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Written Answers

Volume 86: debated on Thursday 14 November 1985

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Written Answers To Questions

Thursday 14 November 1985

Wales

Welsh Language Education

asked the Secretary of State for Wales what consultation he had with Mudiad Ysgolion Meithrin concerning the proposal to establish a Welsh language education development body; and if he will make a statement.

My hon. Friend the Member for Monmouth (Sir. J. Stradling Thomas) met representatives of several Welsh language groups on 25 June 1985. Mudiad Ysgolion Meithrin was represented at that meeting and was able to present its views on the proposal to establish a Welsh language education development body.

Full-timePart-time
GradeMaleFemaleMaleFemale
Radiographers
Basic37170189
Senior II107641
Senior I23747
Superintendent IV511
Superintendent III920
Superintendent II35
Superintendent I75
Teacher12
Senior Teacher41
Principal Teacher II21
Principal Teacher I11
Principal Teacher 24+1
Speech Therapists
Senior II3617
Senior I13610
Chief IV42
Chief III9
District Chief II2
District Chief I3
Clinical Psychologists
Basic grade, probationary period47
Basic grade, post-probationary period1062
Senior16126
Principal1851
Top grade1
Top grade with greater responsibility1
Hospital pharmacists
Pre-registration students512
Basic1342116
Staff605317
Principal III171
Principal IV41
Principal V1
Medical Laboratory Scientific Officers
Junior—Scale A684
Junior—Scale B347437
Basic205241226
Senior104316
Chief908

Music Therapy

asked the Secretary of State for Wales how many music therapists there are employed by health authorities in Wales; and whether he has any plans for allocating more resources to develop such services.

No music therapists were employed by health authorities in Wales on 30 September 1984, the latest date for which information is available. It is for health authorities to plan and develop their services according to their policies and priorities and to deploy their resources accordingly.

National Health Service (Staff)

asked the Secretary of State for Wales if he will break down by grade, sex, full and part-time staff the numbers in Wales of (a) radiographers, (b) speech therapists, (c) clinical psychologists, (d) hospital pharmacists, (e) medical laboratory scientific officers, (f) medical physics technicians, and (g) physiological measurement technicians.

The latest available information relates to 30 September 1984, when staff numbers were as follows:

Full-time

Part-time

Grade

Male

Female

Male

Female

Senior Chief302
Principal3

Medical Physics Technicians

Student A1
Student B1
Junior4
Technician IV3442
Technician III317
Technician II241
Technician I5
Principal1

Physiological Measurement Technician

Student A21
Student B8261
Technician115617
Senior6392
Chief814
Senior Chief31

Day-Care Places

asked the Secretary of State for Wales how many day-care places are available for children in each Welsh authority; and what were the comparative figures for October 1979, 1980, 1981, 1982, 1983 and 1984.

Number of day care places available for children
197919801981198219831984
Clwyd178178205221236253
Dyfed
Gwent15315493116116116
Gwynedd40606060
Mid Glamorgan127127127127145260
Powys101010
South Glamorgan492447385366338397
West Glamorgan40104444130140

Labour Statistics

asked the Secretary of State for Wales (1) how many jobs in Wales have been created in (a) the service sector, (b) the public sector, (c) the manufacturing sector and (d) the private sector so far in 1985;(2) how many Welsh jobs have been lost in

(a) service industries, (b) manufacturing industries, (c) private sector and (d) public sector so far in 1985.

Information is not available in the form requested, but data on net changes in the numbers of employee in employment are provided in the Department of Employment's quarterly estimate series. These do not distinguish between public and private sector employment, but the manufacturing and service industry figure are as follows:

Staffed beds allocated
Hospital1979198019811982198319841985
Clwyd:
Abergele

The available information relates to 31 March. Figures for 31 March 1979 to 1984 are given in the table and include places provided by other registered premises or persons as well as facilities provided by the local authorities.

Thousands
December 1984June 1985
Manufacturing industries207204
Service industries576583

Acute Geriatric Beds

asked the Secretary of State for Wales how many acute geriatric beds there are in each Welsh general hospital now; and what are the figures for the years 1979 to 1984, inclusive.

The table gives the numbers of staff beds allocated to non-psychiatric geriatric specialties in each hospital classified as acute, mainly acute and partly acute in Wales. The figures relate to 30 June 1985 and to 31 December for the years 1979 to 1984.

Staffed beds allocated

Hospital

1979

1980

1981

1982

1983

1984

1985

Catherine Gladstone
Chirk and District
Colwyn Bay Community
Denbigh Infirmary
Flint Cottage
H.M. Stanley74747474747474
Holywell Cottage
Llangollen
Maelor General76767979999696
Mold
Ruthin
Wrexham & East Denbigh
Ysbyty Glan Clwyd103040404046

East Dyfed:

Amman Valley
Bronglais General78787878787862
Cardigan and District
Llandovery Cottage
Llanelli
West Wales General107107107107107107107

Pembrokshire:

Tenby Cottage
Withybush104104104104104104104
Abertillery and District30303030303030
Allt-yr-Yn29292929292929
Blaenavon Health Care Unit
County30303030303030
Monmouth
Nevill Hall50505050505050
Royal Gwent

Gwynedd:

Bryn Beryl30303030303030
Caernarvon Eye and Cottage
Dolgellau and District10101010101010
Ffestiniog Memorial
Llandudno General30303030303030
Madoc Memorial
St. David's Bangor3232323232
Stanley Sailors
Towyn and Distict10101010101010
Ysbyty Gwynedd6060

Mid Glamorgan:

Aberbargoed and District18181818181818
Aberdare General1515
Bridgend General48484848484848
Caerphilly Miners36363636363636
East Glamorgan General
Llwynypia84848484848482
Llynfi
Maesteg General
Mardy22222222312237
Mountain Ash
Pentwyn Cottage
Pontypridd and District
Porth and District303030303030
Prince Charles
Redwood Memorial1010101081010
Tonteg26262626252525
Treherbert

Powys:

Brecon War Memorial
Builth Cottage
Llandrindod War Memorial30303030303030
Llanidloes and District29202020202020
Machynlleth and District
Montgomery County Infirmary142020202020
Victoria Memorial30303030303030

South Glamorgan:

Staffed beds allocated

Hospital

1979

1980

1981

1982

1983

1984

1985

Barry Community
Cardiff Royal Infirmary100100100100100
Llandough60606060606060
Rookwood
St. David's, Cardiff1211218985111111111
University Hospital of Wales29292626262626

West Glamorgan:

Gorseinon6666666
Hill House47475947474747
Morriston56565656565656
Neath Annexe24242424242424
Neath General
Port Talbot
Singleton

Elderly Persons (Primary Care)

asked the Secretary of State for Wales how many primary care teams for the elderly currently operate in Wales; and in which counties they are in operation.

The idea of teams to ensure comprehensive provision for the elderly has been advocated in a consultative document recently published by our Department. While elements of such teams already exist in many parts of Wales, I am not aware of any that involve all the components discussed in the consultative document.

Elderly Hospital Patients (Advice)

asked the Secretary of State for Wales in how many Welsh hospitals geriatric and medical advice and assistance are readily available for pre- and post-operation elderly patients.

Geriatric and medical advice and assistance are available to all hospitals in Wales.

Agricultural Advice

asked the Secretary of State for Wales whether, in view of the changes now being introduced requiring farmers to pay for services received from the Agricultural Development and Advisory Service, farmers in Wales will continue to be able to receive the service and advice through the language of their choice whether Welsh or English.

Environment

Private Flats

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment when he anticipates being able to publish the report, findings and recommendations of the committee which he established to consider problems arising over the management of blocks of private flats and matters of management, maintenance, service charges and related issues and the circumstances of long lease holders of flats whose common services are managed at their expense by an agent appointed by their landlord.

I refer my hon. Friend to the answer given today to my hon. Friend the Member for Westminster, North (Mr. Wheeler).

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment if he has received the report of the committee on the management of privately-owned blocks of flats, chaired by Mr. Edward Nugee, QC; and if he will make a statement.

I have now received the report, which is being published today, and I have placed copies in the Library. My right hon. Friend and I are extremely grateful to the committee for the work it has done and the way it has carried out its tasks. The report makes many recommendations, and we will consider these in detail as quickly as possible.

Local Government Reform (Residuary Bodies)

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment if he will name the members appointed to the Residuary Body for Tyne and Wear, their present or former professions, and the fees they will receive.

The information is as follows:

Tyne and Wear Residuary Body
Member and Present or former profession (on appointment)Remuneration to be paid (£ per annum)
Mr. Jock Robertson (Chairman)
Formerly chief executive, Northumbrian water authority16,000
Mr. Kenneth Douglas
Formerly managing director, Austin and Pickersgill Ltd.5,600
Mr. Henry Foakes
Formerly chief Executive, Northumberland county council5,600
Mr. Stuart Sisterson
Partner, Storey Sons and Parker, chartered surveyors5,600
Mr. Roger Spoor
Partner, Arthur Young, chartered accountants5,600
Remuneration for the chairman is on a two days a week basis; for the other members, one. Remuneration is subject to abatement, if applicable, in respect of public sector pension received.

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment if he will name the members appointed to the Residuary Body for Merseyside, their present or former professions, and the fees they will receive.

The information is as follows:

Merseyside Residuary Body
Member and Present or former profession (on appointment)Remuneration to be paid (£ per annum)
Mr. Leslie Pocock CBE
Chairman, Liverpool district health authority17,600
Mr. Norman Brodrick
Formerly local agent, Bank of England5,600
Mr. Duncan Forbes
Formerly chairman, Booker Line5,600
Mr. John Hill
Formerly treasurer, Liverpool metropolitan city council5,600
Mr. William Hughes
Formerly director personnel and management services, Wirral metropolitan borough council5,600
Mr. Leslie Jones
Formerly superintending estates officer, Department of the Environment, north west region5,600
Mr. Kenneth Medlock
Vice-Chairman, Merseyside chamber of commerce and industry5,600
Remuneration for the chairman is on a two days a week basis; for the other members, one. Remuneration is subject to abatement, if applicable, in respect of public sector pension received.

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment if he will name the members appointed to the Residuary Body for Greater London, their present or former professions, and the fees they will receive.

The information is as follows:

London Residuary Body
Member and Present or former profession (on appointment)Remuneration to be paid (£ per annum)
Sir Godfrey Taylor (Chairman)
Formerly chairman, Southern water authority50,000
Mr. Alan Blakemore CBE
Formerly town clerk and chief executive, London borough of Croydon12,000
Mr. Jack Esling
Formerly general manager, personnel, Thames water authority24,000
Mr. Wallace Mackenzie OBE
Group managing director, Slough Estates, plc12,000
Mr. Michael Roberts
Partner, Deloitte, Haskins and Sells, chartered accountants18,000
Mr. Jack Wolkind CBE
Formerly chief executive, London borough of Tower Hamlets12,000
Councillor Peter Bowness
(appointed from the London Co-ordinating Committee of successor councils) Leader of the council, London borough of Croydon6,000
Remuneration for the chairman is on a full-time basis; for Mr. Esling on the basis of four days a week, Mr. Roberts three, Messrs. Blakemore, Mackenzie and Wolkind two, and Councillor Bowness one. Remuneration is subject to abatement, if applicable, in respect of public sector pension received.

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment if he will name the members appointed to the Residuary Board for Greater Manchester, their present or former professions, and the fees they will receive.

The information is as follows:

Greater Manchester Residuary Body
Member and Present or former profession (on appointment)Remuneration to be paid (£ per annum)
Mr. Peter Hadfield JP (Chairman)
Formerly chairman and managing director of Bass North West Ltd.17,600
Mr. Kenneth Alford OBE
Partner, W. H. Robinson and Co., chartered surveyors5,600
Mr. Brian Scholes OBE
Formerly chief executive, Bolton metropolitan borough council5,600
Mr. Clifford Singleton OBE
Formerly chief executive, Blackburn borough council5,600
Mr. Robert Willan
Chairman and managing director, The Willan Building and Property Group5,600
Councillor Bernard Coyle JP
(appointed from the Greater Manchester Co-ordinating Committee of successor councils) Leader of the council, Wigan metropolitan borough council5,600
Remuneration for the chairman is on a two days a week basis; for the other members, one. Remuneration is subject to abatement, if applicable, in respect of public sector pension received.

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment (1) if meetings of the Greater Manchester Residuary Body will be open to the public;(2) if the minutes of meetings of the Greater Manchester Residuary Body will be made available to the public.

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment if he will name the members appointed to the Residuary Body for West Midlands, their present or former professions, and the fees they will receive.

The information is as follows:

West Midlands Residuary Body
Member and Present or former profession (on appointment)Remuneration to be paid (£ annum)
Dr. Malcolm Skillicorn (Chairman)
Corporate director, public affairs, GKN Group17,600
Mr. Geoffrey Jackson CBE JP
Managing director, Jackson of Coventry, Ltd5,600
Mr. John Meeting JP
Agent, Calthorpe, Edgbaston and Elvetham Estates5,600
Mr. William Page CBE
Formerly chief executive, Birmingham metropolitan city council5,600
Mr. Kenneth Williams
Formerly chief executive and town clerk, Wolverhampton metropolitan borough council5,600
Councillor Joseph Adams
(appointed from the West Midlands Co-ordinating Committee of successor councils) Leader of the council, Sandwell metropolitan borough council5,600

Remuneration for the chairman is on a two days a week basis; for the other members, one. Remuneration is subject to abatement, if applicable, in respect of public sector pension received.

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment if he will name the members appointed to the Residuary Body for West Yorkshire, their present or former professions, and the fees they will receive.

The information is as follows:

West Yorkshire Residuary Body
Member and Present or former profession (on appointment)Remuneration to be paid (£ per annum)
Mr. Tom McDonald OBE (Chairman)
Partner, Armitage and Norton, Chartered Accountants16,000
Mr. Keith Bridge
Formerly chief executive, Humberside county council5,600
Mr. Donald Hanson
Chairman and managing director, Woolcombers (Holdings) plc5,600
Mr. Anthony Mallett CBE
Formerly chief executive, South Yorkshire metropolitan county council5,600
Mr. Roger Suddards
Partner, Last Suddards, solicitors5,600
Councillor George Mudie
(appointed from the West Yorkshire Co-ordinating Committee of successor councils) Leader of the council, Leeds metropolitan cityattendance
councilallowance
Remuneration for the chairman is on a two days a week basis; for the other members, one. Remuneration is subject to abatement, if applicable, in respect of public sector pension received.

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment if he will name the members appointed to the Residuary Body for South Yorkshire, their present or former professions, and the fees they will receive.

The information is as follows:

South Yorkshire Residuary Body
Member and Present or former profession (on appointment)Remuneration to be paid (£ per annum)
Mr. Bernard Cotton CBE (Chairman)
Deputy chairman, Baker Perkins plc16,000
Councillor Irvine Patnick OBE (Deputy Chairman)
Leader of the opposition, South Yorkshire metropolitan county council13,200
Mr. Malcolm Simpson
Formerly director of finance, Leeds metropolitan city council5,600
The Hon. Neil Turner
Chairman, Edward Turner and Associates5,600
Mr. Philip Wolf
Formerly regional director, Manpower Services Commission5,600
Remuneration for the chairman and deputy chairman is on a two days a week basis; for the other members, one. Remuneration is subject to abatement, if applicable, in respect of public sector pension received.

Great Grimsby (Housing)

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment if he will allocate additional resources to Great Grimsby borough council under the housing investment programme for housebuilding and modernisation; and if he will make a statement.

Decisions have not yet been taken on the distribution of resources for housing investment programmes for 1986–87.

Public Rights Of Way

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment (1) whether he will list in the Official Report those local authorities which have not yet modified definitive maps in existence prior to the implementation of the Wildlife and Countryside Act to indicate public rights of way, in accordance with section 53 of the Act; and whether he will make a statement;(2) whether he is satisfied with the progress of the implementation of sections 53 to 66 of the Wildlife and Countryside Act in respect of public rights of way.

We are aware that the following county councils have made orders under section 53 of the Act:

AvonLincolnshire
DerbyshireNorfolk
DevonNorthamptonshire
DorsetNorth Yorkshire
Greater ManchesterOxfordshire
HampshireSomerset
Isle of WightTyne and Wear
LancashireWiltshire
LeicestershireWest Sussex
Apart from Cornwall, Cumbria and Staffordshire and the London boroughs of Bexley and Richmond, who are not yet in a position to make such orders, pending completion of the review they have in progress under the pre-1981 Act system, we have no means of knowing which of the remaining county and London borough councils have made orders, as only opposed orders are required to be submitted to the Secretary of State for confirmation.

London Residuary Body

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment whether he proposes to make any further member appointments to the London Residuary Body.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I have given today to the hon. Member for Worsley (Mr. Lewis). I have no plans at present to make any further appointments to the London Residuary Body.

Waste Disposal Authority (London)

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment what is his policy towards the creation of a single London-wide waste disposal authority; and if he will make a statement.

Section 10 of the Local Government Act 1985 does not permit final conclusions on the establishment of single authorities for waste disposal before 15 November 1985. My right hon. Friend's conclusions will be announced as soon as possible thereafter.

Rate Demands

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment (1) if he will place in the Library copies of responses received from local authorities to his inquiries of June 1985 concerning rate demands;(2) when he expects to publish his new rules governing rate demands and background information accompanying them.

The Rate Demands and Notice of Rates and precepts Rules 1985 (S.I. 1985/1486) were laid before Parliament on 30 September 1985 and came into operation on 22 October 1985. It is not my right hon. Friend's normal practice to place in the Library copies of responses to documents issued for purposes of consultation.

County Hall

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment what representations he has received during the past year concerning the listed building status of County Hall.

Numerous representations have been received about the future of County Hall, some of which referred to its status as a listed building.

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment if he will make it a condition of the sale of County Hall that the war memorial be preserved.

The future of County Hall will be a matter for the London Residuary Body to decide.

Queen Elizabeth Ii Centre

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment what conference bookings have been received in respect of the Queen Elizabeth II Centre; and how many have been confirmed.

Thirty-eight bookings have so far been made of which nine have been formally confirmed. In addition, the centre will be in constant use for Government purposes throughout the EC Presidency from July to December 1986.

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment what is the maximum booking period for the Queen Elizabeth II Centre.

Major Developments (Departmental Guidance)

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment whether his Department gives guidance to metropolitan county councils on consultation procedures to be undertaken in advance of major developments.

As local planning authorities, metropolitan county councils have powers, in regulations 4 and 5 of the Town and Country Planning General Regulations 1976, to grant themselves deemed planning permission for development they intend to carry out, or which they intend others to carry out on land vested in them. The regulations prescribe the extent of the consultations to be undertaken, and authorities have been asked to give their proposals the same publicity as they would applications for similar development made by private individuals or bodies.

Lea Valley

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment what proposals he has for transferring the Greater London council's share of the costs of the Lea Valley regional park authority to the London boroughs on the abolition of the Greater London council.

The GLC contributes some 80 per cent. of the costs of the park authority. On its abolition this will be split between the 32 London boroughs and the City of London by way of a per capita levy. In the light of legal advice received since my right hon. Friend's announcement of 12 November 1984 [Vol. 67, c. 134] he has agreed that the six riparian London boroughs should not make double per capita contributions on abolition of the GLC. However he intends in due course to invite the various bodies concerned to consider whether legislation to change those arrangements should be promoted.

Osborne House

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment what arrangements he proposes to make for the discharge of his functions at Osborne House.

The Civil Service benevolent fund now manage the convalescent home on my right hon. Friend's behalf. With the agreement of the Lord Chamberlain, my right hon. Friend proposes to direct the Historic Buildings and Monuments Commission for England under section 34 of the National Heritage Act 1984 to exercise his remaining functions at Osborne House with effect from March 1986. The Commission will not be empowered, to make significant changes in, or additions to, the presentation of the House, its contents or the grounds to the public, without my right hon. Friend's prior approval.

Sports Council

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment if he will make a statement about the Sports Council's proposed grant-in-aid for 1986–87.

The Sports Council's grant in aid is increased for the next financial year, 1986–87, from the current £30·6 million to £37 million. This substantial increase reflects our general confidence in the effective work of the council and our support for the programme set out in its corporate plan. The allocation of the additional funds is for the Sports Council to decide, within the framework of the plan; but we expect it will need most: of these funds—about £5 million—to help district and borough councils with projects of wider than local interest in the wake of the abolition of the Greater London council and the metropolitan county councils. Additionally, we have provided the council with about £1 million for more inner city projects, supplementing the extensive and varied work the council is already doing in these important areas, and for other new developments in hand.The Sports Council is engaged in important objectives, in particular to boost mass participation, and especially in areas of need and stress. As for all the Department's sponsored bodies, we look to the council under its new chairman, John Smith, to continue to strive for efficiency and value for money in all its activities.

Local Government Reform

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment if he will reaffirm that, consequent on the abolition of the metropolitan county councils, metropolitan district councils will not have to pay former metropolitan county council staff they employ to run the devolved services the salary as they received formerly.

[pursuant to his answer, 12 November 1985, c. 120]: Where district councils recruit staff they are free to decide the terms and conditions that they offer (ex-MCC staff may be entitled also to compensation for financial detriment; but that compensation will be paid by the residuary body not the recruiting district). Where staff are transferred by order, they retain their existing terms and conditions; but it will be for district councils to decide whether they wish to have staff transferred to them in that way.

Solicitor-General For Scotland

Peterhead Prison

asked the Solicitor-General for Scotland if he will carry out an investigation into the circumstances at Peterhead prison on 21 July when a young person who was visiting his father was taken to Aberdeen royal infirmary in connection with the suspected swallowing of a controlled drug; and if he will make a statement.

Mark Lynch was detained by the police under section 23 of the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971 whilst visiting his father, William George Lynch at Peterhead prison. He was taken to Peterhead police office to be searched under section 23. He was seen to take something from his pocket and put it into his mouth. The police suspected that the article could have been drugs and they attempted to prevent him from swallowing and to recover the article but were unsuccessful. Mark Lynch was immediately taken to Peterhead cottage hospital where he was given an emetic. He vomited as a result and a compressed wad of clingfilm was found amongst the vomit. No chocolate was analysed. Mark Lynch was then detained under section 2 of the Criminal Justice (Scotland) Act 1980 but later released.The circumstances have been reported to the regional procurator fiscal at Aberdeen in respect of alleged criminal conduct by the police officers involved in the incident. After further investigation, the procurator fiscal has concluded that no criminal proceedings should be taken against any police officer in connection with this incident and, in this decision, my noble and learned Friend the Lord Advocate and I have concurred.

Trade And Industry

Retail Grocers

asked the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry if he will estimate the total number of independent retail grocery businesses that have closed within the last 10 years; and if he will make a statement.

Data available from the retailing inquiries conducted by the Business Statistics Office suggest that the number of single outlet grocery retailers fell by about 20,000 businesses between 1976 and 1982 to a level of 36,000.

Design Management (Seminars)

asked the Secretary of state for Trade and Industry whether there are plans for further seminars on design management as begun by his Department in April; and if he will make a statement.

The series of design management seminars held earlier this year were organised by the design management group of the Society of Industrial Artists and Designers. My Department supported them with a grant to cover a proportion of their costs. Edited proceedings of the seminars will be published in December.I understand that the design management group is considering another event of this nature which will take place probably in autumn 1986 as part of Industry Year.My Department is planning to hold a commitment conference for 70 company chairmen in January 1986.

Design Council

asked the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry which of the Design Council proposals submitted to him in June are planned to be introduced.

The proposals were made by the Design Council's policy working party and the council is already taking action on many of them. My Department has helped the council to achieve this by increasing the 1985–86 grant by £500,000 to enable it to expand its regional and its education and training activities and to begin a major awareness campaign aimed at senior management in British industry and commerce.

Information Technology (Education Centres)

asked the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry what is his policy for the continued funding of information technology education centres; and if he will make a statement.

My Department will continue to provide pump priming financial support to those information tehnology centres which remain eligible to receive it. The future funding arrangements for all ITeCs are being considered by my Department together with other Departments who have an interest in the programme.

Young Designers Into Industry

asked the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry if he will make a statement on the young designers into industry bursaries scheme.

The young designers into industry scheme is a joint Department of Trade and Industry/Royal Society of Arts initiative to provide recently graduated designers with up to a year's carefully planned and monitored industrial experience. The full quota of 12 textile design graduates are already participating in the first pilot year of the scheme. In the second pilot year, 40 graduates of textile design and industrial product design will be involved. If the pilot years are successful, the scheme will be expanded to cover 200 students over five years. The cost of the scheme is being shared equally by my Department and private industry.

Privatisation

asked the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry (1) whether he will make a statement on those institutions privatised since 1979 where the rules in respect of the investor passing on entitlements in the event of death are the same as those governing the share bonus and bill voucher of the British Telecom offer;(2) how many people he expects to be affected by the statement on page 57 of the British Telecom prospectus in respect of entitlement to share bonuses and bill vouchers of those receiving holdings in British Telecom on the death of the original investor;(3) what representations he has received in respect of the rules made by British Telecom about the entitlement to bill vouchers and share bonuses of those left holdings in British Telecom on the death of the investor; whether he is satisfied with the rule; and whether he will make a statement.

The 1982 Britoil sale is the only other Government share sale in which an incentive of this type has been offered to investors. The share bonus arrangements for that sale also involved loss of entitlement in the event of the death of a sole investor. It is not possible to predict how many shareholders will be affected by these rules in the BT case. I have had few complaints. I am satisfied that the rules were both necessary and clearly set out in the BT prospectus at the time of the offer.

Eureka Project

asked the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry if he will make a statement on progress in the EUREKA project.

A declaration of principles relating to EUREKA was agreed by the 18 countries participating in EUREKA and the European Commission at the Conference of Ministers in Hanover on 6 November. Agreements have been concluded on the launching of 10 EUREKA projects; three involved United Kingdom firms. Other projects, some involving United Kingdom firms, are still under discussion.The United Kingdom has the chairmanship of EUREKA until May 1986 when we will host the next Ministerial Conference.A copy of the declaration of principles has been placed in the Library of both Houses.

Energy

Gas (Safety)

asked the Secretary of State for Energy (1) if he will make it his policy that elderly and disabled people living alone should be offered free safety checks on all gas appliances in the event of the privatisation of British Gas;(2) if he will make it his policy to offer a subsidised home advisory service for the disabled customers of British Gas if the corporation is privatised;

(3) if he will make it his policy that leaflets on gas safety should be printed in all languages used by citizens in the United Kingdom in the event of the privatisation of British Gas.

Safety checks for elderly and disabled people living alone are available now from the British Gas Corporation, which also takes appropriate steps to bring safety issues to the attention of ethnic minorities. The new company will maintain the corporation's excellent safety record and continue to provide help to particular groups who may require it.

Great Grimsby

asked the Secretary of State for Energy what initiatives have been taken by his Department to encourage the conservation of energy in public buildings in Great Grimsby.

Last year the Energy Efficiency Office organised a breakfast seminar on energy efficiency in Great Grimsby for 200 local senior executives, including representatives of public sector bodies.More generally, the Energy Efficiency Office is promoting energy efficiency across the public sector in all regions. It has collaborated with the Audit Commission in devising a system to be used by latter's auditors to help all local authorities in England and Wales assess their energy use and draw up an energy action programme. It has developed a monitoring and targeting system to help local authorities control their energy use. It published, in July, a guide to good energy practice in local authorities, in which a case study by Great Grimsby borough council was featured. It has issued guidelines to help councils use contract energy management companies. It has collaborated with the Department of Health and Social Security in initiatives to improve energy efficiency in hospitals. But the final responsibility for energy efficiency in public buildings in Great Grimsby rests with local energy users and their management.

Employment

Local Charities (Job Creation)

asked the Paymaster General if he will make a statement on his recently announced policy of making money available to local charities so as to provide jobs.

On 4 November, I announced that £3 million has been set aside to help charities provide up to 1,000 new jobs for long-term unemployed people, and expand their services to the community. The jobs will involve work such as help for the elderly and disabled, and caring for handicapped children.This initiative will extend the valuable work already undertaken by voluntary organisations under the community programme. Instead of setting up specific projects, charities will be able to add additional posts to their existing organisation.Recruits should gain very useful experience which will stand them in good stead with future employers.The success of this experiment will be reviewed in the course of 1986.

Labour Statistics

asked the Paymaster General what is the number of persons made redundant since May 1979 in (a) the Birkenhead travel-to-work area and (b) Merseyside; and if he will present these data on a 12 monthly basis starting at May 1979 in the form used in the answer of 14 November 1983, Official Report, column 316.

The available information, relating to confirmed redundancies is set out below. Figures are shown for the new Wirral and Chester travel-to-work area and for the Merseyside metropolitan county.

Redundancies confirmed as due to occur* from May 1979 to September 1985†
Wirral and Chester travel-to-work area‡Merseyside metropolitan county‡
1 May 1979—30 April 19804,14113,820
1 May 1980—30 April 19818,93521,476
1 May 1981—30 April 19828,61018,285
Closures reported as due occur* from May 1979 to September 1985†
Wirral and Chester travel-to-work area‡Merseyside metropolitan county‡
EstablishmentsRedundancies involvedEstablishmentsRedundancies involved
1 May 1979—30 April 198010187704,445
1 May 1980—30 April 1981194941147,642
1 May 1981—30 April 1982302,232926,736
1 May 1982—30 April 198316970665,444
1 May 1983—30 April 1984231,615704,800
1 May 1984—30 April 198512480562,368
1 May 1985—30 September 1985†857518864
* Confirmed by the Manpower Services Commission as due to occur and based on notification of impending redundancies involving 10 or more workers.
† Includes provisional figures for August and September 1985.
‡ Grouping of jobcentre areas approximating to the area.

asked the Paymaster General why people who have been made redundant and are making claims at unemployment benefit offices are included in the unemployment count.

Such people who have been made redundant are included in the unemployment count because they are signing on as unemployed and available for work.

asked the Paymaster General how many claimants included in the unemployment count were (a) sick and (b) disabled; and why persons who are sick but still employed are classified as unemployed.

I refer my hon. Friend to my replies of 29 October at columns 331 and 332. No person who is sick but still employed should be claiming unemployment benefit.

asked the Paymaster General why men aged over 60 years who are not working are required to sign on as unemployed; and how many such persons are included in the latest unemployment statistics.

Men aged over 60 years who are unemployed and available for work need to sign on at an

Wirral and Chester travel-to-work area‡

Merseyside metropolitan county‡

1 May 1982—30 April 19834,93713,819
1 May 1983—30 April 19843,67914,318
1 May 1984—30 April 19853,0739,912
1 May 1985—30 September 1985†1,0763,950
* Confirmed by the Manpower Services Commission as due to occur and based on notifications of impending redundancies involving 10 or more workers.
† Includes provisional figures for August and September 1985.
‡ Grouping of jobcentre areas approximating to the area.

asked the Paymaster General if he will list the number of firms and the number of employees involved in firms which have closed since May 1979 in (a) the Birkenhead travel-to-work area and (b) Merseyside; and if he will present these for each 12 months beginning with May 1979 in the form used in the answer of 14 November 1983, Official Report, column 316.

The available information, relating to confirmed redundancies is set out below.unemployment benefit office in order to claim unemployment benefit. Men aged over 60 do not need to sign on to claim supplementary benefit or national insurance credits. In October 1985 there were 74,847 men aged 60 and over included in the count of unemployed claimants for the United Kingdom.

asked the Paymaster General how many students on vacation who intend to return to full-time education and are unemployed claimants are included in the latest unemployment figures.

Students on vacation who intend to return to full-time education are excluded from the unemployment totals, but recorded separately. On 10 October 1985 there were 33,939 students claiming unemployment benefits in the United Kingdom.

asked the Paymaster General how many persons in receipt of holiday pay for a number of weeks at the termination of employment were included in the latest unemployment figures for the weeks covered by this holiday pay.

asked the Paymaster General why women who are single, widowed or separated with dependent children aged under 16 years, who do not receive unemployment benefit, are included in the unemployment figures.

Such women are included in the unemployment count because they are signing on as unemployed and available for work.

Youth Training

asked the Paymaster General if he will explain the new rules concerning youth training scheme schemes run by voluntary organisations; and if he will make a statement.

Under the two-year youth training scheme, which will commence in April 1986, there will be a single method of funding and administration. Providers will receive a management fee of £110 per contracted place per year and a basic grant of £160 per filled place per month. Organisations—including those in the voluntary sector—which offer places for young people with special needs will receive an additional premium of £110 per filled place per month and those voluntary organisations currently involved in the youth training scheme as mode B1 providers will also be eligible for transitional funding in 1986–87 and 1987–88. Voluntary organisations providing specialised training places for disabled youngsters will receive extra payments of £75 per filled place per month on a permanent basis (but will not be eligible for transitional funding). The new administrative arrangements will give current mode B1 providers much greater freedom than at present in the management of their schemes.

Local authority district1983–841984–85
Entrants*Completions†Entrants*Completion†
Mode AMode BMode AMode BMode AMode BMode AMode B
Oldham1,13845131071,745541552206
Thameside1,07443021,187423473177
Stockport1,570199151,722393864139
Bolton1,6244811441,943426876119
Bury83919842792820437037
Rochdale95666125561,040695388165
Wigan1,8428021482,0795671,032318
Manchester2,3241,878102453,0591,6991,167585
Salford1,09089315131,576938508352
Trafford1,10668832191,140434562164
Greater Manchester Total13,5636,6816376616,4196,3206,7922,262
* The entrants figures include a number of young people who have joined more than one youth training scheme.
† The figures quoted for completions exclude young people who left schemes before completing their full entitlement to training.

Availability For Work Test

asked the Paymaster General why no figures are yet available for 1984 regarding the availability for work test; and if he will make a statement.

This information is now available and shows that in 1984 more than 49,000 claims for unemployment benefit were disallowed on availability grounds.

The two-year youth training scheme is a major advance, in which voluntary organisations have an important role. We believe the arrangements we have made, with the agreement of the voluntary organisations, will enable and encourage them to participate fully.

asked the Paymaster General if he will make a statement concerning the future of the Moss Side youth training scheme.

The Moss Side training workshop at present operates in the youth training scheme under the sponsorship of the Greater Manchester council. In view of the abolition of metropolitan borough councils from 1 April next year, a new sponsor for the training workshop will have to come forward if it is to continue in the new two year youth training scheme. The Manpower Services Commission is aware of the need for high quality training in the Greater Manchester area and is urgently considering what it can do to help the Moss Side training workshop continue in operation under the new two-year scheme.

asked the Paymaster General how many people entered youth training schemes in each local authority area in Greater Manchester; and how many people completed the scheme in mode A and mode B in the last two years.

The table below gives details by mode of young people entering and completing the youth training scheme in each local authority district of Greater Manchester during 1983–84 and 1984–85. The figures for completions in 1984–85 include young people who started training in 1983–84 and finished their course in 1984–85. Similarly many young people entering schemes in 1984–85 will not complete their training until 1985–86.

Prime Minister

Constitutional Reform

Q28.

asked the Prime Minister whether she will make a statement on the discussions with the Government of the Republic of Ireland regarding matters affecting Northern Ireland.

As my right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland told the House earlier today, discussions between the two Governments continue but we hope that they will soon be brought to a conclusion.

Job Creation

Q63.

asked the Prime Minister which of the policies announced in the Queen's Speech is designed to have the greatest impact on unemployment.

The Gracious Speech reaffirms the Government's adherence to the policies that have led to declining inflation, sustained economic growth and the creation of over 650,000 new jobs in just over two years.

Cheap Imports

Q72.

asked the Prime Minister what recent discussions she has had with foreign Governments about unfair competition from cheap imports.

I certainly raise this issue in bilateral negotiations as and when the need arises, but this is principally a matter for the European Community. Indeed, the Commission acts vigorously against damaging imports which have been subsidised or dumped. For example, they have recently imposed definitive antidumping duties on certain hydraulic excavators and ball bearings from Japan.

Ministerial Statements

Q 101.

asked the Prime Minister if she will make it her policy to require first drafts of ministerial statements to the House in time of conflict to be placed in the Public Record Office.

Drug Abuse

Q121.

asked the Prime Minister if she is satisfied with existing interdepartmental co-ordination of the Government's efforts to tackle the problem of drug abuse and misuse.

The Government's approach is co-ordinated by the inter-departmental ministerial group on the misuse of drugs, chaired by my hon. Friend the Parliamentary Under-Secretary, Home Office which I believe is proving very effective.

British Telecom (Staff Vetting)

asked the Prime Minister whether Her Majesty's Government have arranged for security vetting procedures to be carried out in relation to the staff of British Telecom; and if she will make a statement.

Checks are carried out as necessary on persons employed in duties with security implications, but for the reasons given in my reply to the hon. Member for Peckham (Ms. Harman) on 12 November 1985 at column 103 I cannot give details.

Overseas Aid

asked the Prime Minister whether she will make it her policy that the amount of overseas aid provided by the United Kingdom in 1986–87 is, in real terms, not less than that provided in 1985–86.

The Chancellor of the Exchequer's autumn statement to the House on 12 November 1985 at column 431–434 provides for an increased aid provision of £1,187 million in 1986–87; £1,230 million in 1987–88 and £1,270 million in 1988–89, compared with £1,130 million in 1985–86. This will maintain the aid programme in real terms on the basis of the forecast rate of United Kingdom inflation over the public expenditure survey period.

asked the Prime Minister whether she is satisfied with the co-ordination between the Department of Trade and Industry and the Overseas Development Administration in the provision of overseas aid.

Yes. The Department of Trade and Industry is fully consulted by the Overseas Development Administration in planning expenditure under the aid programme, and in particular our bilateral aid. Interdepartmental machinery also exists to consider applications for support under the aid and trade provision.

Sub-Saharan Africa

asked the Prime Minister whether she will seek to undertake an official visit to the drought-affected areas of sub-Saharan Africa.

Chieftain Tank (Iran)

asked the Prime Minister upon what criteria the decision was made for the Ministry of Defence to sell Chieftain tank parts to Iran in the context of the general guidelines of Her Majesty's Government for the export of weapons to Iran and Iraq.

The spares concerned were due for supply under an existing contract, having been fully paid for prior to the 1979 Iranian revolution. The decision was therefore entirely consistent with the guidelines set out by my right hon. Friend, the Foreign and Commonwealth Secretary in his reply to the right hon. Member on 29 October 1985 at column 454.

Cocom

asked the Prime Minister what is the direct and indirect cost of United Kingdom membership of COCOM; and how many staff in total, from each Ministry, are involved in its operation.

The United Kingdom's contribution to the COCOM budget this financial year will be about £97,000. Time spent by officials on COCOM is equivalent to 63 full-time staff as follows:

Numbers

DTI31
MoD15
Her Majesty's Customs11
FCO6

The indirect cost of United Kingdom membership is not readily available and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Economic Alert List

asked the Prime Minister what information she has as to the contents of the latest version of the United States economic alert list or recent versions of this list as it relates to the United Kingdom and its high technology export business; and if she will make a statement.

Engagements

asked the Prime Minister if she will list her official engagements for Thursday 14 November.

This morning I presided at a meeting of the Cabinet and had meetings with ministerial colleagues and others. In addition to my duties in this House I will be having further meetings later today. This evening I shall attend a dinner given by the Emir of Qatar.

Aid Programme

asked the Prime Minister if she will make a statement on the effectiveness of Her Majesty's Government's official aid programme.

The aid programme is effective in promoting development in the poorer countries and has the flexibility to respond to emergency situations such as the present famine situation in Africa. Aid-funded activities are carefully appraised and monitored, and are evaluated on a sample basis.The aid programme provides considerable business for British industry. Our bilateral aid is tied to procurement in Britain except where local costs are financed, and our membership of multilateral agencies provides British firms with access to substantial overseas business opportunities. In the last three years the aid and trade provision has helped win contracts worth £1 billion: the new soft loan facility announced by the Chancellor of the Exchequer on November 12 will increase its effectiveness.Aid also forms part of our wider relationships with friendly developing countries.

Public Bodies (Appointments)

asked the Prime Minister if she will state the number of public bodies in each of the past five years to which she has appointed members.

Numbers

198322
198419
198518

Mr Raoul Wallenberg

asked the Prime Minister when she last raised the case of Mr. Raoul Wallenberg with the Government of the USSR; and if she will make a statement.

We have raised this case with the Soviet authorities four times in the last three years, most recently when the Minister of State, Foreign Office my hon. Friend the Member for Edinburgh, Pentlands (Mr. Rifkind) met the Soviet First Deputy Foreign Minister in Moscow in July. Regrettably, the Soviet side has had nothing to add to its position as stated in 1957 to the Swedish ambassador in Moscow.

Foreign And Commonwealth Affairs

Human Rights

asked the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs if he will list the countries which have adopted the right of individual petition under the European convention on human rights and the dates at which they made their adoption.

The countries are:

CountryOriginal date of adoption
Austria3 September 1958
Belgium5 July 1955
Denmark13 April 1953
France2 October 1981
Federal Republic of Germany5 July 1955
Iceland29 March 1955
Ireland25 November 1953
Italy1 August 1973
Liechtenstein8 September 1982
Luxembourg28 April 1958
Netherlands28 June 1960
Norway13 December 1955
Portugal9 November 1978
Spain1 July 1983
Sweden4 February 1952
Switzerland28 November 1974
United Kingdom14 January 1966

Stabex

asked the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs if he will list the countries outside Lomé to which the EEC is willing to extend the STABEX system of export price stabilisation; and if the Council of Ministers will follow the Commission's request of extending the scheme only to countries with respectable human rights records.

The new European Community scheme is intended to help the least developed countries (as defined by the United Nations) which are not covered by the Lomé convention. These are Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Haiti, Laos, Maldives, Nepal, the Yemen Arab Republic and the People's Democratic Republic of Yemen. But in announcing the scheme at the recent mid-term review of the substantial new programme of action in Geneva, the Community made it clear that its offer was subject to certain conditions, among them respect for human rights.

Helsinki Final Act

asked the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs if he will publish a list of alleged Soviet violations of the Helsinki final act.

We have widespread evidence of the Soviet Union's failure to live up to its commitments under the Helsinki final act, particularly in the field of human rights and fundamental freedoms. A comprehensive list could not be produced except at undue expense, but various examples were set out in the reply given by my hon. Friend, the Member for Shoreham (Mr. Luce) to my hon. Friend the Member for Southampton, Itchen (Mr. Chope) on 25 July at columns 683–85.

Abm Treaty

asked the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what information he has about alleged violations of the ABM treaty.

The United Kingdom is not a party to the anti-ballistic missile treaty. Consequently we do not participate in the standing consultative commission which was set up, among other things, to consider questions concerning compliance with the treaty. We regard the ABM treaty as an important element in preserving international peace and stability. We have accordingly urged strict compliance with the treaty by both sides. In this context, the United Kingdom has expressed its concern about the implications for the ABM treaty of the large phased array radar at Krasnoyarsk, particularly in relation to its orientation and siting.

Chile

asked the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what discussions he has held with the Chilean Government; what representations were made concerning the recently signed national accord; and if he will make a statement.

At his meeting in New York on 25 September with the Chilean Foreign Minister, my right hon. and learned Friend reminded Sr. del Valle, of the widespread interest in the United Kingdom in seeing a full and prompt return to democracy in Chile. I also refer the hon. Member to the answer given to my hon. Friend the Member for Dorset South (Viscount Cranborne) on 12 November at column 146.

asked the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs if it remains Her Majesty's Government's policy not to provide arms to Chile which could be used for internal repression; and if he will make a statement.

We have made clear on many occasions that our policy is not to approve the sale to Chile of items which, in our judgment, are likely to be used for internal repression.

asked the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what recent discussions he has held with Chile on the export of Centaur half-track vehicles; and if he will make a statement.

None. The manufacturers are aware that the eventual return to Britain of their demonstration Centaur vehicle was a condition of the issue of a temporary export licence.

Mr Raoul Wallenberg

asked the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what discussions he has held with other EEC countries concerning the case of Mr. Raoul Wallenberg; and if he will make a statement.

The case of Raoul Wallenberg has not been discussed by Ministers of the Ten in the framework of European political co-operation. We, the Swedes, and other Western Governments have raised the case with the Russians who have consistently either refused to comment or referred to their 1957 note. I doubt that the intervention of the Ten would produce any different answer.

Home Department

Adoption

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will list the countries whose adoption laws are recognised by his Department when citizens of the United Kingdom wish to enter the United Kingdom with children whom they have adopted, and those countries from which such children are not accepted.

Adoptions made by order of a court in the United Kingdom or Islands or in one of the countries specified in the Adoptions (Designation of Overseas Adoptions) Order 1973 are recognised as valid under United Kingdom legislation. In addition, an adoption which is valid by the law of the country in which it is made may be recognised in England at common law if at the time of the adoption the adopter was domiciled in that country.

Drug-Related Offences

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many people were serving sentences of imprisonment for drug-related offences in 1983, 1984 and 1985, respectively; and if he will make a statement.

Provisional information for 1985 shows about 2,300 persons serving sentences for drugs offences (excluding fine defaulters) on 30 June 1985, as compared with 1,600 on 30 June 1984 and 1,200 on 30 June 1983.

Reparation Orders

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department in what respects the new reparation order being considered by the Home Office would differ from compensation orders, or from reparation schemes combined with probation orders or deferment of sentence.

Consideration of possible new provisions for reparation in the criminal justice system are still at an early stage. My right hon. Friend is currently funding four experimental schemes in which reparation is used, and hopes to publish before Christmas a discussion document examining such issues as the form which reparation might take.

Prison Statistics

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what was the prison population of England and Wales and the certified accommodation of the prison system on the most recent convenient date.

On 8 November 1985 there were 45,227 males and 1,590 females in prison department custody. The certified normal accommodation on that date was: males—39,077, females—1,401.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many prison cells in England and Wales have some means of access to sanitation at night; and how many do not have such access.

Approximately 19,400 places in prison department establishments have some means of access to night sanitation, while approximately 21,800 places do not have such access. These figures include places currently out of use for refurbishment which do not appear in the current certified normal accommodation. The available information does not distinguish between cells and other types of inmate accommodation.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many prisoners were sharing cells designed for one person on the most convenient date; and how many of these had no access to sanitation at night.

On 13 October 1985 there were 13,022 males and 250 females held two to a cell and 4,065 males and three females held three to a cell. It is estimated that over 90 per cent. of these males and over 50 per cent. of these females had no access to night sanitation. More detailed information is not available centrally.

Bail Hostels

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many places there are in bail hostels in each of the probation areas of England and Wales.

The following is the information for all types of approved hostel; about one third of the total places are occupied by persons on bail:

Places in approved hostels on 31 October 1985
Probation areaBail hostelsCombined bail and probation hostelsProbation hostels which also take persons on bail
Avon2920
Bedfordshire19
Berkshire1560
Buckinghamshire16
Cambridgeshire22
Cheshire15
Cleveland2020
Cornwall16
Cumbria18
Derbyshire17
Devon1620
Dorset14
Essex1530
Glamorgan (Mid)20
Glamorgan (South)20
Hampshire2536
Hereford & Worcester32
Hertfordshire15

Places in approved hostels on 31 October 1985

Probation area

Bail hostels

Combined bail and probation hostels

Probation hostels which also take persons on bail

Humberside19
Kent52
Lancashire1441
Leicestershire1740
Lincolnshire15
London - Inner4426135
London - North East37
London - South East16
London - South West14
Greater Manchester2763
Merseyside958
Middlesex1814
West Midlands341456
Norfolk18
Northamptonshire39
Northumbria919
North Wales12
Nottinghamshire53
Oxfordshire12
Somerset15
Staffordshire1220
Suffolk32
Surrey14
Warwickshire30
Yorkshire - South2461
Yorkshire - West1598
Totals2493081,219

Eleven probation areas have no hostel but the courts there have access to hostels in neighbouring probation areas.

Bail Verification Schemes

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many bail verification schemes similar to that established in 1975 at Camberwell Green magistrates' court are currently in existence in England and Wales.

Between 1975 and 1980, 37 such schemes are known to have been set up. By 1980 some magistrates' courts had already abandoned their schemes following the introduction of the Bail Act 1976 and the establishment of duty solicitor schemes. We have no information about the number of bail verification schemes, if any, which now exist.

Probation Service

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what change in real terms in the expenditure on the probation service is anticipated between the financial year 1983–84 and the financial year 1986–87.

The Government's published expenditure plans envisage an increase of 14·3 per cent. in real terms in expenditure on the probation service between 1983–84 and 1986–87.

Prison Service

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what increase in real terms in expenditure on the prison service is expected between the financial year 1983–84 and the financial year 1986–87.

Expenditure on the prison service in England and Wales is now planned to increase from £548 million in 1983–84 to £701 million in 1986–87. This represents an increase of £66 million or 11·5 per cent. in real terms. The figure for 1986–87 takes into account the additional provision announced in my right hon. Friend, the Chancellor of the Exchequer's autumn statement on 12 November.

Aftercare Hostel Grant Scheme

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department at what stage voluntary organisations will be consulted concerning the conclusions of the review of the aftercare hostel grant scheme; and whether this will be before final decisions are taken on the future hostel provision.

The fact-finding review of the aftercare hostel grant scheme has now been completed. In the light of its conclusions we have asked officials to conduct a comprehensive study of the case for devolving to the probation service the responsibility for administering and financing the present schemes of probation and bail hostels and of grant-aiding voluntary aftercare projects, and the means whereby this might be achieved. The study will involve the widest possible consultation with all those concerned, including the voluntary organisations, and it is hoped to start it shortly. No decisions will be taken on the long-term funding of hostel provision until the outcome of the study is known.

Youth Custody Sentences

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many juveniles and young adults, respectively, were serving youth custody sentences in (a) prisons and (b) remand centres on the most recent convenient date.

The latest readily available information is given in the following table. Of the trainees shown, all the juveniles and some 40 per cent. of the young adults were being held for allocation or transfer to a youth custody centre, or for other temporary purposes, or had a net sentence of less that 21 days.

Youth custody trainees held in prisons and remand centres in England and Wales on 31 August 1983 by age and type of establishment.
Number
Type of establishmentUnder 1717 and over
Remand centres25155
Chelmsford prison†255
Other prisons25815
All prisons and remand centres501,225
* Based on central records which are approximate
† A prison for young offenders

Immigration (Points Of Entry)

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will list all places in the United Kingdom where foreigners may lawfully enter by land, sea or air and indicate the number of immigration officers at each of them.

All persons subject to control under the Immigration Act 1971 who arrive in the United Kingdom as passengers from outside the common travel area require leave to enter from an immigration officer regardless of the place of arrival. Those who arrive as members of the crew of a ship or aircraft may enter without that leave unless required by an immigration officer to submit to examination.The table shows the number of immigration officers in post at ports on 31 October 1985. At other small ports officers of Customs and Excise are sometimes employed as immigration officers.

Number
1. Sea ports
Avonmouth3
Cardiff4
Dover east109
Dover hoverport14
Dover west55
Falmouth1
Felixstowe13
Folkestone34
Great Yarmouth2
Gravesend9
Hartlepool3
Harwich38
Hull13
Immingham3
Livepool14
London33
Middlesbrough3
Milford Haven2
Newhaven15
Newport1
North Shields8
Plymouth7
Portsmouth17
Preston1
Ramsgate13
Scunthorpe1
Sheerness12
Southampton24
South Shields2
Swansea2
2. Airports
Aberdeen5
Belfast5
Birmingham23
Bournemouth (Hurn)2
Bristol4
Cardiff4
East Midlands10
Edinburgh5
Gatwick150
Glasgow14
Heathrow:
Terminal 193
Terminal 2146
Terminal 3264
Leeds/Bradford6
Luton20
Lydd2
Manchester28
Newcastle6
Norwich4
Prestwick6
Southend5
Stansted7

Data Protection Act 1984

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what advice has been available to the Data Protection Registrar on the design of application forms for registration; and if he will describe the length and complexity of these forms.

I understand that the registrar received advice on the design and layout of the application forms from Her Majesty's Stationery Office. In addition, he consulted a large number of representative organisations and tested the forms with 100 data users; the responses from these organisations were taken into account in the final design. Copies of the application forms have been deposited in the Library.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will estimate the approximate number of applications for registration that the Data Protection Registrar is expected to receive during the six-month registration period commencing 11 November; and if he will identify and describe any other occasions in the last 10 years when an equivalent number of businesses and individuals were obliged to complete forms of similar complexity.

Although it is difficult to estimate the likely number of registrations under the Data Protection Act the registrar's current working assumption is that he will receive about 300,000 initial applications.It is not possible to compare the obligations imposed by the Data Protection Act with obligations imposed under other legislation since the Act deals with an entirely new area and needs to be viewed as a whole.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) if he will estimate the approximate cost to a typical business data user of preparation for and compliance with the Data Protection Act 1984 (a) before successful application for registration, (b) after successful application and before 11 November 1987 and (c) annually thereafter, specifying the size and nature of the business described as typical;(2) if he will estimate the approximate total of costs to businesses in the United Kingdom of preparation for and compliance with the Data Protection Act 1984

(a) up to 11 November 1987 and (b) annually thereafter; and if he will make a statement.

The costs to an individual data user of preparing for and complying with the Data Protection Act will vary depending upon the amount and nature of the data held and the circumstances under which they are held. Each user's circumstances will be different and it is not possible, therefore, to identify a business that could be described as typical. The only mandatory cost prior to 11 November 1987 will be a fee of £22 for the first three-year period of registration. After 11 November 1987 data users will be able to offset the costs of complying with subject access requests by charging a fee up to a maximum to be determind by my right hon. Friend.An estimate of the total cost to businesses is not available and could not be obtained without disproportionate expense.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he is satisfied that the Data Protection Registrar is adequately equipped with staff and resources to carry out his duties in the six-month registration period commencing 11 November; and what steps will be taken to monitor whether these resources prove to be adequate during the period.

The resources available to the registrar are based upon current estimates of the number of applications for registration likely to be received. It is, however, very difficult to assess the likely work load of the Registrar's office and my right hon. Friend will consider sympathetically any request for additional resources should the estimates which have been made prove to be inaccurate.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what information will be available to him about the performance and efficiency of the Office of the Data Protection Registrar during the six-month registration period commencing 11 November; and if he will make a statement.

The registrar will be monitoring very closely the performance and efficiency of his office during the initial six-month registration period and will be in close contact with Home Office officials during that time. We are satisfied that adequate information will be available to us in this way.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he plans a publicity campaign on the registration of computer users personal data banks following the commencement of the Data Protection Act.

This is a matter for the Data Protection Registrar, who has launched a wide-ranging publicity campaign.

Wrongful Imprisonment (Compensation)

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department when he expects to complete his review of compensation for wrongful imprisonment; and if he will make a statement.

Data Protection (Electoral Registers)

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what guidance he gives to electoral registration officers about the implications of the first data protection principle for the circumstances in which they may sell the electoral register in machine-readable form; and if he will make a statement.

None at present, but regulations are shortly to be laid before Parliament to regulate the supply of electoral registration data. We have it in mind that, following approval of these regulations, guidance will be issued to the effect that under paragraph 1(2) of part II of schedule 1 to the Data Protection Act 1984, any data supplied in accordance with the regulations will satisfy the first data protection principle.

Jurors (Peremptory Challenge)

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will introduce legislation to prohibit agreements of any type between counsel on peremptory challenge of jurors.

We have no present plans to do so, but I would refer the hon. Member to what my right hon. Friend said about peremptory challenges in the debate on the Address on 7 November at column 130.

British Summer Time

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what consideration he is giving to changing the present arrangements for British summer time; and if he will make a statement.

A draft order in council has been laid before Parliament to continue the existing arrangements for the years 1986–1988 as proposed to the House on 29 November 1984. At the present time, the arguments for change appear to be firmly outweighed by those for retaining the status quo, but the matter will continue to be kept under review.

Mrs Cherry Groce

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department when he will publish the result of the inquiry into the shooting of Mrs. Cherry Groce.

I understand from the Police Complaints Authority, which is supervising the investigation into the shooting of Mrs. Groce, that good progress is being made with the investigation, and that the authority expects to receive a copy of the investigating officer's report shortly. How long it will be thereafter before an announcement can be made, or the authority's account of the incident made public depends, amongst other considerations, upon whether the report discloses matters which need to be referred to the Director of Public Prosecutions, and whether criminal or disciplinary charges are bought. Because of the widespread public concern, everyone involved understands the need for as early an indication as possible of the outcome of the investigation.

Law And Order

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will make a statement on Government priorities for the maintenance of law and order.

the Government's chief priority is to prevent crime and the disruption of public order by ensuing that the police have the necessary powers, manpower and equipment and that the courts have adequate powers to deal with those brought before them; by encouraging practical crime prevention measures; and by fostering a greater sense of individual responsibility for the maintenance of law and order.

Business Voting

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he has any plans to introduce legislation to restore business voting for local elections.

Honorary Citizenship

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will introduce legislation creating honorary British citizenship; and if he will make a statement.

Sentencing Statistics

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) what was the total number of male persons over the age of 21 years who were sentenced to a custodial sentence in 1983 in which (i) they were immediately imprisoned, (ii) the sentence was partially suspended and (iii) the sentence was totally suspended;(2) what was the total number of males over the age of 21 years who were sentenced to a period of imprisonment for summary offences during 1983.

The information requested is published annually in "Criminal Statistics, England and Wales, Supplementary Tables" (in volume 1 table S1.1(E)—magistrates' courts and in volume 2, S 2.1(E)— the Crown court). "Criminal Statistics, England and Wales 1984" (Cmnd. 9621) and the supplementary tables for 1984 were published on 2 October 1985.

Post Offices (Protection)

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) if he will call for a report from the chief constable of Suffolk as to the recent incidence of attacks on village post offices in Suffolk; and if he will make a statement;(2) if he will make a statement on the adequacy of co-operation between the various bodies responsible for the protection and security of sub-post offices in rural areas.

I understand from the chief constable of Suffolk that in the period 5 July to 7 November seven offences of burglary and three of attempted burglary involving sub-post office premises have been committed in villages in the county. The Suffolk police investigation into these offences is co-ordinated with that of the No. 5 regional crime squad and of Norfolk and Essex forces, where similar offences have occurred. I am satisfied that excellent co-operation exists between the police and the Post Office investigation department, which has responsibility for security at Post Office premises, in the prevention and investigation of offences involving rural sub-post offices.

Breathalyser Equipment

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what makes of breathalyser equipment are currently being used by police forces; and if he will make a statement.

Since the inception in 1968 of breath testing as a means of detecting alcohol in the body of a motorist the following roadside breath screening devices (hand held) have been, and remain, approved for use by police forces in England and Wales:

Device and TypeFirst approval
Alcotest 80—Bag and tube filled with reactive crystals1968
Alcotest 80A—Bag and tube filled with reactive crystals1975
Alcolyser—Bag and tube filled with reactive crystals1979
Alcolmeter—Electronic1979
Alert—Electronic1980
The following evidential breath testing instruments have been approved for use by police in England and Wales from 6 May 1983:

The Camic Simulator and Camic Breath Analyser
The Lion Breath Simulator and Lion Intoximeter 300

Instruments for use in Scotland and Northern Ireland are a matter for my right hon. Friends the respective Secretaries of State.

Drink-Driving Offences

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many people were convicted of driving when over the limit in alcohol in 1985 to date and in each of the past four years; and if he will make a statement.

The available information is for findings of guilt at all courts for offences of driving, and so on after consuming alcohol or drugs and is published in table 5 of the Home Office statistical bulletin "Offences Relating to Motor Vehicles, England and Wales, 1984" (issue 28/85). Information for 1985 is not yet available.

Northern Ireland

Security

5.

asked the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland if he will make a statement on cross border security.

Mr. Tom King