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Written Answers

Volume 82: debated on Monday 1 July 1985

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Written Answers To Questions

Monday 1 July 1985

Church Commissioners

Redundant Churches

asked the hon. Member for Wokingham, as representing the Church Commissioners, how many churches have been declared redundant since 1 January; and if he will list them.

Fifteen churches have been declared redundant since 1 January 1985. They are as follows:

ChurchDiocese
Lozells St. SilasDiocese of Birmingham
Ellel Grange St. MaryDiocese of Blackburn
Goodnestone St. BartholomewDiocese of Canterbury
Berners RodingDiocese of Chelmsford
Colchester St. LeonardDiocese of Chelmsford
Darlington St. HildaDiocese of Durham
Hopton CangefordDiocese of Hereford
Llanrothal St. John the BaptistDiocese of Hereford
Stretton-en-le-Field St. MichaelDiocese of Leicester
Bayston Hill Christ ChurchDiocese of Lichfield
Finchley St. LukeDiocese of London
Forncett St. MaryDiocese of Norwich
East Stoke St. Mary the VirginDiocese of Salisbury
Throapham St. John the BaptistDiocese of Sheffield
Stambermill St. MarkDiocese of Worcester

House Of Commons

Summer Recess

asked the Lord Privy Seal how many times Parliament has risen for the summer recess on or after 1 August since 1955; and if he will give the years in question, with the date the House rose.

The House of Commons has risen on or after 1 August 15 times since 1955. The dates are as follows:

2 August 19565 August 1971
2 August 19579 August 1972
1 August 19587 August 1975
4 August 19616 August 1976
3 August 19623 August 1978
2 August 19638 August 1980
5 August 19651 August 1984
12 August 1966

Trade And Industry

Cloft Scheme

asked the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry, following the refusal of the EC to accept the CLOFT scheme for assistance to the clothing, footwear and textile industries, what steps he is taking to help these industries; and if he will make a statement.

My Department has a wide range of schemes currently available to assist the development of industry, including the clothing, footwear and textile industries. These schemes have recently been repackaged and a copy of the brochure "Support for Business" was deposited in the House of Commons Library. The clothing, footwear and textile industries have also made proposals which are currently being considered by the Department.

Footwear And Leather Industries

asked the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry what steps he is taking to assist the footwear and leather industries to adopt new technology; and if he will make a statement.

As regards the footwear industry I refer my hon. Friend to my answer of 1 July 1985. The Government have provided £1·1 million in assistance over the last two complete financial years under the Science and Technology Act to help the Shoe and Allied Trades Research Association (SATRA) undertake programmes of benefit to this industry, particularly in areas of application of new technology. The Government have similarly provided £456,000 to the research wing of the British Leather Confederation (BLC).

Telephones

asked the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry (1) whether he will now ensure that all public telephone operators display notices explaining how coinbox telephones can be used by people with hearing aids;(2) whether he will now ensure that all public telephone operators fitting Statesman telephones ensure that the models can be used by those wearing hearing aids; and whether he will make a statement.

The obligations required of licensed telecommunications operators are matters which are the responsibility of the Director General of Telecommunications. I am drawing the hon. Member's questions to his attention with the request that he write to the hon. Member.

asked the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry whether he will now publish the code of practice for the magnetic coupling of telephones to hearing aids prepared by the working group on telecommunications for the hearing-impaired and issued to members on 31 May; and whether he will make a statement.

The code of practice is a useful guide for telephone designers and hearing aid designers. I am grateful for the efforts put in to it by the working group. The Office of Telecommunications is arranging for the code of practice to be published shortly.

Ford Motor Company

asked the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry when he expects to receive appropriate undertakings from the Ford Motor Company following the Monopolies and Mergers Commission report, Cmnd. 9437.

I shall make a statement on the position when discussions with Ford are concluded.

Mechanical Engineering Products

asked the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry (1) what was the average value per tonne of total United Kingdom imports of mechanical engineering products; and what information he has as to how this figure compares with the average value per tonne of total imports of mechanical engineering products into France, West Germany, Italy and Sweden in the years 1960, 1965, 1970, 1975, 1980 and 1983.(2) what was the average value per tonne of total United Kingdom exports of mechanical engineering products; and what information he has as to how this figure compares with the average value per tonne of total exports of mechanical engineering products from France, West Germany, Italy and Sweden in the years 1960, 1965, 1970, 1975, 1980 and 1983.

Information Technology Centre 6502, Manchester

asked the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry if he will explain his reasons for his decision to withdraw industrial support funding from the information technology centre 6502 in Moss Side, Manchester; and if he will make a statement.

As with all information technology centres, Moss Side 6502 has been eligible for pump-priming support of £75,000 over a period of 3 years. The extent of the support was made clear at the outset of th ITEC programme in 1983 and all ITECs have been encouraged to engage in commercial activities to ensure sufficient funding after the support is exhausted. I understand that in the case of Moss Side 6502 the £75,000 has been taken up.

Copyright

asked the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry (1) what action Her Majesty's Government will take to ensure that the United States Government comply with the general agreement on tariffs and trade ruling of March 1984 which determined that the manufacturing clause in the United States Copyright Act infringed the general agreement on tariffs and trade;(2) what response he has received, as a signatory of the general agreement on tariffs and trade, from the United States Government concerning the general agreement on tariffs and trade's ruling of March 1984 which determined that the manufacturing clause in the United States Copyright Act infringed the general agreement on tariffs and trade;(3) what assurances have been received by Her Majesty's Government that the manufacturing clause in the United States Copyright Act will lapse in 1986.

The United States Administration have assured GATT members that they intend to conform to the ruling which condemned this legislation, and to amend United States law accordingly. A ruling accepted by the contracting parties to the GATT is binding in international law. The offending United States law is due to expire in June 1986. My right hon. Friend has every confidence that the United States Government will honour their international obligations. We will continue, through the European Commission, to remind the United States Government of our continuing concern about this matter, and to press for early action.

asked the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry if Her Majesty's Government will make it their policy to refuse to allow imports of publications printed in countries whose Governments take no action against publishers and printers who pirate British copyright publications.

United Kingdom obligations under the GATT only permit restrictions on imports which themselves threaten United Kingdom commercial or public interests. Accordingly, United Kingdom copyright legislation enables the importation of infringing printed copies of literary, dramatic and musical works to be prevented. The Government none the less pursues all available opportunities to encourage suppression of piracy and adherence to the international copyright conventions. It participates fully in initiatives to this end within the European Community and the Council of Europe.

"Britain Means Business"

asked the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry how many activities have so far been held under the "Britain Means Business" campaign; where and when they were held; by whom they were sponsored; and if he will make a statement.

The "British Means Business" campaign was launched on 1 April 1985 and a series of activities will take place to the end of 1985. These include overseas 'Briefing on Britain' seminars, visits to the United kingdom by United States and Japanese journalists and the publication of a quarterly magazine directed at prospective investors overseas.There have been two 'Briefing on Britain' events held so far. Th first was held in Tokyo on 4 June and was co-sponsored by Midland Bank plc and Price Waterhouse & Co. The second event was held in Hartford, Connecticut on 26 June and was co-sponsored by the National Westminster Bank plc. Ministers were the principal speakers at both events. The Peterborough Development Corporation has held a successful seminar in Boston, on 19 June, using the "Britain Means Business" logo.Three United States and four Japanese journalists have also visited the United Kingdom and two of the quarterly magazines have been published.It is still relatively early days in the campaign's programme of events. I and the co-sponsors have been very pleased by the size and quality of the audiences attending the seminars held so far and by the interest which has been shown in investing in the United Kingdom. The "Britain Means Business" events play an important part in realising the campaign's objective of achieving maximum success and benefit for the United Kingdom by coordinating promotional efforts of the relevant public sector inward investment bodies and the private sector to project an effective, united image of Britain overseas.

asked the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry how much money he has made available to "Britain Means Business"; and for how long.

My Department has allocated £1 million, additional to the Invest in Britain bureau's normal promotional budget for 1985–86, to the "Britain Means Business" campaign. Substantial contributions to the campaign, both 'in kind' and financial, are being made by the territorial and regional promotional organisations and the private sector.The campaign began on 1 April 1985 and will run to the end of the calendar year.

Computer Software

asked the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry what is his current assessment of the share which the domestic software industry has of the national market in the United Kingdom; and what equivalent information he has about the share of the national markets taken by the respective domestic markets in France, Italy and Germany.

Loan Guarantee Scheme

asked the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry how many' jobs have been created by the loan guarantee scheme; and what is the average cost of each job created.

Information from sample surveys carried out by my Department suggests that loan guarantees authorised up to 31 May 1984 assisted the creation of about 44,500 jobs at a cost after taking account of estimated failure rates of approximately £2,200 per job. These figures do not allow for possible displacement of jobs elsewhere in the economy.

asked the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry what is the average failure rate among firms which have received support from the loan guarantee scheme; and how these figures compare with the average failure rate of small businesses in general.

About one in three of all firms are estimated to fail within their first three years of existence. The failure rate at the end of three years on guaranteed loans authorised between June 1981 and May 1982 was approximately 40 per cent. Subsequent loans have not yet run for three years. Available figures suggest a reduction in failure rates in the later period but this cannot yet be reliably quantified.

Anti-Dumping Levies

asked the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry what consideration he has given to an application to apply general agreement on tariffs and trade anti-dumping levies to Japanese computer and component firms.

Responsibility for anti-dumping action under GATT on behalf of EC member states rests with the EC Commission. We have not been informed of any request for such action against imports of Japanese computers and computer components, but if the United Kingdom industry believes that it is being damaged by such dumped imports, we would press the Commission to give any request urgent and sympathetic consideration.

British Telecom

asked the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry (1) pursuant to the answer of 27 June, Official Report, column 443, how many shares Rudolf Wolff and Co. undertook to buy its role as underwriters to the flotation of British Telecommunications; and what happened to the shares it handled.(2) pursuant to the answer of 27 June,

Official Report, column 443, when the applications by employees of an eligible fund based overseas for 31,900 British Telecommunications shares were discovered; what arrangements were made for the surrender of their profits to charity; which charities were involved and on what dates payments were made to them; if any investigations into possible fraud or deception were carried out; and if he will make a statement.

Prime Minister

Herbicide 2,4,5,-T

asked the Prime Minister if she will ensure that the Advisory Committee on Pesticides reconsiders the safety of 2,4,5,-T when the Health and Safety Executive has completed its report on the case of Ms. Anna Noon; and if she will make a statement.

the Advisory Committee on Pesticides carried out full-scale reviews of the safety of 2,4,5,-T herbicides in 1979, 1980 and 1982. On each occasion its advice was that formulations of 2,4,5,-T cleared under the pesticides safety precautions scheme were safe for use as recommended. The Government accepted that advice. The committee continues to examine all important evidence on the safety of 2,4,5,-T herbicides.A report of the Health and Safety Executive's investigations of the case of Ms. Anna Noon will he made to the committee.

Palestine Liberation Organisation

askd the Prime Minister whether the Government have received any request from King Hussein for United Kingdom Ministers to meet the deputation of Jordanians and Palestinians currently visiting Italy and France; and whether Her Majesty's Government will make clear that their policy regarding ministerial contact with representatives of the Palestine Liberation Organisation remains unchanged.

The Italian and French Governments received a joint Jordanian/Palestinian delegation in late June at the request of King Hussein. We ourselves are in close touch with King Hussein and are examining how best we can support his courageous efforts to move towards peace negotiations. As is well known, contacts at ministerial level with the PLO remain difficult while PLO attitudes on Israel's right to exist and on the use of violence remain ambiguous.

Retirement Pensioners

asked the Prime Minister what improvements the Government have made in the circumstances of retirement pensioners since 1979.

The Government's pledge to protect the value of retirement pensions has been fully honoured. When the new rates announced on 18 June by my right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Social Services come into force in November 1985, the pension will have risen by 96·4 per cent. since November 1978, some ten percentage points more than the expected rise in prices over the same period.The method of uprating pensions has been changed so that increases are now based on the actual rate of inflation rather than on uncertain forecasts of price changes.The pensioners' earnings rule has been increased to £70 a week and will be further increased to £75 a week in November.The capital limit for supplementary benefit was raised to £3,000 in November 1983, the capital limit for single payments was raised to £500 and the first £1,500 of the surrender valie of life assurance policies is now disregarded in relation to supplementary benefit entitlement: all of which help pensioners with savings.Help with heating costs reached an estimated level of £400 million in 1984–85, about £140 million more in real terms than under the last Labour Government. Over 90 per cent. of supplementary pensioners now receive a heating addition.The Christmas bonus has been made a permanent statutory entitlement.In November 1984 the residence test for the non-contributory over-80's pension was relaxed so that the 10 years' residence test could be completed after age 80, enabling people who returned to this country from abroad after age 70 to qualify for the pension.We have taken steps to ensure that from November 1985 married women over 80 who qualify for the non-contributory pension will receive it at the full rate instead of a reduced rate.We have abolished the residual effects of the married women's half-test with effect from December 1984, enabling 25,000 married women who reached age 60 before April 1979 to receive a pension on their own contributions.Finally, the Government's most important achievement for pensioners — and for all those living on fixed incomes—has been to bring down the rate of inflation and to keep it in single figures for four succesive years.

Disabled Persons

asked the Prime Minister if Her Majesty's Government have any plans to seek to encourage (a) the making available of defence and nuclear robotic research to those wishing to produce sophisticated aids for the disabled and (b) the making available of research regarding aids for the disabled, using light-weight and low-cost materials, to those exploring defence and nuclear robotic possibilities.

My right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Social Services is responsible for reporting each year to Parliament progress made on research and development work carried out on behalf of every Minister of the Crown which might be of assistance to the disabled. The inquiries made by his Department seek to identify all such useful work, including that arising from defence. These inquiries have not included the nuclear field. I am grateful for the suggestion of a further source of information.The Department of Health and Social Security has sought to increase the effectiveness of this report by commissioning a study last year by the disabilities study unit in addition to its own inquiries. The report of the unit is being studied. First indications are that few developments have been revealed of which the DHSS was previously unaware. The project has clearly been useful in providing a further stimulus to research establishments to consider the need for the disabled.Research regarding aids for the disabled is not subject to secrecy except where commercial confidentiality applies and information is therefore available through a wide range of publications concerning this area, as well as in the report made under section 22 of the Chronically Sick and Disabled Persons Act 1970.

Wales

Incontinence Laundries

asked the Secretary of State for Wales what information he has as to which health authorities in Wales have arrangements for providing an incontinence laundry service for the use of patients in the community.

Geriatric Medicine (Specialists)

asked the Secretary of State for Wales if he will provide financial assistance to the East Dyfed health authority to appoint additional specialists in geriatric medicine commensurate with the large geographic area and dispersed communities as highlighted in the report of the joint hospital advisory services and social work service published on 7 June; and if he will make a statement.

I refer the hon. Gentleman to the reply I gave him on 25 June at col. 359. East Dyfed has approval from the All-Wales Manpower Committee for a consultant post in geriatrics. Central funds for the consultant expension programme in 1985–86 have already been allocated. It is open to the authority to make a bid against such monies as might be available for the programme in 1986–87.

Farm Grants (Brecon And Radnor)

asked the Secretary of State for Wales if he will estimate the number of farmers in the parliamentary constituency of Brecon and Radnor who have (a) applied for grant under the variable beef premium scheme and (b) have had their application granted in each year since 1979.

Payments to Welsh producers under the beef variable premium scheme are as follows:

Marketing yearNumber of animals certified (Wales)Total premium paid (£ million)
1980–81110,6594·2
1981–8291,0700·42
1982–8398,7561·61
1983–84116,2214·9
1984–85121,1244·67
Separate figures for the parliamentary constituency of Brecon and Radnor and for the number of individual producers involved are not available.

asked the Secretary of State for Wales if he will estimate the number of farmers in the parliamentary constituency of Brecon and Radnor who have (a) applied for grant or subsidy and (b) received grant or subsidy under the European Economic Community sheepmeat regime in each year since 1979.

Payments to Welsh producers under the EC sheepmeat regime are as follows:

1. Sheep variable premium scheme
Marketing yearNumber of animals certified (Wales)Total premium paid (£ million)
1980–812,298,1907·5
1981–822,383,30712·6
1982–832,489,96925·4
1983–842,564,45430·5
1984–852,676,85921·4
2. Sheep annual premium scheme
Marketing yearNumber of claims paidTotal paid (£ million)
1980–8115,6552·5
1981–8215,6655·2
1982–8315,58310·3
1983–8415,58626·3
1984–85*11,9546·1
* To 31 May 1985
Separate figures for the parliamentary constituency of Brecon and Radnor and for the number of individual producers are not available.

Home Department

Community Radio

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department when he expects to make a statement about the development of community radio.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he is yet ready to announce his plans for development of community radio; and if he will make a statement.

My right hon. and learned Friend hopes to make a further statement before the recess.

Penal Establishments (Medical Services)

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what happens when a penal establishment exhausts its allocation for medical services.

Establishments are expected to keep within their financial allocation subject to the requirement to maintain a proper standard of health care. There is no question of patients being denied essential treatment, and the re-allocation of provision within the voted resources of the prison service is considered if the need arises.

Escort Duties (Cost)

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what is the average cost of escort duties involved in taking a prisoner from a local prison to a Crown court on one occasion.

Bail

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will provide a breakdown of the main reasons given for refusal of bail.

Such information is not collected routinely but details of the grounds for refusal of bail by magistrates' courts in the period May to October 1978 are contained in Criminal Statistics, England and Wales, 1979 (paragraph 8·8 and tables 8·9 and 8·10).

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) what was the total number of bail beds available in England and Wales, the location of the bail hostels and percentage occupancy in 1984;(2) what is the average cost of a bail bed; and what is the average cost of a prison remand place.

I refer my hon. Friend to the reply given to his question on 27 June at column 453.

Brecon And Radnor

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many additional electors in the Brecon and Radnor constituency, presently ineligible to vote through absence on holiday and other causes, he estimates will be enfranchised by recent legislation; and if he will make a statement.

It is estimated that throughout Great Britain over two million people, or 5 per cent. of those registered as electors, would at present be disfranchised through absence on holiday at a parliamentary general election held during July. The proportion may vary from one constituency to another, but clearly a substantial number of electors who will be unable to vote in person at the Brecon and Radnor by-election would be able to vote by post or proxy under the provisions of the Representation of the People Bill.

Justices Of The Peace Act 1361

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many persons in England and Wales have been arrested, how many charged and how many convicted under the Justices of the Peace Act 1361 in each of the last five years; and how many of these arrests and charges related to domestic disputes.

Proceedings under the Justices of the Peace Act 1361 provide for persons who have been arrested for an alleged breach of the peace (which is not an offence in itself) to be brought before a magistrate's court with a view to being bound over to keep the peace. The information collected centrally relates to the number of applications made and the outcome; details of the circumstances leading to the arrest are not collected centrally. The available information, which may be incomplete, is shown in the table. Corresponding information for 1984 is not yet available.

Proceedings under the Justices of the Peace Act 1361 to find surety to keep the peace or for good behaviour.
England and WalesNumber of Applications
YearApplications
TotalOrder madeNo Order made
198087,78080.4437,337
198192,59484,8327,762
1982104,14897,0417,107
1983102,99696,1136,883

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he has any plans to introduce legislation to amend the Justices of the Peace Act 1361; and if he will make a statement.

We have no plans for such legislation at present. The Law Commission is considering the power to bind over to keep the peace, and hopes to publish a working paper with provisional proposals for reform in the course of next year.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what information he has as to the average length of time for which a person charged under the Justices of the Peace Act 1361 is held before being brought before a magistrate.

No information is held centrally about the length of time for which persons who are bound over to keep the peace have been detained before being brought before a magistrate.

Prisoners (Money)

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what moneys a prisoner on home leave is allowed to take with him; and what is the source of these moneys.

Payments from Public Funds

  • 1. Travelling Costs: the prisoner receives either a travel warrant or the cost of fares for the return journey.
  • 2. Subsistence: a subsistence allowance for the duration of the outward and return journey is paid in accordance with the following rates:
  • 2–5 hours£1·00
    5–10 hours£2·40
    10–16 hours£4·40
    16–24 hours£5·60
  • A packed meal may be provided for the outward journey. If so no allowance for the outward journey will be paid.
  • 3. Householder's Allowance: in cases where leave has been approved and the prisoner is to spend leave in the home of a householder who is known to lack the resources to keep the prisoner for the period of leave and is not receiving supplementary benefit from the DHSS, an allowance of £5·00 for short home leave or pre-parole leave or £10·00 for terminal home leave may be paid to the prisoner when proceeding on leave.
  • 4. Lodgings Allowance: where a prisoner has no suitable accommodation for his leave, arrangements may be made for the prisoner to stay at a suitable hostel or lodgings. If so, expenditure may be incurred to meet the cost of accommodation and meals. The maximum amounts which prison governors may authorise are £21·00 for short home leave or pre-parole leave and £41·00 for terminal home leave. Normally these payments would be made direct to the hostel or lodgings and the prisoner would not be given this money when he proceeds on leave.
  • B. Prisoners' Monies

  • 1. The maximum amount in earnings and private cash which a prisoner may take on leave is £20·00* for terminal home leave or £10·00* for short home leave.
  • 2. Additional sums of private cash may be sent home in advance of leave, subject to an annual limit of £95·00.
  • * (Includes a sum of £4·00 for terminal home leave and £2·00 for short home leave or pre-parole leave which the prisoner must have saved from earnings before being allowed to take leave. Where prisoners have already taken short home leave and are to take terminal home leave they must save £2·00 before leave may be taken.)

    asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what moneys a prisoner may bring back into prison after home leave; and what rules govern the bringing in of moneys at this time.

    There are no restrictions on the amount of money which a prisoner may bring back into prison after home leave. The money will be credited to his private cash account in the books of the prison in accordance with prison rule 41(3). Prisoners who have large sums of money in their cash account are encouraged to open accounts with the National Savings Bank or similar institutions.

    asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what wages a prisoner on home leave loses during this period or following his period of home leave.

    No wages are paid to adult prisoners during absence on home leave. On return from such leave it is normal practice for prisoners to re-join their work party and they therefore usually suffer no loss of earnings.

    Racial Discrimination

    asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) how many employers were prosecuted for discrimination under the Race Relations Act (a) between 1976 and 1979 and (b) between 1979 and 1984;(2) how many employers were prosecuted under the Sex Discrimination Act

    (a) between 1975 and 1979 and (b) between 1979 and 1985.

    Drug Addicts

    asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many registered class A drug addicts there were in Basildon in the years 1980 to 1985.

    I refer my hon. Friend to the reply I gave to his question on 11 January at columns 559–60. The only information which has since become available is the provisional figures for new addicts notified in the Essex police force area in 1984, given in the reply to a question from my hon. Friend the Member for Westminster, North (Mr. Wheeler) on 11 June 1985 at columns 394–95.

    asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what are the totals of the registered number of addicts in England and Wales addicted to (a) heroin and (b) cocaine, broken down by regional health authority areas for the years 1980, 1981, 1982, 1983 and 1984, respectively.

    [pursuant to his reply, 24 June 1985, c. 287]: The available information about the number of drug addicts notified as addicted to heroin or cocaine relates to police forces areas and is given in the following tables for the years 1980 to 1983. Corresponding information for 1984 is not yet available. However, provisional figures for all new addicts notified in 1984 by police force area were

    TABLE 1
    New drug addicts notified to the Home Office during the years 1980–83 as addicted to heroin or cocaine
    England and WalesNumber of persons
    Heroin alone or with other drugs but not with cocaineCocaine alone or with other drugs but not with heroinHeroin and cocaine only or with other drugs
    198019811982198319801981198219831980198119821983
    Avon and Somerset22273456122327
    Bedford381391222463
    Cambridgeshire513171711412316
    Cheshire1016506512164
    Cleveland11323
    Cumbria141413
    Derbyshire212813
    Devon and Cornwall61115151115
    Dorset71018131111
    Durham12351
    Essex16263442222343
    Gloucestershire510108112
    Greater Manchester818731694315
    Hampshire881926235
    Hertfordshire21212723112313
    Humberside2223131243
    Kent172431271112422
    Lancashire1431559313216
    Leicestershire8135171112
    Lincolnshire115211
    Merseyside1729823611232
    Metropolitan police district5638308481,42410111929587176156
    Norfolk9811331715
    Northamptonshire7788212311
    Northumbria3358131
    North Yorkshire1132515
    Nottinghamshire1516910212
    South Yorkshire1632304311022
    Staffordshire1813201111
    Suffolk224153
    Surrey131916201524
    Sussex36325179151386911
    Thames Valley315141462392310
    Warwickshire217131121
    West Mercia25101711
    West Midlands303775511322
    West Yorkshire881721212132
    Wiltshire12531121
    Total for England9141,3341,6532,81215274551124134147269
    Dyfed-Powys73671131
    Gwent286113
    North Wales2616
    South Wales32711202321258
    Total for Wales3914314923224912
    Total for England and Wales9531,3481,6842,86115294853126138156281
    TABLE 2
    New drug addicts notified to the Home Office during the years 1980–83 as addicted to heroin or cocaine
    England and WalesNumber of persons
    Heroin alone or with other drugs but not with cocaineCocaine alone or with other drugs but not with heroinHeroin and cocaine only or with other drugs
    198019811982198319801981198219831980198119821983
    Avon and Somerset1042736111
    Bedford471382124
    Cambridgeshire657121
    Cheshire5211121
    Cleveland
    Cumbria11

    given in the reply to a question from my hon. Friend the Member for Westminster, North (Mr. Wheeler) on 11 June 1985 at columns 394–95.

    Heroin alone or with other drugs but not with cocaine

    Cocaine alone or with other drugs but not with heroin

    Heroin and cocaine only or with other drugs

    1980

    1981

    1982

    1983

    1980

    1981

    1982

    1983

    1980

    1981

    1982

    1983

    Derbyshire211111
    Devon and Cornwall2464111
    Dorset368111
    Durham411
    Essex1612161424
    Gloucestershire33361
    Greater Manchester1912231111
    Hampshire689101
    Hertfordshire151217122132
    Humberside142
    Kent327711112
    Lancashire891423211
    Leicestershire19116112
    Lincolnshire1111
    Merseyside10181722
    Metropolitan police district286347427599323118273879
    Norfolk2481212
    Northamptonshire35751113
    Northumbria21212
    North Yorkshire12111
    Nottinghamshire541252
    South Yorkshire3761431
    Staffordshire11
    Suffolk12211
    Surrey41215101113
    Sussex1627244725335
    Thames Valley6142224111
    Warwickshire1123
    West Mercia42
    West Midlands112171911
    West Yorkshire32341141
    Wiltshire111311
    Total for England4285547339495678335960124
    Dyfed-Powys52231
    Gwent22
    North Wales1111
    South Wales1291514411
    Total for Wales171220201412
    Total for England and Wales4455667539695678346361126

    Drug Trafficking

    asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many persons in Great Britain have been charged with drug trafficking offences in 1984–85.

    The latest available information relates to 1983, when 3,919 persons were proceeded against for trafficking in controlled drugs (unlawful production of drugs other than cannabis, unlawful supply, possession with intent to supply unlawfully, and unlawful import or export).

    asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what current proposals regarding a convention on extradition proceedings for drug trafficking are currently being discussed by the United Nations.

    The United Kingdom is firmly supporting efforts to draw up a new United Nations convention to deal with all aspects of drug trafficking. We shall be pressing for real progress in the new convention on those issues, like the freezing, seizing and confiscation of the assets of drug traffickers and the extradition of such offenders, where international co-operation is absolutely crucial if the drugs menace is to be defeated. The United Kingdom is submitting this week its response to the United Nations on matters to be included in the convention, and I shall arrange for copies of the response to be placed in the Library.

    asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what information he has as to the number of persons (a) against whom extradition proceedings have been taken or are planned in relation to drugs-related offences and (b) who are sought by police forces to assist them with inquiries into drug related matters, who have sought asylum in foreign countries between 1980 and 1985.

    Drugs (Seizures)

    asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what amounts of class A drugs were seized by the police between 1980 and 1985 in each region.

    Information on the total amounts of class A drugs seized by the police in the United Kingdom for 1980 to 1983 was given in table 1·3 of "Statistics of the Misuse of Drugs, United Kingdom, Supplementary Tables 1983"; corresponding information for 1984 and 1985 is not yet available. Provision of a breakdown by region would involve disproportionate cost.

    Children (Offences)

    asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) how many children were charged with offences relating to sections 32, 33 and 34 of the Offences Against the Person Act 1861, for (a) Billericay petty sessional area (b) Essex and (c) England and Wales, for each of the past five years;(2) how many children were charged with offences relating to sections 35 and 36 of the Malicious Damage Act 1861 for

    (a) Billericay petty sessional area (b) Essex and (c) England and Wales, for each of the past five years;

    (3) how many children were convicted of offences relating to sections 32, 33 and 34 of the Malicious Damage Act 1861; and what was the average sentence for (a) Billericay petty sessional area (b) Essex and (c) England and Wales, for each of the past five years;

    (4) how many children were convicted of offences relating to sections 35 and 36 of the Malicious Damage Act 1861; and what was the average sentence for (a) Billericay petty sessional area (b) Essex and (c) England and Wales, for each of the past five years;

    (5) in what percentage of cases of children convicted under sections 35 and 36 of the Malicious Damage Act 1861 compensation orders were made against parents for (a) Billericay petty sessional area (b) Essex and (c) England and Wales, for each of the past five years;

    (6) in what percentage of cases of children convicted under sections 32, 33 and 34 of the Offences Against the Person Act 1861 compensation orders were made against parents for (a) Billericay petty sessional area (b) Essex and (c) England and Wales, for each of the past five years;

    (7) how many children were cautioned under sections 35 and 36 of the Malicious Damage Act 1861 by (a) Essex police and (b) the British Transport police for each of the past five years; and what percentage of these resided in south-east Essex;

    Persons aged under 17 cautioned or proceeded against in Billericay Petty Sessional Division, Essex police force area and England and Wales for certain offences by disposal

    1980–83

    Number of persons and percentages

    Disposal

    Year

    Billericay PSD

    Essex police force

    England and Wales

    Offences under Sections 32 to 34 of the Offences Against the Persons Act 1861

    Cautioned1980n.a.3
    1981n.a.3
    1982n.a.2
    1983n.a.6
    Proceeded against at magistrates courts198055
    19811133
    198216
    198232
    Found guilty at all courts1980†52
    19811124
    19822
    198312
    Fine (numbers)198010
    198114
    19822
    Fine (average amount)1980£14

    (8) how many children were cautioned under sections 32, 33 and 34 of the Offences Against the Person Act 1861 by (a) Essex police and (b) British Transport police for each of the past five years; and what percentage of these resided in south-east Essex;

    (9) how many children have been convicted of offences relating to section 56 of the British Transport Commission Act 1949, what was the average sentence for (a) the Billericay petty sessional area, (b) Essex, and (c) for England and Wales for each of the past five years;

    (10) how many children were charged with offences relating to section 56 of the British Transport Commission Act 1949 for (a) the Billericay petty sessional area, (b) Essex, and (c) for England and Wales for each of the past five years;

    (11) on how many occasions compensation orders have been made on parents of children convicted of offences relating to section 56 of the British Transport Commission Act 1949 in (a) the Billericay petty sessional area, (b) Essex, and (c) in England and Wales for each of the past five years.

    [pursuant to his replies, 18 June 1985, c. 88–89 and 20 June 1985, c. 185]: The information available to me, which may be incomplete is given in the following table for 1980–83; corresponding information for 1984 is not yet available.Question (3) has been taken to refer to the Offences Against the Persons Act 1861.Information collected centrally does not include details of cautions by the British Transport police, nor on the place of residence of offenders. For offences under sections 32 to 34 of the Offences Against the Persons Act 1861, the information for England and Wales is published annually in "Criminal Statistics England and Wales, Supplementary Tables", under offence classification 6: in vol 1, tables S1·1(B) and S1·1(C)—magistrates' courts, in vol 2, tables S2·1(B) and S2·1(C)—the Crown Court and in vol 4, table S4·1(C)—cautions.

    Disposal

    Year

    Billericay PSD

    Essex police force

    England and Wales

    1981£39
    1982£63
    1983£23
    Other non-custodial sentence198041
    19818
    198212
    198319
    Custodial sentence1980
    1981112
    1982
    1983
    Parents to pay compensation (numbers)1980
    1981
    1982
    1983
    Parents to pay compensation (percentages)1980
    1981
    1982
    1983

    Offences under Sections 35 to 36 of the Malicious Damage Act 1861

    Cautioned1980n.a.1
    1981n.a.7
    1982n.a.3
    1983n.a.5
    Proceeded against at magistrates courts198027
    198120
    198224
    198318
    Found guilty at all courts198025
    198119
    198222
    1983‡19
    Fine (numbers)19807
    19811
    19821
    19833
    Fine (average amount)1980£24
    1981£20
    1982£75
    1983£50
    Other non-custodial sentence198015
    198116
    198218
    198311
    Custodial sentence19803
    19812
    19823
    19835
    Parents to pay compensation (numbers)1980
    1981
    1982
    1983
    Parents to pay compensation (percentages)1980
    1981
    1982
    1983

    Offences under certain Acts relating to railways

    *

    Cautioned1980n.a.24
    1981n.a.16
    1982n.a.135
    1983n.a.9
    Proceeded against at magistrates courts19809390

    Disposal

    Year

    Billericay PSD

    Essex police force

    England and Wales

    1981418249
    19826249
    19836260
    Found guilty at all courts19809380
    1981317235
    19826230
    19834243
    Fine (numbers)19806259
    1981312167
    19824156
    19833199
    Fine (average amount)1980£13£11
    1981£20£16£11
    1982£8£12
    1983£7£12
    Other non-custodial sentence19803121
    1981568
    1982274
    1983144
    Custodial sentence1980
    1981
    1982
    1983
    Parents to pay compensation (numbers)19801
    1981
    1982
    19832
    Parents to pay compensation (percentages)1980(less than half)
    1981
    1982
    19831
    n.a. Not available.

    * Including section 56 of the British Transport Commission Act 1949 and private railway acts.

    † Includes one person committed for sentence by a magistrates' court but not yet sentenced by the Crown Court.
    ‡ Persons can be found guilty at the Crown Court for a difference offence from which they are committed for trial. Hence, sometimes the total found guilty at all courts exceeds the total proceeded against at magistrates' courts.

    Education And Science

    Teaching—Non-Teaching Staff Ratios

    asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science if he will publish a table showing the ratio of teaching to non-teaching staff under the control of the director of education in each local education authority.

    Area Advisory Committees

    asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science what information he has as to how many local education authorities have or have had area advisory committees, and as to their composition, powers, and functions.

    Local education authorities may set up area advisory committees at their discretion and they do not require the approval of my right hon. Friend. The Department does not therefore hold any information on them.

    Local Education Committees

    asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science what information he has as to the number of local education authorities in which schemes have been approved under circular 8/73; what information he has as to which authorities have amended their schemes subsequently; on what dates; and of what these amendments consisted.

    All local education authorities in England have arrangements for their education committee which have been approved by my right hon. Friend or his predecessors, as they have been required by law to do since 1944.It is not possible to provide the further detail requested except at disproportionate cost.

    asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science how many proposed schemes regarding the composition of local education committees under circular 8/73 he has rejected or amended; on what date; and for what reasons.

    My right hon. Friend has no power to amend proposals as to the composition of education committees. Since September 1981 he has approved all such proposals which have been put formally to him, with the exception of three which have been recently received and on which no decision has yet been reached.

    Polytechnics

    asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science if he will list the education equipment bids to his Department from all the English polytechnics via their respective education authorities in 1983, 1984 and 1985.

    This information is not available. Local education authorities' bids for equipment do not distinguish between polytechnics and their other further education institutions.It is for the authority to determine the apportionment of its allocation of prescribed capital expenditure, made under section 72 of the Local Government Planning and Land Act 1980, between institutions maintained by them. It has been the Department's practice in recent years to meet in full LEAs' bids for further and higher education equipment required for teaching and research.Some information on allocations to authorities for equipment for advanced further education as a whole is available, however, and I would refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave to the hon. Member for Battersea (Mr. Dubs) on 24 January at column

    476.

    Collective Worship

    asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science what steps he has taken to ensure that there are satisfactory arrangements for collective worship at the Winston Churchill school, Woking.

    The Department has raised this matter with Surrey county council, and I understand that the school's governing body has recently discussed the arrangements made for collective worship. I will write to my hon. Friend shortly.

    asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science what representations he has received calling for changes in the law regarding religious instruction in schools and the requirement for a daily assembly and act of worship; and if he will make a statement.

    We have received a small number of letters from members of the public; and earlier this year I met representatives of the National Association of Head Teachers to discuss their views on this matter. As my right hon. Friend has made clear in response to the Swann report and on other occasions, the Government have no plans to propose changes in the existing statutory provisions on religious instruction and collective worship in schools, and we look to local education authorities and individual schools to ensure that the statutory requirements are met.

    Science

    asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science what opportunities are provided to improve the understanding of senior officials in his Department advising him on priorities in the allocation of the science budget of the practical working of the private sector of industry.

    My right hon. Friend is advised by the Advisory Board for the Research Councils on priorities in the allocation of the science budget. Members of the ABRC include a number of senior industrialists who are able to give first hand advice on the practical working of the private sector of industry.

    Attorney-General

    Law Society (Coopers And Lybrand Report)

    41.

    asked the Attorney-General if he will make a statement on the Lord Chancellor's consideration of the Coopers and Lybrand report on the Law Society's role and functions.

    I understand that The Law Society intends to publish the report soon as the basis of its consultation on the handling of complaints against solicitors. The Lord Chancellor will await the outcome of that consultation.

    Judges (Retirement)

    asked the Attorney-General how many judges have continued to serve beyond retirement age in order to sit in Diplock trial cases in the last 10 years; and what was the age at which each eventually retired.The Attorney-General: None.

    asked the Attorney-General what is the age and name of the oldest judge currently sitting in Diplock courts; and what was the age and name of the oldest judge ever to hear such cases since these courts were established.

    The answer to both parts of the hon. Member's question is Lord Justice Gibson. He is now aged 72, having been born on 1 May 1913.

    Johnson Matthey

    asked the Attorney-General whether he will make a statement on the inquiry by the fraud investigation group into the affairs of Johnson Matthey Bankers.

    Scotland

    Multi-Occupation

    asked the Secretary of State for Scotland what consideration his Department has given to the problems of multi-occupancy; and what discussions his Department has had with Glasgow district council over legislative measures to control the sub-division of flats.

    Matters concerning houses in multiple occupation receive on-going consideration by the Scottish Development Department. My officials are currently considering proposals for a registration scheme for houses in multiple occupation, submitted informally by Glasgow district council. In its final form, the registration scheme will require the approval of my right hon. Friend the Secretary of State under section 100 of the Housing (Scotland) Act 1966.

    Pratt And Whitney (European Service Centre)

    asked the Secretary of State for Scotland (1) if he will place copies of all correspondence between his Department and Pratt and Whitney regarding the establishment of a European service centre at Prestwick in the Library;(2) on what occasions and in what manner he or any Minister or official in his Department has communicated with Pratt and Whitney regarding the establishment of their European service centre at Prestwick;(3) what communications he had with Pratt and Whitney before answering the parliamentary question of the hon. Member for Carrick, Cumnock and Doon Valley on 18 June,

    Official Report, column 124.

    No. Details of communications between Ministers or departmental officials and commercial companies cannot be disclosed, as to do so would break commercial confidentiality.

    Environment

    Farm Buildings

    asked the Secretary of State for the Environment if he will introduce legislation to provide that farmers require planning permission for the erection of all farm buildings.

    The erection of new agricultural buildings already requires planning permission, although general permission for many such buildings is given by class VI of the general development order. My Department has published proposals to amend the GDO so as to require specific planning permission for the development of livestock buildings near residential property; and proposals to qualify the exercise of GDO rights in respect of farm and forestry buildings and roads in the national parks.

    Berne Convention (Biennial Report)

    asked the Secretary of State for the Environment when he expects to send the biennial report required under article 9 of the Berne convention to the convention's secretariat; and if, at that time, copies of the report will be made available to voluntary conservation organisations.

    The United Kingdom report under article 9 of the Berne convention should be sent to the convention's secretariat by the end of July. In accordance with the terms of the convention, the report will be made to the standing committee and it is for that committee to decide upon any wider distribution.

    Derelict Land

    asked the Secretary of State for the Environment what is his policy towards the future development of disused industrial land which is not currently eligible for derelict land grant; and if he will make a statement.

    The Government are concerned that disused industrial land should be brought back into productive use as soon as possible. In many areas where land is not eligible for derelict land grant there are other grants, particularly urban development grant and the urban programme.

    asked the Secretary of State for the Environment if he will conduct a review of the various forms of grant available for environmental improvement work in areas of industrial and other man-made dereliction in order to establish the extent to which the current system offers scope for simplifications; and if he will make a statement.

    We have recently reviewed derelict land reclamation policy, including the proposed after-use of reclaimed sites. We propose to issue for consultation shortly a draft circular to local authorities which will set out priorities for the programme and outline the changes to the system which we propose to introduce for the next financial year.

    Information Technology Centre 6502 (Funding)

    asked the Secretary of State for the Environment if he will explain his reasons for his decision to withdraw urban aid programme funding for the Information Technology Centre 6502 in Moss Side, Manchester; and if he will make a statement.

    Urban programme funding for the Moss Side information technology centre has not been withdrawn. Urban programme grant was given on the capital costs (£83,000) of the centre on its establishment in 1982 and aid at £32,000 per annum towards its running costs in the first three years. That support has been extended at a level of £16,000 per annum for a further three years.

    Specialist Land Reclamation Teams

    asked the Secretary of State for the Environment what is his policy towards the future status and functions of the specialist land reclamation teams currently employed by metropolitan county councils; and if he will make a statement.

    Decisions on the future of the specialist reclamation teams employed by the metropolitan county councils must properly be taken by the successor authorities. At the same time my Department is prepared to use its good offices in advising how the teams might be maintained if there is a demand for this from the successor authorities.The Local Government Bill has now been amended to require residuary bodies to ask each successor authority before abolition about the desirability of their taking over certain staff on the abolition date, in order to provide services temporarily to the successor bodies while long-term arrangements are being finalised.

    Chinese Archway, Manchester

    asked the Secretary of State for the Environment what response he is prepared to make to the Manchester city council request for a special contribution towards the construction of a Chinese archway in the city centre area known as Chinatown.

    Manchester city council has proposed joint funding under the urban programme but Greater Manchester council has yet to decide on the source of its share of the funding. Additionally, Manchester city council has not submitted its inner area programme for 1985–86. A response on this individual proposal is therefore not appropriate at this time.

    Small Businesses

    asked the Secretary of State for the Environment what steps he is taking to encourage local authorities to allow non-polluting, new small businesses to be set up and to grow with the minimum of bureaucratic controls.

    I take it that my hon. friend has planning controls chiefly in mind. Our aim since coming into office has been to reduce unnecessary planning controls generally and to make the system as simple and efficient as possible. A wide range of further measures of relevance to small businesses is being considered following consultation on such matters as the proposal for simplified planning zones and amendments to the general development order. The circular and booklet on guidance for small firms which my hon. Friend, the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State announced to the House on 22 April at column 720 will be published in draft shortly.

    Liverpool

    asked the Secretary of State for the Environment whether, following the decision by Liverpool city council to set a rate for 1985–86, he intends to make payments to it for rate-related grants; and if he will make a statement.

    I refer the hon. Member to the answer given to my hon. Friend the Member for Skipton and Ripon (Mr. Watson) on Friday 28 June 1985 at columns 515–16.

    Job Creation

    asked the Secretary of State for the Environment how much Government money has been committed to projects that have created jobs in the Greater London area since 1979.

    Overseas Development

    Africa (Famine)

    48.

    asked the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs whether he will make a statement on the famine in Africa and how it is being alleviated by British, European and international agencies supported by the United Kingdom.

    The famine in Africa continues to be very serious, especially in Ethiopia and the Sudan. Substantial progress in the provision of food has been made, but port-discharge, transport and distribution problems persist in several countries. The United Nations office for emergency operations in Africa is making a concerted effort to overcome those problems. We continue to make a significant contribution from the £60 million of emergency assistance I announced in Geneva in March.

    Africa (Food Supplies)

    asked the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what study his Department has made of the possible use of the developing generation of British airships for the delivery of emergency food supplies to the destitute areas of Africa; and if he will make a statement.

    We are following progress in this field, but at present relative payloads, cost and operating difficulties would appear to make airships less attractive than aircraft for emergency relief operations.

    The Arts

    Kessler Collection

    asked the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State answering in respect of the Arts whether the Minister for the Arts will take immediate action to rectify the insurance indemnity problem which has arisen, under section 16 of the National Heritage Act 1980, preventing the Kessler art collection being loaned by the Tate Gallery for exhibition in Leicestershire as from 27 July.

    There is no reason why, under present loan arrangements through the Government indemnity scheme, the Tate Gallery should not lend pictures for exhibition.

    Agriculture, Fisheries And Food

    Labour Statistics

    asked the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food what information he has as to the proportion of people directly and indirectly involved in agriculture in Britain and other EEC countries.

    Information in respect of people indirectly engaged in agriculture is not available. The latest available information on the proportion of people directly engaged in agriculture is as follows:

    Per cent.
    United Kingdom*2·6
    Germany†5·4
    France†7·9
    Italy†12·0
    Netherlands†4·9
    Belgium†2·9
    Luxembourg†4·7
    Republic of Ireland†16·8
    Denmark†8·5
    Greece‡30·0
    Notes:
    * Percentage of total civilian manpower directly engaged in agriculture alone, 1984 (provisional).
    † Percentage of total manpower directly engaged in agriculture (including forestry and fishing), 1983.
    ‡ Percentage of total civilian manpower directly engaged in agriculture (including forestry and fishing), 1983.
    Sources:
    * Annual Review of Agriculture 1985 (Cmnd. 9423) † and ‡ The Agricultural Situation in the Community — 1984 Report (Commission of the European Communities).

    Atlantic Salmon

    asked the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food what further information he has now obtained about the action of the Canadian authorities in banning commercial fishing for Atlantic salmon in Canadian waters.

    Since my reply of 7 June at column 293, I have learned that, for the 1985 season, the actions the Canadian authorities have taken include a local ban on commercial fishing in the Maritime Provinces only. This ban does not extend to the commercial fishing of Newfoundland, Labrador or Quebec.I understand that no decision has been taken as to what happens next year, and that consultations will be held with the Canadian industry to develop a longer-term plan for the entire Canadian Atlantic fishery.

    Wheat Seed

    asked the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food what representations he has received from producers of wheat seed in Britain about the effects on the industry of the growth of equivalent subsidised imports; what import quotas are currently in force; and if he will make a statement.

    I have received no such representations. There are no quotas for imports of wheat seed into the United Kingdom. The level of imports from third countries is negligible compared with total production of wheat seed in this country.

    Pigs

    asked the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food if he will have discussions with the pig industry to seek to produce a social cost-benefit analysis for the pig industry to assist future planning of the industry.

    I doubt whether it would be possible to produce a meaningful social cost-benefit analysis for the pig industry. But we are in constant touch with associations representing pig farmers and processors about future developments in the pig industry in general and about such matters as production, structure, income and costs, animal health and welfare, the environment, pollution, processing, hygiene and trade in particular.

    Farm Animal Disease

    asked the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food if he will bring forward proposals for a co-operative approach between Government and the industry to the funding of farm animal disease control; and if he will make a statement.

    The Government are always willing to discuss with the industry measures for dealing with diseases of farm livestock. A co-operative approach already exists under which there are many and regular meetings with the industry to discuss and determine ways and means of dealing with the various disease problems which arise.

    Aujeszky's Disease

    asked the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food if it remains his policy to seek to control for the time being and eventually eradicate Aujeszky's disease.

    The policy for dealing with Aujeszky's disease remains the same. The objective of the programme was initially to control and then to seek to eradicate the disease. Control was quickly achieved and considerable progress has been made towards the ultimate goal of eradication.

    asked the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food what consideration he has given to employing procedures other than the entire slaughter of all herds containing one or more Aujeszky's sero-positive pigs; and what consultation he has had with the pig industry on the subject.

    Careful consideration has been given to the principle of selective slaughter instead of whole herd slaughter where circumstances reveal only one or a few infected animals. Consultations were held and agreement reached with the Pig Disease Eradication Fund Ltd. to the adoption of this approach if the state veterinary service considered it appropriate in particular circumstances.

    Wheat

    asked the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food what quantity of category 3 wheat from the EEC is stored in the United Kingdom; what intervention price per tonne is paid for this wheat; where it is stored; and what it is used for.

    Offerers are not required to state the category (or class) of wheat delivered into intervention, but it is probable that almost all of the 3·3 million tonnes of common wheat stored in the United Kingdom falls into class III: varieties not usually accepted for inclusion in breadmaking grists by United Kingdom millers. The common wheat intervention price rose from £113·05 per tonne to £127·36 per tonne over the first ten months of the current marketing year, and offerers receive the price for the month scheduled for delivery of their wheat into store. The wheat is held in 145 intervention stores in England and Scotland, and its main use would be for animal feed.

    Employment

    Youth Training

    asked the Secretary of State for Employment if he will give the proportions of youth training scheme leavers going to the following destinations for each available month of the 15 per cent. leavers sample and for each of the previous samples (a) full-time work with the same employer, (b) full-time work with a different employer, (c) part-time work, (d) full-time college or training course, (e) back at school, (f) on another youth training scheme, (g) claimant unemployed and (h) other; and if he will show for each survey (i) the proportion of respondents who had left the scheme early and (ii) the usable percentage response rate.

    The Manpower Services Commission introduced a regular monthly survey of leavers from the youth training scheme in 1984. Questionnaires are sent to a 15 per cent. sample of all leavers in each month some three months after they leave the scheme. Leavers in June 1984 were the first group to

    Response to the Question "What are you doing now?"
    Ad Hoc Surveys Leavers between15 per cent Follow-Up Programme leavers in:
    April 1983 and November 1983April 1983 and March 1984April 1984 and July 1984June 1984July 1984August 1984September 1984October 1984
    In full-time work with same employer412222130322819
    In full-time work with different employer3437343531292729
    In part-time work**211111
    On full-time course at college/training centre41223461
    Back at school211
    On another YTS Scheme2913445569
    Doing something else33232222
    Unemployed2434343528272938
    Sample Details:
    Percentage who were early leavers10090645644333756
    Percentage response5355706767656863
    * Information not available.

    Labour Statistics

    asked the Secretary of State for Employment how many unemployed people in Slough and in Berkshire had registered details of their skills and experience at jobcentres at the most recent date for which the information is available; and what proportion those numbers represented of the total registered as unemployed.

    On 3 May 1985, 418 job seekers were registered in Slough and 2,329 job seekers registered in Berkshire. These figures include a small number of employed people seeking a change of employment. Unemployed people are no longer required to register at the jobcentre as a condition of claiming benefit. However, it is not necessary to register for employment in order to use the jobcentre. It should not be assumed that these figures represent all the job seekers in the area who are actively looking for work. Large numbers of job seekers regularly use the self-service display areas from where 65 per cent. of the vacancies notified to jobcentres are filled.

    asked the Secretary of State for Employment what is his estimate of the number of job vacancies filled each month.

    It is estimated that, during 1984–85, on average about 600,000 job vacancies were filled each month.

    asked the Secretary of State for Employment what information is collected by his Department on the state of the labour market in travel-to-work areas, other than the number of people registered as unemployed and job vacancies notified directly to jobcentres.

    The labour market data collected by the Department for travel-to-work areas are as follows:

    be covered by this survey. An earlier programme of ad hoc surveys provided comparable information about young people who left the scheme before June 1984. The results of all completed surveys are given in the table.

  • (i) Monthly counts of the claimant unemployed resident in each area analysed by sex, with quarterly analyses by age and duration of unemployment;
  • (ii) Triennial estimates of employees in employment in each area, analysed by sex and industry and full-time/part-time status.
  • Statistics of job vacancies and of confirmed redundancies are collected for jobcentre areas, from which approximations can be made for travel-to-work areas.

    Information on certain aspects of labour markets in travel-to-work areas, such as the occupations of those in employment, is also available to the Department from the decennial census of population, which is conducted by the office of population censuses and surveys.

    Job Creation

    asked the Secretary of State for Employment if he has any figures for jobs created as a result of grants from the European Economic Community.

    The European Commission has estimated that, from the inception of the European regional development fund in 1975 to the end of 1983, grants were awarded to industrial projects in the United Kingdom which directly created 109,790 new jobs and preserved 52,590 existing jobs. In addition, about 70 per cent. of the allocations to the United Kingdom in that period were made to capital investments in infrastructure, and this resulted indirectly in the creation of many more jobs. Information on the European Social Fund is not available in the same form but, of the figure of about 1,200,000 people taking part in training and employment schemes supported by the fund in the United Kingdom in 1984, about 300,000 were on job creation schemes.

    Wages Councils

    asked the Secretary of State for Employment when he expects to be in a position to make a statement on the future of wages councils.

    No decision on the future of wages councils will be made before we have completed our study of the many and varied responses to our consultative paper.

    Prices

    asked the Secretary of State for Employment what has been the increase in the retail prices index (a) over the period 1979–80 to 1984–85 and (b) over the period 1980–81 to 1984–85; and if he will make a statement.

    The retail prices index increased by 52·7 per cent. between financial years 1979–80 and 1984–85 and by 31·3 per cent. between financial years 1980–81 and 1984–85. Retail prices rose by 21· per cent. during the first financial year mentioned and by 6·9 per cent. in the last, indicating the success of present Government policy.

    Air Pollution

    asked the Secretary of State for Employment if he will list the number of enforcements by Her Majesty's air pollution inspectorate of air pollution legislation in the years since 1979.

    The number of enforcements by Her Majesty's industrial air pollution inspectorate of air pollution legislation for the years since 1979 are as follows:

    YearProsecutionsImprovement notices
    19797
    198010*17
    1981174
    1982204
    1983172
    198411
    Total7228
    * Fourteen of these were for one registered works.

    Enterprise Allowance Scheme

    asked the Secretary of State for Employment how long applicants for the enterprise allowance scheme in Portsmouth and Hampshire currently have to wait on average before being granted an appointment at the initial information seminar.

    Potential applicants for the enterprise allowance scheme in the Hampshire and Isle of Wight area wait on average one to two weeks to attend an information session. No separate information is available for the Portsmouth area.

    Asbestos

    asked the Secretary of State for Employment how many licences under the Asbestos (Licensing) Regulations 1983 have been issued.

    asked the Secretary of State for Employment to what he attributes the large disparity in the number of enforcements of asbestos licensing regulations issued in the different Health and Safety Executive areas.

    The number and nature of asbestos contracts for which a licence is required varies between Health and Safety Executive areas, and a similar level of enforcement activity in each area is not expected. Some contracts are of short duration and modest risk. Other more complex work, possibly associated with demolition, may call for increased attention. As a result of the asbestos (licensing) regulations and requirements to notify work with asbestos which have been a condition of most licences, enforcing authorities are now able to take into account knowledge of contractors' ability to strip asbestos competently, thus enabling inspectors to decide how much time they need to devote to particular sites.

    Football Ground Safety

    asked the Secretary of State for Employment if he will extend the scope of community programme work to assist with necessary safety work at football league grounds.

    The relevance of community programme support for work on football league grounds will be considered, taking account of discussions which my hon. Friend the Minister with responsibility for sport is having with the football organisations and Government Departments about the financing of ground improvements.

    Technology (Training)

    asked the Secretary of State for Employment (1) what steps he is taking to improve the availability of high technology and information technology training for mature staff in both public and private sectors;(2) what steps he is taking to encourage employers to retrain existing staff in information technology and high technology skills.

    Primary responsibility for retraining existing employees will continue to remain with employers in both the public and the private sector. However, the Government's pump priming support for adult training gives priority to new technology skills and to new open learning techniques. These include the open tech programme, priority skills training and local training grants to employers. We are also improving access by employed people to new technology training through skillcentre new technology access centres, information technology centres and the access to information technology scheme.

    Community Programme

    asked the Secretary of State for Employment what is his estimate of the number of people who so far have been on the community programme who were under the age of 25 years.

    Information on the number of entrants to the community programme and the percentage of those entrants under the age of 25 is set out in the table:

    Total entrantsPercentage under 25
    October 1982–May 198328,53954
    June 1983–May 1984142,90655
    June 1984–May 1985166,16863

    Energy

    Energy Conservation

    asked the Secretary of State for Energy what steps he is taking to encourage greater energy conservation and the use of energy conservation devices in the public sector, particularly in regard to heat loss in tower blocks and from both military and civil government establishments, and to promote low-cost, alternative energy generators at remote locations.

    The Government's energy efficiency campaign which aims to promote energy efficiency over all sectors of the economy has generated an upsurge in interest and activity. In particular, I am encouraging the appointment of energy managers in both public and private sectors whose task it is to act as a focus for the improvement of energy efficiency in their own establishments.

    Oil Exploration (Warwickshire)

    asked the Secretary of State for Energy what plans he has to extend the area of Warwickshire licensed for (a) oil exploration and (b) oil production; and if he will make a statement.

    The Petroleum (Production) (Landward Areas) Regulations 1984 set out the arrangements for applications for new licences. On 25 June 1985, at column 360, I announced that the Secretary of State for Energy will on 2 July formally invite applications for exploration licences for unlicensed areas. Unlicensed areas of Warwickshire could therefore be applied for in this round. I have sent my hon. Friend a map indicating existing licensed areas in Warwickshire.

    asked the Secretary of State for Energy (1) what inquiries he has had since he last granted oil exploration licences for Warwickshire about (a) further exploration and (b) production; and if he will make a statement;(2) what parts of Warwickshire have to date been prospected for

    (a) oil and (b) other hydrocarbons with negative results; and if he will make a statement.

    Exploration for oil and other hydrocarbons has taken place in southern parts of Warwickshire. Specifically a network of seismic lines was shot in July 1984 in exploration licences XLs 176 and 197 along and south of a line between Dorsington and Banbury. The survey included areas outside Warwickshire, but in that county the survey was of the area around Shipston-on-Stour.A further survey in XL 176 is planned for July 1985, parts of which will be in Warwickshire around Dorsington, Shipston-on-Stour and Great Wolford.In May 1984, one short line in production licence PL 168 was shot near Banton on the Heath.

    I refer my hon. Friend to my answer given today in relation to the evaluation of seismic data. No other interest in areas in Warwickshire has been expressed to my Department.

    asked the Secretary of State for Energy (1) what progress has been made under the production licences to secure oil production in Warwickshire; and if he will make a statement;(2) if, further to the reply to the hon. Member for Rugby and Kenilworth of 27 June,

    Official Report, columns 473–74, concerning oil exploration in Warwickshire, he will make a statement on the outcome to date of the seismic surveys conducted.

    Seismic surveys have been carried out in the licensed areas of Warwickshire. Such surveys should provide evidence as to whether or not suitable structures, which could contain oil, exist. The detailed analysis of the data they provide is a lengthy procedure and has not yet been completed by the licensees. Results of all seismic surveys are, however, confidential to the licensees concerned and are not made available publicly.

    asked the Secretary of State for Energy (1) what licences are currently in force for (a) exploration and (b) production of hydrocarbons other than oil in Warwickshire; if he will specify in each case the date of issue, to whom the licence has been issued, the period of the licence, the precise area covered and progress to date; and if he will make a statement;(2) further to the reply to the hon. Member for Rugby and Kenilworth of 27 June,

    Official Report, columns 473–74, concerning oil exploration in Warwickshire, if he will specify the precise areas within which (a) each of the production licences and (b) each of the exploration licences are operative.

    Parts of two production licences (PLs) are in areas of Warwickshire. The licence boundaries are given in the following grid references.

    PL 168SP 10002900,SP 15002900,SP 15002600,
    SP 22502600,SP 22503400,SP 30003400,
    SP 30003000,SP 35503000,SP 35502000,
    SP 10002000,SP 10002900.
    PL 169aSP 30004000,SP 44044000,SP 44003200,
    SP 35503200,SP 35503000,SP 30003000,
    SP 30004000.
    Parts of two exploration licences (XLs) are in areas of Warwickshire. The licence boundaries are as follows:

    XLSP 11005000,SP 40005000,SP 40004000,
    SP 30004000,SP 30003400,SP 22503400,
    SP 22502600,SP 15002600,SP 15002900,
    SP 11021900,SP 11005000.
    XL 197SP 40005000,SP 57005000,SP 57003000,
    SP 42503000,SP 42502000,SP 48002000,
    SP 48001000,SP 40001000,SP 40002000,
    SP 35502000,SP 35503200,SP 44003200,
    SP 44004000,SP 40004000,SP 40005000.
    A production licence grants the right to search, bore for and get petroleum, which is defined as any mineral oil or relative hydrocarbon and natural gas existing in its natural condition in strata, but excluding coal, bituminous shale or other stratified deposits from which oil can be extracted by destructive distillation. An exploration licence of this type grants the right to search but not bore for petroleum. The exercise of the right granted by these licences is subject to all necessary permissions, including planning permission where necessary. I refer my hon. Friend to my reply of 27 June for the details of licensees, date of grant and period of licence.

    asked the Secretary of State for Energy what information is available to him as to any correlation between the incidence of coal deposits in south Warwickshire and of hydrocarbons, including oil, in that approximate area; and if he will make a statement.

    The National Coal Board has sent out to local authorities its proposals for the development of the 400-million tonne reserve of coal in south Warwickshire. There is no information available to confirm the presence of hydrocarbons in this area.

    Defence

    Multilaunch Rocket System

    asked the Secretary of State for Defence what is the latest position on production of the multilaunch rocket system project; and if he will make a statement.

    I have nothing to add to the answer given to the hon. Member on 22 May 1985 at columns 424–5.

    Dry Training

    asked the Secretary of State for Defence if it would be possible to carry out at Spadeadam all the dry training he now proposes should take place on land at Stainmore; and if he will make a statement.

    asked the Secretary of State for Defence if he will now undertake urgent studies into the potential use of land on the north-west and south-east of the present firing points on Worcop ranges for the purposes of dry training.

    No. This land is privately owned and we have no indication that it is to become available for purchase or lease.

    asked the Secretary of State for Defence if he will now withdraw his proposal to acquire land for dry training at Stainmore in light of the decision by Eden district council to object to the proposal.

    We have just received the council's response to the PSA's notice of proposed development. We are now considering the way forward.

    asked the Secretary of State for Defence what would be the future of Worcop and the live firing ranges if he fails to acquire additional land for dry training at Stainmore.

    Use of Warcop training area would continue as at present. However, we would still face difficulties in providing suitable facilities for low level training for small units in military skills for which there is no need for live ammunition to be fired, and we would therefore continue to have a requirement to acquire a dry training area close by.

    asked the Secretary of State for Defence if he will publish the figures showing the maximum potential utilisation of Warcop at present and its actual usage over the last two years.

    There is a very heavy, continuing demand for the training facilities at Warcop training area, which are almost invariably used to capacity. It is not possible to produce realistic figures to show what the maximum potential usage of the training area would be as these will vary depending on the assumptions used in the calculation about the nature and pattern of the training being conducted. The usage in 1983–84 amounted to 112,324 man training days and in 1984–85 to 177,736 man training days.

    Houses

    asked the Secretary of State for Defence if he will list the number of houses in his Department's ownership in Portsmouth, Gosport, Fareham and Havant districts; and how many of these are currently occupied.

    The numbers are as follows:

    StockOccupied
    Royal Navy
    Portsmouth1,5864285
    Gosport3,622
    Fareham87
    Havant
    Army
    Gosport/Portsmouth111109
    Thorney Island211198
    The unoccupied Royal Navy houses are vacant for the following reasons:

    Number
    Vacant allocated42
    Vacant furnishing45
    Awaiting works services196
    Undergoing works services252
    Vacant502
    Plans are in hand to reduce our stocks of houses significantly over the next few years.

    Arms Sales

    asked the Secretary of State for Defence if he will publish a table in the Official Report showing the percentage value of total arms exports sold and delivered to each African country for 1980 to 1984.

    It has been the consistent policy of successive Governments not to publish detailed figures of defence sales to individual overseas customers beyond those given in volume II of the statement on the Defence Estimates.

    asked the Secretary of State for Defence if he will make a statement on the current level of sales by the Defence Sales Organisation regarding British arms sales to the Third world and indicate the expected rate of increase in arms deliveries for 1985 as compared with 1983 and 1984.

    The Defence Sales Organisation is fundamentally concerned with supporting sales by British industry, whose export figures are given as follows. There is no generally accepted definition of the term "Third-world" countries. However, taking the 45 poorest countries in the world according to the 1985 World Bank atlas — excluding states with a population of less than 100,000 and all dependencies — the value of United Kingdom defence contracts known to us for 1983 was £842·4 million. The comparative figure for 1984 was £443·36 million; no meaningful statistics are yet available for the first half of 1985.

    asked the Secretary of State for Defence if he will make a statement outlining his policy with regard to safeguards and standards governing the supply and sale of arms to countries in the Third world.