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Horticultural Imports

Volume 29: debated on Thursday 28 October 1982

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asked the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food if he will list the horticultural products imported into the United Kingdom from Spain and the tonnage and value on an annual basis; and whether the United Kingdom farmers are in any way protected from the effects of low-cost supplies.

The information on the main horticultural produce imported from Spain—including the Canary Isles—in 1981 is as follows:

Quantity(tonnes)Value(£'000)
Aubergines1,189672
Carrots and turnips17640
Cauliflowers1,1131,223
Celery10,3663,114
Courgettes, marrows and pumpkins573234
Cucumbers and gherkins18,0477,806
Green beans571396
Lettuce1,109695
Onions104,19013,144
Potatoes (new)34,9765,788
Sweet peppers7,8784,452
Tomatoes123,55954,074
Apples7,7451,455
Cherries2613
Grapefruit7918
Lemons12,3803,337
Melons54,00214,357
Oranges54,31810,643
Orange hybrids78,76515,650
Peaches1,7081,268
Pears1,351307
Plums7,0943.183
Strawberries2,4062.322
Table grapes26,5879,025
Cut flowers206424

Source:Her Majesty's Customs and Excise (provisional figures)

United Kingdom growers are protected from the effects of low-cost supplies by the common customs tariff, which varies according to season from just under 6 per cent. on tomatoes to 24 per cent. on cut flowers. In addition, our growers are protected in their main marketing season by a reference, or minimum import, price system which applies to apples, aubergines, cherries, courgettes, cucumbers, pears, plums and tomatoes.