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Written Answers

Volume 79: debated on Monday 20 May 1985

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Written Answers To Questions

Monday 20 May 1985

Attorney-General

Land Registration And Law Of Property Bill

asked the Attorney-General whether Her Majesty's Government intend to introduce a further Bill in place of the Land Registration and Law of Property Bill 1984–85; and if he will make a statement.

The Government are awaiting the report of the Law Commission on overriding interests, rectification and indemnity before introducing further legislation.

Home Department

Entry Clearance

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what was the total number of decisions to allow or refuse entry under the primary purpose rule for each quarter since the rules were changed in 1983.

Information is available only for the Indian subcontinent and is given in the table.

Applications from husbands and fiances for entry clearance for leave to enter the United kingdom decided*under the 1983 immigration rules.
Indian subcontinentNumber of persons
1983
1st quarter410
2nd quarter380
3rd quarter500
4th quarter680
1984
1st quarter680
2nd quarter610
3rd quarter630
4th quarter540
* Applications granted initially or on appeal or refused initially.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) what percentage of all the decisions to allow or refuse entry clearance were based, either wholly or partly, on the primary purpose rule, in the second, third and fourth quarters of 1984;(2) what percentage of all the refusals of entry clearance were based, either wholly or partly, on the primary purpose rule in the second, third and fourth quarters of 1984.

The information requested is available only for the Indian subcontinent. Applications for entry clearance from husbands and fiances refused solely or partly because of the primary purpose rule accounted for about 40 per cent. of all applications decided, and about 80 to 90 per cent. of all applications refused in each of the last three-quarters of 1984.

Public Events (Policing)

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will call for a report from the Commissioner of Police of the Metropolis as to the numbers of police estimated to have been in attendance at, and the number of arrests made in connection with, each of the public events listed in (a) appendix 10 to the report of the Commissioner of Police of the Metropolis for 1982, (b) appendix 3(ii) of the Commissioner's report for 1983 and (c) appendix 11 to the Commissioner's report for 1981.

Information regarding the number of police officers deployed at each of these events is given in the appendices referred to. I understand from the commissioner that information regarding arrests in 1981 and 1982 is not readily available and can only be obtained at disproportionate cost. The information in respect of 1983 is as follows:

DateSubjectArrests
22 JanuaryDemonstrations on 'G' district following the incident involving Colin Roach22
22 MarchState visit of the President of ZambiaNil
17 AprilLondon marathonNil
24 AprilDemonstration by the British Union for the Abolition of Vivisection26
7 MayYouth CND march28
28 MayTrooping the colour—1st rehearsalNil
4 JuneTrooping the colour—2nd rehearsalNil
5 JunePeoples' march for jobsNil
11 JuneTrooping the colourNil
22 JuneState opening of ParliamentNil
25 JuneDemonstration by the Society for the Protection of the Unborn ChildNil
23 JulyAnimal Aid marchNil
30 JulyMeetings 'Y' district—in connection with the "Albert Mariner public inquiry campaign"9
29–30 AugustNotting Hill carnival84
22 OctoberCND march and rallyNil
12 NovemberDemonstration by the British Union for Abolition of Vivisection24
31 DecemberNew Year's eve festivities32

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will call for a report from the Commissioner of Police of the Metropolis as to (i) the public events which took place between 1 January 1984 and 25 February 1985 in the Metropolitan police district which required the attendance of more than 1,000 officers and (ii) the number of officers in attendance; the number of members of the public estimated by the police to have been in attendance; and the number of arrests made by the police in connection with each event, respectively.

I understand from the commissioner that the public order events requiring the attendance of more than 1,000 officers in the period specified were as follows

Date

Subject

Number of police

Number of participants (where appropriate)

Arrests

29 March 1984NALGO— TUC Democracy day1,4859,00034
21 April 1984Libyan Peoples Bureau siege
Day 51,056nil
Day 61,017nil
Day 71,424nil
Day 81,424nil
Day 91,484nil
Day 101,583nil
Day 111,469nil
12 May 1984BUAV march to protest against proposals to replace Cruelty to Animals Act 18761,1723,500nil
13 May 1984London marathon1,744nil
2 June 1984Anti-apartheid march (reference visit of P. W, Botha)1,53613,50028
7 June 1984NUM march and lobby of Parliament1,3507,500120
7 June 1984Economic summit conference1,726nil
8 June 1984Economic summit conference1,283nil
9 June 1984Economic summit conference1,08513
9 June 1984CND march and Economic summit events5,76451,000201
9 June 1984Trooping the colour (second rehearsal)1,225nil
10 June 1984Sikh march3,55535,0006
16 June 1984Trooping the colour ceremony1,410nil
27 June 1984NUM day of action1,40911,500nil
27 August 1984Notting Hill carnival7,718150,00030
28 August 1984Notting Hill carnival200,00081
23 October 1984State visit of President Mitterand2,1285
6 November 1984State opening of Parliament1,592nil
7 November 1984Democracy for London campaign march and rally1,382400nil
11 November 1984Remembrance day morning ceremony1,088nil
18 November 1984Policing the Ban on Marches in the Metropolitan police district1,390nil
31 December 1984New Year's eve celebrations1,30550,00082
25 February 1985NUM defence committee march1,61513,000121

Animals (Research)

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether he is yet in a position to publish the result of his consultations on his White Paper on the use of animals in research; and if he will make a statement.

I would refer my hon. Friend to the answer given to a question from my hon. Friend the Member for Thanet, North (Mr. Gale) on 15 May at column 126.

Local Government Reform

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many civil servants in his Department and at what grades are currently engaged on work associated with the abolition of the Greater London council and the metropolitan county councils; and what is the total cost.

At present one full-time principal, and the time of other staff, amounting to about eight posts in all. On the basis of the Treasury's "Ready Reckoner of Staff Costs" the total annual rate would be about £270,000.

Computerised Data Processing

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what is his Department's annual budget for computerised data processing, including hardware, software, and out of house services; and how many people in his Department are employed in carrying out computerised data processing work.

The information requested is not immediately available. I will write to my hon. Friend as soon as possible.

Member's Correspondence

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department when he expects to reply to the letter sent to him on 5 March by the right hon. Member for Manchester, Gorton, with regard to restrictions on access to Downing Street.

Exercise Brave Defender

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will now list those police forces which have indicated that they will participate in Exercise Brave Defender.

So far, chief officers of the following police forces in England and Wales have indicated an intention to participate in Exercise Brave Defender:

  • Bedfordshire police
  • Cambridgeshire constabulary
  • City of London police
  • Cleveland constabulary
  • Derbyshire constabulary
  • Essex police
  • Hampshire constabulary
  • Hertfordshire constabulary
  • Humberside police
  • Leicestershire constabulary
  • Metropolitan police
  • Norfolk constabulary
  • Northamptonshire police
  • Northumbria police
  • North Yorkshire police
  • Nottinghamshire constabulary
  • South Yorkshire police
  • Staffordshire police
  • Suffolk constabulary
  • Surrey constabulary
  • Sussex police
  • Warwickshire constabulary
  • West Mercia constabulary
  • West Midlands police
  • West Yorkshire Metropolitan police
It is expected that most of the remaining police forces will also participate, although final decisions have not yet been taken.

Tamil Community

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what is his policy towards the return of Sri Lankan Tamils from the United Kingdom to Sri Lanka; and if he will make a statement.

Since the outbreak of widespread communal violence in Sri Lanka in July 1983, we have kept the situation there under close review in considering applications for leave to enter or remain in this country from Sri Lankan Tamils who have expressed a fear of return to Sri Lanka. Since April 1984 no Sri Lankan Tamil who has expressed such a fear has been removed or deported to Sri Lanka against his will. As a result there are now some 900 Sri Lankan Tamils in this country who do not qualify to remain here but whose departure has not been enforced.While the situation in Sri Lanka continues to cause concern, there is no reason to believe that Tamils returning to Sri Lanka face persecution, and few Sri Lankan Tamils are likely to qualify for refugee status in this country. A large proportion of the Tamil community in Sri Lanka has been relatively unaffected by inter-communal violence, and I do not consider that the situation is such as to justify a general policy of granting leave to enter or remain on an exceptional basis to all Tamils who express a fear to return there.I have therefore decided that any case in which a Sri Lankan Tamil fails to qualify for leave to enter or remain under the immigration rules but expresses a fear of returning to Sri Lanka should be considered on its merits, in the light of all the circumstances of the case. Such a person will be granted leave to remain on an exceptional basis (for 12 months in the first instance) only if there is reason to believe that he would suffer severe hardship if he returned to Sri Lanka. If he is unable to satisfy this test, he will be returned to Sri Lanka. This policy will be applied immediately to new and recent arrivals.Those Sri Lankan Tamils who have been here for more than a month without leave to enter or remain, but whose departure has not been enforced will be granted leave to remain exceptionally for six months. Their cases will then be reviewed on the basis outlined above. Normal appeal rights will apply.The Government will continue to urge on all concerned the need for a political settlement of the difficulties between the communities in Sri Lanka.

Prime Minister

Hospital Management

asked the Prime Minister if she will make a statement on the discussions which have taken place between Her Majesty's Government and representatives of an American corporation concerning the possibility of setting up a pilot scheme whereby the management of a National Health Service hospital would be contracted out.

The Government favour greater collaboration between the National Health Service and the independent health sector, and many discussions have taken place on the topic, at both ministerial and official levels with private sector companies. We have no plans at present for a centrally promoted scheme of the type described, but if any health authority is satisfied that such an arrangement is in the interests of its NHS patients, the Government will look sympathetically at the proposals.

Nurses (Pay Review)

asked the Prime Minister when she now expects to publish the report of the pay review body for nurses, midwives, health visitors and professions allied to medicine.

Public Expenditure

asked the Prime Minister if she will give an up-to-date statement of the expenditure per head for each person in Scotland, in England, and Wales; what is the per capita expenditure for each person resident in Scotland for every £100 spent on each person resident in England; and if she will publish a table giving the figures for each level of public spending.

In response to a question from my hon. Friend, the Member for Aberdeen, South (Mr. Malone) a full analysis of identifiable public expenditure in England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland was published in the Official Report on 22 February 1985 at columns 608–18. This included per capita comparisons and details of spending programmes. The latest available figures relate to 1983–84, and indicate that per capita expenditure in Scotland was £126 for every £100 in England.

Voluntary Organisations (Grants)

asked the Prime Minister if she will list the total amounts given by Government Departments in grants to voluntary organisations during the financial year 1984–85.

I refer the hon. Member to the reply that I gave on 4 April to my hon. Friends the Members for Rugby and Kenilworth (Mr. Pawsey) and Ruislip-Northwood (Mr. Wilkinson) at columns 715–16. I regret that the figures for 1984–85 will not be available for some months.

Bradford Fire (Appeal Fund)

asked the Prime Minister how the Government contribution to the Lord Mayor of Bradford's appeal fund will be financed.

A supplementary estimate on the Central Environmental Services Vote (class VIII, vote 2) will be presented in due course to cover the urgent expenditure on this new service. Pending parliamentary approval of this supplementary estimate, the Government's contribution of £¼ million to the Lord Mayor of Bradford's appeal fund will be met by a repayable advance from the Contingencies Fund. The cash limit is being increased by £250,000 from £143,025,000 to £143,275,000; this sum will be charged to the Reserve and therefore does not add to the planning total of public expenditure.

Trade And Industry

Ford Motor Company Ltd (Report)

asked the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry if he has yet received a report from the Director of Fair Trading arising from the findings of the Monopolies and Mergers Commission report on the Ford Motor Company Limited; and if he will make a statement.

I shall make a statement on the position when discussions with Ford are concluded.

Child Buggy Pushchairs

asked the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry, further to his answer to the hon. Member for Welwyn Hatfield, Official Report, 15 April, column 19, if he will give details of the European Economic Community Commission's request for the introduction of new regulations on the safety of child buggy pushchairs to be suspended; and if he will make a statement.

The Commission of the European Communities notified the Government in a letter dated 20 March 1985 that it considered the proposed Pushchairs (Safety) Regulations would hamper the free movement of goods between member states in breach of article 30 of the Treaty of Rome. The Government have responded to the Commission that the proposed regulations are needed on grounds of public health and safety, and are thus fully warranted under article 36 of the treaty. The Commission has been asked to reconsider its position.There is a further issue. The Commission had earlier notified member states of its intention to propose a directive relating to the control of chemical substances, dangerous to health, where these substances are present in objects manifestly intended for children. The Commission considers that pushchairs will be covered by the proposal and that article 9 of Directive 83/189/EEC suspends our proposed regulations until 30 October 1985.As the Government believe the proposal is only marginal to the subject of pushchairs, and as any agreed directive may turn out to be compatible with the chemical hazards part of the new pushchairs regulations, the Commission has been asked to reflect again on its position.

South Africa

asked the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry what was the total cost of (a) direct and (b) indirect investment in (i) South Africa and (ii) Namibia by Britain in each year from 1979; and what was the rate of return on British investment in each of those years for (1) South Africa, (2) Namibia and (3) the rest of the world.

The value of United Kingdom outward direct investment in South Africa from 1979 to 1983 was published today in British business.Information relating to indirect investment in South Africa and Namibia and rates of return on British investment in South Africa, Namibia and the rest of the world are not available.

Manufacturing Industry

asked the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry (1) how many (a) USA, (b) EEC, and (c) other foreign private sector enterprises were involved in manufacturing in the United Kingdom in (i) 1984, (ii) 1974 and (iii) 1964, respectively;(2) what information he has as to the gross output of

(a) United States, (b) European Economic Community and (c) other foreign private sector manufacturing companies in the United Kingdom in (i) 1964, (ii) 1974 and (iii) 1984, respectively;

(3) what information he has as to the capital expenditure by (a) the United States, (b) the European Economic Community and (c) other foreign and private sector manufacturing enterprises in the United Kingdom in (i) 1964, (ii) 1974 and (iii) 1984, respectively;

(4) how many people were employed by (a) United States, (b) European Economic Community and (c) other foreign and private sector manufacturing enterprises in the United Kingdom in (i) 1964, (ii) 1974 and (iii) 1984, respectively.

The information sought is not available for the years specified. Available figures are shown in the following table:

Activity in the United Kingdom in 1963, 1973, 1981 of foreign private sector enterprises classified to manufacturing
ECUSARest of World
Number of enterprises
19634736986
1973173760161
1981340827355
Gross output (£ million, current prices)
19739457,5061,238
19814,56521,7985,546
Employment (thousands)
19634540688
197310762491
1981127568163
Net capital expenditure (£ million, current prices)
1963810516
19734926546
1981211917274
Estimates of gross output are not available for 1963.

Source: Census of production.

South Africa (Ec Code Of Conduct)

asked the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry how many of the companies submitting full reports for the period ending June 1984 on the European Economic Community code of conduct, for companies with dealings with South Africa used, in responding to section 3 of the code, the supplementary living level figures rather than the minimum living level plus 50 per cent.; and if Her Majesty's Government ask any further questions of such companies.

asked the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry how many of the companies submitting full reports for the period ending June 1984 used, in responding to section 3 of the code, the supplementary living level or minimum living level plus 50 per cent. for families of size five in areas where the average family size is shown in the supplementary living level minimum living level studies to be higher; and if Her Majesty's Government ask any further questions of such companies.

asked the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry how many of the companies submitting full reports for the period ending June 1984, in responding to section 3 of the code, compare their minimum wage levels with poverty levels other than the household subsistence level/household effective level or supplementary living level/minimum living level for families of five or six people; and if Her Majesty's Government ask any further questions of such companies.

asked the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry how many companies submitting full reports for the period ending June 1984 on the European code of conduct for companies with dealings with South Africa quote, in responding to section 3 of the code, separate levels for men and women and compare the two with different poverty levels; and if Her Majesty's Government ask any further questions of such companies.

asked the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry how many of the companies submitting full reports for the period ending June 1984 do not give figures for their total work force of all races as called for in the reporting format; and if Her Majesty's Government ask any further questions of such companies.

asked the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry how many of the companies submitting full reports for the period ending June 1984 make clear in the annual reports that their response to the code is available from the company; and what procedure is followed with those that do not.

Pirate Radio Stations

asked the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry if he will introduce legislation to make it an offence to advertise the existence of a pirate radio station; and if he will make a statement.

Section 5(3)(f) of the Marine & Broadcasting Offences Act 1967 already makes it an offence to publish details or promote the activities of unauthorised broadcasting stations operating on the high seas. I therefore assume that my hon. Friend refers to unlicensed broadcasting stations operating in the United Kingdom.As a general principle it is preferable where possible, both on ground of clarity in establishing the nature of an offence and of fairness, to have enforce-powers against prime movers in the commission of an offence rather than those who give indirect assistance. Under the Wireless Telegraphy Act 1940 we have powers to take action against the unlicensed use of radio. These powers were significantly strengthened in the Telecommunications Act 1984, particularly with the introduction of the power to seize and detain, for the purpose of legal proceedings, the apparatus used by the unlicensed stations. Using these powers, we have considerably improved the effectiveness of our action aimed at removing this nuisance. I do not therefore propose to seek further powers at the moment.

asked the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry how many letters he has received from the general public complaining about pirate radio broadcasting; and what is the nature of the replies which he has sent.

I have received numerous letters in the past, though the number has greatly diminished recently as the improved enforcement powers, which we took in the Telecommunications Act 1984, have proved themselves. Some have been written by people complaining that the transmissions of unlicensed broadcasting stations were interfering with their reception of programmes on authorised stations. Some have complained that unlicensed broadcasting stations offer unfair competition to authorised stations and do not pay fees for broadcast of records and news programmes.I have replied that I am determined to take effective action to stop the unauthorised use of radio which causes interference, annoyance and sometimes danger, to authorised radio users. To illustrate this determination I have pointed to our record of activity. Since the start of 1985 the Department's Radio Investigation Service has taken action on 75 occasions against 41 unlicensed broadcasting stations. In the same period, 37 people have been prosecuted and convicted for their involvement in the operation of unlicenced stations.

Manufacturing Trade (Deficits)

asked the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry what were the deficits in manufacturing trade with Germany and Japan, respectively, at the most recent annual period for which figures are available; and what were the comparable deficits or surpluses in the same period five and 10 years previously.

Trade with individual countries is available only on the Overseas Trade Statistics basis with imports, but not exports, valued inclusive of insurance and freight charges. The crude balance calculated on this basis are in the table.

United Kingdom Crude Balance of Trade in Manufactures*£ Million Overseas Trade Statistics Basis
F R GermanyJapan
12 Months ending:
March 1975-889-286
March 1980-2,612-999
March 1985-5,227-2978
* Standard International Trade Classification, sections 5 to 8

Bosporus Bridge

asked the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry what reply he has received from the Japanese Government about the complaints on unfair subsidising of the Turkish bridge project.

Japan (Trade Restrictions)

asked the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry what is the level or range of tariffs imposed on British exports to Japan and on Japanese exports to the United Kingdom.

When the Tokyo Round tariff reductions are completed (in 1986–87), the weighted average of tariff rates on imports into the European Community of industrial products will be 4·7 per cent. The comparable figure for Japan will be 2·8 per cent.

asked the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry what quota or voluntary restraint restrictions are placed by the United Kingdom through the European Economic Community on Japanese exports to the United Kingdom; and what comparable restrictions are placed on United Kingdom exports to Japan.

Japan has agreed with the European Commission to restrain her exports of video tape recorders and cértain other industrial products. There is no voluntary restraint on United Kingdom or EC exports to Japan: we are striving to increase these. Japan has global quotas in several sectors, including for example, quotas on footwear and leather, which affect United Kingdom industry.

asked the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry what evidence he has of tariff, non-tariff or other restrictions imposed by the Japanese authorites on the export of British goods to Japan; and if he will make a statement.

Transport

Licences

asked the Secretary of State for Transport if he will list in the Official Report all the different types of licences operated or granted by his Department and the year in which they first came into operation.

My Department operates or grants the following licences, permits and certificates to enable individuals or businesses to undertake particular activities. Road service licensing is to be abolished under the Transport Bill, against which the hon. Gentleman voted.

Licence etcFirst Year of Operation (or date of current legislation)
ROAD TRANSPORT
Road Freight

Licence etc

First Year of Operation (or date of current legislation)

Goods vehicles operators licences1968
Heavy goods vehicle drivers licence1970
International road freight permits1967

Passenger Transport

Public service vehicles operators licences1980
Road service licences (to be abolished under the Transport Bill)1930
Public service vehicle drivers licence1930
EEC international regular and special regular service authorisations1973
EEC international shuttle service authorisations1973
Minibus permits1977
International passenger transport authorisations1980

Other Vehicle and Drivers' licences

Driving licence1903
Driving test pass certificate1935
International driving permit1930
Vehicle excise duty licences and exemption certificates1920

Driving Instructors

Approved driving instructor certificates1964
Trainee driving instructor licence1970

Other

Authorisation to carry out MOT tests1960
Tachograph centre approval1976
RAILWAYS
Light railway orders1896
SHIPPING AND MARINE

Seafarers

Certificates of competency for masters, deck officers, marine engineer officers1852
Certificates for skippers and second hands serving on fishing vessels1894
Boatmen's licences1968
Certificates for lifeboatmen1932
Dispensation and exemption certificates1906
Safe manning certificates1983
Medical fitness certificates1983
Licences for seamen's employment agencies1894

Hovercraft

Operating permits for commercial operations1972
Operating crew licences1985

Miscellaneous

Consents to work in tidal waters that may have adverse effects on the safety of navigation1949
Licences for wreck exploration1973
Licences to print and sell marine forms1894

In addition, the Department operates for safety reasons a number of systems for approving equipment and works.

The Civil Aviation Authority has statutory responsibility under the Civil Aviation Act 1982 for a wide range of licences in connection with aviation matters.

Roads (Reconstruction)

asked the Secretary of State for Transport if he will publish the location and classification of the lengths of road which make up the 220 mile backlog of all-purpose trunk roads in need of reconstruction, where such lengths exceed half a mile.

Road Number

Location

County/London borough

A64MaltonNorth Yorkshire
A19Crathorne diversionNorth Yorkshire
A63ElloughtonHumberside
A646HebdenWest Yorkshire
A6IrthlingboroughNorthants
A38RipleyDerbyshire
A1TuxfordNottinghamshire
A1BaldertonNottinghamshire
A1GonerbyLincolnshire
A1Great PontonLincolnshire
A1ColsterworthLincolnshire
A1WitteringCambridgeshire
A1WaternewtonCambridgeshire
A13TilburyEssex
A10HoddesdonHertfordshire
A45StowmarketSuffolk
A45RoughamSuffolk
A41BarnetLondon Borough of Barnet
A19SunderlandTyne & Wear
A1NewcastleTyne & Wear
A1MorpethNorthumberland
A19Teesside diversionCleveland
A580LeighG.M.C.
A74North of J44/M6Cumbria
A34StaffordStaffordshire
A38BurtonStaffordshire
A34TittensorStaffordshire
A449Ross-on-WyeHereford & Worcester
A446ColeshillWarwickshire
A46Stratford-on-AvonWarwickshire
A5WitherleyWarwickshire
A27HavantHampshire
A2SwanscombeKent
A2LyddenKent
A21Castle hillKent
A43OxfordOxfordshire
A30Indian QueenCornwall
A30CamborneCornwall
A30GossmoorCornwall
A438Aston CrossGloucestershire

Trunk Roads (Review)

asked the Secretary of State for Transport when the results of his review of the trunk road programme will be published.

Vehicle Excise Duty

asked the Secretary of State for Transport what is the total cost of collecting and administering vehicle excise duty.

The collection of vehicle excise duty and the registration of vehicles are operated as a single integrated system and the costs of each are not easily identified. The cost of vehicle excise duty collection and vehicle registration in the United Kingdom was £88 million in the financial year 1984–85.

asked the Secretary of State for Transport how many civil servants are employed in the collection and administration of vehicle excise duty.

The collection of vehicle excise duty and the registration of vehicles are operated as a single integrated system and an assignment of staff to each system cannot easily be made. The number of civil servants employed in excise duty collection and vehicle registration in the United Kingdom was 4,180 in the financial year 1984–85.

Shipping Industry

asked the Secretary of State for Transport what was the fall in deadweight tonnes of the United Kingdom-owned and registered merchant fleet between May 1979 and the end of 1984.

The United Kingdom-owned and registered fleet of merchant vessels of 500 gross tons and over fell by 20·5 million deadweight tonnes between May 1979 and the end of 1984.

asked the Secretary of State for Transport what recent representations he has received from (a) the General Council of British Shipping and (b) the National Union of Seamen about the future of the British maritime industry.

I have had a number of meetings and exchanges of correspondence with the General Council of British Shipping and the National Union of Seamen, most of which have in one way or another borne on the future of the United Kingdom shipping industry.

asked the Secretary of State for Transport what policy initiative he plans in order to promote an expansion of the share of the United Kingdom's coastal trade taken by merchant ships registered in the United Kingdom.

The Government plan no such policy initiative. Our efficient coastal fleet is quite capable of defending its substantial share of this trade without intervention by the Government. Where we can—and will—help this fleet is by securing access to the closed coastal trades of our Community partners.

Engineering Works (Rayleigh Weir)

asked the Secretary of State for Transport whether in view of the continuing traffic congestion and its projected increase at the A127 and A129 road junction at Rayleigh Weir, Essex, he will consider advancing the start of the proposed engineering works before 1988.

After the current public consultations the full statutory procedures will follow. Much detailed design work will also be necessary. This makes a start of work before 1988 difficult. I am however conscious of increasing traffic congestion at the junction, and if it proves possible to advance the programme of work, this will be done.

Trunk Roads

asked the Secretary of State for Transport what additional schemes he expects to include in the trunk road programmes which have not hitherto been justified by traffic forecasts, following his present review and his Department's revised traffic forecasts.

The review is not yet complete. The effect of the recently revised traffic forecasts, however, is not the only factor taken into account in deciding which schemes should be included in the national programme.

Mr W Rawlinson (Member's Correspondence)

asked the Secretary of State for Transport when he proposes to reply to the hon. Member for Mid-Staffordshire in respect of the points raised by his constituent, Mr. W. Rawlinson of 5 Tilling Drive, Walton, Stone, Staffordshire, in his letter of 1 April 1985, in particular with regard to the pension rights of employees of the National Bus Company and its subsidiaries.

Seat Belts

asked the Secretary of State for Transport whether he will include in the independent study of seat belt wearing, its implications for accidents involving pedal cyclists; and if he will make a statement.

I invited Professors Durbin and Harvey to carry out an independent assessment of all the available statistical evidence on the effects of compulsory seat belt wearing. It will include the possible effects on casualty trends for all road users including cyclists and pedestrians.

Parking Restrictions

asked the Secretary of State for Transport, pursuant to the answer of 13 May, Official Report, column 63, what are the specific difficulties in implementing section 7 of the Road Traffic Act 1974.

Local Government Reform

asked the Secretary of State for Transport how many civil servants in his Department and at what grades are currently engaged on work associated with the abolition of the Greater London council and the metropolitan county councils; and what is the total cost.

London Regional Transport

asked the Secretary of State for Transport if, pursuant to the reply of the hon. Member for Wallasey on 18 March Official Report, column 618, he will publish the basis on which the marginal estimated benefits and costs of Greater London council planned subsidy levels were computed.

The figures are contained in table 7A of the 3-year plan produced by the former London transport executive and approved by the Greater London council on 26 June 1984. This showed that, at the higher level of subsidy planned by the GLC, a marginal increase of £10 million in financial support would have produced £1·4 million in additional external benefits.

Traffic Management Systems (London)

asked the Secretary of State for Transport if he will detail the circumstances under which he will use his reserve powers to take control of traffic management systems in London.

[pursuant to the reply, 16 May 1985, c. 250]: The absence of satisfactory arrangements by boroughs.

A38 (Safety Fencing)

asked the Secretary of State for Transport when he expects to publish the results of his review into the criteria relating to the provision of safety fencing on the A38 between Exeter and Plymouth.

[pursuant to the reply, 16 May 1985, c. 251]: The review is a national one and I shall make the results publicly available as soon as possible after its completion in about one year's time. However, the Department hopes to publish interim guidance updating existing criteria shortly.

Cars (Lead-Free Petrol)

asked the Secretary of State for Transport what recent representations he has received about the timetable for equipping new cars with the capacity to run on lead-free petrol.

[pursuant to the reply, 13 May 1985, c. 62.]:The views of many interested organisations have been taken into account in determining the line the UK delegation should take in Community discussions about vehicle emissions and lead in petrol.

Energy

Oil And Gas (Enterprise) Act 1982

asked the Secretary of State for Energy what has been the volume and value of gas supplied by gas producers to customers by making use of the common carrier provisions of the Oil and Gas (Enterprise) Act 1982 in each year since the Act came into force.

To date no directions have been issued under the relevant sections of the Oil and Gas (Enterprise) Act 1982. Arrangements for carriage of third party gas in BGC pipelines, achieved through commercial negotiations, are a matter for the BGC and the party concerned.

Non-Proliferation Treaty

asked the Secretary of State for Energy what publications, and in what numbers, the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority has produced for educational distribution on the non-proliferation treaty in preparation for the non-proliferation treaty third review conference in September of the current year.

The United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority has produced no such publications.

Atomic Energy Authority Constabulary

asked the Secretary of State for Energy how many special constables were employed by the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority in each year since 1976.

The strength of the AEA constabulary for each year since 1976 is as follows:

Numbers
1976435
1977469
1978512
1979516
1980589
1981591
1982613
1983635
1984646
1985*654
* at 1 April 1985

People's Republic Of China

asked the Secretary of State for Energy if he will give information as to the trade in nuclear materials and technology between the People's Republic of China and agencies responsible to or sponsored by his Department since 1979.

The United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority and the radiochemical centre (up to 1982) are the only organisations sponsored by my Department which have traded with the People's Republic of China since 1979. The trade has comprised the supply of very small quantities of radioisotopes used in industrial analysis and academic research.

Namibia

asked the Secretary of State for Energy whether any nuclear material deriving from Namibia or South Africa has been reprocessed on the Magnox reprocessing line at Sellafield.

Some of the spent Magnox nuclear fuel reprocessed at Sellafield was produced from Namibian origin uranium.

Combined Heat And Power

asked the Secretary of State for Energy what research his Department has conducted into combined heat and power technology.

The Government have been examining the feasibility and economic case for combined heat and power and district heating in the United Kingdom and has published the following reports.

Energy Paper No. 20 — District heating combined with electricity generation in the United Kingdom—1977
Energy Paper No. 35—Combined Heat and electrical power generation in the United Kingdom—1979
Energy Paper No. 53—Combined Heat and Power District Heating Feasibility Programme: Stage 1 — 1984
On 5 April 1984 my right hon. Friend announced that the Government were ready to encourage the formation of local consortia. As my right hon. Friend announced on 25 January 1985, the Government are prepared to offer grant assistance of up to £250,000 each to Belfast, Edinburgh and Leicester consortia to undertake further studies into CHP provided that the major participation in the development of such schemes comes from the private sector.

Wales

Cegb (Chairman)

2.

asked the Secretary of State for Wales when he next expects to meet the chairman of the Central Electricity Generating Board.

Labour Statistics

10.

asked the Secretary of State for Wales what is the total number of unemployed in the Rhymney valley, Mid-Glamorgan and Wales at the latest available date for which information is available.

On 11 April 1985, the numbers of unemployed claimants were 7,681, 35,560 and 180,031 respectively.

Rhondda Valley

15.

asked the Secretary of State for Wales what plans he has to reduce unemployment in the Rhondda Valley.

The Government's economic strategy is designed to attack the underlying causes of unemployment in the economy as a whole and therefore in the Rhondda Valley, as elsewhere in Wales.

Licences

asked the Secretary of State for Wales if he will list in the OfficialReport all the different types of licences operated or granted by his Department and the year in which they first came into operation.

This information could only be provided at disproportionate cost.

Welsh Language Act

asked the Secretary of State for Wales if he will clarify the objectives of the discussion his Department agreed to hold with the ad hoc committee working on a new Welsh Language Act; and if it remains his policy to consider the possibility of introducing legislation relating to the Welsh language.

I met representatives of the working party in April to discuss their demands for a new Welsh Language Act. I was not convinced that a valid case had been made for legislation but undertook to consider further any proposal which in my view would benefit the Welsh language.

All-Wales Strategy For Mentally Handicapped People

asked the Secretary of State for Wales whether any proposals relating to the implementation of the all-Wales strategy for mentally handicapped people have been frozen by his Department; and if he will make a statement.

No. In the main, proposals under the strategy are considered in the context of the comprehensive plans prepared in each of the counties and the vanguard districts. These plans are in various stages of preparation or implementation. Those for South Glamorgan, West Glamorgan and Clwyd were approved last June and that for Gwent was approved last week. Plans for the Gwynedd (non-vanguard area) and Rhondda (vanguard district) are under consideration within the Welsh Office and the remaining four plans have yet to be formally submitted to me by the relevant planning groups.

School Meals

asked the Secretary of State for Wales if he will list those local education authorities providing free school meals to children other than those covered by the statutory requirements; and what proportion of all local education authorities in Wales these represent.

Three-quarters or six of the eight local education authorities in Wales make such provision. They are:

  • Clwyd
  • Gwent
  • Gwynedd
  • Mid Glamorgan
  • South Glamorgan
  • West Glamorgan

Labour Statistics

asked the Secretary of State for Wales how many people there are in employment in Wales (a) in full-time employment, (b) in part-time employment and (c) in self-employment; and how these figures compare with the position in May 1979.

Comprehensive and comparable information is available only for June each year since, although most of the information is produced on a quarterly basis, in Wales that on self employment is an annual series for June. Separate information is not collected about male part-time employment.

Total employment (excluding HM Forces)
Employees in employment 000sSelf employed 000s
MaleAllFemale part-time
June 1979618415165100
June 1984504397173142

Non-Government Bodies (Payments)

asked the Secretary of State for Wales if he will list the payments made to those appointed to the various nominated bodies and non-departmental public bodies by him or any other Ministers in his Department (a) in recognition of their services and (b) towards their costs.

Details of remuneration, where appropriate, of those people appointed by me to executive bodies, advisory bodies, tribunals and health authorities in Wales and the Welsh water authority are included in "Public Bodies 1984" published by HMSO (December 1984). Information on expenses paid to appointees is not held centrally.

Tourism

asked the Secretary of State for Wales what financial assistance has been provided to support the development of tourism in Wales in each financial year since 1979; and what were the sources of such assistance.

Support for the tourism industry comes from many sources. The Wales tourist board has spent the following amounts since 1979–80. The figures in brackets are the amounts spent on assisting specific projects under section 4 of the Development of Tourism Act 1969:

£000s(£000s)
1979–803,652(1,696)
1980–814,316(1,696)
1981–825,077(1,911)
1982–835,562(1,515)
1983–845,032(1,209)
1984–856,365(1,800)
For 1985–86 the board has been allocated £7·196 million of which £2 million is for section 4 support. Many projects that are supported by urban development grant while not specifically for tourism have incidental tourism benefits. It is not possible readily to identify the proportions of the total assistance that relates to tourism. Some local authorities have received support for their tourism schemes under the urban programme. The following commitments on such schemes have been given since 1979–80:
£000s
1979–80138
1980–81144
1981–8262
1982–83465
1983–84412
1984–8563
Tourism and recreational projects can also receive assistance from the European regional development fund. Since 1979–80, the following amounts have been committed for such projects:

£000s
1979–801,835
1980–811,075
1981–822,927
1982–831,067
1983–842,998
1984–851,774
Both the Welsh Development Agency and the Development Board for Rural Wales contribute to the development of tourism but it is not possible to identify within their budgets the amounts involved.Details of local authority spend on tourism can be found in Summary Table 'B' of the CIPFA Leisure and Recreation Statistics for the period 1979–80 to 1984–85; copies of which are in the Library.

Departmental Grants

asked the Secretary of State for Wales what grants were made by his Department and who were the recipient organisations under each of the following Acts in 1984–85: the Development of Rural Wales Act 1976, the Education Act 1944, the Health Services and Public Health Act 1968, the Historic Buildings and Ancient Monuments Act 1983, the Housing Act 1977, the National Health Services Act 1977, the Road Traffic Act 1972 and the Town and Country Planning Act 1972.

I will write to the hon. Gentleman shortly, and place a copy of my reply in the Library.

Computerised Data Processing

asked the Secretary of State for Wales what is his Department's annual budget for computerised data processing, including hardware, software and out of house services; and how many staff of his Department are employed in carrying out computerised data processing work.

£1,316,000 is included in the 1985–86 Supply Estimates for current and capital computer expenditure. A total of 17 staff are assigned full-time to computing work within my Department. In addition, some 200 staff use computing equipment from time to time in the course of their duties.

Legionnaire's Disease

asked the Secretary of State for Wales how many people in Wales are known by his Department or the communicable diseases surveillance centre to have died from legionnaire's disease in the last year.

There was one death registered in Wales during 1984 for which the underlying cause of death was legionnaire's disease.

Water Rates

asked the Secretary of State for Wales what is the average water rate levied in (i) the Welsh water authority area and, (ii) Wales as a whole; and by how much those rates have increased in real terms since 1979.

I refer the hon. Gentleman to the answer provided by my hon. Friend the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for the Environment, the Member for Sutton and Cheam (Mr. Macfarlane) on 17 May 1985 at columns 249–50. The information provided there was in respect of the Welsh water authority's areas, but information for Wales as a whole is not readily available.

asked the Secretary of State for Wales what was the increase in average water rates in the area of the Welsh water authority in 1985–86 over 1984–85.

The increase in the average household water bill in the area of the Welsh water authority in 1985–86 over 1984–85 is £11·14.

A5 (Bypasses)

asked the Secretary of State for Wales when he expects to receive the final report of consulting engineers into routes for bypasses around the five villages on the A5 on Anglesey; if any route has yet been finalised; if it is proposed to finalise some routes earlier than others; and if he will make a statement.

As my hon. Friend knows, we expect to receive by the end of the year the consultants' formal report on the extent of the need for bypasses of the five villages. This will include an assessment of environmental benefits as well as the likely cost effectiveness of the proposals. Final decisions on routes and decisions on priorities must await this report.

Company Headquarters

asked the Secretary of State for Wales what proportion of the leading 1,000 companies in the United Kingdom had their headquarters in Wales from 1974 to 1984.

The hon. Gentleman is presumably referring to the companies listed in the publication entitled "The Times 1,000". The addresses of the headquarters of these companies are listed in this publication which is published annually and copies of which are in the Library.

Infant Mortality

asked the Secretary of State for Wales what is the latest estimate of the rates of infant mortality in Wales.

The infant mortality rate in Wales in 1984 was 8·8 per 1,000 live births.

Bankruptcies

asked the Secretary of State for Wales how many bankruptcies in Wales his Department has been notified of in each year since 1979.

I have been asked to reply. Bankruptcy cases handled by courts in Wales from 1979 to 1984 are as follows:

Number
1979203
1980231
1981306
1982334
1983419
1984547
These figures are published annually in the Digest of Welsh Statistics.

Scotland

Glenochil Centre

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland if he will make a statement on his inquiries into visiting conditions at Glenochil centre.

As I explained to the House on 2 May at column 486, visiting entitlements were improved in most penal establishments last year. This included both Glenochil young offenders institution and Glenochil detention centre where the existing minimum scales for visits for all inmates are one 30-minute visit on reception and two 30-minute visits every month thereafter. Both institutions operate a grade structure by which inmates can progress to two 1 hour visits per month. Extra visits are granted on request at the Governor's discretion. All visits are open.

School Meals

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland if he will list those local education authorities providing free school meals to children other than those covered by the statutory requirements; and what proportion of all local education authorities in Scotland these represent.

I assume that the question refers to school meals provided under education authorities' discretionary power in section 53(3) (b) of the Education (Scotland) Act 1980. At the time of the 1984 school meals census ten out of the 12 education authorities were providing free school meals under section 53(3) (b):

  • Borders
  • Central
  • Dumfries and Galloway
  • Fife
  • Grampian
  • Strathclyde
  • Tayside
  • Orkney
  • Shetland
  • Western Isles

Rates

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland how many (a) domestic ratepayers and (b) commercial ratepayers would be in a position to benefit from the scheme announced on Tuesday 14 May; and if he will publish a table giving figures for each category, region-by-region and district-by-district.

I refer my hon. Friend to the figures my right hon. Friend gave the House at column 219 following the statement on 14 May. These are very approximate estimates which I would hope to revise when information is available from assessors as to the number of rateable subjects with valuation multipliers greater than 3. I can make no estimate by region or district.

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland if Edinburgh district council will receive further funds from Her Majesty's Government if they bring their rate fund contribution down to the Secretary of State's limit.

If Edinburgh district council revises its budget such as to bring its estimated rate fund contribution for 1985–86 down to the figure in the Housing Revenue Account Rate Fund Contribution Limits (Scotland) Order 1985, the council's gross HRA capital allocation for 1985–86 will be increased from £12·362 million to £18 million.

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland if he will publish in the OfficialReport the amount of rates collected in Scotland in each year from 1981–82; and if he will express the costs of both (a) lands valuation and (b) collection of rates as a percentage of the total.

[pursuant to his reply, 16 May 1985, c. 229]: The information is given in the table.

Cash amount of rates collected in Scotland after rebates and reliefs

Cost of (a) lands valuation and (b) collection of rates as a percentage of rates collected

£ million

(a) per cent.

(b) per cent.

1981–821,2050·71·0
1982–831,3730·61·0
1983–841,3080·70·9
1984–85

*1,445

0·71·0
1985–86

*1,611

0·61·0

* Estimate.

The percentages are based on the figures used in the answer to the hon. Member's question on 26 April 1985 at column 219.

Housing Associations

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland what allocations have been made available to housing associations for each of the years from 1979 to date.

Finance for housing association projects is provided through lending by the Housing Corporation and through a smaller programme of lending by local authorities. The gross provision for the housing association movement in Scotland as a whole for each financial year since 1979–80 is set out in the following table.

Financial year£ million
1979–8053·9
1980–8170·3
1981–8292·0
1982–83119·8
1983–84119·7
1984–85111·4
1985–86109·9

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland what is the total stock of housing association houses in Scotland; and how many housing association houses have been built in each of the years of from 1979 to date.

It is estimated that the total stock of housing association houses in Scotland at the end of 1983 numbered 35,000. The table (drawn from returns by local authorities) shows the number of newly built dwellings completed by housing associations in each year since 1979.

YearCompletions
1979544
1980881
19811,928
19821,167
19831,271
19842,032

Education Expenditure

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland how Scotland's spending on education, expressed as a percentage of gross domestic product, compares with Western European countries; and if he will make a statement.

Nhs (Expenditure)

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland what has been the increase in spending on the National Health Service in Scotland in (a) funds and (b) the percentage terms for 1985–86 in comparison to 1984–85, giving figures for (i) Scotland and (ii) the Lothian Health Board, respectively.

The latest estimate of gross expenditure on the National Health Service in Scotland in 1984–85 is £1,901 million; the gross provision made for 1985–86 is £1,998 million, an increase of 5·1 per cent.Estimated gross recurrent expenditure by health boards in 1984–85 is £1,282 million; the financial allocation to boards for recurrent expenditure 1985–86 is £1,353 million; an increase of 5·5 per cent.

Health Boards

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland what are the allocations for individual health boards for 1985–86, and if he will submit a table indicating the increase in real terms for each health board over 1984–85 as well as the average for the whole of Scotland in both percentage and actual terms.

Gross recurrent expenditure allocations to boards for the hospital and community health services in 1985–86 amounted to £1,353 million. The net cash limited allocations to individual boards for recurrent expenditure, after expected income is taken into account, are shown in column (a) following. The average increase of 5·5 per cent, in resources shown at columns (b) and (c) is intended to cover inflation costs and to meet new demands for health care.

(a)(b)(c)
Health Boards1985–86 Recurrent Expenditure Allocation†Increase over 1984–85 Allocations
(Net) £,000Cash £,000Per cent.
Argyll and Clyde97,7374,8975·27
Ayrshire and Arran69,5695,1127·93
Borders19,8251,1696·27
Dumfries and Galloway35,0342,0036·06
Fife65,3724,0456·60
Forth Valley63,4323,6026·02
Grampian119,4177,1136·33
Greater Glasgow359,24016,3404·77
Highland50,2382,7645·82
Lanarkshire110,7786,4716·20
Lothian216,97710,5075·09
Orkney3,6312286·70
Shetland4,5422766·47
Tayside126,2375,3864·46
Western Isles6,9315007·77
TOTAL*1,348,96070,413
Average5·51
* Includes £12·8 million allocated for specific commitments.
† As adjusted for changes in the course of the year.
In addition, £36·5 million has been allocated to boards for their ordinary capital programmes in 1985–86 and a further £25 million specifically for expenditure on upgrading the NHS estate.

Political Conferences (Policing Costs)

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland if he will call for reports from the chief constables of the relevant regions concerning the costs of policing (a) the Liberal party conference at Inverness, (b) the Scottish Trades Union Congress at Inverness, (c) the Labour party conference at Perth, (d) the Conservative party conference at Perth, all held in 1985, and (e) the Scottish National party conference at Inverness in September 1984.

I understand that it is not the practice of the forces concerned to maintain separate records of the costs of policing such events. The information requested is not therefore readily available and could be obtained from the forces concerned only at disproportionate cost, because it would be a time-consuming exercise to extract it from financial records.

Legionnaire's Disease

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland how many people in Scotland are known by his Department or the communicable diseases surveillance centre to have died of legionnaire's disease in the last year.

The provisional number of deaths in Scotland for 1984, reported to the Registrar General, in which the underlying cause of death is Legionnaire's disease, is four. A further two deaths have been attributed to this cause by the communicable diseases (Scotland) unit, Ruchill hospital, as a result of tests carried out after the death certificates were written.

Water Rates

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland what was the increase in average water rates in each authority area in Scotland in 1985–86 over the preceding financial year.

Since domestic water rate poundages all decreased between 1984–85 and 1985–86 because of revaluation, I assume the hon. Member is seeking information about average domestic water rate bills. This is as follows:

Average household domestic water rate bills
Authority1984–85 £1985–86 £Difference £Difference per cent.
Borders25·8122·57-3·24-12·56
Central16·8818·882·0011·85
Dumfries and Galloway24·8024·57-0·23-0·93
Fife20·1425·074·9324·48
Grampian31·1934·132·949·43
Highland25·9626·010·050·20
Lothian24·6526·311·666·74
Strathclyde24·8126·271·465·89
Tayside20·2624·494·2320·88
Orkney28·6729·630·963·35
Shetland7·7412·034·2955·43
Western Isles24·2524·11-0·14-0·58
Scotland24·3226·241·927·90

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland what is the average water rate levied in each water board region and in the United Kingdom as a whole; and by how much those rates have increased in real terms since 1979.

[pursuant to his reply, 17 May 1985, c. 261]: Average domestic water charges in England and Wales are to be found in "The Water Industry" and domestic water rates in Scotland in "Rating Review", both published by the Chartered Institute of Public Finance and Accountancy and available in the Library. The figures north and south of the border are not however directly comparable.In England and Wales water charges pay for sewerage, sewage treatment and disposal, land drainage and certain environmental services as well as water supply. In Scotland, after taking account of direct charges to industrial and commercial consumers about two-thirds of the net expenditure on water supply is met from domestic water rates; the remaining one-third plus the expenditure corresponding to the expenditure on sewerage etc. contained in water charges in England and Wales is met from regional rates (general rates in the islands) assisted by rate support grant. The one-third of net water expenditure met from regional and general rates in Scotland is, broadly, for the use of water by public services, for example, the fire service, street cleansing and the like.In Northern Ireland water expenditure is included in the calculation of the regional rate for local government services collected by the Department of the Environment.

Education (Expenditure)

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland if he will list in the Official Report the money spent by Her Majesty's Government on Scottish education in the years 1979 to 1984 and the latest available figures for 1985–86.

Information on expenditure on education in Scotland is contained in table 15·8 of the "Commentary on the Scottish Programme" which was published in February 1985. More detailed figures for central Government expenditure on education in 1985–86 are contained in Supply Estimates, class XV.

Teachers

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland what sums Her Majesty's Government has allocated for in-service training in the teaching profession for the years 1979 to 1984; and what are the latest available figures for 1985–86.

Provision for the in-service training of teachers in Scotland is included in local authorities' rate support grant relevant expenditure, but is not separately identified. In addition, my right hon. Friend has recently introduced two schemes of assistance towards the expense of teachers attending approved in-service training; specific grants available under these schemes for the financial years 1984–85 and 1985–86 amounted to £720,000 and £763,000 respectively.

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland if he has any plans to introduce job sharing in the teaching profession; and if he will make a statement.

Schools (Behaviour Problems)

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland what investigations have been made into pupils' emotional and behavioural problems at school; and what has been the result of these investigations.

Recent work in this field has included the 1977 Pack report on truancy and indiscipline, the 1981 report by the Convention of Scottish Local Authorities on discipline in Scottish schools and various detailed research projects commissioned by the Scottish Education Department. It is for education authorities to take account of such investigations in determining school policies and organisation.

Defective Houses

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland whether the booklet giving guidance to owners of defective houses purchased from local authorities will be made available to Edinburgh district council and other local authorities in Scotland very shortly; and whether a satisfactory agreement has been arrived at involving the National Housebuilding Council and the Building Societies' Association.

I hope that the booklet of guidance will be ready for issue to all local authorities around the end of this month. On the question of agreement between the National House-Building Council and the Building Societies' Association, the warranty scheme approved by the NHBC, to which I referred in the reply which I gave my hon. Friend on 16 May, has been agreed with the BSA.

Infant Mortality

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland what is the latest estimate of the rate of infant mortality in Scotland.

Provisional figures for 1984 show a rate of 10·3 per 1,000 live births.

Shipbuilding Industry

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland how many jobs in the shipbuilding industry have been lost since June 1979 in (a) Scotland, (b) Strathclyde region and, (c) Greenock travel-to-work area.

[pursuant to his reply, 13 May 1985, c. 56]: The estimated net decreases in employment in the shipbuilding and marine engineering industry in manufacturing units with 11 or more employees between 1979 and 1984 were 12,000 in Scotland and 9,000 in Strathclyde region; estimates for the Greenock travel-to-work area are subject to disclosure restriction. The estimates are based on the regional data system.

Employment

Earnings

asked the Secretary of State for Employment what have been the real increases in earnings in the public sector in each of the past three years.

Estimates of the percentage increase in average gross earnings of full-time employees in the public sector, deflated by the increase in the retail prices index, are as follows.

Changes in real average gross weekly earnings of full-time adult employees working a full week
Percentage
April 1981 to April 1982*-1·0
April 1982 to April 1983†+3·8
April 1983 to April 1984+0·6

Source: New Earnings Survey.

* Based on males aged 21 and over and females aged 18 and over.

† Based on those on adult rates of pay.

Changes in average earnings in April of successive years may reflect changes in the timing of pay settlements.

Numbers and percentage of employees in employment in the 15 Industry Groups with the largest numbers of employees

Orders of the Standard Industrial Classification 1968

June 1971

June 1976

September 1981

(latest available)

Number (000s)

Per cent.

Number (000s)

Per cent.

Number (000s)

Per cent.

Agriculture, forestry and fishing1·62·31·52·01·41·7
Food drink and tobacco1·92·71·52·01·21·6
Chemicals and allied industries1·51·9
Metal manufacture

*

*

Mechanical engineering3·55·03·44·63·03·8
Electrical engineering9·012·66·89·13·94·9
Vehicles10·414·68·411·36·48·2
Metal goods not elsewhere specified1·11·51·21·71·21·5
Timber, furniture etc1·42·01·52·0
Construction3·65·03·64·94·55·8
Gas, electricity and water1·11·41·01·3
Transport and communication3·14·33·95·25·36·7
Distributive trades9·413·212·216·414·318·3
Insurance, banking, finance and business services1·11·63·04·15·87·5
Professional and scientific services9·213·09·613·012·916·5
Miscellaneous services5·98·37·710·48·811·2
Public administration and defence4·05·64·25·72·93·7

* Figures suppressed to avoid disclosure of information concerning an individual firm.

Unemployment Statistics

asked the Secretary of State for Employment (1) what is the latest number of those under 21 years in (a) the United Kingdom, (b) the west midlands and (c) the black country area of the west midlands who have been unemployed for 12 months and more; what was the percentage increase in each case since the changes in recording these figures; and what was the date on which the change took effect;(2) what is the latest number of those aged 45 years and over in

(a) the United Kingdom, (b) the west midlands and (c) the black country area of the west midlands who have

Claimants unemployed for over one year—11 April 1985

Aged under 20 years†

Aged 45 years and over

Total all ages

April 1985

Increase since October 1982‡ per cent.

April 1985

Increase since October 1982‡ per cent.

April 1985

Increase since October 1982‡ per cent.

United Kingdom110,23324·4432,55211·61,334,16134·9
West Midlands13,08214·955,0587·5164,18026·6
Black country area*4,08423·717,45610·351,45830·0

Also, changes in average earnings may reflect changes in the structure of employment and do not necessarily correspond to equivalent changes in rates of pay for comparable jobs.

Swindon

asked the Secretary of State for Employment what were the 15 largest categories of employment in the Swindon constituency in 1971, 1976, 1981 and in the latest available year; how many were employed in each category; and what percentage of the total work force these represent.

The available information is for the Swindon jobcentre area and is as follows.been unemployed for 12 months and more; and what has been the percentage increase in each case since the change in recording these figures;(3) what is the total amount in

(a) the United Kingdom, (b) the west midlands and (c) the black country area of the west midlands, who have been unemployed for 12 months and more; and what has been the percentage increase since the change in recording these figures.

The following information is in the Library. Percentage increases are shown since 14 October 1982, when the unemployment count was first based on the numbers of claimants to benefit at unemployment benefit offices.

* Figures relate to the former Dudly and Sandwell, Wolverhampton and Walsall travel-to-work areas, as defined in 1978. Figures for the new travel-to-work areas will be available shortly.

† Figures are not available for those aged under 21.

‡ Comparisons since October 1982 are affected by the 1983 Budget measures which that certain older men, mainly over 60, no longer need to sign on at an unemployment benefit office in order to receive supplementary allowance or national insurance credits.

asked the Secretary of State for Employment (1) if he will list the latest unemployment figures and percentages in each region and the percentage of those in each region who have been unemployed for 12 months and more;(2) if he will set out the unemployment figures and percentage in each region in May 1979, May 1982 and May 1984 and, in each case, the percentage of those who have been unemployed for 12 months and more.

Job Creation

asked the Secretary of State for Employment if he will publish a table showing the numbers of additional jobs for (a) employees and (b) self-employed that were created in (i) Scotland, (ii) England and (iii) Wales in the calendar years 1983 and 1984; and if he will publish similar tables for the number of part-time and full-time jobs created; and for men and women, respectively.

Personal Disposable Income

asked the Secretary of State for Employment what is his latest estimate of personal disposable income, as a percentage of the United Kingdom average, in Wales and the regions of England.

Available information relating to normal weekly disposable household income per head from the 1982 and 1983 family expenditure surveys show the following percentages:

Per cent.
North92
Yorkshire and Humberside90
North West95
East Midlands95
West Midlands95
East Anglia100
Greater London124
Remainder of South East113
South West102
Wales89
United Kingdom100

Trans Promotions Ltd

asked the Secretary of State for Employment (1) what information he has on the number of staff employed by Trans Promotions Ltd. in running its youth training schemes in each relevant Manpower Services Commission area; how this information compares with the average figures given in the report to the Manpower Services Commission youth training board of the Manpower Services Commission's survey of scheme providers, paper YTB 85/14, annex A, paragraph 1·1; and if he will make a statement;

(2) whether the Manpower Services Commission undertook any financial checks into the standing of the youth training scheme managing agent Trans Promotions Ltd. prior to the signing of a contract between Trans Promotions Ltd. and the Manpower Services Commission; and whether there are any plans to conduct such a check in the future;

(3) what steps he has taken to satisfy himself that the youth training schemes run by Trans Promotions Ltd. meet the minimum criteria of the Manpower Services Commission; and if he will make a statement;

(4) on what dates the large companies unit, the large companies sub-group of the youth training board and the youth training board of the Manpower Services Commission approved a contract to provide youth training scheme places between the Manpower Services Commission and the managing agent Trans Promotions Ltd.; on what dates the renewal of the contract for 1984–85 was approved; on what dates a list of work experience provider for 1984–85 was approved; and what steps he has taken to satisfy himself as to the actions of the above bodies and as to the adequacy and accuracy of the list of work experience providers;

(5) how many places on the youth training scheme are being offered by the managing agent Trans Promotions Ltd. nationally and by Manpower Services Commission area in the current year; how many trainees were in training in these places nationally and by Manpower Services Commission area on the latest available date; and how many trainees have entered such places by Manpower Services Commission area and nationally in the current year.

[pursuant to his reply, 17 May 1985, c. 241]:The first agreement between Trans Promotions Ltd. and the large companies unit of the Manpower Services Commission was exchanged on 9 May 1983. Scheme approval was given by officials of the large companies unit using authority delegated by the youth training board large companies unit sub-group. A renewal agreement for 1984–85 was exchanged on 29 June 1984 under the same procedure.Prior to the signing of agreements, the bulk of individual work experience placements were approved by officials of the large companies unit following consultation with officials of Manpower Services Commission training division area offices. As in all schemes, adjustments were made subseuently in the light of operational experience.Action by officials and agreements were endorsed by the youth training board large companies unit sub-group on 15 June 1983 in respect of 1983–84 and on 31 July 1984 in respect of 1984–85.The youth training board large companies unit sub group reports directly to the youth training board who are in turn responsible to the Commission.Contracts for 1985–86 have not yet been signed. The 1984–85 agreement covered 323 places nationally. A total of 100 trainees were in training on 25 March 1985; 220 trainees had entered the 1984–85 scheme by that date. It is not possible to provide an analysis of these figures by Manpower Services Commission training division area offices other than at disproportionate cost.The large companies unit applies national standards with regard to quality and financial status to the schemes that it negotiates. Routine checks were made to establish the company status of Trans Promotions Ltd. but a detailed investigation into its financial affairs was not made. Such an investigation would only be undertaken in the event of serious concern or doubt and there are no plans to make such an investigation in this case.All youth training schemes are regularly monitored by Manpower Services Commission officials to establish whether they meet current requirements for content and design laid down by the Commission. The large companies unit's current assessment of the Trans Promotion Ltd. scheme is that it is meeting current requirements.The report, presented to the Manpower Services Commission youth training board on 14 March 1985, showed that on average, the equivalent of eight full-time staff were employed by managing agents to manage, administer and provide training for each 100 trainees. However, the number of staff employed by individual managing agents varied depending on the extent to which elements of the programme were sub-contracted or offered in-house. Trans Promotions Ltd. has provided details of staffing in confidence and the large companies unit is satisfied that they are adequate.

Northern Ireland

Black Report

asked the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland if it is still intended to implement the Black report's recommendation that custodial and residential sentences for juveniles should be replaced by a single determinate residential order as announced by the then Minister of State to the Northern Ireland Committee on 5 November. 1980.

The Treatment of Offenders (Northern Ireland) Order 1980 replaced semi-determinate borstal training orders by provision for determinate sentences for young persons aged over 16 years convicted of imprisonable offences. Further legislation relating to the Black report recommendations on the sentencing of those aged 16 and under is still being considered.

European Social Fund

asked the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland what changes have been decided by the European Commission in the criteria for allocations from the European social fund; what are the implications for future allocations from the fund to Northern Ireland; and if he will make a statement.

The review of the European social fund completed in late 1983 resulted in entirely new regulations and guidelines governing the funds's operations which remained unchanged in 1984 and 1985. New guidelines for the Management of the fund in 1986 have just been adopted by the Commission, but it is too early to say what effect they may gave on allocations to Northern Ireland in that year. The distribution of fund assistance is influenced by many factors including, notably, the overall pressure of demand on its resources. I would expect that Northern Ireland's status as an area of absolute priority will mean that it will continue to receive high levels of support from the fund.

Birds (Licences To Kill)

asked the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland how many licences he issued in (a) 1983 and (b) 1984 and so far in 1985 to kill birds under section 16 of the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981; and if he will indicate in each case the species of bird involved, the number allowed to be killed, the location and the reason.

None. The Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 does not apply to Northern Ireland.

Legionnaire's Disease

asked the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland how many people in Northern Ireland are known by his Department or the communicable diseases surveillance centre to have died from legionnaire's disease in the last year.

Security

asked the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland what is the design capacity by modern standards for each prison in Northern Ireland, including the new prison; and what are the actual numbers in each prison at the present time.

[pursuant to his reply, 13 May 1985 c. 3]: The following is the normal capacity of each penal establishment and the present population:

EstablishmentCapacityPopulation
Armagh11456
Belfast600589
Maze (Compound)197
Maze (Cellular)800720
Malligan300328
Maghaberry (Male)450
Maghaberry (Female)56
Hydebank300207
There is no established capacity to the Maze (compound)

asked the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland if he will publish in the Official Report a table to show the following information, for each year since 1 January 1982 (a) the value of goods produced by each prison workshop in each Northern Ireland prison, (b) the value of goods produced on a per capita basis in each case, (c) the average number of hours worked by each prisoner in each prison per week and the average for the United Kingdom as a whole, (d) the number of prisoners who did not work in each year in each prison in Northern Ireland and (e) the average number of prisoners who are in each prison in Northern Ireland.

[pursuant to his reply, 13 May 1985, c. 3]: The available information is as follows:

Establishment and Industry

Value of goods produced by inmates

*

Value of goods produced per capita

Average number of hours worked each week by each inmate allocated to a prison industry

Average daily population

Financial year

Financial year

Financial year

1982–83

1983–84

1984–85

1982–83

1983–84

1984–85

1982–83

1983–84

1984–85

1982

1983

1984

£

£

£

£

£

£

HM Prison Armagh

Laundry5,2864,4894,8509981,31021·421·3545143
Garment manufacture53,47730,69830,9021,8062,809+¶10+¶11+¶9

HM Prison Belfast

Joinery8,530NilNilNilNilNilNil262 +¶263228 +¶405215 +¶388
Laundry25,589NilNilNilNilNilNil
Horticulture2,488NilNilNilNilNilNil
Firewood736NilNilNilNilNilNil
Garment manufacture16,295NilNilNilNilNilNil

HM Prison Maze (Compound)

NilNilNilNilNilNilNilNilNil316267234

HM Prison Maze (Cellular)

Joinery74,69626,153Nil1,561Nil5·46·6†817 +¶209843791
Metal fabrication50,79719,198Nil2,954Nil
Cement production7261,965Nil393Nil
Garment manufacture63,73536,5281,6223,479943
Laundry68,11274,05974,7345,4866,366

HM Prison Magilligan

Garment manufacture12,85623,42420,3851,9521,3634·33·1414437377
Shoe manufacture46,99034,43022,0724,7482,759
Metal fabricationNil8,72215,0212,1811,966
Firewood1,0071,0811,252131172
Horticulture1,1051,180Nil152Nil

HM Young Offenders Centre, Hydebank

Horticulture1,3051,4741,27429529013·712·2234 +¶12218 +¶12202 +¶11

* The number of inmates available for work varied from day-to-day and the figure quoted is based on goods produced by the average number of prisoners working assuming a working year of 50 weeks.

†This figure is only for the first six months of 1982 thereafter all remand and untried prisoners were moved to Her Majesty's prison, Belfast.
‡The information necessary to calculate these figures for the financial year 1982–83 is no longer available.
║As Her Majesty's prison, Belfast has become mainly a remand prison, prison industries ceased to operate there in November 1982. Some inmates continue to be employed in he laundry and the garden but these activities are not run on a commercial basis.
¶Remand/Untried.

To obtain the information requested on the number of prisoners who did not work in each year would involve the examination of each individual's prison record, since there are forms of work other than in a prison industry. This could only be done at disproportionate cost.

Questions about the number of hours worked by prisoners in other parts of the United Kingdom are matters for my right hon. and learned Friend the Secretary of State for the Home Department and my right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Scotland.

asked the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland what have been the average hours worked in each week in each prison in Northern Ireland by civilian teachers and instructors in each of the years or financial years 1982 to date.

[pursuant to his reply, 13 May 1985, c.3]: The weekly conditioned hours of full-time teachers in the Northern Ireland prison service consist of 18 to 22 hours class contact, depending on grade, but additional time is spent on preparatory work. The conditioned hours for civilian instructors are 42 a week. Since the escape from Her Majesty's prison Maze (cellular) in September 1983, however, it has not been possible to utilise fully these instructors.Details of the hours actually worked by civilian instructors are not readily available and could be obtained only at disproportionate cost.

Home Helps

asked the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland what was the average hourly pay for home helps in each of the years 1974 to 1984 in Northern Ireland.

[pursuant to his reply, 17 May 1985, c. 241–242]: The figures are as follows:

YearHourly rate (at November)
Pence
197475·93
197595·88
1976102·12
1977112·38
1978121·13
1979145·83
1980165·63
1981177·13
1982190·77
1983199·48
1984209·74

asked the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland how the average hourly pay for home helps in Northern Ireland relates to the average hourly pay for (a) full-time female manual workers and (b) full-time male manual workers in each of the years 1974 to 1984.

[pursuant to his reply, 17 May 1985, c. 241–242]: The figures are as follows:

Average hourly earnings

Home helps pay

Full-time women manual workers on adult pay rates

Full-time men manual workers on adult pay rates

Pence

Pence

Pence

197475·9352·480·7
197595·8875·7107·7
1976102·1297·8130·8
1977112·38105·9142·7
1978121·13120·1159·3
1979145·83129·6179·9
1980165·63159·7220·8
1981177·13184·3246·7
1982190·77195·3264·0
1983199·48206·3280·9
1984209·74221·4294·6