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Pay And Allowances

Volume 79: debated on Wednesday 22 May 1985

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asked the Lord Privy Seal if he will give the latest available figures on the pay and allowances of parliamentarians in (a) European Economic Community countries and (b) the United States of America, Canada and Australia.

The latest available figures on the pay and allowances of parliamentarians which have been compiled on a comparable basis are given in the 20th report of the Review Body on Top Salaries (May 1983). The figures for the countries referred to in the hon. Gentleman's question are as follows:

Country

Salary

Allowances

Chamber of DeputiesSame as Senator.Same as Senator.
LUXEMBOURG Chamber of DeputiesLF1,137,474 (£13,655) half of which is tax free, LF568.737 (£6,828).Half the salary is tax free, LF568.737 (£6,828), and is regarded as an allowance for expenses. Allowance of LF12,000 (£144) per annum towards the cost of car insurance premium.
NETHERLANDS Second ChamberVariable salary ranging from minimum of FL59,762 (£12,770) to FL93.881 (£20,060), according to income from outside occupations, all taxable.General allowance ranging from FL12,814 (£2,938) to FL5.476 (£5,476) according to distance of home from The Hague; intended to cover subsistence, administrative costs, postal and telephone costs etc. Travel allowance of FL9.460 (£2,021) per annum.
REPUBLIC OF IRELAND Dail EirearnIR£13,902 (£10,954), all taxable.Subsistence allowance of IR£17·50 (£13·89) per night for sittings of Dail or committees for MPs 20 miles or more from Dublin; IR£10 (£7·94) for Dublin MPs.
UNITED STATES SenateUS$60,662·50 (£35,684), all taxable. In 1977 a limit on outside earnings equivalent to 15 per cent, of the member's salary was imposed but this was increased to 30 per cent, in December 1982. Compared with Senators, members of the House of Representatives do not add substantially to their income by means of outside earnings.General allowance ranging from US$33,000 (£19,412) to US$143,000 (£84,118)—average of US$55,000 (£32,353) to cover travel, telephone costs, stationery, postage, constituent mailings and computer services. Varies according to population of state and distance from Washington. Staff allowance, varying according to population of state, ranging from US$621,054 (£365,326) to US$1,247,879 (£734,046) per annum From January 1983 the general allowance was increased to between US$36,300 (£21,353) and US$157,300 (£92,529). The staff allowance also increased but precise details are not yet available.
House of RepresentativesSame as Senator from December 1982, however, members of the House of Representatives will receive US$69,800 (£41,059)—the first time since 1796 that Senators and Congressmen have received different salaries.General allowance to cover same expenses as for Senator, ranging from $47,300 (£27,824) to US$233,000 (£137,059)—average US$103,000 (£60,588). Varies according to population of district and distance from Washington. Staff allowance of US$352,536 (£207,374), same for all members. Up to US$15,000 (£8,824) may be transferred to general allowance. From January 1983 the general allowance was increased to US$52,000 (£30,588). The staff allowance was also increased but precise details are not yet available.

Note:

Throughout this table the figures in £s given in brackets are converted from local currencies at the rates of exchange prevailing in October 1982.