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Board And Lodging

Volume 87: debated on Thursday 21 November 1985

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asked the Secretary of State for Social Services how many representations his Department has now received opposing the effects on young people of the board and lodgings regulations' time limits.

The Department has received a substantial volume of correspondence on the board and lodgings regulations. Our records do not enable us to identify representations on particular aspects of the regulations separately.

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services (1) what proportion of young people claiming board and lodgings benefit have moved to a different area when their benefit entitlement, under the board and lodgings regulations, expired;(2) what proportion of young people claiming board and lodgings benefits have remained at the same address but have changed their benefit status to that of householder;(3) what proportion of young people claiming board and lodgings benefit have returned to their parental home when their benefit entitlement under the board and lodgings regulations expired.

A survey of 2,350 claimants in the south east carried out between June and August 1985 showed that some 5 per cent. of the claimants concerned moved to a different local office area (not necessarily to a different board and lodging area). A similar proportion remained at the same address and changed their benefit status to householder, compared with over 28 per cent. who stayed at the same address as non-householders. This study did not identify separately claimants who returned to their parental homes. A much smaller study in Scotland found that about one-third of people who changed their address following reassessment returned to live with parents and a further sixth moved to friends, or other relatives. Most of the rest became householders. Indications from local offices generally support the broad findings of these studies.