Skip to main content

Immigration

Volume 33: debated on Thursday 2 December 1982

The text on this page has been created from Hansard archive content, it may contain typographical errors.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will estimate the number of potential husbands of British women citizens who will be permitted to enter the United Kingdom for marriage under the new immigration rules from each of the United States of Amercia, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Hong Kong, Africa generally, South Africa, and East European countries.

The number of men admitted for marriage, by nationality, is published annually in "Control of Immigration: Statistics"—column 14 of tables 1(a) and 1(b) of the latest issue, Cmnd. 8533. The total number of admissions for marriage of fiances from the countries specified was about 100 in each year from 1978 to 1981. It is not possible to make a precise estimate of future such admissions under the new rules because of lack of knowledge about the citizenship status of the women they entered the United Kingdom to marry.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department to what extent acceptances for settlement from the New Commonwealth and Pakistan, excluding United Kingdom passport holders, have increased between 1971 and 1981.

Total acceptances for settlement by nationality are published annually in "Control of Immigration: Statistics United Kingdom", table 4 of the latest issue for 1981, Cmnd. 8533. Total acceptances for settlement from the New Commonwealth and Pakistan excluding United Kingdom passport holders dropped from 30,600 in 1971 to 28,200 in 1981.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will set out for each of the last eight years the numbers of (a) men and (b) women accepted for settlement on arrival or on removal of time limit from the Indian Sub-continent and Sri Lanka for the combined reasons of marriage or affiancement.

Figures of men and women accepted for settlement by reason of marriage are published annually by nationality in "Control of Immigration: Statistics United Kingdom", tables 2 and 3 of the latest issue for 1981, Cmnd. 8533. During the period specified it has not been possible for people to be settled on account of affiancement.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many dependants were accepted for settlement from the Indian Sub-continent and Sri Lanka for each of the years 1970, 1971, 1980 and 1981.

Total acceptances for settlement of dependants from the Indian Sub-continent numbered 18,300 in 1980 and 18,100 in 1981; included are acceptances on arrival of all children and women other than with a United Kingdom grandparent, and acceptances on removal of time limit other than of men for marriage and of men or women after four years approved employment with a United Kingdom grandparent or exempt from deportation. The information available for 1970 and 1971, which is published in table 3 of "Control of immigration statistics" for 1970 and 1971—Cmnd. 4620 and 4951 respectively—relates only to acceptances on arrival of dependants accompanying or coming to join the head of household; such acceptances from the Indian Sub-continent and Sri Lanka numbered 14,800 in 1970 and 11,700 in 1971.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what is the average number over the last five years by which women accepted for settlement from the New Commonwealth and Pakistan exceeded men accepted for settlement; and what is his assessment of the reasons for any difference.

Over the five years, 1977–81 the number of women citizens of New Commonwealth countries and Pakistan accepted for settlement exceeded the number of men by an average of about 6,700 per year; this average is derived from the figures published in Table 12 of "Control of Immigration: Statistics 1981" (Cmnd. 8533). During this period many women came to the United Kingdom to join husbands who had settled in this country in previous years.