, it would be possible to classify output in the form requested.

Anglia Building Society

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer if he will list the names, ages, and occupations of the directors of the Anglia building society as at 21 April.

The annual return from the Anglia building society gave the following information about the members of the board on 31 December 1981:No such correspondence exists, however, for the major part of industry and so a comprehensive disaggregation is thus not possible.

Public Sector Borrowing Requirement

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer if, pursuant to the answer on 13 May 1982 to the right hon. Member for Heywood and Royton, Official Report, c. 936, concerning the public sector borrowing requirement, he will now make a statement on the investigations into the reasons why the monitoring of public expenditure did not disclose so large a change in such a short time.

[pursuant to his reply, 24 May 1982, c. 225.]: The main areas of shortfall were in the central Government borrowing requirement and in local authorities market and overseas borrowing. In the case of the central government, the effect of the Civil Service dispute on the figures for revenue and expenditure made the information available in February much more difficult than usual to interpret. The Budget forecast outturn of local authorities' borrowing took account of a survey carried out in January in which local authorities were asked to predict their borrowing in the final quarter of the financial year; the results proved to be a considerable overstatement.

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer whether the public sector borrowing requirement forecast for 1982–83 assumed that the contingency reserve in his public expenditure plans would be spent; whether his latest information indicates there will be a further substantial shortfall similar to that in 1981–82; if so, whether he is proposing to take action to prevent such a shortfall; and if he will make a statement.

[pursuant to his reply, 24 May 1982, c. 225]: The PSBR forecast for 1982–83 at the time of the Budget did assume that the contingency reserve would be fully spent. It is too soon yet to say whether this will prove to be correct. It is not, and never has been, an object of Government policy to spend the reserve, which is a control on fresh decisions to incur expenditure that cannot be accommodated within existing programmes. Until more is known about the reasons for the PSBR shortfall in 1981–82 it is not possible to assess the consequences for 1982–83.

Wales

Gipsies (Caravan Sites)

asked the Secretary of State for Wales if he will list the authorised sites for gipsy caravans in each county in the Principality as at January 1980, January 1981 and January 1982.

The information is as follows:

Authorised Sites for Gipsy Caravans
CountyDistrictSite
As at January 1980
Clwyd*DelynGwespyr Dee Banks, Bagillt
DyfedLlanelliMorfa
PreseliWithybush
PreseliUnder-the-Hills
South PembrokeshireKingswood Common
*CarmarthenWestover Caravan Park, Whitland
GwentBlaneau GwentCwmcrachen
TorfaenPontypool
Mid Glamorgan*Rhymney ValleyPandy Road, Bedwas
South GlamorganCardiffRover Way
* CardiffShirenewton Farm Wentloog
As at January 1981 (in addition to those listed above)
GwyneddArfonLlandegai
South GlamorganCardiffLamby Way (temporary)
As at January 1982 (in addition to all those listed above)
DyfedSouth PembrokeshireCatshole Quarry (being developed progressively, not yet fully operative)
Mid GlamorganMerthyrGlyn Mil
PowysMontgomeryWelshpool
West GlamorganSwanseaMorriston (temporary)
* These sites are privately owned. The remainder are local authority owned.

Committee For Wales

asked the Secretary of State for Wales whether he has proposals to maintain and develop the work of the Committee for Wales of the Schools Council; and if he will make a statement.

My right hon. Friend, the Secretary of State for Education and Science, announced to the House on 22 April the Government's proposals for the future of the Schools Council for Curriculum and Examinations. The proposals are being discussed today with the local authority associations who, with the Government, jointly finance the Schools Council. Curriculum development needs in Wales will be borne in mind during these and subsequent discussions.

Overseas Development

Joint Funding Scheme

asked the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what allocations have been made through the joint funding scheme for 1982–83; which voluntary organisations have been allocated grants and for what purposes; and which voluntary organisations have been allocated grants under joint funding for population and family planning programmes.

The sum of £2,270,000 has been allocated for joint funding purposes in 1982–83. This is made up as follows:

£
OXFAM1,200,000
Christian Aid310,000
Catholic Fund for Overseas Development (CAFOD)100,000
Save the Children Fund310,000
Other Agencies350,000
The grants to OXFAM, Christian Aid, CAFOD and SCF are allocations to be spent on agreed development projects put forward for support in the course of the year.Grants so far allocated to other agencies are as follows:

£
Action AidProvision of school furniture—Gambia12,495
School building project—Gambia30,757
Well digging—Gambia36,422
Amazon TrustHealth project—Peru48,000
British Red Cross SocietyPolyclinic—Algeria25,000
Dominica Overseas Nationals AssociationHospital Laundry-Dominica8,000
Friends of PeruCommunity Health Centre—Peru7,100
Population ServicesFamily Planning—Philippines44,528
InternationalMCH/FP Information and Education—Haiti8,728
Ayurvedic practitioners FP programme—Sri Lanka42,817
Royal Commonwealth Society for the BlindOpthalmic Institute and Training Complex—Bangladesh25,000
RURCONInternational Rural Development Seminar—Sierra Leone7,000
Tear FundLand Settlement Programme—Paraguay16,573
Population programmes are being funded through Population Services International, as described above. fn addition, a payment of £12,823 has been made from the 1982–83 allocation for CAFOD in support of a family planning workship in Mauritius and we expect to make contributions, through OXFAM, for family planning projects in Bangladesh (£1,256) and Pakistan (£3,175).

European Development Fund

asked the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what projects on population and family planning programmes and on rural health schemes have been funded through the European development fund in each of the past two years; and what proportion such amounts represent of total spending by the European development fund in each of those years.

As far as I am aware no projects have been approved for population control or family planning, but commitments to the new rural health projects listed as follows were worth 3,251,000 ECUs (£1·146 million) in 1980 and 10,935,000 ECUs (£6·02 million) in 1981. These represented respectively 0·8 per cent. and 1·6 per cent. of EDF commitments in those years to the ACP countries. I shall ask the Commission to amplify this and will write to the hon. Member.

List of projects approvedMn ECU
1980
Mauritania—Technical assistance for health services0·4
Equatorial Guinea—Medical supplies and hospital rehabilitation1·0
St. Lucia—Health aspects of Roseau Agricultural Resettlement and Diversification project0·031
Senegal—Construction of nurses training school1·35
Congo—Supplementary financing for Nkayi Hospital0·47
1981
Senegal—Supplementary financing for nurses training school1·995
St. Vincent and the Grenadines—Hospital and health centre improvement2·0
Mauritius—Medical supplies1·7
Zambia—Health centres supplementary financing2·0
Mali—Nioro region primary health care2·57
Mauritania—National health infrastructure0·67

Employment

Wages And Salaries

asked the Secretary of State for Employment whether he will publish in the Official Report as much detailed information as may be readily available, showing for the longest period of time the percentage increases in the salaries on an annual or cumulative basis of all stated public servants, including civil servants, industrial and clerical, judges, health workers, nurses, doctors, dentists, teachers, railway workers, police, firemen, military Service men and hon. Members, taking into account and including latest proposals and awards.

I am informed by the Departments concerned that settlements, including where relevant comparability awards, for the public service groups listed, for this and the two previous pay rounds, led to the average increases in salaries shown in the following table. The four pay increases for teachers in 1979–80 resulted from a comparability award and a separate arbitration award, both of which were staged. Information about the pay of railway workers is a matter for the British Railways Board.

1979–801980–811981–82
Non Industrial Civil Service18·75 per cent.7·5 per cent.5·9 per cent.
Industrial Civil Service16·9 per cent.7·5 per cent.No offer yet made
Judges(Including the deferred third stage of the 1978 increase updated in April 1979) 23·5 per cent.7·0 per cent.18·6 per cent.
NHS Ancillary workers25·0 per cent.7·8 per cent.On offer 4 per cent.
Nurses25·4 per cent.6·0 per cent.On offer 6·4 per cent.
Doctors and Dentists(Includes 10·7 per cent, from the 1978 award) 31·4 per cent.6·0 per cent.Announced 6·0 per cent.
Teachers—Primary and Secondary—England and Wales9 per cent. +12 per cent. +9 per cent. +2·5 per cent.7·5 per cent.Arbitration award awaited. 3·4 per cent, on offer
Police13·5 per cent.21·3 percent.13·2 percent.
Firemen(Including the third stage of the 1978 agreement) 20·45 per cent.18·8 per cent.10·1 per cent.
Servicemen MPs16·8 per cent. (Including the second stage of the TSRB's recommendation for June 1979) 24·30 per cent.10·3 per cent. (Including the third stage of the TSRB's recommendation for June 1979) 18·7 per cent.6·1 per cent. (Current Government proposal) 4·0 per cent.

Manpower Services Commission

asked the Secretary of State for Employment if he will publish the names, occupations and addresses of the members of the area boards and the Manpower Services Commission.

The following are the members of the Manpower Services Commission

  • F. A. Baker CBE, K. Graham OBE, W. H. Keys: appointed after consultation with organisations representing employees.
  • Miss S. I. L. Elkin OBE, T. P. Lyons, O. G. Stradling: appointed after consultation with organisations representing employers.
  • Cllr. Miss E. Carnegy, Cur R. Thwaites: appointed after consultation with local authority organisations.
  • R. L. Helmore CBE: Appointed after consultation with organisations representing educational interests.
  • I will write to my hon. Friend giving him information concerning area boards.

Manchester

asked the Secretary of State for Employment what is the percentage unemployment rate in the construction industry in Manchester; and how many craftsmen in each of the respective trades are unemployed.

At August 1981, the latest date for which an industrial analysis is available, the rate of unemployment in the construction industry in the Manchester travel-to-work area was 29·4 per cent. A further industrial analysis of the unemployed was made on 13 May 1982 and the results will be available in early June.The following table gives for October 1981, the last date for which an analysis was made, the numbers of unemployed people registered at employment offices in the Manchester travel-to-work area for employment in skilled construction occupations.

Carpenters and Joiners601
Electricians285
Linesmen and cable jointers4
Heating and ventilating engineering fitters40
Plumbers and pipe fitters421
Scaffolders (metal scaffolding)125
Other steel erectors and riggers and cable splicers144
Painters and decorators674
Bricklayers and stone setters536
Plasterers229
Terrazzo workers and tile setters24
Roofers139
Glaziers36
General builders49
Pipe layers and jointers76
Concreters18
Earth movers and civil engineering equipment operators110
Crane, hoist and other materials handling equipment operators116
Total3,627

Unemployment Statistics

asked the Secretary of State for Employment if he will publish in the Official Report for each year for the period 1945 to 1981 total unemployment in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development countries; what percentage of the working population each figure represents; and if he will indicate any adjustments required because of new members to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development.

The available information published by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development gives a total unemployment rate for 15 OECD countries for each year since 1965.

Unemployment in fifteen OECD countries as per cent, of total labour force
Year
19652·6
19662·5
19672·8
19682·8
19692·6
19703·0
19713·5
19723·6
19733·2
19743·5
19755·1
19765·2
19775·3
19785·1
19795·1
19805·8
19816·8

Note:

The fifteen OECD countries are United States, Japan, Germany, France, United Kingdom, Italy, Canada, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Finland, Netherlands, Norway, Spain and Sweden.

These countries represented, in 1980, about 85 per cent. of unemployment in all OECD countries.

In 1981, it is estimated that there was an average of 25 million unemployed in all OECD countries.

asked the Secretary of State for Employment what is the latest figure for whole-time unemployment in Eastleigh; and how the percentage rate compares with the figures for Hampshire, the South-East of England and the United Kingdom, respectively.

The following is the provisional information at 13 May:

Number registered as unemployedPercentage rate of unemployment
Eastleigh employment office area1,791*8·5
Hampshire53,6349·3
South-East region685,8579·1
United Kingdom2,969,44312·4
* The rate relates to the Southampton travel-to-work area which comprises the Southampton, Eastleigh, Hythe, Romsey and Winchester employment office areas. Rates are not calculated for the constituent parts of travel-to-work areas.

asked the Secretary of State for Employment if he will give for the latest available date the number of registered disabled people who are unemployed; and what percentage of total registered unemployed disabled people this represents for the following categories (a) blind, (b) totally or severely deaf, (c) epileptic, (d) mentally handicapped and (e) mentally ill.

At 8 April 1982, the latest available date, the total number of registered disabled people unemployed was 76,939. The information requested for the specific categories of disabled people is:

Registered disabled people unemployedPer cent, of total registered disabled people unemployed
(a) Blind9291·2
(b) Totally or severely deaf1,8722·4
(c) Epileptic5,1826·7
(d) Mentally handicapped3,6474·7
(e) Mentally ill5,0706·6

asked the Secretary of State for Employment if he will publish at the latest available dale the numbers of and percentages of unemployed registered disabled people and the unemployed among the total United Kingdom work force who have been unemployed (a) up to two weeks, (b) over two weeks and up to four weeks, (c) over four weeks and up to six weeks, (d) over six weeks and up to eight weeks, (e) over eight weeks and up to 13 weeks, (f)over 13 weeks and up to 26 weeks, (g) over 26 weeks and up to 52 weeks and (h) over 52 weeks.

I refer the right hon. Member to my reply of 7 December 1981—[Vol. 14, c. 253–4]—which gave the latest available figures.

asked the Secretary of State for Employment if he will give for the latest available date the number of registered disabled people, the number of those unemployed and the percentage of the total that represents.

At 19 April 1982, the latest date for which such information is available, there were 447,259 registered disabled people. The number of those unemployed at 8 April 1982 was 76,939, representing 17·2 per cent. of the total.

asked the Secretary of State for Employment if he will list the number and percentage of registered and unregistered disabled people unemployed in each of the last 12 months for which figures are available.

The numbers and percentages of registered disabled people unemployed and the numbers of unregistered disabled people unemployed are shown below. It is not possible to calculate the percentage of unregistered disabled people unemployed.

Wolverhampton employment office area
MalesFemales
Duration in weeksUnder 2525–5455 and overAll agesUnder 2525–5455 and overAll ages
2 or less1571413933794405139
Over 2 and up to 4 weeks16317237372120578185
Over 4 and up to 8 weeks3214231108542351517393
Over 8 and up to 13 weeks3354268985027314510428
Over 13 and up to 26 weeks6868212541,76139929635730
Over 26 and up to 52 weeks1,1631,2945272,984774500561,330
Over 52 and up to 104 weeks1,1102,1257964,031491429911,011
Over 104 and up to 156 weeks2606221851,06711714928294
Over 156 weeks785132218124614938233
Total4,2736,5372,25813,0682,5491,9162784,743
West Midlands region
MalesFemales
Duration in weeksUnder 2525–5455 and overAll agesUnder 2525–5455 and overAll ages
2 or less3,9553,2318898,0752,8841,3821284,394
Over 2 and up to 4 weeks3,1474,0601,1318,3382,1731,7641334,070
Over 4 and up to 8 weeks5,6927,5592,09715,3484,1483,2662607,674
Over 8 and up to 13 weeks6,4408,4572,43117,3284,5863,7683208,674
Over 13 and up to 26 weeks12,39319,2687,09838,7598,6307,37883816,846
Over 26 and up to 52 weeks18,82927,68212,42258,93313,03710,9871,48025,504
Over 52 and up to 104 weeks18,28939,40915,59273,2908,0999,4001,79319,292
Over 104 and up to 156 weeks4,07510,2133,36217,6501,8782,4045214,803
Over 156 weeks1,1027,9854,57313,6607942,1358253,754
Total73,922127,86449,595251,38146,22942,4846,29895,011

Closed Shop (Gennard Report)

asked the Secretary of State for Employment if he will now publish the Gennard report on the closed shop; and if he will make a statement.

Professor Gennard's research is not yet, in his view, complete or in publishable form. When it is it will be published by its authors.

Registered Disabled People Unemployed

Unregistered Disabled People Unemployed

Numbers

Percentage of total disabled people on register

Numbers

April 198276,93917·2118,470
March 198276,68816·7117,035
February 198276,80816·7116,838
January 198276,90616·7116,758
December 198176,29916·6114,892
November 198176,95516·7115,577
October 198177,05616·7114,491
September 198175,69716·4114,026
August 198175,52116·4112,441
July 198173,10515·9107,901
June 198172,74215·8106,986
May 198172,35715·7103,793

asked the Secretary of State for Employment what are the unemployment figures for (a) Wolverhampton and (b) the West Midlands categorised by sex, age and the duration of unemployment for the last month for which figures are available.

Asbestos

asked the Secretary of State for Employment if he is satisfied with the manner and degree to which the recommendations of the advisory committee on asbestos have been carried out.

I am generally satisfied with the progress that has been made so far. However, the implementation of some of the recommendations of the advisory committee on asbestos has been largely overtaken by the proposals set out in two draft European Council directives on asbestos, which are currently under negotiation. The Government broadly support these directives, which are in many respects consistent with our policy on asbestos, which is itself largely based on the recommendations of the advisory committee.

Ethylene Oxide

asked the Secretary of State for Employment if he intends to introduce stricter safety standards regarding exposure to ethylene oxide in working conditions; and if he will study the work of the United States of America Occupational Safety and Health Administration on exposure to ethylene oxide.

The Health and Safety Commission's advisory committee on toxic substances has recently reviewed the relevant data on ethylene oxide and has recommended the establishment of a stricter control limit for exposure to ethylene oxide vapour of 5 parts per million in air, 8-hour time-weighted average. This represents a 10-fold improvement over the currently published advice. The recommendation is to be considered by the Health and Safety Commission shortly.

Placings of registered and unregistered disabled people (and percentage comparisons with the previous year)
Registered per cent.Unregistered per cent.Total per cent.
1981
May2,026 (-16·2)1,623 (-20·5)3,649 (-18·2)
June1,912 (-32·2)1,269 (-43·9)3,181 (-37·4)
July1,617 (-13·9)1,201 (-23·7)2,818 (-18·4)
August1,691 (-7·0)1,378 (-15·1)3,069 (-10·8)
September1,590 (+7·8)1,150 (-11·0)2,740 (-1·0)
October1,662 (-1·1)1,231 (-7·2)2,893 (-2·6)
November1,932 (+9·2)1,579 (+2·3)3,511 (+5·9)
December1,543 (+12·1)1,363 (+15·8)2,906 (+13·8)
1982
January1,175 (+7·4)910 (+4·6)2,085 (+6·2)
February1,567 (+11·8)1,221 (+7·1)2,788 (+9·7)
March1,519 (-1·4)1,279 (-0·8)2,798 (-1·1)
April1,917 ( +15·1)1,440 (+5·4)3,357(+10·7)

asked the Secretary of State for Employment what was the number and percentage increase over the last year for (a) registered disabled people, (b) unregistered disabled people and (c) the total United Kingdom work force.

The number of people registered as disabled under the Disabled Persons (Employment) Act 1944 in Great Britain decreased by 12,919 (2·8 per cent.), from 460,178 to 447,259 during the 12 months ended April 1982, the latest date available. There is no comparable information available in respect of unregistered disabled people. The total United Kingdom work force decreased by 291,000 (1·1 per cent.) from 26,263,000 to 25,972,000 during the 12 months ended December 1981, the latest date available.

Job Release Scheme

asked the Secretary of State for Employment if he will publish in the Official Report any exceptions to a person who is compulsorily retired at the age of 63 years being able to take advantage of the job release scheme.

The Health and Safety Commission is not aware of any work on exposure to ethylene oxide published by i he United States Occupational Safety and Health Administration, although it is aware of a publication of 22 May 1981 by the United States National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. I understand that the conclusions of that document are in general accordance with those of the advisory committee on toxic substances, although no specific limit on exposure was recommended by NIOSH.

Disabled Persons

asked the Secretary of State for Employment how many registered and unregistered disabled people have been placed in employment by disablement resettlement officers for each of the last 12 months and the latest available date; and what was the percentage increase in placements over the previous year.

The job release scheme specifically excludes applications from those who are, or who are within six months of being, compulsorily retired.

Sheltered Workshops

asked the Secretary of State for Employment how many people were employed in sheltered workshops at the latest date for which figures are available.

The latest available figures are those given in my reply to the right hon. Member on 4 December—[Vol. 14, c. 258]. More up-to-date figures—in respect of the year ending 31 March 1982—are expected to be available towards the end of August.

Manpower Services Commission (Schemes)

asked the Secretary of State for Employment if he will publish in the Official Report a table giving the total number of persons, including young persons, engaged on Manpower Services Commission schemes in (a) the Wolverhampton area and (b) the West Midlands, together with a breakdown showing the number of schemes and the number of persons engaged in each category of scheme, including youth opportunities programmes, community enterprise programmes and training opportunities programmes.

The information is not available in the exact form requested. The schemes run by the

Table A: Wolverhampton Area
MSC SchemeNearest equivalent to Wolverhampton area for which figures availableNumber of schemes active as at 24.5.82Number of participants/filled places
Youth Opportunities ProgrammeWolverhampton Local Authority District1,204 Work Experience on Employers Premises schemes 16 Community Projects 1 Training WorkshopDuring the period 1.4.81 to 31.3.82 approximately 5,800 young people entered schemes
In April 1982 approximately 330 young people entered schemes
Community Enterprise ProgrammeMSC Special Programmes Division's Wolverhampton Area Office (includes Walsall, Dudley, Sandwell and Wolverhampton)6At the end of March 1982 there were 810 filled places on schemes.
Training Opportunities ProgrammeMSC's Training Services Division Wolverhampton area including Wolverhampton, Bilston, Willenhall, etc.Not availableOn 19 May 1982 there were 132 people participating in courses: 27 based at employers' establishments and 105 at colleges of further education
Table B: West Midlands
MSC SchemeNearest equivalent to West Midlands area for which figures availableNumber of participants/filled places
i) Youth Opportunities ProgrammeMSC Special Programmes Division West Midlands Planning Region, which includes: Warwickshire, Hereford, Worcester, Shropshire, Staffordshire and West Midlands Metropolitan District, including Dudley, Wolverhampton Walsall, Sandwell, Solihull, Birmingham and CoventryDuring the period 1.4.81 to 31.3.82 some 67,100 young people entered schemes In April 1982 approximately 4,800 young people entered schemes
ii) Community Enterprise ProgrammeAs above, plus Northamptonshire CountyAt the end of March 1982, there were 2,290 filled places on schemes.

Manpower Services Commission are administered on different geographical areas. The following tables give details of MSC schemes broken down into areas coinciding as closely as possible with the areas requested. Information on the numbers of schemes in the West Midlands is not available, except at disproportionate cost.

MSC Scheme

Nearest equivalent to West Midlands area for which figures available

Number of participants/filled places

iii) Training Opportunities ProgrammeMSC Training Services Division West Midlands Region. As for (i) above.At the end of March 1982, there were approximately 2,800 participants, of whom some 1,530 were non-skillcentre-based, and approximately 1,270 were skillcentre-based

Health And Safety Commission

asked the Secretary of State for Employment if he will make a statement on the chairmanship of the Health and Safety Commission.

I have announced today that I am to reappoint Mr. William Simpson as chairman of the commission for a further year beyond his present appointment which is due to end on 30 September 1982.

Foreign And Commonwealth Affairs

North Atlantic Treaty Organisation

38.

asked the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what was the United Kingdom's contribution to the budget of the North Atlantic Treaty Organisation information service in each of the past six years.

The United Kingdom's contribution to the NATO information service in each of the last six years was:

Belgian Francs
197612,675,000
197713,416,000
197814,209,650
197915,054,000
198015,301,420
198116,380,000

Seals

asked the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs whether Her Majesty's Government will support the Canadian Government's proposal to the Commission of the European Communities for the reference to independent scientific experts, including the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea, of questions related to the seal population and management and methods of slaughter.

We understand that the Commission is studying the Canadian proposal and that it has meanwhile asked the Nature Conservancy Council for a report on the seal population. We shall consider the merits of the Canadian proposal in the light of that report and of any other independent scientific evidence that becomes available.

Education And Science

Research (Departmental Support)

asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science what support his Department is giving to research into developing alternatives to scientific experimentation on animals.

My Department's responsibilities for the support of scientific research are discharged by the research councils, which receive grants-in-aid from the science budget, and by the universities, which receive block grants for teaching and research from the University Grants Committee. Scientific research does not include the routine testing of cosmetics, pharma ceutical agents and other toxic substances; such testing is not carried out by these bodies.The research councils feel that in general it is not practicable to search for alternatives to the use of live animals in isolation from the individual experiments in which the animals are used. However, council research workers and those supported by council grants lire encouraged in their individual experiments, to use procedures which do not involve animals, and where such use would not give scientifically valid results, to minimise the use of animals. I understand that a similar approach is taken by the universities.

National Heritage Fund

asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science how much money it is planned to expend on the national heritage fund in the next three years.

My right hon. Friend, the Secretary of State for the Environment and I decide the grant to the national heritage memorial fund annually, in the light of circumstances at the time.

Anorexia Nervosa

asked the Secretary of Slate for Education and Science if his Department is sponsoring research projects into anorexia nervosa; and if he will provide details.

The Medical Research Council, which receives a grant-in-aid from my Department's Science Budget, is currently supporting a study at the Institute of Psychiatry into the assessment of the efficacy of family therapy in modifying the long-term prognosis of anorexia nervosa. The council is also funding basic research in the field of psycho-physiology, which may be expected to advance our understanding of this condition.Research relevant to anorexia nervosa is being undertaken at a number of universities and medical schools, using funds from the block grants provided by the University Grants Committee for teaching and research. Many of these research projects are listed in the publication "Research in British Universities, Polytechnics and Colleges", a copy of which is available in the Library.

Open University Fees

asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science what would be the total cost to local education authorities if they were to pay the full cost of Open University fees.

The cost of extending the mandatory award scheme to cover the tuition and summer school fees of undergraduate students of the Open University is estimated to be at least £6 million.

"Further Education In A Multiracial Society"

asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science what is his policy towards the recommendations of the Commission for Racial Equality in its publication "Further Education in a Multiracial Society" with particular regard for the suggestion of introducing special access courses to enable members of the ethnic minorities without examination qualifications to move into higher education; and if he will made a statement.

The Department has encouraged the development of a number of special access courses and has commissioned research to assess their effectiveness.

Education Act 1981

asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science, pursuant to the answer of 20 May to the hon. Member for Ealing, North, if he has yet reached a decision on which bodies are to be invited to attend the conference on the implementation of the Education Act 1981; and if he will make a statement.

Social Services

Inflation And Spending

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services whether he will ensure that, if inflation in the financial year 1982–83 should rise above the present estimate of 9 per cent. or if wage costs rise above 4 per cent., a spending increase of 2 per cent. in real terms is still achieved.

The public expenditure White Paper, Cmnd. 8494, plans provided for growth in the hospital and community health services of over 2 per cent. between estimated expenditure in 1981–82 and planned expenditure in 1982–83. Health authorities were required to provide about 0·2 per cent., or £17 million, of this growth by making better use of existing resources.Growth in services in 1982–83 will be affected by the extent to which health authorities succeed in making efficiency savings in excess of £17 million to meet their contribution towards the cost of pay offers in excess of 4 per cent. that have been made to certain groups of NHS staff, and by whether price inflation is above or below the cash limit provision of 10·3 per cent. for health authority goods and services.There is no reason at this stage to believe that an increase in services of 2 per cent. cannot be achieved.

Special Hardship Allowance

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services how many people over retirement age received special hardship allowance in 1979, 1980 and 1981.

The number of people over minimum pension age who were in receipt of special hardship allowance at 30 September 1979 was 53,740. On 30 September 1980 the number was 53,780. I regret that the number for 30 September 1981 is not yet available.

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services how many people received special hardship allowance in 1979, 1980 and 1981.

On 30 September 1979, 148,020 people were in receipt of special hardship allowance. The provisional figure for 30 September 1980 is 145,360. I regret that the figure for 30 September 1981 is not yet available.

Industrial Death Benefit

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services how many widows received industrial death benefit in 1979, 1980 and 1981.

The number of widows in receipt of industrial death benefit on 31 December was as follows:

YearNumber
197930,882
198030,980
1981*30,364
* Provisional.

Disablement Benefit

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services how many people with less than 10 per cent. disability received disablement benefit in 1979, 1980 and 1981.

During the year ending on 30 September 1979, 125,720 gratuities were paid in respect of assessments of less than 10 per cent. I regret that similar information is not available for 1980 and 1981 and could be obtained only at disproportionate expense.Disablement pensions were in payment in lieu of gratuities, for assessments of less than 10 per cent., as follows:

30 September 19797,460
30 September 19807,530
The corresponding figure for 1981 is not yet available.

Injury Benefit

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services how many people received injury benefit for the maximum period of 26 weeks in 1979, 1980 and 1981, respectively.

I regret that records do not show how many people received injury benefit for 26 weeks. They do, however, show the following numbers of spells of incapacity resulting from industrial injury which lasted 26 weeks.

Year ended 2 June 19793,400
Year ended 31 May 19805,800
The corresponding information for 1981 is not yet available.

Nurses

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services if he will list the current pay for all grades of nurses in the National Health Service showing the net increase effect of the present proposed increase for each grade and the real value of these increases compared with the years 1979, 1980 and 1981.

The following table shows, for the main nursing pay grades, basic pay at the maximum point of the salary scales for the years 1978 to 1981, and the maxima for 1982 which would result from implementation of the current pay offer. In addition, the movements in basic pay since 1978 are shown. Comparable earnings data are not available—the figures below therefore take no account of additional payments, for which most nurses are eligible, for working overtime or at unsocial hours. In 1980–81 nurses' working hours were reduced from 40 to 37½ per week, equivalent to 6·5 per cent. on basic pay. Over this period, April 1978-April 1982, the retail price index increased by 64·3 per cent.

Basic pay at maximum of salary scale, effective from 1 April—£ (Movement over 1978 base of 100)Salary scale after current offer £
Main Grades19781979198019811982
Regional Nursing
Officer—R110,996 (100)12,094 (110)19,000 (173)21,924 (199)22,801 (207)
District Nursing
Officer—D19,370 (100)10,325 (110)15,538 (166)17,928 (191)*
Divisional Nursing
Officer—I7,339 (100)8,115 (111)10,836 (148)12,654 (172)*
Senior Nursing
Officer II5,407 (100)6,013 (111)7,983 (148)8,462 (157)*
Senior Nursing
Officer I5,206 (100)5,794 (111)7,687 (148)8,148 (157)*
Nursing Officer I4,978 (100)5,546 (111)7,350 (148)7,791 (157)*
Nursing Officer II4,825 (100)5,380 (112)7,124 (148)7,551 (156)*
Nursing Sister II
(Ward Sister)4,429 (100)4,949 (112)6,807 (154)7,215 (163)7,676 (173)
Staff Nurse, SRN3,385 (100)3,813 (113)5,119 (151)5,426 (160)5,772 (171)
Enrolled Nurse3,016 (100)3,411 (113)4,561 (151)4,835 (160)5,143 (171)
Nursing Auxiliary2,584 (100)2,915 (113)3,790 (147)4,017 (155)4,274 (165)
Student—3rd year2,356 (100)2,667 (113)3,390 (144)3,593 (153)3,882 (162)
Director of Nurse
Education—I7,786 (100)8,601 (110)11,496 (148)13,425 (172)14,352 (184)
Senior Tutor5,533 (100)6,150 (111)8,170 (148)8,660 (157)9,273 (168)
Tutor5,158 (100)5,742 (111)7,616 (148)8,073 (157)8,663 (168)
Clinical Teacher4,825 (100)5,380 (112)7,124 (148)7,551 (156)8,126 (168)

Notes:

* These grades have now been replaced with new management grades which reflect different responsibilities arising out of the restructuring of the National Health Service.

Figures for 1978 have been included to indicate the size of the pay increases which were paid on 1 April 1979.

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services if, in the negotiations the Minister for Health is proposing to have with both sides of the Whitley council relating to the establishment of a permanent pay formula scheme for nurses, he will consider the possibility of introducing a factor analysis arrangement, as used by the Armed Forces, an indexation arrangement, as used by the police and firemen, or a review body arrangement, as used by doctors and dentists; whether he has made any evaluation of these options; and if he will make a statement.

I should be happy to discuss a wide range of possibilities as part of the discussions which I hope to have with both sides of the Whitley council to explore possible progress on the complex and difficult issue of a permanent arrangement for the pay of nurses and midwives. The Government would be unwilling to see the introduction of index-linking into a further area of public sector pay bargaining, but all other matters are open to discussion without commitment by any party at this stage. I am mainly anxious that discussions within the working party should now get under way without further delay.

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services if he will give the number of full-time nurses of (a) State registered nurse qualification and (b) State enrolled nurse qualification employed in the National Health Service for 1978, 1979, 1980 and 1981.

We do not have any firm figures broken down into the categories of nurses specified more up to date than for the year ended 30 September 1980. The number of nurses and midwives, including agency staff, who were employed full-time in the National Health Service in England for the years ended 30 September 1978, 1979 and 1980 were as follows in the categories specified:

1978*1979*1980
Registered nurses96,98798,73699,683
Enrolled nurses40,01940,30543,973
State certified midwives║12,14712,51812,494
* Numbers of staff in the hospital service are available prior to 1980 but not in the primary health care service. The appropriate whole-time equivalents have therefore been included.
Includes health visitor students and nurses undertaking post registration training.
Includes nurses undertaking post-enrolment training for 1980 only as those categories were not identified in previous years.
║ Includes some midwives who are not additionally registered or enrolled nurses.
Many more have been recruited since September 1980 and I regret that I am not able to give an up-to-date analysis.

Health Service Staffs (Pay)

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services if he will list the ancillary workers in each region of the National Health Service who are currently paid less than £60 per week, between £61 and £80 per week and between £81 and £100 per week; and how many are below the family income supplement level for a family with two children.

Information is not available centrally in the form requested. The following figures are estimated from a sample of staff employed in the six months ended September 1981 in eight English regions:

Gross Earnings (per week)Full Time StaffPart time staff
No. in samplePer cent.No. in samplePer cent.
Up to £605,2607·459,38981·1
£61–£8017,03024·110,22114·0
£81–£10021,55930·52,3443·2
£101 and Over26,88638·01,2281·7
Total Sample70,73510073,184100
Entitlement to family income supplement depends upon the individual circumstances, including the total gross income of the family concerned.

Supplementary Benefit

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services if he is satisfied that no hardship is caused when the supplementary benefit to which a wife is entitled becomes withheld owing to the operation of the regulations which deem a wife's entitlement to be assessed as part of a family unit even though that wife may be temporarily living away from her husband and conducting her financial arrangements independently; and if he will make a statement.

In the assessment of claims for supplementary benefit, the principle that the resources and requirements of married couples must be aggregated reflects the assumption that husband and wife have a mutual obligation to provide for each other. This principle continues to operate even where one partner is temporarily away from home. If, however, in these circumstances a husband is no longer supporting his wife, there is provision under the urgent cases regulations for her to claim supplementary benefit in her own right. Benefit would be paid at a reduced rate for the first two weeks, as with all urgent needs payments, but if the situation continued beyond two weeks payment would be at the normal rates for a single woman in similar circumstances.If the right hon. Member has a particular case in mind perhaps he would write to me.

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services if he will publish in the Official Report a table showing the total number of persons in receipt of supplementary benefit in (a) Wolverhampton and (b) the West Midlands at the latest available date, together with a breakdown of these figures by claimant group, registered unemployed, sick and disabled, unemployed in receipt of the long-term scale rate, one-parent families, pensioners and others.

Information at February 1982, the latest available date, is as follows:

Wolverhampton*West Midlands Social Security Region
Supplementary allowance cases:
Sick and disabled1,50023,300
Single parent families2,60039,700
Registered unemployed14,600195,200
Unemployed on long-term scale rate1002,500
Others5007,900
Total supplementary allowances19,400268,500
Supplementary pensioners10,800166,500
Total supplementary beneficiaries30,200434,900
* The two Wolverhampton offices may also deal with people who live outside Wolverhampton.
Excludes some one parent families in other groups, for example, widows with national insurance benefit and those who are unemployed.
Sub-heads do not add to totals because of rounding.

Source: 100 per cent. count of cases in action February 1982.

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services if he will now announce the November 1982 changes in those rates of supplementary benefit which were not available at the time of his uprating statement on 10 March.

Current rate(s) £

November 1982 rate(s) £

Non-householder's housing contribution2·553·10
Standard non-dependant's housing contribution5·406·55
Modified non-dependant's housing contribution2·553·10
Board and lodging meals allowances
Breakfast0·900·95
Lunch1·251·35
Dinner1·251·35
Expenses incidental to sub-letting
Furnished2·302·50
Unfurnished1·151·25
Other (eg for garage)0·300·35
Deductions for fuel from inclusive rents
Heating5·105·60
Cooking0·600·65
Hot Water0·600·65
Lighting0·400·45
Repairs and insurance allowance1·651·70 (from 1 April 1983)
Extra provision for board and lodging charges
Claimants under pension age with an underlying entitlement to the long-term scale rate, up to5·756·30
Claimants under pension age or dependents, who are infirm because of a mental or physical disability, up to6·507·00
Claimants over pension age, or who satisfy both of above conditions or who are in care accommodation not provided by a local authority or an area health authority, up to12·2513·30
Central heating addition
Lower rate (1–4 rooms)1·651·90
Higher rate (5 or more rooms)3·303·80
Lower rate dietary addition1·301·45
Higher rate dietary addition3·053·35
Dietary addition for dialysis8·709·60
Amount above which laundry expenses may be met0·400·45
Reduction in benefit paid to strikers for their families13·0014·50
Disregard of union strike payments
Direct deduction from benefit for housing and fuel debts:
Basic rate (5 per cent, of single householder rate)1·201·30
Higher rate for fuel (10 per cent, of single householder rate)2·352·60
Personal expenses rate for claimants in:
Resettlement units5·906·55
Re-establishment centres7·758·55
Ilford Park Polish Home8·559·45

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services if, further to his answer of 29 April,Official Report, c. 331, he will place in the Library a copy of the new instructions to staff in supplementary benefit offices on the handling of claims to supplementary benefit of people from abroad.

[pursuant to his reply, 17 May 1982, c. 42]: Pending publication of the S manual, we do not think it appropriate to make available piecemeal the Department's procedural circulars, as distinct from the guidance in chief supplementary benefit officer's memoranda, which are already published. In this case, however, procedures and guidance have for practical reasons been combined in a circular and in view of the public interest in the matter I have, exceptionally, placed a copy in the Library.

Hospital Appointments

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services if he will take steps within the National Health Service to establish effective sanctions against those consultants who prevent family medical practitioners from holding part-time hospital appointments.

I am not aware of any general problem in this area. It is for health authorities to decide whether such an appointment is necessary on service grounds and it is for the appointments committee to consider whether a particular candidate is suitable for appointment.

Acheson Report

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services whether he has accepted the Acheson report on primary health care in inner London; and if he will make a statement.

Disabled Persons

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services what is the most recent research undertaken by his Department into the extra private expenditure incurred by disabled people because of their disability; and if any new research is contemplated.

Last year the social policy research unit of York university completed a study of the effects of severe disablement in children on their families' incomes and expenditure patterns. The results of the study have been discussed with the research team and the need for additional analyses of data and for further research in this area are currently under consideration.

Residential Accommodation

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services what were the numbers of residents aged between 16 years and 64 years in local authority residential accommodation for physically handicapped, mentally-ill or handicapped and elderly people at the latest date for which figures are available and at the same date in each of the three preceding years; how he accounts for the changes in numbers; and if he will make a statement.

The following are the numbers of residents aged over 16 years and under 65 years in local authority accommodation in England at 31 March for each year:

197819791980*1981
(i) physically handicapped5,9075,5594,9625,227
(ii) mentally ill2,3802,5792,7642,469
(iii) mentally handicapped8,0008,5489,1389,522
* Provisional.

The low figure for physically handicapped residents in 1980, and for mentally ill residents in 1981 are probably statistical artefacts, resulting from changes in the collection of figures.

The overall changes are consistent with Departmental policies for the increased support of dependent people in the community rather than in hospital, in their own homes wherever possible, but if necessary in residential care. The trend away from long-term hospital care for mentally ill and mentally handicapped people has resulted in a net increase in local authority residential care as well as in the open community, whereas for physically handicapped people improvements in the domiciliary support available appear to have enabled a net reduction in residential care.

Mental Hospitals (Male Patients)

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services how the number of male patients who have been in mental illness hospitals for five years or more in the Mersey region compares with the national average; what research his Department is undertaking into the reasons for the difference; and if he will make a statement.

The estimated number is 1,255; this gives a rate per 100,000 (male) population of 106 which is higher than the national average rate. Numbers are affected by historical and geographical influences on each regions patterns of care, as well as by discharge policies in hospitals and units.

War Widows

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services how many widows draw pensions arising from the death or injury of their husbands on active service in the Second World War.

This figure is not available, but at 26 March 1982 there were about 60,900 war widows' pensions in payment as a result of service in the Second World War and later.

Computer Systems

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services if he will publish in the Official Report the membership and remit of the committee currently investigating computer systems for the National Health Service.

I assume that the hon. Member is referring to the NHS computer policy committee which my right hon. Friend has set up under the chairmanship of Mr. G. J. Roberts, CBE, JP, the chairman of Oxford RHA, with the following terms of reference:

"To make recommendations on policy on Computing in the NHS, including the promotion of the best use of standard and transferable systems in the NHS and to obtain the commitment of Health Authorities to specific policies and developments to achieve that end."
The membership has been as follows:

Chairman

  • Mr. G. J. Roberts, CBE, JP.

Vice Chairman

  • Mr. J. A. Tatchell, BSc, FiEE.
  • Mr. K. F. Bales, BSc(Soc), DSA, AHA.
  • Mr. G. Brooke, MSc(Eng), FICE, FIHosp E, FBIM.
  • Dr. J. M. Forsythe, BSc(Hons), MRCS, LRCP, MB, BS, DROG, MSc(Soc Med), FFCM.
  • Mr. T. Rippington, CBE, DPA, FHA, IPFA.
  • Miss F. Harrison, SRN, SCM, MTD.
  • Mr. D. C. Ward.

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services what is his policy in relation to the purchase of computer systems by regional health authorities.

The NHS computer policy committee has been set up to advise amongst other things, on computer purchasing policy in the NHS. I am awaiting that advice which will follow the EC/GATT rules for the purchase of computer systems.

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services when he expects his inquiry into computer systems for the National Health Service to be completed.

We have not set up a special inquiry into this matter. The National Health Service computer policy committee will advise us on National Health Service computer systems.

Deaf Children