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Written Answers

Volume 79: debated on Wednesday 22 May 1985

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Written Answers To Questions

Wednesday 22 May 1985

Attorney-General

Trials (Waiting Times)

asked the Attorney-General, how many cases are currently awaiting trial in (a) the Court of Appeal, and (b) the Divisional court; and how these figures compare with each of the past five years.

In the Court of Appeal Criminal Division, as at 30 April 2,536 persons had applications for leave to appeal or appeals before the court: of these 617 were awaiting a full court hearing. Corresponding figures for the end of each of the previous five years are as follows:

Persons whose applications for leave to appeal or appeals were before courtAwaiting full court hearing (1)
end 19802,531834
end 19812,414914
end 19822,516815
end 19833,3331,136
end 19842,545712

Note: (1) These figures are included in the first column.

In the Court of Appeal Civil Division the numbr of appeals outstanding at the end of April 1985 was 941. Corresponding figures, where available, for the end of previous years are as follows:

Appeals outstanding at the end of year shown

1980834
1981Not available
1982Not available
1983902
1984873

In the Divisional court of the Queen's Bench Division the total number of cases outstanding at the end of April 1985 was 1,201. Corresponding figures for the end of the previous five years are as follows:

Cases outstanding at end of year shown

1980242
1981246
1982696
19831,219
19841,681

Northern Ireland

Local Elections (Voting Rights)

asked the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland how many people were refused the right to vote in the local elections in Northern Ireland on 15 May because they were unable to produce the necessary documents.

The figures requested are not available. It is clear that some people wishing to vote but not able to produce one of the documents specified under the Elections (Northern Ireland) Act 1985 were refused ballot papers in accordance with the provisions of the Act. In many of these cases, however, the voters concerned subsequently returned to the polling place with an appropriate document and were then able to vote. The total turnout, at 60–61 per cent. compares with 65·0 per cent. at the 1981 local elections and 55·4 per cent. at the 1977 local elections: in some areas it was over 80 per cent.

Dogs (Licences)

asked the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland how many prosecutions were made in 1984 and with what result for (a) keeping a dog without a licence, (b) taking possession of a dog before a licence had been issued and (c) giving or selling a dog to a person who had not produced a licence.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave my hon. Friend the Member for Penrith and The Border (Mr. Maclean) on 15 April 1985, in columns 58 and 59.A detailed breakdown of the types of prosecution is not available. The fixed penalty system is applied to most licensing offences and in their reports councils only identify specific cases where attacks on persons or livestock are concerned resulting in the destruction of the dog.

Housing Executive

asked the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland when he will lay the latest accounts of the Northern Ireland Housing Executive before Parliament; and if he will make a statement.

The accounts of the Northern Ireland Housing Executive for 1983–84 together with the reports of the Local Government Auditor and of the Comptroller and Auditor-General thereon were laid today (Cmnd. 9512). The matters raised have been discussed between the Department of the Environment for Northern Ireland and the Housing executive and the agreed follow-up action will be monitored. In this occasion the report raises individual issues rather than criticisms of systems and in that sense it is encouraging.I have arranged for copies of a statement by the Housing Executive in response to the Local Government Auditor's Report to be placed in the Library of the House.

Electricity Industry (Capital Investment)

asked the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland if he will make a statement on his plans for future capital investment in the electricity industry in Northern Ireland.

Some 90 per cent. of the usable generating capacity in Northern Ireland is oil-fired. This heavy oil-dependence is the main reason for Northern Ireland's high electricity generating costs, and for the decision to provide a substantial Government subsidy to keep Northern Ireland electricity tariffs in close association with the highest area board in England and Wales. The cost of that subsidy—estimated to be more than £95 million in 1985–86—is becoming an increasing burden on the Northern Ireland public expenditure block. The Government and the Northern Ireland Electricity Service have therefore been anxious to explore how best the oil-dependence of the Northern Ireland electricity system might be significantly reduced.I have decided that the first step in reducing Northern Ireland's oil dependence should be the immediate conversion of the first phase of Kilroot power station to solid fuel-firing. In the first instance the station will be converted to coal-firing, although provision will be made in the design to retain the existing oil-fired capability, and to allow the future burning of a processed form of lignite at the station, should this prove to be technically feasible and economic. For this purpose I have made funds available within the Northern Ireland public expenditure block which will support the investment and enable the Northern Ireland Electricity Service to carry out the necessary works. The initial cost of the project is estimated at £94 million, at October 1984 prices, and the station is expected to be taken out of service in the years 1986 to 1988, and to recommissioned in 1989. After Kilroot is recommissioned as a coal-fired station, it is estimated that Northern Ireland Electricity Service fuel costs could be reduced by some £25 to £30 million per annum, which will represent a significant saving in public expenditure.At the same time I am very conscious of the contribution which cheap local lignite might make to reducing Northern Ireland Electricity Service generating costs, and the fact that a substantial proportion of total existing NIES capacity—as much as 35 per cent.—will be progressively retired throughout the 1990s. We have therefore given considerable thought to how Northern Ireland's future generating capacity needs should be met, and the extent to which lignite might feature in these plans. Our current assessment is that the most economically effective use of lignite would be in a purpose-built mine-mouth power station, and that lignite-fired plant would offer the cheapest option when new generating capacity is required in the 1990s. As an initial step therefore I have authorised the Northern Ireland Electricity Service to enter into the preliminary planning stages of a new lignite-fired power station to be constructed at the mouth of the lignite mine, and work on such studies has now begun.It should be realised, however, that the capital expenditure involved in the construction of a new power station will be substantial. Detailed assessments of the phasing of such capital expenditure and of its economic implications have to be carefully examined before a final decision on construction would be taken. In that context I am examining in depth the scope for private sector involvement in the development of lignite-fired electricity generation.

Employment

European Social Fund

89.

asked the Secretary of State for Employment what discussions he has had concerning the reform of the guidelines covering the European social fund.

My right hon. Friend and the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs have discussed the European Commission's proposed interpretation of its guidelines for 1985 with Commissioner Sutherland and President Delors respectively. So far as 1986 is concerned, officials discussed the draft guidelines with the Commission both informally and formally. The guidelines for 1986 were published by the Commission on 6 May.

Skillcentres

asked the Secretary of State for Employment if he will list the skillcentres which have been closed in the Greater London council area during the last five years.

The skillcentres at Poplar and Charlton, together with Charlton annexe, have been closed in the last five years. In addition, the annexes at Enfield, Perivale and Twickenham have been merged with their parent skillcentres.

Community Industry Scheme

asked the Secretary of State for Employment if he will provide a regional breakdown of the occupancy rates on the community industry scheme; and if he will give each region's allocation.

The latest statistics, for community industry regions, are set out in the table below:

Community industry regionOccupancy*Allocation
London and South-East589695
Midlands631665
Wales and South-West1,0071,025
North-West1,0741,155
Northern936975
Yorks and Humberside1,0331,045
Scotland1.4521,440
Total6,7227,000
* 11 April 1985.

Accident Reporting

asked the Secretary of State for Employment how he proposes to deal with the reporting of accidents in the period until new regulations are available.

The Health and Safety Commission is considering proposals for revised regulations on the reporting of accidents. The Notification of Accidents and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations 1980 continue in force.

Youth Training Scheme

asked the Secretary of State for Employment if he will publish in the Official Report statistics on numbers entering and numbers completing the youth training scheme by mode for each local education authority area in Yorkshire and Humberside for 1983–84, setting out the results for boys and girls separately.

The information requested is given in the table. The figures do not include young people who entered or completed construction industry training board schemes. There were few young people who entered the youth training scheme early enough in 1983 to complete their programmes in the 1983–84 financial year.

Entrants 1983–84

Completions 1983–84

Local education authority area

A

B1

B2

Total

A

BI

B2

Total

ROTHERHAM
Male6003202971,2170167
Female872992011,1720077
Total1,4724194982,389011314
SHEFFIELD
Male1,6675875942,848102425
Female1,6733864232,482011819
Total3,3409731,0175,330114244
WAKEFIELD
Male7644721801,4162761391
Female932155771,164114823
Total1,6966272572,58039021114
BARNSLEY
Male452209127788114116
Female589112797800718
Total1,0413212061,568121224
DONCASTER
Male6746481731,49521321135
Female1,0233511721,546387191
Total1,6979993453,04152192226
HUMBERSIDE
Male2,1071,1277854,0194213257
Female1,9855286933,206261523
Total4,0921,6551,4787,2256274780
LEEDS
Male1,3356942122,2412112235
Female1,493380451,918291030
Total2,8281,0742574,1595013265
NORTH YORKSHIRE
Male1,06330701,3702507
Female96314901,1120202
Total2,02645602,4822709
BRADFORD
Male8705373391,7460551267
Female801332541,1870381048
Total1,6718693932,93309322115
CALDERDALE
Male338371128837088088
Female34617086602063063
Total6845412141,43901510151
KIRKLEES
Male9513793211,651045045
Female741346971,184132033
Total1,6927254182,835177078
YORKSHIRE AND HUMBERSIDE TOTAL
Male10,8215,6513,15619,6283344991573
Female11,4183,0081,92716,3533625160347
Total22,2398,6595,08335,98169700151920

Overseas Development

Sub-Saharan Africa

asked the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what was the total overseas development assistance by the United Kingdom Government in sub-Saharan Africa during 1984 or the last year for which figures are available.

Gross public expenditure on British bilateral aid to sub-Saharan Africa during 1984 was £248 million. In addition, substantial amounts of British aid go to sub-Saharan Africa through various multilateral and European Community channels.

Nicaragua

asked the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what response he will make at the European Economic Community Council of Ministers to the Commission proposal that aid to Nicaragua should be doubled by member countries.

The Commission has not to date communicated to the Council any proposal to this effect. But the Commission is expected soon to forward proposals on ways by which the European Community could further relations, including aid, with Central America following the meeting last year of Foreign Ministers in San José.

Crown Agents

asked the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs when the 1984 annual report and accounts of the Crown Agents for Oversea Governments and Administrations will be published.

The 1984 report and accounts will be published on 29 May and I am arranging for copies to be placed in the Library of both Houses. Copies will be laid before the House after the recess.

Commonwealth Development Corporation

asked the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs when the 1984 annual report and accounts of the Commonwealth Development Corporation will be published.

The report and accounts will be published on 23 May. Copies have been laid in both Houses today. Copies are also being placed in the Library.

Defence

Budget

asked the Secretary of State for Defence if he will give, for each financial year from 1978–79 to the current year, the increase in real terms in the total defence budget over the previous year.

The information is as follows:

YearReal increase in outturn defence expenditure Percentage
1979–802·9
1980–812·7
1981–821·5
1982–836·0
1983–84*2·2
Note:
* Includes £251 million available for carry forward to 1984–85.
The outturn for 1984–85 is not yet available.

Army Officers

asked the Secretary of State for Defence how many Army officers bought themselves out of the service in (a) 1984 and (b) so far in 1985.

There is no provision in the regulations for officers to purchase their discharge from the Army. They may, however, be permitted to terminate their Service prematurely at their own request.The number of officers who left the Army through premature voluntary retirement during the periods in question was:

1984

1 January-31 March 1985

United Kingdom Trained Adult Male Officers*562128
United Kingdom Trained Adult Female Officers†299

* Female officers serving in RAMC, RADC, ALC, and RAVC are included in the UKTAM totals.

UKTAF officers are those serving in the WRAC and QARANC.

Phantom Aircraft

asked the Secretary of State for Defence what steps he has taken to satisfy himself as to the cost effectiveness of the recent purchase of Phantom F4J's from the United States Government.

This purchase was approved in accordance with the normal procedures of my Department which have as a primary objective the most cost-effective procurement of defence equipment.

asked the Secretary of State for Defence what was the cost of the Phantom F4J's recently purchased from the United States Government: what information he has as to (a) the original life expectancy of their airframes (b) their length of service with the United States Navy and (c) the remaining life expectancy of their airframes; and if he will make a statement.

The cost of the Phantom F4J project including refurbishment of 15 aircraft, training, spares and support equipment is some £125 million at current prices. The aircraft were refurbished before delivery and they are expected to be in service with the RAF well into the 1990s.

Falkland Islands (Airport)

asked the Secretary of State for Defence if he will make periodical reports to the House on the savings effected in the South Atlantic as a result of the opening of the new airport at Mount Pleasant.

I refer my hon. Friend to the reply I gave to the hon. Member for Carrick, Cumnock and Doon Valley on 22 April in column 386. The savings are expected initially to be of the order of those in that reply. My right hon. Friend will continue to keep the House informed.

Multi-Launch Rocket System

asked the Secretary of State for Defence, if he will make a statement regarding the latest position of the multi-launch rocket system project.

The MLRS basic system (phase I) is in production in the USA. Production of European requirements will be undertaken in Europe by an industrial consortium known as Europäische Productions Gesellschaft mbH (EPG). Work sharing between the European partners — France, Italy, Germany and the United Kingdom—was agreed in November last year. The offer by EPG for European production of MLRS is currently being considered by the participating nations and we expect that a contract will be awarded later this year. The ISD is planned for about 1990.A contract for development of a terminally guided warhead (MLRS phase III) for use with the basic system was awarded last November to MDTT Incorporated, a joint venture company of which Thorn-EMI is the United Kingdom member. The first stage of development is progressing well and will be completed in 1987. The system is planned to enter service in the early 1990s.

Type 23 Frigate

asked the Secretary of State for Defence what will be the value of the contracts to build a further three type 23 frigates.

The value of the contracts to build the next three type 23 frigates will depend upon the prices negotiated following receipt of tenders. As stated in Cmnd. 9430–1, the estimated unit cost of a type 23 frigate is £110 million at 1984–85 prices, including weapons and equipment fitted in the ship but excluding development costs.

asked the Secretary of State for Defence if he will specify the British shipbuilding companies which will be invited to tender for the next three type 23 frigates.

As my right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Defence said on 28 January, Swan Hunter Shipbuilders Ltd. will be invited to tender for the second type 23 frigate.It is intended to invite tenders for type 23 frigates 03 and 04 only from the United Kingdom shipyards with current experience of building destroyers and frigates for the Royal Navy: Cammell Laird Shipbuilders Ltd., Swan Hunter Shipbuilders Ltd., Vosper Thornycroft (UK) Ltd. and Yarrow Shipbuilders Ltd. We would consider requests from other United Kingdom companies on their merits at the time.

Trooping The Colour (Tickets)

asked the Secretary of State for Defence how many tickets are available for this year's trooping the colour; how they are being distributed; if he will list the bodies to which allocations are being made together with the number of tickets allocated in each case; how the current year's arrangements compare with those for previous years; and what is expected to be the total income from the sale of tickets.

Further to the reply which my right hon. Friend the Minister for the Armed Forces gave to the hon. Member for Stalybridge and Hyde (Mr. Pendry) on 25 January 1985 at columns 556 and 557, the distribution of tickets for the trooping the colour ceremony is arranged by the Brigade Major, HQ Household Division, Horse Guards. The list of bodies to which allocations have been made this year is:

Number
HM The Queen and the Royal Households92
Houses of Parliament300
Diplomatic Corps198
Ministry of Defence and Service Establishments1,734
Other Government Departments923
Household Division and Regiments (including those participating in Parade)1,714
Ambassador of the United States of America12
Lloyds Bank6
Metropolitan Police62
St. John's Ambulance6
Sheriffs of the City of London4

Number

Cavalry and Guards Clubs4
Elder Brothers of Trinity House2
Gordon Boys School6
Official Photographer2
Contractor (stand erection and dismantling)12
NAAFI4
Army Benevolent Fund14
Press45
St. Dunstans30
Ulster Defence Regiment12

I am not able to list precise allocations for 1984 as such records are not maintained, but broadly speaking the arrangements for the allocation of tickets have not changed over the years, except that since 1984 special provision is now made for wheelchairs.

The total income from the sale of tickets based upon the revenue for the 1984 parade is expected to be in the region of £70,000. Normally about 1,500 tickets are available for sale to the general public.

Raf Basic Trainer

asked the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the answer of 8 May, Official Report, column 386, why, following the telephone call made by the Principal Director of Contracts (Air), to the group commercial director of British Aerospace on 13 March to inform him of the deadline date for the tender for the new Royal Air Force basic trainer, the Controller of Aircraft on 15 March telephoned the managing director of British Aerospace to confirm that the latter understood that the bid received by the relevant contracts branch of his Department before noon on 14 March was British Aerospace's final offer.

Controller Aircraft rang Sir Raymond Lygo, managing director of British Aerospace, to satisfy himself that Sir Raymond understood that the company's bid received before noon the previous day was indeed its final offer. In doing so he neither encouraged Sir Raymond to make a further bid nor gave any indication that a further offer from British Aerospace might be accepted by the Ministry of Defence.British Aerospace did, however, submit later bids, but, although these narrowed the gap, they did not change the fact that the total acquisition cost would have been higher for the PC-9 than for the Tucano.

Skk 2400 Submarines

asked the Secretary of State for Defence if he will list in the Official Report the names of the shipyards which have submitted tenders for the construction of SKK 2400 submarines; and if he will make a statement.

The following shipyards have submitted tenders for the construction of the three submarines to follow HMS Upholder: Yarrow Shipbuilders Ltd., Cammell Laird Shipbuilders Ltd., Vickers Shipbuilding and Engineering Ltd. and Scott Lithgow Ltd. These tenders are under consideration. Decisions have yet to be taken on the size and timing of orders.

Auxiliary Oil Replenishment Vessels

asked the Secretary of State for Defence whether any foreign companies have been invited to tender for the first two auxiliary oiler replenishment vessels.

asked the Secretary of State for Defence which British shipbuilding companies have been invited to tender for the first two auxiliary oiler replenishment vessels.

The following companies have been invited to tender for the first two auxiliary oiler replenishment vessels: British Aerospace plc, Marconi Projects Ltd., Swan Hunter Shipbuilders Ltd., Harland & Wolff Ltd., Scott Lithgow Ltd. and Cammell Laird Shipbuilders Ltd.

asked the Secretary of State for Defence when he expects to place an order for auxiliary oiler replenishment vessels for the Royal Fleet Auxiliary.

asked the Secretary of State for Defence how many auxiliary oiler replenishment vessels will be required to support the Royal Navy surface fleet in the early 1990s.

No decision has been taken on the total number of auxiliary oiler replenishment vessels to be ordered.

Sea Harrier

asked the Secretary of State for Defence further to paragraph 408 of the "Statement on the Defence Estimates 1985", whether the BAe Sea Harrier FRS 1 is equipped with weapons for all its operational options while embarked on board Invincible class carriers.

It has been the policy of successive Governments neither to confirm nor deny the presence of nuclear weapons at particular locations.

Sub-Saharan Africa (Sales Missions)

asked the Secretary of State for Defence how many missions to sub-Saharan Africa were undertaken by the Defence Sales Organisation in 1984 or the last year for which figures are available.

There were five visits to sub-Saharan Africa by the Defence Sales Organisation in 1984.

Hms Otter And Hms Euralyus

asked the Secretary of State for Defence if he will list all the work, and its estimated cost, that has been or is to be done for the refit of HMS Otter and HMS Euralyus in Rosyth and Plymouth dockyards.

The royal dockyards at Rosyth and Devonport are providing certain assistance, including technical advice and guidance, direct to the contractors undertaking these refits. In addition, replacement items which have been or which may be issued to the contractors, some from MOD stocks, will in some cases have been fabricated or refurbished in the dockyards. The propeller shafts refurbished at Devonport — Official Report, Vol. 79, columns 57 and 58—are an example of the latter category. A running total of such assistance is not maintained centrally. Full records are, however, being maintained by the various MOD authorities responsible and the relevant costs will be taken fully into account when the final cost to the MOD of these refits is assessed.

Wales

Physiotherapists

asked the Secretary of State for Wales if he will undertake a survey to ascertain how many physiotherapists are needed to meet the requirements for physiotherapy in Wales; and how this compares to the numbers of established posts for physiotherapists in Wales and the numbers of trained physiotherapists available to fill these posts.

No. It is for each individual district health authority to assess its needs for physiotherapy staff in accordance with locally determined priorities.

A40 Whitland Bypass

asked the Secretary of State for Wales if he will give details of the expected start of the A40 Whitland bypass; and if he will make a statement as to the causes of its delayed start.

The scheme is presently expected to be ready to start in 1988. However, this is dependent on the satisfactory completion of engineering design and of the statutory procedures. The actual start will depend on the availability of resources.

Education Support Grants

asked the Secretary of State for Wales if he will make a statement about the amount of expenditure and the activities to be supported through education support grants in the financial year 1986–87.

Subject to Parliament's approval of regulations which will amend the Education Support Grant Regulations 1984 it is intended that expenditure to be supported by education support grant in 1986–87 will amount to £2·61 million in that year. It is proposed that £1·35 million of this total of planned expenditure will be accounted for by continuing expenditure arising from projects first approved in 1985–86. Roughly £1·26 million will be available to support expenditure on new activities and on the extension of existing ones. Grant will be paid at the rate of 70 per cent. of the amount of expenditure approved for support.The following table shows the new and extended activities, the amount of expenditure for each, a provisional assessment of the number of LEAs likely to be supported and the length of support. The precise division of the £1·26 million available and its distribution among authorities will not be settled until applications have been received and considered.

Category

New expenditure envisaged to be supported through ESGs in FY 1986–87 (cash) £ million

Provisional assessment of number of LEAs to be supported

Likely length of support

I. The teaching of science and technology as part of primary education0·07OneThree years
II. The provision of retraining and updating courses directed towards the needs of industry and commerce (PICKUP)0·13AllUp to two years
III. The development of the use of information technology at further education establishments, by providing equipment, preparing or providing course material and computer software, and training teachers employed at such establishments0·69AllOne year in the first instance with a possible extension up to a further four years
IV. The planning, development and co-ordination of provision to meet the educational needs, including the need for guidance, of those who are unemployed (excluding those currently receiving full time education)0·05AllTwo years with a possible extension for a further year
V. The provision of data processing equipment, accessories and software for use in the management of further education establishments0·07All or mostTwo to three years
VI. The development, provision and appraisal of a course of initial training for school governors0·01OneTwo years
VII. The provision of computerised learning aids at further education establishments for use by students with special educational needs0·08AllTwo years
VIII. The strengthening of college-employer links to improve the quality and relevance of NAFE provision0·04AllOne to two years
IX. Action within the education services to combat the misuse of drugs0·12AllOne year (with a possible extension for a further year)

Energy

Licences

asked the Secretary of State for Energy if he will list in the Official Report all the different types of licences operated or granted by his Department and the year in which they first came into operation.

The following are the types of licences granted or available under current legislation for which my Department is responsible.

Petroleum licences in operation or available under various Regulations made pursuant to the Petroleum (Production) Act 1934, as extended by the Continental Shelf Act 1964:—
  • Mining licence—landward: first granted in 1942.
  • Methane drainage licence—landward: first granted in1958.
  • Exploration licence—seaward: first granted in 1964.
  • Exploration licence—landward: first granted in 1973.
  • Production licence—seaward: first granted in 1964.
  • Production licence—landward: first granted in 1967
  • Appraisal licence—landward: none yet granted.
  • Development licence—landward: none yet granted.

Prime Minister

Whaling

asked the Prime Minister if she will transfer responsibilities relating to whaling issues to the Department of Environment prior to the International Whaling Commission meeting in July.

The present distribution of ministerial responsibility relating to whaling issues has not prevented the Government from pursuing policies within the International Whaling Commission designed to conserve whale populations, but if my hon. Friend wishes to let me have his reasons for suggesting such a transfer I will of course consider them with my right hon. Friends the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food and the Secretary of State for the Environment.

Scotland

Forestry Commission (Aerial Spraying)

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland where the Forestry Commission will be seeking approval to spray by aerial means 500 hectares of land with glyphosphate; and why alternative means of application have been discounted.

The programme that has now been drawn up covers less than 500 hectares of land. The areas to be sprayed are as follows:

ConservancyForest districtArea (hectares)
North EnglandBellingham100
East EnglandSherwood98
WalesLlanwynno200
In addition, an area of 46 hectares may be sprayed in the Brecon forest district of Wales Conservancy.Aerial spraying is the most efficient means available for applying glyphosphate on these areas.

Hearing Aids

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland how many outpatients are waiting to have a hearing aid fitted or exchanged in Scotland; and what is the average waiting time in each case.

Local Authority Expenditure

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland against which authorities he proposes to take action on the grounds of excessive and unreasonable expenditure.

I have decided to initiate action in terms of section 5 of the Local Government (Scotland) Act 1966 in respect of Edinburgh district council on the grounds that its planned expenditure for 1985–86 is excessive and unreasonable. A letter has today been sent to the council proposing a rate reduction of 5·2p and inviting it to make representations about the proposed reduction.

Stirling District Council(Local Inquiry)

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland whether he has received the report of the public local inquiry in Stirling on 29 April; and if he will make a statement.

I received the report of the local inquiry on 8 May. Having considered the report carefully, I am satisfied that Stirling district council is in default of its statutory duties under sections 23A of the Housing (Financial Provisions) (Scotland) Act 1972 and section 108(2) of the Local Government (Scotland) Act 1973, namely, to limit the amount of contribution out of their general fund to the estimated housing revenue account for the year 1985–86 to an amount not exceeding £2.026 million and to determine such district rate as will provide sufficient moneys to meet such part of the total estimated expenses to be incurred by the authority during the year 1985–86 as falls to be met out of monies raised by rates.Accordingly, I have today made an order under section 211 of the Local Government (Scotland) Act 1973 requiring Stirling district council to remedy their default within 21 days by revising their estimated housing revenue account so as to budget for a rate fund contribution within the limit set, and also by revising the district rate from 23p in the £ to not more than 20p in the £, and to take all necessary steps to give full effect to these decisions. Copies of the inquiry report and of the default order have been placed in the Library of the House.

Rates

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland if he will publish in the Official Report in respect of (a) each local authority area in Scotland and (b) the average for Scotland as a whole, the percentage increase in average rate bills for 1985–86 over 1984–85 for (i) domestic, (ii) industrial, (iii) commercial, (iv) miscellaneous, (v) public utility and (vi) all subjects.

[pursuant to his reply, 30 April 1985, c. 90]: Since the tabulated information asked for by the hon. Member, and by my hon. Friend the Member for Edinburgh, West (Lord James Douglas-Hamilton) is quite bulky, I am placing the computer print-outs in the Library rather than publishing them in the Official Report.

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland what are the average rates payments for (a) domestic ratepayers, (b) commercial ratepayers and (c) industrial ratepayers, for each district and region in Scotland.

[pursuant to his reply, 7 May 1985, c. 376]: Since the tabulated information asked for by my hon. Friend, and by the hon. Member for Gordon (Mr. Bruce), is quite bulky, I am placing the computer print-outs in the Library rather than publishing them in the Official Report.

Home Department

Public Disorder (Newham)

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will call for a report from the Commissioner of Police of the Metropolis concerning incidents of public disorder which occurred in Newham, east London on Saturday 11 May, detailing the cause and nature of the disturbance, the number of persons involved, the number of persons arrested, whether there were any injuries and the ethnic breakdown of the persons involved; and if he will make a statement on the substance of the report.

I understand from the commissioner that these incidents of public disorder occurred during a march and rally held by the Newham 7 Defence Campaign and others, in which some 1,500 people of various ethnic backgrounds took part. The mood of the marchers initially was good but scuffles later broke out and some arrests were made. As the demonstrators assembled for a short rally in Plashet park, missiles including stones, bottles and smoke canisters were thrown at the police, who used shields to protect themselves. After the crowd in the park was dispersed, some demonstrators remained in nearby streets and bricks were thrown at a police vehicle, but eventually all the demonstrators dispersed. During the afternoon 15 police officers sustained minor injuries and one demonstrator, who had been struck on the head by a brick, was taken to hospital. Fifteen people were arrested of whom three were white, nine black and three of Asian origin.

Milton Keynes Prison

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many cells in the proposed prison at Milton Keynes will be for single occupation and how many for double or multiple occupation.

The nature of the living accommodation for the proposed prison at Milton Keynes will be determined later this year when the design brief is finalised.

Bicester Prison

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many cells in the proposed prison at Bicester will be for single occupation and how many will be for double or multiple occupation.

Police (Greater Manchester)

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department by how many officers the Greater Manchester police force was below its authorised establishment at 31 March; to what reasons he ascribes this reduction in the strength of the force; and if he will make a statement.

The authorised establishment of the Greater Manchester police is 6,943, an increase of 208 since May 1979. The strength of the force was 6,736 on 31 March 1985. Police manpower levels fluctuate from month to month because of different recruiting and wastage patterns, seasonal changes and other local reasons. I understand that there was further recruitment to the Greater Manchester police in April, and the present strength is 6,744. The number of full-time civilian staff in the force has increased by 176 to 1,437 since May 1979, including an additional 76 during the past year.

Missing Persons

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the answer of 14 May regarding sources of information on missing persons, why accurate statistical information could be provided only at disproportionate cost from the police national computer; and if he will publish such information as is available for the last five years together with the relevant qualifications on its accuracy.

The Police National Computer provides an operational service to police forces and holds information about missing persons only for the minimum period essential to that purpose. Information is not retained for statistical purposes and it is therefore not possible to provide information about the number of persons reported missing over the last five years.

Fire Brigades (Cover)

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will make a statement about the review of the national recommended minimum standards of fire cover which has been undertaken by the central fire brigades' advisory councils for England and Wales and for Scotland.

Table 1
Juveniles and vulnerable adults║ recorded as missing from outside the Metropolitan police district including overseas + including those outstanding from previous year‡
United Kingdom other than MPD, and overseasNumber of persons*
Year
MaleFemaleTotal
Under 1414–1718+TotalUnder 1414–1718+Total
197529119529677232402975601,237
197630101625756242203225661,322
19771002487751,123514134369002,023
1978361449171,097343265449042,001
1979371679801,184232655428302,014
1980471681,0751,290162145557852,075
1981451691,1751,389191695957832,172
1982531641,2161,433401745637772,210
198340199733972352144016501,622
1984¶58167623848431853115391,387
* The same person may be reported missing more than once.
+These figures are not comprehensive because other forces are not required to report to the Missing Persons Bureau cases of missing juveniles and do not report to the bureau cases relating to non-vulnerable adults.
‡Persons recorded as missing at the end of the year plus those traced or identified during the year.
║"Vulnerable adults" include the elderly, the sick and those whose manner of disappearance gave cause for special concern
¶The figures for 1984 may have been increased by improved procedures for recording those missing for only a short period.

A joint committee of the central fire brigades' advisory councils began a review of the recommended minimum standards of fire cover and of the requirements of special emergency and other services in July 1981. The committee's review was completed in November 1984 and its report was subsequently presented to the advisory councils. The principal recommendations are that the current minimum standards should not be changed but that fire authorities should review the categorisation of the risk of fire in their areas in the light of guidance contained in the report. The advisory councils have endorsed the report's recommendations and so now do I and my right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Scotland. Accordingly, the report, a copy of which has been placed in the Library, is being sent to fire authorities today together with a circular commending its recommendations to them. In addition, my right hon. Friend arid I have asked our fire service inspectorates to be ready to assist fire authorities in achieving consistency in application and to monitor how individual fire authorities carry out the recommendations in their areas.

Missing Persons

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will publish a table showing juveniles and vulnerable adults who were (a) recorded as missing from outside the Metropolitan police district, including overseas, and (b) who were traced or identified, broken down under each heading by age and sex, for each of the last ten available years; and if he will make a statement.

[pursuant to his reply, 16 May 1985, c. 172]: I understand from the Commissioner of the Police of the Metropolis that the available information from the missing persons bureau of the Metropolitan police is as given in the following tables. Comprehensive statistics on missing persons are not collected centrally. The procedures for the recording of persons who were missing for a short period only were improved in 1984 and this may have increased the numbers recorded by the missing persons bureau.

Table 2

Juveniles and vulnerable adults, ‡ recorded as missing from outside the Metropolitan police district including overseas' and traced or identified

United Kingdom other than MPD, and overseas

Number of persons

*

Year

Male

Female

Total

Under 14

14–17

18+

Total

Under 14

14–17

18+

Total

1975138017526810173134317585
1976115419726210135122267529
197775180260515322832125271,042
19783010826540322257225504907
19791912625439911219204434833
1980191082133403151157311651
1981221302373895140167312701
198225952563766124114244620
19831413627342315153193361784
1984║3613417434431147120298642

* The same person may be reported missing more than once.

†These figures are not comprehensive because other forces are not required to report to the Missing Persons Bureau cases of missing juveniles and do not report to the bureau cases relating to non-vulnerable adults.
‡"Vulnerable adults" include the elderly, the sick and those whose manner of disappearance gave cause for special concern.
║The figures for 1984 may have been increased by improved procedures for recording those missing for only a short period.

Environment

Mansion House Square Site

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment when he expects to announce his decision on the proposals to redevelop the Mansion House Square site.

My decision to dismiss the appeal and thereby refuse permission for the proposed development of the Mansion House Square site was issued today. Copies of the decision letter have been placed in the Library of both Houses and the Vote Office.

Radioactive Waste

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment if it is proposed to extend the duty to accept radioactive wastes to all or any of the operators of landfill refuse sites.

Under section 9(5) of the Radioactive Substances Act 1960 there is a duty on a waste disposal authority to accept radioactive waste on a refuse disposal site specified in an authorisation for disposal of that waste granted by the relevant Minister under section 6 of the Act. There is no plan at present to extend this statutory duty to operators of private waste disposal sites.

Rateable Values

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment if he will publish in the Official Report the number of domestic hereditaments in England on an authority by authority basis with a rateable value of under £400.

Homes (Tenant Exchanges)

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment how many tenants exchanged homes between (a) England and Scotland and (b) England and Wales in 1984.

English local authorities report in their HIP returns the numbers of their dwellings which have been let during the year to 31 March through the national mobility scheme (and in London under the Greater London mobility scheme and the inter-borough nomination scheme), those let through the tenant exchange scheme, and any other dwellings let to tenants to other authorities under exchange agreements.

The information provided is not broken down according to the originating area, nor do authorities provide information on numbers of tenants who have left their stock under exchange arrangements.

Households (South-East England)

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment (1) what factors lie behind the differential between the figure of new households in the south-east projected for the decade 1981 to 1991 in his Department's report "1981-Based Estimates of Numbers of Households in England, the Regions, Counties 1981–2001", in February and the projected figure given by officials of his Department to the south-east regional plan inquiry in December 1984;(2) if he will publish in the

Official Report the figures for the postulated rates of household formation in the south-east for the decade 1981 to 1991 which were being projected by his Department in (a) October 1981, (b) November 1984 and (c) February 1985;

(3) what features of the model used by his Department for forecasting rates of household formation in its February report "1981-Based Estimates of Numbers of Households in England, the Regions, Counties 1981–2001", are new; and on what basis the old model has been discarded;

(4) what is the basis of his Department's projection in the report "1981-Based Estimates of Numbers of Households in England, the Regions, Counties 1981–2001", concerning the increase in the category Other Households in the Greater London Council area in the decade 1981 to 1991 and subsequent decrease in the following decade;

(5) what is the basis of his Department's projection in the report "1981-Based Estimates of Numbers of Households in England, the Regions, Counties 1981–2001", concerning the increase in the category Other Households in Hampshire in the decade 1981 to 1991 and subsequent decrease in the following decade.

The household projections published by the Department are derived from projections of the population of men and women of different ages and marital status by applying the appropriate "headship rates" —the proportions who will head households.The figures released in 1981 were based on headship rates from the censuses of 1961, 1966 and 1971 extrapolated to 1991. These were applied to "1979-based" population projections published by the Office of Population and Censuses and Surveys, analysed by marital status on the basis of projections on the Government Actuary's Department. Separate headship rates were derived for 24 categories: men, women, ages 15–29, 30–44, 45 but below retirement age, retirement age (men of 65 or over and women of 60 or over); married, widowed or divorced, single.To incorporate the figures from the 1981 census, a new mathematical procedure was devised to extrapolate from four instead of three sets of data. The projected headship rates were applied to the OPCS "1981-based" population estimates. These incorporated the main census results. Initially the headship rates were derived for and applied to the same age, sex and marital status categories as

South-East Region: Projected Households
Thousands
1979-based1981-based
ProvisionalPublished
Type of household19811991Increase19811991Increase19811991Increase
Married couple4,0034,083803,8523,912603,8593,92061
Lone parent4645145050259795503641138
One person1,6162,0294131,4961,8433471,4941,900406
Other3663811545950041466581115
All6,4487,0065586,3096,8525436,3227,042720
Private household population16,54116,92438316,72717,13240516,72717,132405
Average household size2·572·422·652·502·652·43
The increase in "other" households in the decade 1981 to 1991 and the decrease in 1991 to 2001 apply generally across the country, not just to London and Hampshire. This reflects a combination of changes in the age structure of the population and of trends in headship rates for households.

Local Government Reform

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment, in the event of the abolition of the Greater London council, if the Government will ensure that the Greater London council's successor bodies provide facilities for the disabled at the same level as that currently provided by the Greater London council.

I see no reason why abolition of the GLC should harm the interests of disabled people.

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment which consultants have been (a) approached and (b) engaged by his Department to carry out an initial appraisal of the tasks in order to draw up for use by the residuary bodies (i) an initial brief, (ii) an action plan, (iii) a model organisational structure and (iv) suggested before. The resulting figures for the south-east region are those which were provided to the London and South East Regional Planning Conference Housing Issues Group as provisional results and at its request in December last.These provisional results were scrutinised in the Department and the method was then improved by splitting the age groups into five-year bands for England as a whole. In particular, this corrected for the effect of a relatively large number of births in the 1960s and a lower number in the 1970s which meant that the 15 to 29 age group in 1981 contained an unusually high proportion under 20 and in 1991 an unusually low proportion under 20. The headship rates were derived from only a 10 per cent. sample of the census data and, for this reason, projections for sub-divisions of England have not been made in that detail. Instead, the estimates for the different types of households—married couples, lone parent, one person and "other" households—within the broader age-bands used initially have been adjusted for each area pro rata to the changes in the England totals. The changes between the provisional and final published estimates are predominantly among young single people living on their own or heading "other" households and these households are disproportionately common in the south-east and particularly in London.The projected figures for 1981 and 1991 are as follows:arrangements for liaison with the local authorities in their areas, in the event of the abolition of the Greater London council and the metropolitan county councils; and what is the estimated budget for the consultants' costs.

My Department has recently commissioned Price Waterhouse to undertake such a study in relation to the London residuary body, and Peat Marwick in relation to the six metropolitan counties. It is not our practice to reveal details of fees negotiated.

Onshore Oil And Gas (Exhibition)

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment if he will arrange for an exhibition relating to onshore oil and gas activity to be displayed in the Upper Waiting Hall.

I understand that arrangements have been made with the authorities of the House for the exhibition to be held in the Upper Waiting Hall from 3 to 7 June. Also available at the exhibition will be copies of a new booklet setting out the stages of oil and gas operations and the safeguards which apply to protect the environment.

Local Government Reform

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment if he will publish in the Official Report a list of the voluntary bodies for which he has approved grants by the Greater London council under section 137 of the Local Government Act 1972.

[pursuant to his reply, 28 March 1985, Vol. 76, c. 338]: Specific consent under section 7 of the Local Government (Interim Provisions) Act 1984 has been given for expenditure by the Greater London council under section 137 of the Local Government Act 1972 on assistance to the following organisations:

  • Advance
  • African People's Historic Monument Foundation (UK)
  • Asian Community Action Group
  • Beormund Community Centre
  • Black Londoners Action Committee
  • Black People's Information Centre
  • Black Teens Publications Ltd.
  • British Trust for Conservation
  • Camden Training Centre
  • Caribbean Educational Project
  • Caribbean Teachers Association
  • Carila Resource Centre
  • Caribbean Studies Group
  • Centerprise Ltd.
  • Central London Youth Project
  • Central Wandsworth Youth Advisory Service
  • Chinese Information and Advice
  • Clays Lane Community Co-op
  • Community Information Project
  • Community Land and Workspace Services Ltd.
  • Community Organisations Forum
  • Community Roots Trusts
  • Community Service Volunteers
  • Conference of Ethnic Minorities Senior Citizens
  • Creation for Liberation
  • Credit Unions of Great Britain
  • Drake Fellowship
  • Ealing Community Law Centre
  • Ecological Parks Trust
  • Elephant Jobs
  • Ethiopian World Federation
  • Family Welfare Association Ltd.
  • Federation of Ethnic Minority Organisations
  • Federation of Independent Advice Centres
  • Ghana Union
  • Greater London Citizens Advice Bureaux — Welfare Rights
  • Unit
  • Grass Roots Self Help Project
  • Haringey Womens Training and Education Centre
  • Hammersmith Crisis Centre
  • Haringey Irish Association
  • Hillingdon Community Newspaper
  • Hillingdon Legal Resource
  • Hotel and Catering Industry Training Board
  • Hybrid Vehicle Development
  • Indian Workers Association
  • Information on Ireland
  • Institute of Race Relation
  • Interchange Trust Ltd.
  • Islington Dial-A-Ride
  • Lambeth Inner City Consultative Group
  • Law Centres Federation
  • Lewisham Women's Training Workshop
  • Local Radio Workshop
  • London Association of Community Relations Councils
  • London Community Projects Design Service
  • London Cycling Campaign
  • London Friend
  • London Interpreting Project
  • London New Technology Network
  • London Voluntary Service Council
  • London Wildlife Trust
  • Manor House Centre for Judaism
  • Migrant Service Unit
  • New Grapevine
  • New Ways to Work
  • Newham Association of Education and Training
  • Newham Community Renewal Programme
  • North Kensington Law Centre
  • North London Garages Group Training Association
  • North London Training Workshop
  • Notting Hill Adventure Playground
  • Nucleus-Earls Court Community Action
  • Paddington Farm Trust Ltd.
  • Palingsworth House Ltd.
  • Parents Association for Educational Advance
  • Passage Day Centre
  • Portuguese Community Centre
  • R T Studios
  • Racism Awareness Programme Trust
  • Rastafari Universal Zion
  • Redbridge Asian Women's Association
  • Redbridge Community Care
  • Response Community Projects
  • Roehampton and Putney Community Law Centre
  • Royal Town Planning Institute
  • Shalom Justice and Peace Centre
  • Shri Guru Valmik Sabha
  • Society of Voluntary Associates
  • South Bank Polytechnic
  • Southall Community Law Centre
  • Tabernacle Community Association Ltd.
  • Tooting and Balham Law Centres
  • Tottenham Community Projects
  • Tower Hamlets Association for Racial Justice
  • Tower Hamlets Advanced Technology Training
  • Tower Hamlets Environment Trust
  • Tower Hamlets Information Research and Resource Centre
  • Tower Hamlets Law Centre
  • Town and Country Planning Association
  • Vince Hines Foundation
  • Waltham Forest Chamber of Commerce
  • Waltham Forest Chamber of Commerce Training Trust Ltd.
  • Waltham Forest Social Resource Centre
  • Wandsworth Legal Resource Project
  • Wells Park Health Project
  • Wesley Hall Community
  • West Indian Ex-Servicemen's Association
  • West London Garages Group Training Association
  • Women and Training South London
  • Women in Print
  • World Wildlife Fund

Glc And Metropolitan County Councils

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment what is his current estimate of the number of staff needed by each of the residuary bodies due to take over in the event of the abolition of the Greater London council and the metropolitan county councils.

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment what support arrangements he intends to set up in the regions for each of the residuary bodies in the event of the abolition of the Greater London council and the metropolitan county councils; and what is the estimated cost.

After their formal establishment, the residuary bodies will be responsible for making their own arrangements for support services.

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment in the event of the abolition of the Greater London council and the metropolitan county councils, what is his most recent estimate of (a) the reduction in the number of jobs and (b) redundancies in each of the authorities concervned.

I have nothing to add to the estimates given by my right hon. Friend the Minister for Local Government in his reply to my hon. Friend the Member for Surbiton (Mr. Tracey) on 30 November 1984 at column 611–14. As my right hon. Friend made clear, the numbers will depend on decisions by the successor authorities. If the authorities behave responsibly, we expect redundancies to be significantly fewer than reductions in posts. A Government amendment has just been made in another place to clause 57 of the Local Government Bill which is directed towards this objective.

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment if any approaches have been made by his Department to existing individual members of staff of the Greater London council and the metropolitan county councils in respect of future employment; and if he will make a statement.

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment how many staff will be allocated by his Department to provide support for the proposed chairman and core members of the residuary bodies prior to their formal institution; and what is the estimated cost.

This has yet to be decided, but the manpower and the associated costs will be met from within existing provisions.

Lgr2 Division

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment how many staff are employed in LGR2 division of his Department; and what is the estimated annual cost.

The division consists of seven staff. The cost, including accommodation, of employing these staff for a whole year would be approximately £176,000 (1984 prices).

Departmental Cars (Cost)

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment, pursuant to the answer of 9 May, Official Report, column 467–68, if he will give the reasons for the annual increases of £2,600 between the years 1980–81 and 1981–82 and between 1981–82 and 1982–83 in respect of costs to provide cars for the Secretary of State and five of the departmental Ministers; why the increases were uniform; why the costs of car provision for one of the Parliamentary Under-Secretaries of State declined by £8,060 between 1980–81 and 1981–82 when costs were increasing for all other Ministers; what caused the annual increase in car costs of £4,680 for all Ministers between 1982–83 and 1983–84 except one; and why the costs remained stable for the Secretary of State's car between 1983–84 and 1984–85 whilst over the same period it declined by a uniform £2,600 per annum in respect of four of his departmental Ministers.

Education And Science

Infant Teachers

asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science if he will make a statement on the current availability of suitably qualified infant teachers in (a) England and Wales and (b) Inner London; what representations he has received on the issue; and if he will take steps to increase the number of teacher training places for infant teachers.

No representations have been made to my right hon. Friend on the current availability of suitably qualified infant teachers nationally, or in inner London in particular, and he has no evidence that authorities are experiencing difficulties in recruiting such teachers. Visits by HM inspectors have shown that many teacher training institutions have responded positively to a Departmental letter, issued in March 1983, inviting those with experience in the primary phase to increase their provision for the training of teachers of the 3 to 8-year-old age range. The criteria for the assessment of courses of initial teacher training, issued in April 1984 by my right hon. Friends the Secretaries of State for Education and Science and for Wales, require that the approach to teaching method in courses should differentiate according to the age group the student intends to teach (whether primary or secondary), and that, within primary, special emphasis should be given to particular age ranges, such as 3–8. In March this year, my right hon. Friends announced that intakes to courses of initial teacher training for the primary phase should increase from 8,620 in 1985 to 10,950 in 1989. The UGC and the national advisory body for public sector higher education are currently considering the allocation of those intakes to institutions.

University Teachers (Pay)

asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science how many letters he has received on university teachers' pay since 20 April.

The Department has received about 1,700 letters on the pay of university academic and related staff.

School Leavers

asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science if he will publish in the Official Report statistics on the occupational destinations of school leavers in each local education authority in Yorkshire and Humberside by numbers and as proportions for the most recently available year, setting out the results for boys and girls separately.

The information requested is not available. Some information at regional level will be available as a result of a series of studies of young people aged 16 to 19 commissioned jointly by the Department of Education and Science, the Manpower Services Commission and the Department of Employment in England and Wales. Preliminary results, covering the experiences of young people who reached the minimum school leaving age in 1983–84, are expected to become available towards the end of this year.

asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science if he will publish statistics in the Official Report on the general certificate of education/certificate of secondary education achievements of school leavers in each local education authority in Yorkshire and

School leavers, England 1982–83
Maintained schools, Yorkshire and Humberside region
BoysGirls
Proportion of leavers with no A level passes but:Proportion of leavers with no A level passes but:
Total leavers 1000's)1+A level passes5+ higher grade O level/CSE passes1–4 higher grade 0 level/CSE passes1+ other grade passesNo graded resultsTotal leavers (000's)1+A level passes5+ higher grade O level/CSE passes1–4 higher grade O level/CSE passes1+ other grade passesNo graded results
Barnsley1·868·97·220·647·515·81·977·611·627·543·310·1
Doncaster2·4411·57·225·044·212·12·7012·86·435·935·89·2
Rotherham2·478·09·330·641·310·81·9912·211·626·839·310·0
Sheffield4·4514·49·421·344·011·04·1013·38·032·237·68·9
Bradford4·1712·16·121·240·919·73·6911·19·127·340·711·8
Calderdale1·4419·08·527·932·412·21·5415·27·533·237·56·6
Kirklees3·011·16·926·138·411·53·0419·110·330·331·78·6
Leeds5·4012·56·025·244·312·05·1914·59·430·036·59·6
Wakefield2·485·69·922·647·014·92·747·211·330·739·211·6
Humberside7·6114·49·222· 837·516·16·7012·210·727·038·611·3
North Yorkshire5·1218·111\·023·837·89·45·6822·111·029·532·15·3
Total region40·4513·38·323·941·113·439·3414·09·829·737·09·4

Source: School Leavers Survey. Proportions are subject to sampling error.

Note: Higher grade O level/CSE passes defined as O level passes grades A-C and CSE grade I. Other grades defined as O level passes D, E and CSE grades 2–5.

Education Support Grants

asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science whether he can yet make a statement about the amount of expenditure and activities to be supported through education support grants in the financial year 1986–87 in England.

The Education (Grants and Awards) Act 1984 empowers the holder of my office to pay education support grant to local education authorities in England. Education support grants were first available in the 1985–86 financial year when a total of £30 million of expenditure was planned for. Of the planned £30 million expenditure of £29·5 million has been approved for support.It is intended that education support grant will again be available in 1986–87. Expenditure so supported will amount to some £40 million in that year. It is proposed that £18.8 million of this total of planned expenditure will be accounted for by continuing expenditure arising from projects first approved in 1985–86. Roughly £21·5 million will be available to support expenditure on new activities and on the extension of existing ones. Grant will be paid at the rate of 70 per cent. of the amount of expenditure approved for support through education support grants.My right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Wales and I will shortly lay before Parliament draft Regulations setting out the new and extended purposes for or in connection with which we propose to pay education support grants in 1986–87. Those regulations will amend

CategoryNew expenditure envisaged to be supported through ESGs in FY 1986–87 (cash) £ millionProvisional assessment of number of LEAs to be supportedLikely length of support
I. The teaching of science and technology as part of primary education2·5up to 443 years

Humberside by numbers and as proportions for the most recently available year, setting out the results for boys and girls separately.

Information is given in the table.the Education Support Grants Regulations 1984 and will be subject to approval by both Houses of Parliament. The laying of the amending regulations follows consultations that I have had with the Association of County Councils and the Association of Metropolitan Authorities and consultations that my right hon. Friend has had with the appropriate local authority organisations in Wales.The following table shows the new and extended activities which I propose should rank for education support grants in England in 1986–87, the amount of expenditure for each, a provisional assessment of the number of LEAs likely to be supported and the length of support. The precise division of the £21.5 million available for new and extended activities between these purposes and the number of authorities to be supported will not be settled until applications have been received and considered.Should Parliament approve the regulations, a circular inviting bids will be sent to all education authorities in England. It is proposed that authorities be asked to submit bids by 1 October 1985 in order that decisions on the bids to be supported should be announced prior to the settling of budgets in 1986–87. It is envisaged that decisions on applications will be announced in December 1985.In order to assist local education authorities in considering how they might respond to the Government's proposals, copies of a draft of the circular will shortly be sent to each local education authority under cover of a letter making clear that the regulations to which it relates are subject to the approval of both Houses of Parliament. Copies will also be placed in the Libraries of both Houses.

Category

New expenditure envisaged to be supported through ESGs in FY 1986–87 (cash) £ million

Provisional assessment of number of LEAs to be supported

Likely length of support

II. Pilot projects to improve the quality or range of the curriculum provided in primary schools in rural areas0·5around 62–5 years
III. Pilot projects to meet the educational needs of those from ethnic minorities, to promote harmony between different racial groups, or in other ways to prepare pupils and students for life in a multi-ethnic society1·0between 20 and 303–5 years
IV. The provision of retraining and updating courses directed towards the needs of industry and commerce (PICKUP)1·6around 36up to 2 years
V. The development of the use of information technology at further education establishments, by providing equipment, preparing or providing course material and computer software, and training teachers employed at such establishments9·0the majority1 year in the
VI. The planning, development and co-ordination of provision to meet the educational needs, including the need for guidance, of those who are unemployed (excluding those currently receiving full time education)1·6about half of all LEAs2 years with a possible extension for a further year
VII. The provision of data processing equipment, accessories and software for use in the management of further education establishments1·0the majority2–3 years

*VIII. The development, provision and appraisal of courses of initial training for school governors

0·1around 102 years

*IX. The provision of services to support parents in the teaching of children under five with special educational needs

up to 1·2around 35a maximum of 3 years for any one LEA

*X. The provision of computerised learning aids at further education establishments for use by students with special educational needs

0·5the majority2 years

*XI. The strengthening of college-employer links to improve the quality and relevance of NAFE provision

0·5around 251–2 years

*XII. Action within the education service to combat the misuse of drugs

2·0the majority1 year (with a possible extension for a further year)

* New activities to be supported in 1986–87.

Drugs

asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science whether he is yet in a position to make a statement about the further action to be encouraged within the education service aimed at preventing the misuse of drugs.

As I am announcing separately today, this is one of the activities which I am proposing should be eligible for education support grants in 1986–87. The money available should be sufficient to allow every local education authority to appoint or second a member of staff at a suitable level to stimulate or co-ordinate action aimed at the prevention of drugs misuse or to take other suitable action in the light of local circumstances. The grant is intended also to cover overheads and operating expenses. The action should lead to increased advice and support for schools and colleges, more training for their staff, and improved co-ordination with the work of other local agencies. Over two years the grants would support expenditure of some £4 million.

Teachers (Dispute)

asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science if he will make a further statement on the teachers' pay dispute.

asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science if he will make a statement on the current teachers' pay dispute.

asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science what progress has been made since 2nd May to resolve the current teachers' pay dispute.

asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science whether he will make a statement on the teachers' dispute.

asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science if he will make a statement on the current dispute between teachers and their employers.

asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science if he will make a statement about the progress of the teachers' pay talks.

[pursuant to his oral reply, 21 May 1985, c. 842]: I wrote yesterday evening to the employers' leaders on Burnham making clear the Government's present position in relation to both 1985–86 and 1986–87, in advance of the Burnham committee meeting fixed for 23 May. Because of the wide public interest in these matters I have made the text of the letter and its annex on teachers' duties publicly available. These are set out below.

Councillor P. D. Merridale
Chairman
Association of County Councils
Eaton House
66A Eaton Square
London SW1W 9BH21 May 1985

Dear Philip

Throughout the current round of negotiations in the Burnham Primary and Secondary Committee, and the associated salary structure talks, I have tried to ensure that the Government's position is understood by those concerned, particularly in relation to the possibility that some additional resources might in the Government's view be justified. I think it right to make the Government's present position clear in advance of the meeting of the Burnham Primary and Secondary Committee fixed for 23 May, in relation to both 1985–86 and 1986–87.

In the light of the position reached in this year's negotiations. the Government is not able to make any additional resources available for teachers' pay in 1985–86. The cost in 1985–86 of any settlement must therefore be within what local authorities can already afford to pay, however the settlement is reached.

There has been debate about what should be regarded as the extent of teachers' contractual responsibilities. The Government believes it would be helpful if there were a generally accepted view on this matter, and if the range of teachers' duties was clearly linked with their contracts of employment. I enclose a note setting out the Government's provisional view on these duties. The Government would welcome views on these as a step toward agreement being reached as part of the basis for negotiations about teachers' pay for 1986–87. In the Government's view that agreement could exclude mid-day supervision from the range of teachers' duties from 1986–87. The Government would then provide in the 1986–87 Rate Support Grant settlement some additional resources for mid-day supervision costs.

For 1986–87 the Government would be willing to provide some additional resources for teachers' pay in the Rate Support Grant settlement, if and only if an acceptable and firm agreement in principle can be reached by October 1985, which would ensure progress towards the Government's objectives. The Government envisages an agreement which would require employers to promote more teachers than under the existing system to the higher salary scales, exercising their discretion in doing so in the light of the quality of teachers' work and the demand for their skills and qualifications elsewhere. The Government believes that increased promotion could benefit a large number of teachers directly over a period and change pay prospects for all teachers.

Because of the wide public interest in these matters, I am making the text of this letter publicly available. I shall of course be glad to have an opportunity of discussing its contents with you at a convenient time, and I shall also let the teacher unions know that I should be happy to discuss its content with them.

I am writing in similar terms to Nicky Harrison.

Yours,

Keith.

ANNEX A

Statement Of Teachers' Duties

TEACHERS MUST

  • Pupils
  • 1. teach assigned timetabled classes
  • 2. take an appropriate share of collective staff responsibility to cover the classes of absent colleagues
  • 3. plan, prepare, evaluate and review personal teaching methods and programmes in accordance with education authority and school policies
  • 4. take an appropriate share of collective staff responsibility to supervise pupils on arrival at and departure from school and during the school day [including the midday break?]
  • 5. mark, record and report on pupils' work (including homework) and progress in accordance with education authority and school policies
  • 6. provide guidance and counsel on educational, social and career matters in accordance with education authority and school pastoral and counselling policies
  • Parents
  • 7. consult and liaise with parents, attending meetings arranged for the purpose
  • Curriculum & Examinations
  • 8. take part in arrangements for presenting pupils in public examinations
  • 9. contribute to the preparation and development of courses of study and teaching materials in response to change in public examinations and assessment procedures and in accordance with education authority and school curricular policies
  • Staff Matters
  • 10. take part in performance appraisal in accordance with education authority arrangements
  • 11. take part in courses of in-service training and other schemes of professional development
  • 12. take an appropriate share of collective staff responsibility for the professional development of colleagues, including new entrants to teaching
  • 13. attend staff meetings
  • General
  • 14. carry out such other related duties and responsibilities at the school as may be reasonably allocated, as need arises, by the head.
  • Trade And Industry

    Chile

    87.

    asked the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry what was the gross volume of United Kingdom trade with the Government of Chile in 1984–85.

    Information on volume of trade with individual countries is not available. In the period April 1984 to March 1985 the United Kingdom imported from, and exported to Chile goods to the value of £117 million (cif) and £76 million (fob) respectively.

    Manufactured Goods

    the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry what are the most recent figures for the balance of trade in manufactured goods.

    Trade in manufactured goods was in deficit by £1.2 billion, in the first quarter of 1985.

    Telephone Installations

    asked the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry (1) if he will introduce legislation to establish an approved list of qualified engineers, other than British Telecom employees, to fit approved do-it-yourself telephone and wiring kits;(2) if he will introduce legislation to permit approved engineers to fit telephone sockets.

    I am aware, from a number of representations made to me by telecommunication equipment suppliers and users, of concern over the effect of existing licences and approvals in excluding competition in the supply of extension wiring and sockets for connection to single exchange lines of public telecommunication systems. The present policy is intended to strike a balance between the interests of effective competition on the one hand and the safety and performance of public networks on the other.

    asked the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry what steps his Department takes to ensure that all approved telephone equipment is safe to connect to the public network and has a very low voltage.

    All telephone apparatus approved for direct connection to public telecommunication systems is required to conform to safety standards. Compliance is independently verified before approval is given. Approval requirements are still in the course of changeover from British Telecom's guides which, as Post Office guides, applied before the enactment of the British Telecommunications Act 1981, to designated British Standards, including BS 6301 which relates to the safety aspects of network connection. Each set of requirements ensures that public networks are protected from voltages higher than those which the telephone networks use for normal operational/purposes.

    asked the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry how many prosecutions there have been in the last 12 months of persons for fitting do-it-yourself telephone and wiring kits; and if he will make a statement.

    Under section 5 of the Telecommunications Act 1984, it is an offence to connect to a licensed telecommunication system any other telecommunication system or any apparatus which is not authorised by the licence to be so connected. Under the licences which authorise people to connect apparatus to public telecommunication systems, it is a requirement that apparatus forming any part of those systems should be the subject of an appropriate approval under section 22 of the Act. As yet, I am not aware of any prosecutions being brought.

    Tyres (Dumping)

    asked the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry (1) what discussions he has had with the British Rubber Manufacturers Association about the dumping of cross-ply tyres by some Eastern European countries;(2) if he will consult the National Economic Development Office about ways to prevent dumping of tyres in Britain by Eastern European countries and the effect on employment in cities such as Stoke-on-Trent;(3) if he will arrange to meet representatives of unions and management of the Michelin company, Stoke-on-Trent, to discuss the effect of dumping of tyres by Eastern European countries on employment prospects in the firm.

    Anti-dumping action is a matter for the European Community. However, my Department's anti-dumping unit has met the British Rubber Manufacturers Association to discuss the presentation of a case to the European Commission. The industry is now gathering the necessary corroborative evidence and seeking further support from other Community manufacturers.I have no plans to consult the National Economic Development Office or to meet representatives of unions and management of the Michelin Company. But my officials would be pleased to receive evidence from any sources that might help reinforce a case.

    Sub-Saharan Africa (Exports)

    asked the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry what was the total value of exports to sub-Saharan Africa during 1984; if he will give a breakdown of the main items; and what was the total value of all United Kingdom exports to, and imports from, sub-Saharan Africa during 1984 or the last year for which figures are available.

    In 1984 United Kingdom exports to, and imports from sub-Saharan Africa were valued at £1,727 million (fob) and £1,794 million (cif) respectively. 85 per cent. of United Kingdom exports were of manufactured goods. Information on individual commodities could only be provided at disproportionate cost.

    Source: United Kingdom Overseas Trade Statistics.

    Notes:
  • (i) 1984 figures are provisional.
  • (ii) sub-Saharan Africa excludes South Africa
  • Internal Market Council

    asked the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry if he will make a statement on the outcome of the meeting of the Internal Market Council held on 7 May.

    The Council, which I attended, covered a number of issues concerned with the reduction of barriers to trade and professional services within the European Community.I was very pleased that the Council agreed on new arrangements, for which the Government and industry have pressed, to simplify and speed up the setting of product standards both at European level and by promoting mutual recognition of national standards. These new arrangements should lead to the more rapid removal of barriers to trade within the Community arising from differing national health and safety standards affecting industrial products.The Council made useful progress towards the granting of right of establishment for the architectural and pharmacist professions. There was also an exchange of views on Commission proposals on frontier crossings by individuals on the proposed commercial agents directive and the proposed European economic interest grouping.

    Balance Of Payments (Japan And Germany)

    asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer what is the size of the total balance of payments surplus or deficit with Japan and Germany, respectively, during the most recent years for which figures are available: and what these figures would be if trade in oil was excluded.

    [pursuant to the reply, 20 May 1985, c. 340]: I have been asked to reply.Figures for the UK's full balance of payments with individual countries is not available. Visible trade figures are available but only on an "Overseas Trade Statistics" basis, that is imports including the costs of insurance and freight. Exports less imports on an OTS basis produce a "crude" balance. This is provided for total trade and for total trade excluding oil in the table.Although invisible transactions are not normally compiled for individual countries some estimates of transactions with Japan were published in "British Business" of 27 April 1984 (page 766): a copy is available in the Library.

    Transport

    Holiday Operators (Failure)

    asked the Secretary of State for Transport if he will strengthen the arrangements for protecting the financial interests of air package holidaymakers against the failure of a tour operator; and if he will make a statement.

    The existing arrangements of bonds lodged by tour operators backed by the air travel reserve fund have so far proved adequate. I am not aware of any immediate threat to holidaymakers from a major failure. But in view of concerns which the chairman of the air travel reserve fund agency has expressed about the potential inadequacy of the fund in the event of such a failure and Sir Peter Lane's recommendations, following an independent review, for a strengthening of the present arrangements, we are now putting forward for consideration a series of changes which should offer a substantially improved level of protection.In summary, we propose that the air travel reserve fund agency should be wound up; that the agency's functions should be transferred to the Civil Aviation Authority and that the monies in the fund should be held in trust; and —most importantly—that a further line of defence for holidaymakers should be created in the form of a top-up insurance scheme.The purpose of top-up insurance would be to provide additional cover in the unlikely event that, following a major collapse in the industry, the bonding arrangements and the fund proved insufficient to repatriate holiday-makers overseas or reimburse those who paid for, but not taken a holiday. Informal soundings of the insurance industry suggest that a level of cover, equivalent at least to the £20 million or so presently in the fund, could be obtained at reasonable cost. Such a scheme would have the effect of at least doubling the financial backing provided by the fund. The premium would normally be paid from the fund's net income and would impose no extra costs on either holidaymakers or the tour industry.The costs and benefits of such a scheme would need to be reviewed periodically and we are not proposing it should be made mandatory that the fund be covered by top-up insurance. But it is desirable that there should be power to acquire this extra form of protection. The air travel reserve fund agency's existing powers to administer the fund may not extend to the acquisition of top-up insurance. One way of ensuring the fund can be used for this purpose would be to transfer it to the CAA.This is the major reason why my right hon. Friend is proposing the winding up of the agency. But there are other reasons. The authority should also be able to deal more flexibly with claims against the fund than the agency. Further, given the authority's existing duties in licensing air travel organisers and administering the bonding system, the various strands in the arrangements for protecting holidaymakers can be more closely aligned.I understand the CAA is, in principle, willing to accept responsibility for the fund and that it would set up an advisory committee, made up of representatives of the tour industry and consumers, to advise on such matters as bonding arrangements and payments from the fund. Should it take over the fund, the CAA would in due course be empowered to replenish it, if necessary, by means of a levy on ATOL holders.Under section 6 of the Air Travel Reserve Fund Act 1975, my right hon. Friend may wind up the air travel reserve fund agency and dispose of the fund after due consultation. I have today written to the agency, the CAA and representatives of the tour industry and the consumer asking for their comments on these proposals by 12 July. We would also welcome written comments from anyone else with an interest. In the interim, I am pleased to confirm that Sir Kenneth Selby has agreed to continue as chairman of the agency during the period of consultation.I shall make a further statement once the consultations have been concluded.

    Foreign And Commonwealth Affairs

    Central America

    13.

    asked the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs if there has been a review of Her Majesty's Government's diplomatic representation in Central America.

    Staffing of our posts overseas is reviewed at regular Diplomatic Service inspections and on other occasions when the need arises. Embassies in Managua and San Salvador were reopened in 1984, as recommended by the Foreign Affairs Committee in its 1982 report and following a Diplomatic Service inspection in 1983.

    61.

    asked the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what steps he has taken to seek to promote peace in Central America.

    Together with our Community partners we strongly support the Contadora initiative which offers the best prospect of a peaceful settlement of the problems of Central America. To underline that support my right hon. and learned Friend attended the meeting held at San Jose last September of European and regional Foreign Ministers. A further meeting is under consideration.

    Coventry Crown Court (Trial)

    18.

    the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs if he will make a new initiative to seek to ensure that the four South Africans who failed to answer to bail at Coventry appear in the Crown court in Birmingham on 5 June when their fellow accused are due to stand trial.

    The South African Government are in no doubt about our views on this matter. We shall continue to remind them that we expect them to honour the undertaking they gave to the court to ensure the return of the four defendants to stand trial.

    Bogdan Lis (Arrest)

    19.

    asked the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what representations he has made to the Polish Government following the arrest in Poland of Bogdan Lis and others.

    During his recent visit my right hon. and learned Friend stressed our concern that progress towards internal reconciliation in Poland should be maintained. He spoke very frankly to his hosts of his deep anxiety about recent moves in a contrary direction and gave examples, including the arrests of Mr. Lis and others.

    Nicaragua

    21.

    asked the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what discussions took place at the Bonn summit with regard to the United States trade embargo on Nicaragua.

    I discussed the situation in Central and Latin America with my colleagues at the Bonn economic summit. Details must remain confidential.

    23.

    asked the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs if he will make a statement on current United Kingdom relations with Nicaragua.

    We share the concern of many Central American states at Nicaragua's build-up of arms and increasingly close contacts with the Soviet Union and Cuba. Our future relations will depend on Nicaragua's establishing genuine democracy, scaling down her level of armaments and putting an end to support for subversion in the region.

    27.

    asked the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs whether he has had any discussions with the United States Government about the use of sanctions against Nicaragua.

    I have nothing to add to the reply which I gave earlier today to the hon. Member for Sheffield, Hillsborough (Mr. Flannery).

    33.

    asked the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs if he will make a statement about discussions he had on Nicaragua at Bonn recently.

    I refer the hon. Member to the reply which I gave earlier today to the hon. Member for Leeds, West (Mr. Meadowcroft).

    65.

    asked the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs if he will make a statement on Her Majesty's Government's policy towards the current situation in Nicaragua.

    I refer the hon. Member to the reply I gave earlier to the hon. Member for Battersea (Mr. Dubs).

    76.

    asked the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs if he has any plans to alter the level of British diplomatic representation in Nicaragua.

    We have no plans to alter the level of diplomatic representation in Nicaragua but diplomatic staffing levels are kept under review.

    asked the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what discussions have taken place between Her Majesty's Government and the United States Government on the situation in Nicaragua.

    I have nothing to add to the reply which I gave earlier today to the hon. Member for Sheffield, Hillsborough (Mr. Flannery).

    Bbc (External Services)

    22.

    asked the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs if he will make a statement on the structure of the funding of the British Broadcasting Corporation external services.

    The British Broadcasting Corporation external services are funded on an annual basis by two grants-in-aid; one is for broadcasting and the other for monitoring. Both are administered by the Foreign and Commonwealth Office. In addition, the FCO is directly responsible for funding and operating four broadcasting stations which relay British Broadcasting Corporation programmes worldwide.

    Anglo-Sudanese Relations

    24.

    asked the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs if he will make a statement on Anglo-Sudanese relations.

    We have had a long and friendly relationship with the Sudan for many years. My visit to Sudan from 29 April to 1 May was warmly welcomed by the Sudanese authorities as the first visit by a western Minister since the takeover led by General Sowar el Dahab. It enabled me to have valuable meetings with members of the Transitional Military Council, the Council of Ministers and leading politicians. I was able to assure them of our continuing support for the stability and prosperity of Sudan.

    Latin America

    25.

    asked the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs if he has any plans to discuss with United States Secretary of State the situation in Latin America with special reference to Honduras and Nicaragua.

    We regularly discuss the situation in Central America with the United States Administration. I discussed the subject with Mr. Shultz in Washington in February and with my colleagues at the Bonn economic summit earlier this month.

    Indian Subcontinent (Nuclear Proliferation)

    26.

    asked the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what recent representations he has received from the Government of India regarding nuclear proliferation in the subcontinent.

    Nuclear non-proliferation is a subject of great importance. It is frequently raised in discussions we have with other Governments. It is not our practice, however, to reveal the contents of such exchanges.

    United Kingdom Embassy (Moscow)

    28.

    asked the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what is the number of British personnel at the United Kingdom embassy in Moscow in the following categories (a) embassy staff. (b) trade delegation, and (c) non-diplomatic staff; and how this compares with the Soviet embassy in London.

    The total number of home-based British staff in all sections of our embassy in Moscow at present is 71, of whom 28 have administrative and technical—that is, non-diplomatic — status. We do not have a separate trade delegation in Moscow. The commercial section of the embassy comprises seven home-based British personnel of whom two have administrative and technical status.The Soviet embassy in London has at present a total of 83 members of staff, who are all Soviet nationals. Of these, 46 are administrative and technical staff. The Soviet trade delegation, which is a separate body whose status is defined in the Anglo-Soviet temporary commercial agreement of 1934, has 45 non-diplomatic Soviet members of staff. In addition, the Soviet trade representative and his two deputies have full diplomatic status and are included in the total just given for the Soviet embassy.

    Cyprus

    29.

    asked the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs if he is satisfied that the Turkish Government are doing all they can to persuade Mr. Denktash to bring about a satisfactory conclusion to the Cyprus intercommunal talks.

    Turkish Government leaders made clear to my right hon. and learned Friend when he visited Turkey in February their support for the United Nations Secretary-General's initiative on Cyprus. We continue to keep in close contact with the parties involved and to urge co-operation with the Secretary-General in his search for a peaceful, just and lasting solution.

    Dooge Committee Report

    30.

    asked the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs when the Council of Foreign Ministers will next discuss the Dooge committee report.

    The report of the Dooge committee is not scheduled to be discussed by the Council of Ministers at this stage. It was commissioned by the European Council and Heads of Government will discuss it at the Milan European Council on 28–29 June.

    54.

    asked the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what recent discussions he has had with EEC Foreign Ministers concerning the proposals contained in the Dooge report.

    My right hon. and learned Friend discussed the issues raised by the report with M. Dumas, the French Foreign Minister, on 21 May. He has also discussed the issues at other meetings with European Community Foreign Ministers, for example in the margins of the Foreign Affairs Council.

    Egypt (Ministerial Visit)

    31.

    asked the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs if he will make a statement on the recent visit of the Minister of State, the hon. Member for Shoreham (Mr. Luce) to Egypt.

    I paid a brief visit to Egypt on 1 May for meetings with President Mubarak and members of the Egyptian Government. In these, I gave an account of my earlier visit to Sudan and exchanged views on bilateral topics and developments in the middle east since President Mubarak's visit to London in March.

    Strategic Defence Initiative

    32.

    asked the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what recent representations he has made to the United States Administration concerning the strategic defence initiative.

    I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave earlier today to the hon. Member for St. Helens, North (Mr. Evans).

    36.

    asked the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs whether he discussed at the Bonn summit the possibility of a concerted European response to the strategic defence initiative.

    The possibility of a concerted European response was not discussed in detail, although as Chancellor Kohl said after the summit the strategic defence initiative was touched on in the course of the meetings that took place.

    37.

    asked the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs whether he had discussions at the Bonn summit about a concerted European response to the United States strategic defence initiative proposals.

    I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave earlier today to the hon. Member for Gordon (Mr. Bruce).

    51.

    asked the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs if he will make a statement on the diplomatic consequences of President Reagan's strategic defence initiative.

    I refer my hon. Friend to the reply I gave earlier today to the hon. Member for St. Helens, North (Mr. Evans).

    62.

    asked the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs if he had discussions at the Bonn summit about a concerted European response to the strategic defence initiative proposals; and if he will make a statement.

    I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave earlier today to the hon. Member for Gordon (Mr. Bruce).

    Soviet Foreign Minister (Visit)

    34.

    asked the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs if a date has yet been arranged for the planned visit to the United Kingdom of the Soviet Foreign Minister.

    India

    35.