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Leeds Prison

Volume 87: debated on Monday 18 November 1985

The text on this page has been created from Hansard archive content, it may contain typographical errors.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many baths, showers and toilets are available to prisoners in Leeds prison; how many baths or showers each prisoner is allowed per week; and how many changes of clothes each prisoner is allowed per week.

Leeds currently has available to inmates a total of seven baths, 41 showers, 93 WCs and 82 urinals. Each prisoner is normally allowed one bath or shower per week and an additional shower when he makes use of the gymnasium. In addition, prisoners employed on jobs that are of a physically dirty nature have a shower each day as do prisoners returning from court appearance. Prisoners at Leeds have one change of clothes per week consisting of one shirt, one pair of socks, one pair of underpants and one vest. Overclothing is changed as necessary but, on return from Court, prisoners receive a full kit of clean clothes.

In addition one towel, two sheets and one pillow-case are changed weekly and a full set of bedding is available to prisoners on return from court.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many square feet of exercise space are available to prisoners in Leeds prison.

40,837 square feet in exercise yards, 5,662 square feet in the hard surfaced games area, and 1,690 square feet in the gymnasium are available in Leeds prison.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what was the average population of Leeds prison in the week ended 2 November, or any other recent typical week.

On 31 October 1985 the population of Leeds prison was about 1,280. Average weekly populations are not recorded centrally.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department for how many hours in the week ended 2 November, or any other recent typical week the workshops in Leeds prison were open; what was the average number of prisoners employed; how many classes took place and for how many hours; what was the average number of inmates in each class; how many individual prisoners attended at least one class during the week; and how much time on average each prisoner spent out of his cell during that week.

In the week ended 2 November 1985 one of seven workshops at Leeds prison was closed for structural alterations. The remaining six workshops were open for an average of 21 hours employing an average of 37 prisoners. In addition 238 prisoners were employed on domestic, catering and maintenance duties.Ninety-five classes were held during this week with total class hours of 195½ and the average number of prisoners attending each class was 6½. One hundred and forty-three prisoners attended at least one class. It is not practicable to calculate the average amount of time spent out of cells since this covers many things besides work and education, for example, visits, medical treatment and applications to see the Governor.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what is the maximum number of prisoners who can be employed in workshops in Leeds prison on any one day.