Skip to main content

Chile

Volume 80: debated on Tuesday 11 June 1985

The text on this page has been created from Hansard archive content, it may contain typographical errors.

asked the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs if he will make a statement on the matters discussed at a meeting between officials of his Department and Mrs. Maria Malvenda of Chile; and what statements officials made on (a) the human rights situation in Chile and (b) the future policy of the United Kingdom towards Chile in the light of this situation.

Mrs. Maluenda called on a senior Foreign and Commonwealth Office official on 2 May to explain the circumstances of her son's death. The official expressed his personal sympathy at her loss and made clear our concern about the human rights situation in Chile.

asked the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what assessment he makes of the current implications for United Kingdom operations in the south Atlantic, and concerning the Falklands in particular, of the effect of the treaty between Chile and Argentina over the ownership of islands in the Beagle straits; and what effect the ratification of this treaty in April is assessed to have on the future policy options of Her Majesty's Government regarding human rights in Chile.

We welcome any measure contributing to the stability of the region, but the question of the Beagle Channel, and our commitment to defend the Falkland Islands, are entirely separate matters. We shall continue to stand by that commitment, using the minimum forces necessary. Our policy on human rights violations in Chile remains as stated in my reply to the hon. Member for Islington, North (Mr. Corbyn) on 3 June at column 75.

asked the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what is the policy of Her Majesty's Government towards instituting a complete embargo on arms sales to Chile; and if he will make a statement.

As I told the hon. Member for Islington, North (Mr. Corbyn) on 9 May at column 493 we do not believe an arms embargo would be effective. We shall, however, continue to refuse approval for the export of items which, in our judgment, are likely to be used for internal repression.