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Waste Disposal (London)

Volume 84: debated on Monday 21 October 1985

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asked the Secretary of State for the Environment how many London boroughs have now submitted proposals for practical arrangements for transfer of waste disposal functions; and what proportion of London's population they represent.

Six London boroughs and the City of London have submitted practicable proposals for two voluntary groupings for waste disposal operations. In addition, four London boroughs have invited the setting up of a statutory joint authority for their area. Thirteen other boroughs have made various proposals which either have not achieved sufficient support or which do not appear to be satisfactory. In all, authorities representing three quarters of the population of Greater London have made proposals.

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment what financial information relating to economy, efficiency and effectiveness he is considering or has considered on the different options for providing waste disposal services in London after 1 April 1986.

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment if he will make a statement further to his Department's note of guidance on arrangements for coordinating licensing control planning and research and development for waste disposal in the London area.

No proposals commanding general acceptance have so far been received. Unless the situation changes, it will fall to the Secretary of State to consider the setting up of joint statutory arrangements in pursuance of section 10 of the Local Government Act 1985.

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment what estimate he has made of the likely costs to the London borough of Newham of the waste disposal service after 1 April 1986 compared with that borough's present contribution to the service provided by the Greater London council.

The costs of waste disposal in any London borough after the abolition of the Greater London council will depend on the policies and practices of the authorities which become responsible.

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment how many London borough councils submitted proposals for the future of the waste disposal service in Greater London by his Department's deadline of 30 September; how many have submitted proposals since that date; and how many of the submissions made indicated unqualified support for his Department's proposals for seven voluntary groupings.

Twenty three London boroughs and the City of London submitted proposals either before or shortly after 30 September. Most of the submissions did not address themselves to ale question whether there should be seven voluntary groupings in London.

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment if he is yet in a position to indicate what the arrangements for waste disposal in London will be after 1 April 1986.

This would be premature as under the terms of section 10 of the Local Government Act 1985, the Secretary of State cannot take a final and complete view on the arrangements to be made until 15 November 1985.

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment what savings will result from his proposals to split London's waste disposal service into seven groups.

Savings resulting from the abolition of the Greater London council, on waste disposal as on other functions, will depend on the economy, efficiency and effectiveness with which successor authorities carry them out.