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Written Answers

Volume 113: debated on Wednesday 1 April 1987

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Written Answers To Questions

Wednesday 1 April 1987

Church Commissioners

Commission Members

asked the hon. Member for Wokingham, as representing the Church Commissioners, if he will list those members of the Government who are ex-officio Church Commissioners; and which meetings of the commissioners each of these office holders has attended during the last 15 years.

General Meetings Attended

  • First Lord of the Treasury—None.
  • Lord President of the Council—None.
  • Lord Chancellor—None.
  • Chancellor of the Exchequer—None.
  • Secretary of State for the Home Department—1986.
  • Attorney General—None.
  • Solicitor General — 1974; 1975; 1976 (twice); 1977; 1978; 1979; 1980; 1985 (twice); 1986.

Scotland

Riding Centre, Summerston

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland if he is now in a position to approve the urban aid application submitted through Glasgow district council for the new riding centre for the disabled at Summerston.

Glasgow district council was informed on 27 March that this project has been approved for funding under the urban programme in 1987–88.

Landscape Conservation

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland if he will publish in the Official Report the names of those organisations which have commented upon the Government's proposals of December 1986 on landscape conservation orders.

The following organisations in Scotland responded with comments to the consultation paper issued by the Department of the Environment entitled "Protecting the Countryside".

  • Association for the Protection of Rural Scotland.
  • Convention of Scottish Local Authorities.
  • Countryside Commission for Scotland.
  • Crofters Commission.
  • National Farmers' Union of Scotland.
  • National Trust for Scotland.
  • Scottish Landowners' Federation.
  • Scottish Wildlife Trust.

Aids

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland when he expects to deal with correspondence inquiring about advertising expenditure on AIDS, referred by the hon. Member for Glasgow, Maryhill on 17 February.

My noble Friend the Minister of State has written to the hon. Member.

Trade And Industry

Research And Development

asked the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry what has been the percentage increase in gross research and development expenditure in Britain in real terms since 1979; and what is the position of Britain in real terms compared with other Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development countries.

The available information is given in the table.

Increase in gross domestic expenditure on research and development (GERD) adjusted for changes in prices: 1983 compared with 1978 or 1979 for some OECD member countries
Percentage increase in GERD
United Kingdom12·3
Australia19·8
Canada29·8
Finland43·9
France24·0
Germany8·1
Iceland14·0
Ireland9·1
Italy36·3
Japan42·5
Netherlands7·6
Norway15·4
Spain27·6
Sweden38·4
Switzerland0·4
United States19·2

Source: OECD.

Note: Increases are over the four-year period 1979 to 1983, except for United Kingdom and Australia, the five-year period 1978 to 1983.

Manufacturing Industry

asked the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry whether he will publish in the Official Report a table showing the United Kingdom share of European Economic Community exports of goods in Standard Industrial Trade Classifications 5, 6, 7 and 8. respectively, in 1979, 1985 and the latest period of 12 months for which figures are available; and what information he has as to how these compare with the share held by Germany, France and Italy.

asked the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry whether he will publish in the Official Report a table showing for each year from 1957 gross and net domestic fixed capital formation by manufacturing industry at current and at 1980 prices.

[pursuant to his reply, 30 March 1987, c. 361]: The requested information is shown in the following table:

Gross and net domestic fixed capital formation by manufacturing industry at current and 1980 prices
£ million
YearGDFCFNDFCF
Current prices1980 pricesCurrent prices1980 prices
19578845,0204382,557
19588634,7413872,172
19598474,6573551,982
19601,0165,5424952,741
19611,2446,5926723,630
19621,1816,1185632,990
19631,0585,2863982,013
19641,2215,9815142,563
19651,4136,6376383,043
19661,4836,6746372,887
19671,4136,3225242,349
19681,5696,7986162,641
19691,7747,4127293,057
19702,0897,9669013,395
19712,1027,2767272,496
19721,9686,3314341,377
19732,3566,7925971,675
19743,0627,4358922,132
19753,4586,7816871,304
(3,646)(7,138)
19763,9106,475541851
(4,146)(6,844)
19774,7306,7747341,001
(5,083)(7,254)
19785,6247,2211,0331,291
(6,169)(7,905)
19796,5157,4961,2431,399
(7,154)(8,230)
19806,4786,478237237
(7,313)(7,313)
19815,3184,865-1,536-1,447
(6,236)(5,697)
19825,4804,704-1,822-1,629
(6,522)(5,600)
19835,8544,780-1,810-1,562
(6,820)(5,558)
19847,3415,762-675-595
(8,429)(6,599)
19857,9505,852-651-524
(9,498)(6,971)

Notes:

  • 1. Except for the figures in brackets, which include leased assets, the table excludes expenditure on assets leased to manufacturers from the financial industries, since this information is not available for net domestic fixed capital formation nor, before 1975, for gross domestic fixed capital formation. Prior to 1975 finance leasing to manufacturers is thought to have been small or negligible.
  • 2. Figures of net domestic fixed capital formation for 1986 are not yet available.
  • Sources: Business Statistics Office, Central Statistical Office and CSO Blue Book.

    asked the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry in which years since 1957 gross fixed investment in plant and machinery in manufacturing industry in real terms has exceeded the 1979 level; and if he will publish in the Official Report a table showing on the basis of 1979 = 100 the amount of real investment in plant and machinery in each year since 1957 by manufacturing industry.

    [pursuant to his reply, 30 March 1987, c. 361]: Gross fixed investment on plant and machinery at 1980 prices has not exceeded the 1979 level in any year in the period from 1957.

    Index of gross fixed investment in plant and machinery in manufacturing industry at 1980 prices (including assets leased to manufacturers from the financial industries) 1979 = 100

    Year

    Index

    195751
    195849
    195949
    196057
    196168
    196263
    196356
    196463
    196570
    196672
    196770
    196876
    196980
    197091
    197183
    197272
    197379
    197490
    197588
    197686
    197789
    197894
    1979100
    198093
    198174
    198272
    198373
    198485
    198590
    198685

    Note: Expenditure on assets leased to manufacturers from the financial industries is included from 1975. Prior to this date no figures are available for such expenditure which is thought to be small or negligible.

    Source: Business Statistics Office.

    Enterprise Education

    asked the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry, of the funds made available to the Royal Society of Arts during Industry Year 1986 to publicise the importance of Enterprise Education, (a) how much and (b) what proportion of the total amount was spent on (i) publicity materials in schools in the United Kingdom (ii) publicity materials in schools in Wales and (iii) publicity materials in the Welsh language.

    [pursuant to his reply, 31 March 1987]: The Government made funds available to the Royal Society for the encouragement of arts, manufacturers and commerce, during Industry Year 1986, to increase awareness of the role of industry and its service to the community. These were spent on all aspects of the campaign. £300,000 (29 per cent.), exclusive of staff costs, design and other overheads was spent on materials for schools in the United Kingdom. These were distributed to all schools including those in Wales. Figures for supply to schools in Wales cannot be separately identified. £11,696 (1·1 per cent.) was spent on translating and printing schools materials in the Welsh language.

    Defence

    British Military Hospital, Dharan

    asked the Secretary of State for Defence what were the full costs of running the British military hospital in Dharan, Nepal in 1984 and 1985.

    [pursuant to his reply, 30 March 1987, c. 382]: The full running costs of the British military hospital Dharan, Nepal were:

    Financial year£
    1984–851,153,600
    1985–861,362,300
    Figures are reported by financial years only.

    asked the Secretary of State for Defence if he will make a statement on the future of the British military hospital in Dharan, Nepal.

    [pursuant to his reply, 30 March 1987, c. 382]: All defence programmes, including those in Nepal, are kept constantly under review. However, no decision has been taken on the future of BMH Dharan.

    Prime Minister

    Road Safety

    asked the Prime Minister what action she purposes to take, in the light of her message to the member states of the European Community, the Commission and the European Parliament in European Road Safety Year, to implement and seek further solutions aimed at reducing the frequency and severity of road accident casualties both nationally and in conjunction with European Economic Community members.

    I have been asked to reply.My right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Transport will soon be reporting to Parliament the outcome of the Government's review of road safety policy. The main conclusion to emerge from the review—that available resources be directed towards proven and cost-effective means of reducing road casualties—is already being reflected in increased funding for low-cost road safety engineering and for road safety research.Within the Community we shall continue to work with our partners on issues which require action at international level, particularly vehicle safety. We are also expanding bilateral exchanges where we can learn from the experience of countries which have developed effective ways of reducing casualties.

    Attorney-General

    Gazumping

    58.

    asked the Attorney-General what steps he proposes to take to stop the practice of gazumping in England and Wales.

    The Law Commission's report on "Subject to Contract" agreements (Law Com. No. 65, published in 1975) concluded that legislation to impose civil or criminal liability for "gazumping" would be counter-productive. The Government hope that buyers and sellers of houses and flats will give favourable consideration to the pre-contract deposit agreement recommended by the conveyancing standing committee in January last.

    Court Proceedings (Documentary Evidence)

    asked the Attorney-General what representations he has received on proposals to give the judiciary a complete discretion to decide whether documents given in evidence in court should remain confidential; and if he will make a statement.

    By the close of the consultation period on 20 March the Lord Chancellor had received 27 replies to his consultation paper proposing amendments to the "Rules of the Supreme Court" to give effect to the friendly settlement reached in the case brought by the hon. Member for Peckham (Ms. Harman) against the United Kingdom. Six of those replies express the view that the amendments give too much discretion to the judges. Changes will be considered in the light of the comments received, but it is an express term of the settlement that it will continue to be possible for a document to be subject to an order preventing its disclosure otherwise than to the parties to the action.

    Home Department

    Prison Officers (Medical Protection)

    asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) if he will make a statement on the procedure laid down by his Department for the protection of the prison officers involved with prisoners in the custody of Her Majesty's prisons who are known to be AIDS victims or carriers of that virus;(2) if he will make a statement on the procedure laid down by his Department for the protection of the prison officers involved with prisoners in the custody of Her Majesty's Government who are known to be hepatitis B victims or carriers of that virus.

    The procedural guidance issued by the prison department provides for infected prisoners who are ill (in the acute phase of hepatitis B infection or suffering from symptoms of AIDS or an AIDS-related condition) to be located either in a prison hospital or removed to National Health Service facilities. For both hepatitis B and HIV carriers who are asymptomatic certain regime restrictions have been advised, the precise restrictions applied in a particular case being a matter for the medical officer. Arrangements have also been introduced which enable appropriate staff to be informed, in such a way that medical confidentiality is preserved, of cases in which restrictions have been applied. Other measures taken include guidance on procedures to be followed in the event of incidents involving risk of exposure to infection, and the introduction of arrangements under which health care staff are offered the opportunity to he vaccinated against hepatitis B.

    Greater London

    asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what arrangements exist within his Department, within the central headquarters or in any regional or sub-regional organisation, for dealing with his responsibilities regarding public services or any other function in respect of the Greater London area; and how many full-time equivalent staff are involved in such work.

    I have well established consultative and other arrangements for assisting in the discharge of my duties with regard to the various services for which I have responsibility. However, these generally relate to England and Wales as a whole and it would not be possible to identify separately those relating exclusively to Greater London or the numbers of staff which are involved.Seven officials work full-time on duties in connection with my responsibilities for the Metropolitan police. But the police department is organised on a functional basis and all its officials are available to advise me depending on the matter under consideration.

    asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department with which Departments and non-departmental bodies his Department, and its related non-departmental public bodies, has consulted during 1986–87 in respect of services provided within Greater London; approximately how often such consultations have taken place; and what issues were discussed.

    I regularly consult many other Government Departments and non-departmental bodies in connection with the discharge of my duties; these consultations take place as and when necessary. The Treasury and the Department of the Environment are consulted regularly on aspects of Metropolitan police resources. It would be possible to provide the other detailed information requested only at disproportionate expense.

    Number of offences
    19811982198319841985
    Gross personal violence to inmate:
    Charge proved6668623937
    Referred to police1629312122
    Adjudication not completed2211
    Charge dismissed812111311
    Sub-total921111057470
    Attempted gross personal violence:
    Charge proved1110777
    Referred to police7
    Adjudication not completed
    Charge dismissed1
    Sub-total1111778
    Assault on inmate:
    Charge proved2,0961,8761,8301,6571,774
    Referred to police711161226
    Adjudication not completed101191013
    Charge dismissed132119152151156
    Sub-total2,2452,0172,0071,8301,969
    Attempted assault:
    Charge proved9950322346
    Referred to police1
    Adjudication not completed

    asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether there are any proposals to change the arrangements for discharging his Department's responsibilities regarding public services or any other function in respect of the Greater London area during the forthcoming year.

    Airports (Passport Checking)

    asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) if he has any plans to include airlines in the bodies authorised to inspect intending passenger passports;(2) if he has any plans to introduce legislation to allow airlines the right to inspect passports of intending passengers.

    Airlines are already able to examine the documents of passengers leaving the United Kingdom on their flights. We have no plans to introduce legislation for this purpose.

    Prisoners (Violence)

    asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many attacks there have been by one prisoner on another in any penal establishment in each of the last five years.

    Information is not available in the form requested. The following table relates to adjudications in prison department establishments in each of the years 1981 to 1985 where an inmate was charged with an offence of gross personal violence to another inmate, or of assault upon another inmate, or with an attempt to commit such an offence.

    1981

    1982

    1983

    1984

    1985

    Charge dismissed1514
    Sub-total9951372451
    Total2,4472,1902,1561,9352,098

    Corresponding figures for 1986 are not at present available.

    Rate Defaulters

    asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many rate defaulters have been sent to prison in each of the last 10 years; and what were the average maximum and minimum sentences.

    Information on the number of persons received on committal by magistrates' courts in default of

    Persons received into Prison Department establishments in England and Wales on committal for non payment of rates: by length of committal and type of court 1975, 1980 and 1985
    Number of persons1
    197519801985
    Length of committalMagistrates' courtsCounty courtsMagistrates' courtsCounty courtsMagistrates' courtsCounty courts
    Up to one week24691
    Over one up to two weeks2215333383
    Over two up to three weeks111121302
    Over three weeks up to one month58412021153
    Over one up to two months9319583
    Over two up to three months1171521781
    Over three up to six months1111
    Over six months
    Not recorded4
    Total31825419735410
    1 Based on information recorded centrally, which is approximate. Checking of individual cases would involve disproportionate cost.

    South West Africa People's Organisation

    asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether he has received any complaints in the last year concerning Oxfam's alleged support in the United Kingdom of the South West Africa People's Organisation.

    Correspondence has recently been received mentioning a possible link between Oxfam and the South West Africa People's Organisation. This is being considered by the Charity Commission.

    Charities (Political Activities)

    asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether he has received any complaints concerning the alleged political activities of charities, and of Oxfam in particular.

    Such complaints are received from time to time. They are a matter for the Charity Commission which has issued detailed guidelines on political activities by charities.

    payment of rates in each of the last 11 years is published annually in "Prison Statistics England and Wales" (table 6·2 of the latest volume, for 1985, Cmnd. 9903). The following table gives details of the length of committal of those received in 1975, 1980 and 1985 on committal by all courts. Further information could be supplied only at disproportionate cost. Data for 1986 are not yet available.

    Immigration

    asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department in how many cases since 1983 he has refused to accept a recommendation from an adjudicator that he reconsider an application outside the immigration rules.

    Whenever an adjudicator makes such a recommendation, the case is always fully and carefully reconsidered. Any decision riot to exercise the use of discretion in an appellant's favour outside the immigration rules is taken at a senior level in the immigration department or, where appropriate or where an hon. Member has made representations on the appellant's behalf, at ministerial level. Statistics of the outcome of such cases are not separately maintained.

    Mr John Fleming

    asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will take steps to seek to secure the extradition from the United States of Mr. John Fleming; and if he will make a statement.

    Mr. Fleming was deported from the United States to this country on 26 March.

    Police Computers

    asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what discussions he has had with, and what advice was received from, the Data Protection Registrar relating to the accessibility of fingerprints held on police computers; and if he will make a statement.

    None. We are satisfied that the arrangements for access to fingerprint images held on police computers comply with the Data Protection Act 1984.

    asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what discussions he has had with, and what advice was received from, the Data Protection Registrar in relation to the proposed new police computers; and if he has any plans to amend the Data Protection Act in consequence.

    None. Police computer systems are subjects to the provisions of the Data Protection Act 1984 and any new application on the police national computer (or any other police computer which contains personal data) will be registered, as appropriate, under the Act.

    Animal Procedures Committee

    asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will now announce the composition of the Animal Procedures Committee under the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986.

    I have now appointed the Animal Procedures Committee under section 19 of the Animals (Scientific Procedures) At 1986, acting jointly with the Department of Health and Social Services for Northern Ireland under section 29 of the Act. The new committee replaces my non-statutory Advisory Committee on Animal Experiments. I am most grateful to all who served on the advisory committee for the invaluable advice they have given to successive Home Secretaries, and to a number of its members for agreeing to join the Animal Procedures Committee, which has been appointed as follows:

    • Professor D. G. T. Williams (Chairman), Rouse Ball Professor of English Law and President of Wolfson College, Cambridge.
    • Dr. Michael Balls, Reader in Medical Cell Biology, Nottingham University and Chairman of the Trustees of th Fund for the Replacement of Animals in Medical Experiments.
    • Mr. Edward Bernard FIAT, Oxford Laboratory Animal Colonies, Bicester.
    • Mr. Jason Brice, Consultant Neurosurgeon.
    • Dr. Roger Brimblecombe, Vice President of Smith, Kline and French Laboratories.
    • Mr. Henry Carter, Veterinary Surgeon.
    • Dr. Charles Coid, Head of Division of Comparative Medicine, Clinical Research Centre, Northwick Park, Harrow.
    • Professor Anthony Dayan, Professor of Toxicology, St. Bartholomew's Hospital Medical College.
    • Professor Gordon Dunstan, formerly Professor of Moral Theology, King's College, London.
    • Mr. Roger Ewbank, Director of the Universities Federation for Animal Welfare.
    • Mr. T. G. Field-Fisher, QC, Chairman of RSPCA Legal Committee.
    • Dr. Judith Hampson, formerly Animal Experimentation Officer of the RSPCA, now freelance Consultant.
    • Mr. Clive Hollands, Secretary to the Committee for the Reform of Animal Experimentation.
    • Sir Andrew Huxley OM FRS, Master of Trinity College, Cambridge.
    • Professor Sheila Jennett, Professor of Physiology, Glasgow University.
    • Dr. John Ledingham, Reader in Medicine, Oxford University.
    • Dr. Brian Newbould, Research Director of ICI Pharmaceuticals.
    • Professor Lawson Soulsby, Professor of Animal Pathology, Cambridge University and past-President of the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons.
    • Professor Peter Venables, Professor of Psychology at York University.
    We intend to make one further appointment to the committee presently.It is the committee's duty under the Act to advise me and the Department of Health and Social Services for Northern Ireland on such matters concerned with the Act and our functions under it as the committee may determine or as we may refer to it. The committee is required in its consideration of any matter to have regard both to the legitimate requirements of science and industry and to the protection of animals against avoidable suffering and unnecessary use in scientific procedures; and to make an annual report on its activities. I am required to lay the report before Parliament and, under section 21 of the Act, to consult the committee before issuing or altering guidance on the operation of the Act and codes of practice on the care and use of animals. The advice of the committee will also be sought on all applications for licences for projects involving cosmetics, microsurgery, and the testing of tobacco products on conscious animals. I am very grateful to Professor Williams and all his colleagues for letting us have the benefit of their considerable expertise in the new committee which has a most important role to play in the rigorous system of controls established by the Act.

    Crime Statistics

    asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what representations he has received on his Department's recently published crime statistics.

    A number of letters from members of the public have been received in the Department about the latest statistics. Figures are, however, not readily available.

    Channel Islands (Defence And International Representation)

    asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what has been the response of the island authorities of Jersey and Guernsey to the Government's request for the islands to make voluntary annual contributions towards the costs of defence and international representation undertaken by the United Kingdom.

    I am pleased to announce that both Jersey and Guernsey have responded positively to the request.As from 1 April 1987, Guernsey will assume from Her Majesty's Government the responsibility for the maintenance of the Alderney breakwater (completed in 1865 to shelter the British fleet, make an annual contribution towards the cost of maintaining the Royal Naval port headquarters in Guernsey and remit fees collected for the issue of passports in Guernsey, in all amounting to approximately £700,000 in 1987–88.In determining the form of its contribution, Jersey has voted to establish on the island a Territoral Army unit whose costs it will bear. Detailed discussions on the feasibility of this are being undertaken urgently between representatives of the Jersey States and the Ministry of Defence. In the interim, Jersey has made a cash contribution of £800,000.Agreement has also been reached with both island authorities that they should pay the costs of international representation undertaken by the United Kingdom specifically on the islands' behalf.

    Energy

    Waddilove Report

    asked the Secretary of State for Energy with which individuals and organisations he has had consultations about the recommendations of the Waddilove report on subsidence damage.

    My right hon. Friend and I have consulted colleagues in other Government Departments, the National Farmers Union and British Coal. We have also received written representations from a range of individuals and interested organisations.

    Social Services

    Benefits

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services what was the total amount paid out in state benefits, including mortgage interest relief, to people earning more than (a) the national average wage and (b) two thirds of the national average wage at the latest date for which figures are available.

    In 1985–86, the estimated cost of mortgage interest relief in the United Kingdom to people with taxable incomes above two thirds average gross adult male full-time earnings (£130) was £4 billion. About £3 billion of this was to people with taxable incomes above average earnings (£195). On the same income basis, the corresponding social security expenditures in Great Britain were £7·2 billion and £3·9 billion in 1985.

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services if he has any plans to raise the level of the amount of charitable income that can be disregarded for supplementary benefit purposes.

    We have no plans to raise the level of the amount of charitable income that can be disregarded for supplementary benefit purposes. However, we shall be putting forward proposals to increase the amount of any voluntary or charitable payment that can be disregarded in the new income support scheme from April 1988 from £4 to £5 a week. The disregard level will apply also to the new housing benefit and family credit schemes.

    Earnings

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services whether he will publish in the Official Report a table showing for tables 5.14 and 5.15 of the latest issue of "Social Trends" the median figure for gross earnings on the horizontal axis and the actual figures and percentages for each category on the vertical axis at that level of earnings.

    The information is as follows:

    July 1986
    Median earnings1

    £
    Total income support2

    £
    Replacement ratio3 percentage
    Family type
    Single person (householder)187100·0630
    Married couple187107·4245
    Married couple with one child (aged 3)187112·1756
    Married couple with two children (aged 4 and 6)187117·5264
    Married couple with three children (aged 3, 8, 11)187124·6274
    Married couple with four children (aged 3, 8, 11, and 16)187131·7286
    Single person with one child (aged 3)12578·3356
    1 Estimated median earnings at July 1986 for:
    adult male full-time employees for all family types except single person plus child
    adult, female full-time employees for single person plus child.
    2 Net income (including the value of benefits in kind) less housing costs and travel to work expenses— referred to as "net weekly spending power" in Social Trends.
    3 Total income support (TIS) out of work and receiving supplementary benefit as a percentage of TIS in work.

    Mentally Ill And Mentally Handicapped People

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services how many places there are in local authority homes and hostels for mentally ill and mentally handicapped people.

    The Department's booklets "Homes and Hostels for the Mentally Ill and the Mentally Handicapped", copies of which have been placed in the Library, give the number of places provided for mentally ill and mentally handicapped people in homes and hostels provided by local authority social services departments at 31 March each year. The latest available figures, for 31 March 1985, are 4,363 places for mentally ill people and 15,152 places for mentally handicapped people.The hon. Member will be aware that the great majority of mentally ill people who are living in the community live in ordinary family homes. Others have their home in housing, including group homes, provided by local authority housing departments. We cannot give figures as these are not identified in central statistics. Mentally handicapped people similarly live in a range of alternative forms of housing, including small NHS units in the community.

    Cancer

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services if he will list in the Official Report the number of deaths in England and Wales from each form of cancer, broken down for men and women, for each of the last 10 years up to the latest year for which figures are available.

    The information is contained in table 2 of the OPCS annual volume "Mortality Statistics—cause", England and Wales, series DH2 (Her Majesty's Stationery Office). Copies for each year 1976–84 inclusive can be found in the Library. The figures for 1985 are shown in the table.

    ICDCause of DeathAll ages
    140–239NeoplasmsM74,324
    F67,294
    140–149Malignant neoplasm of lip, oral cavity and pharynxM1,003
    F694
    140Malignant neoplasm of lipM23
    141Malignant neoplasm of tongueM229
    F163
    142Malignant neoplasm of major salivary glandsM88
    F75
    143Malignant neoplasm of gumM58
    F43
    144Malignant neoplasm of floor of mouthM66
    F40
    145Malignant neoplasm of other and unspecified parts of mouthM115
    F87
    146Malignant neoplasm of oropharynxM128
    F54
    147Malignant neoplasm of nasopharynxM82
    F45
    148Malignant neoplasm of hypopharynxM127
    F127
    149Malignant neoplasm of other and ill-defined sites within the lip, oral cavity and pharynxM87
    F51
    150–159Malignant neoplasm of digestive organs and peritoneumM21,478
    F19,660
    150Malignant neoplasm of oesophagusM2,719
    F1,851
    151Malignant neoplasm of stomachM5,922
    F4,049
    152Malignant neoplasm of small intestine, including duodenumM130
    F113
    153Malignant neoplasm of colonM4,923
    F6,364
    154Malignant neoplasm of rectum, rectosigmoid junction and anusM3,289
    F2,751
    155Malignant neoplasm of liver and intrahepatic bile ductsM680
    F499
    156Malignant neoplasm of gallbladder and extrahepatic bile ductsM329
    F632
    157Malignant neoplasm of pancreasM3,063
    F3,014
    158Malignant neoplasm of retroperitoneum and peritoneumM109
    F69
    159Malignant neoplasm of other and ill-defined sites within the digestive organs and peritoneumM314
    F318
    160–165Malignant neoplasm of respiratory and intrathoracic organsM27,124
    F10,139
    160Malignant neoplasm of nasal cavities, middle ear and accessory sinusesM100
    F89
    161Malignant neoplasm of larynxM669
    F166
    162Malignant neoplasm of trachea, bronchus and lungM25,994
    F9,798
    163Malignant neoplasm of pleuraM325
    F42
    164Malignant neoplasm of thymus, heart and mediastinumM34
    F43
    165Other malignant neoplasms within the respiratory system and intrathoracic organsM2
    F1
    170–175Malignant neoplasm of bone, connective tissue, skin and breastM1,206
    F14,600

    ICD

    Cause of Death

    All ages

    170Malignant neoplasm of bone and articular cartilageM153
    F120
    171Malignant neoplasm of connective and other soft tissueM256
    F236
    172Malignant melanoma of skinM455
    F532
    173Other malignant neoplasm of skinM263
    F199
    174Malignant neoplasm of female breastF13,513
    175Malignant neoplasm of male breastM79
    179–189Malignant neoplasm of genitourinary organsM11,451
    F10,150
    179Malignant neoplasm of uterus, part unspecifiedF517
    180Malignant neoplasm of cervix uteriF1,957
    181Malignant neoplasm of placentaF2
    182Malignant neoplasm of body of uterusF1,018
    183Malignant neoplasm of ovary and other uterine adnexaF3,843
    184Malignant neoplasm of other and unspecified female genital organsF540
    185Malignant neoplasm of prostateM6,628
    186Malignant neoplasm of testisM112
    187Malignant neoplasm of penis and other male genital organsM129
    188Malignant neoplasm of bladderM3,251
    F1,418
    189Malignant neoplasm of kidney and other and unspecified urinary organsM1,331
    F855
    190–199Malignant neoplasm of other and unspecified sitesM6,506
    F6,773
    191Malignant neoplasm of brainM1,472
    F1,099
    192Malignant neoplasm of other and unspecified parts of nervous systemM18
    F35
    193Malignant neoplasm of thyroid glandM106
    F247
    194Malignant neoplasm of other endocrine glands and related structuresM65
    F56
    195Malignant neoplasm of other and ill-defined sitesM172
    F322
    199Malignant neoplasm without specification of siteM4,591
    F4,946
    200–208Malignant neoplasm of lymphatic and haematopoietic tissueM4,716
    F4,322
    200Lymphosarcoma and reticulosarcomaM131
    F133
    201Hodgkin's diseaseM261
    F194
    202Other malignant neoplasm of lymphoid and histiocytic tissueM1,345
    F1,246
    203Multiple myeloma and immunoproliferative neoplasmsM1,019
    F1,013
    204Lymphoid leukaemiaM727
    F551
    205Myeloid leukaemiaM1,040
    F978
    206Monocytic leukaemiaM40
    F45
    207Other specified leukaemiaM28
    F31
    208Leukaemia of unspecified cell typeM125
    F131
    210–229Benign neoplasmsM185
    F327
    210Benign neoplasm of lip, oral cavity and pharynxM5
    F2
    211Benign neoplasm of other parts of digestive systemM17
    F21
    212Benign neoplasm of respiratory and intrathoracic organsM8
    F12

    ICD

    Cause of Death

    All ages

    213Benign neoplasm of bone and articular cartilageM1
    F3
    214LipomaM4
    F1
    215Other benign neoplasm of connective and other soft tissueM8
    F10
    216Benign neoplasm of skinM4
    F1
    217Benign neoplasm of breastM
    F1
    218Uterine leiomyomaF15
    219Other benign neoplasm of uterusF2
    220Benign neoplasm of ovaryF19
    222Benign neoplasm of male genital organsM1
    223Benign neoplasm of kidney and other urinary organsM2
    F2
    225Benign neoplasm of brain and other parts of nervous systemM88
    F173
    226Benign neoplasm of thyroid glandM2
    F2
    227Benign neoplasm of other endocrine glands and related structuresM29
    F46
    228Haemangioma and Lymphangioma, any siteM14
    F14
    229Benign neoplasm of other and unspecified sitesM2
    F3
    230–234Carcinoma in situM1
    F2
    230Carcinoma in situ of digestive organsM1
    F
    232Carcinoma in situ of skinM
    F1
    233Carcinoma in situ of breast and genitourinary systemM
    F1
    235–238Neoplasms of uncertain behaviourM225
    F222
    235Neoplasm of uncertain behaviour of digestive and respiratory systemsM31
    F30
    236Neoplasm of uncertain behaviour of genitourinary organsM11
    F11
    237Neoplasm of uncertain behaviour of endocrine glands and nervous systemM38
    F41
    238Neoplasm of uncertain behaviour of other and unspecified sites and tissuesM145
    F140
    239Neoplasm of unspecified natureM429
    F405

    Disabled Persons (Services, Consultation And Representation) Act 1986

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services how many representations he has received in the current year concerning the implementations of the Disabled Persons Act 1986.

    Since the beginning of 1987, 60 written representations have been received from organisations or individuals relating to implementation of the Disabled Persons (Services, Consultation and Representation) Act 1986. I also met representatives of the local authority associations on 24 February to discuss a number of issues relating to the implementation of the Act and today, at their request, I met members of the steering group of major disability organisations which has been set up to monitor implementation.

    Fluoridation

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services (1) what financial assistance has been given from central Government funds for the capital costs of the installation of fluoridation plants following the passage of the Water (Fluoridation) Act 1985;(2) what additional public expenditure has arisen from the Water (Fluoridation) Act 1985.

    There has been no additional public expenditure arising from the passage of the Water (Fluoridation) Act 1985. The Department has continued to provide some financial assistance to health authorities with the capital costs of fluoridation schemes that were agreed prior to 1985, as it has done since 1975. In the financial year 1985–86 this assistance amounted to £285,000 and to £262,000 in the current financial year.

    Pensioners (Benefits)

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services if he will estimate the cost in a full year at 1987–88 rates of (a) increasing the state pension by £5 per week for single and £8 for married persons, respectively, and (b) increasing supplementary benefits for pensioners between mid-December and the end of March by £5 per week to cover fuel bills.

    The estimated cost (a) of increasing the state pension (retirement, invalidity and widow's pension, supplementary pension and the linked needs allowance for housing benefit) by £5 a week for single and £8 a week for married persons would be £2·7 billion in a full year, (b) of paying £5 a week between mid-December and the end of March to those pensioners currently receiving supplementary benefit would be £150 million; there could also be a substantial extra cost in respect of other pensioners who would then become entitled to supplementary pension during the winter months.

    Motability

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services whether he has any plans to review the criteria for eligibility to Motability; and if he will make a statement.

    Motability is an independent voluntary organsiation set up in 1977 with Government support, specifically to help disabled people in receipt of mobility allowance to exchange the cash benefit for a vehicle.In view of Motability's independent status any review of the criteria for eligibility under the scheme would be essentially a matter for Motability itself in conjuction with the Department which meets the organisation's administration expenses. There are, however, no plans for such a review at present.

    Benefits (Age Limit)

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services what information he has about the age at which young people are entitled to claim social security payments on their own behalf in (a) the United Kingdom and (b) other OECD countries.

    In all countries social security payments under contributory benefits schemes depend primarily on the individual's contribution record, which is normally a function of length of time in covered employment. The minimum age for the payment of contributions to the United Kingdom national insurance scheme is 16.Payment of non-contributory benefits is much more various. The age at which child allowance ceases ranges between 16 and 27 in the countries referred to, and is linked with the status—student, trainee or other—of the young person. This clearly influences the age at which social welfare payments can be made available to the young person on his own behalf. There may in any case be a gap between the end of the child allowance and entitlement (if any) to welfare payments during which a young person is still considered dependent on his parents. In some countries (for example, United States of America, Denmark, Germany, the Netherlands, Switzerland) young people without dependants have no entitlement to social welfare payments.In the United Kingdom child benefit continues to age 19 if the young person is in non-advanced education. Young people aged over 16 are eligible to claim supplementary benefit in their own right from fixed dates at the end of the holiday following the term in which they complete their full-time non-advanced education.

    Nhs Finance

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services what has been total National Health Service spending in monetary and real terms annually since 1974 (a) nationally, (b) for the Wessex regional health authority area and (c) following reorganisation, for the Portsmouth and Southampton district health authority areas; and if he will provide a breakdown of these figures between capital and revenue expenditure in each case.

    Supplementary Benefit

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services (1) whether any consideration is being given to amending supplementary benefit regulations for people aged over 50 years to allow higher part-time earnings before supplementary benefit is reduced; and if he will make a statement;(2) if he will estimate the cost of raising the earnings limit to £20 per week for people aged over 50 years, before supplementary benefit is reduced; how many people he estimates would benefit; and if he will make a statement.

    We have no present plans to increase the amount that people, including those aged over 50, can earn before supplementary benefit is reduced. To increase the limit to £20 for all those in this age group including those who are already receiving supplementary benefit would give increased entitlement to some 35,000 people at a cost of £20 million a year. We do not have a reliable estimate of the number who might be brought into entitlement or what the additional cost might be.For the future we have announced proposals for changes in the levels of disregards of earnings in the income support scheme that replaces supplementary benefit from April 1988. The standard disregard would be increased from £4 to £5 a week although the separate disregard of work expenses would end. There would be a higher disregard of £15 a week for couples who have been unemployed two years, lone parents and those qualifying for the disability premium.

    Social Security Advisory Committee (Report)

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services when the Social Security Advisory Committee will be publishing its next annual report.

    I understand that the Social Security Advisory Committee's Fifth Report is being published today. Copies are available in the Vote Office.

    Cervical And Breast Cancer Screening

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services what further action he is taking to ensure the effective implementation of the Government's policies for cervical and breast cancer screening.

    I have asked Sir Roy Griffiths, deputy chairman of the NHS management board, to lead a small team whose task will be to oversee the implementation of the Government's policy on cervical and breast cancer screening.Sir Roy and his team will be working with health authorities and family practitioner committees to make sure that they have viable plans, not only for installing computerised call and recall systems, but also to improve take-up of screening and to follow up when women do not respond after being called for screening.I shall be asking Sir Roy to make regular reports to me so that I can keep the House informed, particularly about progress towards the target date of 31 March 1988 for the cervical cancer screening service throughout England.

    Transport

    Noise Insulation Regulations 1975

    56.

    asked the Secretary of State for Transport if he has any plans to amend the Noise Insulation Regulations 1975; and if he will make a statement.

    Later this year we will be laying before the House a minor amendment to the Noise Insulation Regulations in the form of a revision of the 1975 edition of "Calculation of Road Traffic Noise". This technical memorandum is prescribed in regulation 6. It sets out the method and procedure for ascertaining noise levels for the purposes of the regulations.We are considering other possible amendments to the regulations.

    National Bus Company

    asked the Secretary of State for Transport what information he has about the sale prices of National Bus Company subsidiaries sold off so far.

    The prices obtained for individual National Bus Company subsidiaries are confidential while sales are in progress. A report will be made to the House in due course on the aggregate proceeds of sale.

    Witchford Bypass

    asked the Secretary of State for Transport if he will make a statement on the proposed opening date of the Witchford bypass.

    Witchford lies on the A142 principal road. It is for Cambridgeshire county council, as highway authority, to determine when a bypass should be built and opened.

    Road Accidents

    asked the Secretary of State for Transport if he will state the number of deaths and serious injuries on the roads in the last year in Cambridgeshire and Suffolk, respectively.

    Road accident information for 1986 will not be available before May 1987. The local authorities concerned may have provisional estimates and my hon. Friend may wish to get in touch with them. Data for 1985 can be found in "Road Accidents Great Britain 1985". A copy is in the Library.

    London Underground (Accidents)

    asked the Secretary of State for Transport how many reported accidents have occurred during the past 12 months on trains without guards on the London Transport underground system.

    Excluding minor injury accidents (which are reported on bulk returns and cannot be related to specific trains or lines) there have been no reported accidents on these trains during the past 12 months.

    Exeter-Exmouth Relief Road

    asked the Secretary of State for Transport what steps he is taking to bring forward the construction of the new Exeter to Exmouth relief road.

    The improvement of the A376 Exeter-Exmouth route is a matter for Devon county council as local highway authority.

    Wheelchair Passengers

    asked the Secretary of State for Transport which existing construction and United Kingdom regulations apply to community transport vehicles used for conveying wheelchair-bound passengers; if he intends to introduce fresh regulations applying only to new vehicles of this type; and if he will make a statement.

    Following the recent consultation with interested organisations we shall shortly be issuing a new code of practice on the carriage of passengers in wheelchairs on buses. This new code makes no distinction between community transport vehicles, public service vehicles and private vehicles. It represents the best advice available on how to secure people in wheelchairs on buses. There are no plans to make special regulations for vehicles used to carry people in wheelchairs.

    Channel Tunnel Roads (War Cemeteries)

    asked the Secretary of State for Transport what representations he has received concerning the implications for British war graves in France of the routes proposed for the construction of certain new roads for Channel tunnel traffic; and what reply he has made.

    My Department has received two representations on this subject. This is primarily a matter for the French Government, but my understanding is that proposals for new roads connected with the Channel tunnel project could not conceivably affect British war cemeteries in northern France.

    Road Assessment Studies (London)

    asked the Secretary of State for Transport (1) if he will list those organisations he has asked to comment on the terms of reference of stage 2 of the road assessment studies for London;(2) when he intends to publish the first terms of reference of the stage 2 consultation of the road assessment studies for London.

    All 20 local authorities in the study areas are being consulted and the organisations listed have been asked for their views by 19 June. We will also consider comments from anyone else. The final terms of reference will be published once we have considered comments received.

    • Association of London Authorities
    • Automobile Association
    • British Airports Authority
    • British Rail
    • British Road Federation
    • Campaign to Improve London's Transport
    • Confederation of British Industry
    • Freight Transport Association
    • Friends of the Earth Ltd.
    • Institution of Civil Engineers
    • Institution of Highways and Transportation
    • London Amenity and Transport Association
    • London Boroughs Association
    • London Centre for Transport and Planning
    • London Chamber of Commerce and Industry
    • London Cycling Campaign
    • London Docklands Development Corporation
    • London Planning Advisory Committee
    • London Regional Transport
    • London and South East Regional Planning Committee
    • London Taxi Drivers Association
    • Metropolitan Police
    • Pedestrians Association
    • Road Haulage Association
    • Royal Automobile Club
    • Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents
    • Standing Advisory Committee on Trunk Road Assessment
    • Transport 2000

    Manchester Airport

    asked the Secretary of State for Transport what reply he is making to the Greater Manchester passenger transport authority's application for section 56 grant towards the cost of a rail link to Manchester airport; and if he will make a statement.

    asked the Secretary of State for Transport when he expects to have completed his consideration of the application for section 56 grant-aid for the Manchester airport rail link; and if he will make a statement.

    The PTA's application, which I requested in December, was sent to me on 10 March. It does not deal with a number of key issues, such as the way in which is proposed to share the costs and revenues of the project, and the economic benefits which are claimed to justify the scheme.I have written today to the chairman of Greater Manchester PTA pointing out these deficiencies and proposing an early meeting between officials to consider the further work which is required.

    Education And Science

    Student Grants

    asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science if he will estimate the cost of reducing by one year the age of independence for student grants.

    The estimated cost of reducing the age of independence to 24 is £3 million.

    Higher Education

    asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science what information he has about the percentage of the higher education budget that is allocated to student maintenance in (a) the United Kingdom and (b) other OECD countries.

    asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science what information he has about the percentage of students in higher education who are living other than in the parental home in (a) the United Kingdom and (b) other OECD countries.

    Nursery Education

    asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science what proportion of three-year-old and what proportion of four-year-old children receive nursery education.

    The proportion of three-year-old children receiving education in maintained nursery schools and in nursery classes in maintained primary schools in England in January 1986 was 32 per cent. The corresponding proportion for four-year-olds was 14 per cent. since the majority of this age group are in infant classes.

    Class Sizes

    asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science if he will publish a table showing the number of classes and of pupils in classes of more than 35 pupils for each year since 1979.

    The number of classes with more than 35 pupils and the number of pupils in these classes in maintained primary and secondary schools in England each year since 1979 is given in the table. The analyses are in respect of classes taught by one teacher on a specified period on the day of the census count in January of each year. The figures may not be representative of the pattern of classes over the academic year as a whole.

    January each yearOne teacher classes with more than 35 pupilsPupils in these classes
    19796,727253,198
    19805,078192,651
    19814,313162,974
    19824,028152,508
    19833,433130,497
    19842,926111,126
    19852,892110,307
    19862,768106,984

    Education Expenditure

    asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science (1) how the population of total public expenditure devoted to the education budget in Britain compares with other Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development countries;(2) how the proportion of gross domestic product spent on the education budget compares with the proportion spent in other Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development countries.

    The readily available information is shown in the following table.

    Total educational expenditure
    CountryYearAs percentage of gross national product1As percentage of total government expenditure1
    Australia19836·013·6
    Austria19845·98·0
    Belgium219846·013·8
    Canada19847·415·2
    Denmark19846·5..
    19806·99·5
    Finland19835·713·1
    France319825·8..
    Germany19834·58·8
    Greece19822·6..
    19792·28·4
    Iceland419754·112·2
    Ireland19836·99·7
    Italy19835·79·6
    Japan19825·719·1
    Luxembourg19835·314·1
    Netherlands19827·7..
    New Zealand19844·9..
    19805·514·5
    Norway19837·0129·
    Portugal19824·8..
    219754·011·2
    Spain19822·5..
    19792·616·4
    Sweden19848·012·2
    Switzerland19835·118·8
    Turkey19842·5..
    19802·710·5
    United Kingdom19835·311·5
    United States of America19816·7..
    19756·518·1
    Yugoslavia19833·9..
    19805·032·5
    1Sources: UNESCO Statistical Yearbook 1986, 1985, 1984.
    2 Expenditure of the Ministry of Education only.
    3 Metropolitan France.
    4 Expenditure of Central Government only.

    asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science what has been the expenditure per pupil on books and equipment, in cash and constant prices, each year since 1978–79.

    The information requested is given in the following table.

    Expenditure per pupil on books and equipment Primary and Secondary Schools (England)
    Cash termsReal terms (1984–85 prices)
    1978–7918·232·4
    1979–8020·230·8
    1980–8122·428·8

    Cash terms

    Real terms (1984–85 prices)

    1981–8225·029·2
    1982–8328·631·2
    1983–8431·032·3
    1984–8532·932·9

    Note: The cash figures for the earlier years have been repriced to 1984–85 prices using the Gross Domestic Product (Market Prices) Deflator.

    City Technology Colleges

    asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science if any further companies have been approached by his Department to fund city technology colleges; and how many companies have now expressed a willingness to provide funding.

    The Department has made no entirely fresh approaches to companies since I replied to the hon. Member on 27 February, at column 424, although further progress has been made with some of those which were already discussing the proposals. The answer which I then gave, that I would not confirm offers of support for city technology colleges until sponsors were ready to make their decision public, is still the case.

    National Finance

    Official Forms (Welsh Language)

    asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer if he will take steps to ensure that the form, "Stamps L(A) 451," used by Companies House in relation to the conveyancing of land, will now be made available generally in the Welsh language and used automatically in all cases where inquiries are received in Welsh, or where a desire to fill in this form in Welsh is indicated; and if he will make a statement.

    There has been very little demand for this particular Revenue form in Welsh and the expense of producing one would not appear to be justified. Purchasers may give the particulars required by section 28 Finance Act 1931 in Welsh if they so choose.

    Government Data Network

    asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer what discussions he has had with, and what advice was received from, the Data Protection Registrar in relation to the Government data network.

    Preliminary discussions with the Data Protection Registrar took place in September last year. A copy of the service requirement for the network was sent to the Registrar in January. He has agreed to advise and assist in relating the operating procedures of the proposed network to the requirements of the Data Protection Act 1984.

    Growth And Manufacturing Output

    asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer what has been (a) the average rate of growth for the United Kingdom and (b) the average rate of growth in manufacturing output in the United Kingdom for the period 1980 to 1986; and what are the comparable figures in the other members of the G7 group.

    [pursuant to his reply, 30 March 1987, c. 394–95]: The information requested is set out in the table.

    Output growth in the G7 countries, 1980 to 1986 (Annual average growth rates, in per cent.)
    Real GDP1Manufacturing
    United Kingdom2·10·7
    United States of America2·43·0
    Japan3·63·3
    Germany1·41·2
    France1·3-0·4
    Italy21·23-0·6
    Canada2·61·5
    1 At market prices.
    2 Includes OECD forecast for 1986.
    3 Up to third quarter 1986.

    Source: OECD 'Main Economic Indicators March 1987' 'National Accounts, Volume 1, 1987', CSO 'Economic Trends'.

    Prices

    asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer whether he will publish in the Official Report a table showing for the years 1975, 1979 and 1985 the information given in tables 11.5 and 11.6 of the 1986 edition of the "United Kingdom National Accounts" in terms of 1980 prices.

    [pursuant to his reply, 30 March 1987, c. 396]: Figures of capital consumption and net domestic fixed capital formation, both at constant 1980 prices, are as follows. Sectoral analyses at constant prices are not available for years up to 1978.

    £ million
    19791985
    Capital consumption at 1980 prices
    Dwellings
    Personal sector2,5103,227
    Companies101109
    Public corporations90108
    Central government2627
    Local authorities1,0881,118
    Total3,8154,589
    Other fixed assets
    Personal sector3,5414,102
    Companies12,20016,277
    Public corporations5,8224,658
    Central government671819
    Local authorities1,2751,410
    Total23,50927,266
    All fixed assets
    Personal sector6,0517,329
    Companies12,30116,386
    Public corporations5,9124,766
    Central government697846
    Local authorities2,3632,528
    Total27,32431,855
    Net domestic fixed capital formation at 1980 prices
    Dwellings
    Personal sector3,8413,103
    Companies16-24

    1979

    1985

    Public corporations267119
    Central government1212
    Local authorities1,410610
    Total5,5463,820

    Other fixed assets

    Personal sector-631,270
    Companies8,5868,140
    Public corporations620-374
    Central government1,2231,775
    Local authorities718-158
    Total11,08410,653

    All fixed assets

    Personal sector3,7784,373
    Companies8,6028,116
    Public corporations887-255
    Central government1,2351,787
    Local authorities2,128452
    Total16,63014,473

    asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer whether he will publish in the Official Report a table showing for the years 1975, 1979 and 1985 the information for all fixed assets in table 10.3 of the 1986 edition of the "United Kingdom National Accounts" in terms of 1980 prices.

    [pursuant to his reply, 30 March 1987, c. 396]: Figures of gross domestic fixed capital formation at constant 1980 prices are as follows. For years up to 1978 only a broad sector analysis of gross domestic fixed capital is available at constant prices. For recent years, from 1979 onwards, slightly more detailed sectoral analyses are available.

    Gross domestic fixed capital formation at 1980 prices all fixed assets
    £ million
    197519791985
    Personal sector Companies24,1389,82911,702
    20,90324,502
    Public corporations7,7656,7994,511
    Central government9,4191,9322,633
    Local authorities4,4912,980
    Total41,54043,95446,328

    Northern Ireland

    Milk Quotas

    asked the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland from what source the extra dairy quota for each of the contending parties in W. and C. Millar versus J. K. Lynn was made available; and on what legal authority it was allocated.

    Extra quota is to be made available to W. and C. Millar only. The quota is to be allocated on an extra statutory basis from the regional reserve.

    Employment

    National Pay Agreements

    asked the Paymaster General what is his assessment of the implications for (a) the level of migration from one part of the United Kingdom to another and (b) the level of emigration from the United Kingdom of abolishing national pay agreements.

    The ending of national pay agreements will enable employers to pay rates of pay that can be afforded by them and are necessary to recruit and retain staff of the required quality in their own locality. This should help to speed up the growth of employment and reduce regional disparities in unemployment, but I do not believe that it would have any discernible effect on migration or emigration.

    Ethnic Monitoring

    asked the Paymaster General if he will make the gathering of information on ethnic origins compulsory, and publish the percentage of entrants to his Department who failed to respond to the ethnic origins questionnaire.

    Responsibility for the arrangements for ethnic monitoring in the Civil Service lies with the Management and Personnel Office and these are covered in the reply given by my right hon. Friend the Prime Minister on 24 March, at column 98. In the period 1 October 1985 to 31 December 1986, 19·4 per cent. of new entrants to my Department failed to respond either to the ethnic origin questionnaire or a reminder.

    Community Programme

    asked the Paymaster General what proportion of the entrants to the community programme in the 12 months to October 1986 and December 1986 were (a) assigned to full-time places, (b) men, (c) single, (d) aged over 25 years, (e) unemployed for over 12 months and (f) formerly benefit claimants.

    The information requested is given in the table.

    12 months to October 198612 months to December 1986
    NumberPer cent.NumberPer cent.
    Total Entrants301,791307,405
    (a) Full time40,44013·440,27013·1
    (b) Male230,87076·5234,24276·2
    (c) Single239,01879·2242,54278·9
    (d) Over age 25110,15336·5114,66237·3
    (e) Unemployed over 12 months174,73757·9179,21758·3
    (f) (i) Former benefit claimants in direct receipt of benefit290,62496·3295,72396·2
    (f) (ii) Former benefit claimants indirectly in receipt of benefit6,2152·06,3482·0

    asked the Paymaster General how many community programme filled places were taken by community programme national initiatives in each category, crime, energy, CRS, FCI, NGF, UK2000 tourism for each Manpower Services Commission region at the most recent date.

    Community Programme
    National Initiative Filled Places by Region 27 February 1987

    Filled Places

    Crime Prevention

    Energy Efficiency

    Community Refurbishment Scheme

    Farm and Country-side

    National Garden Festival

    UK2000

    Tourism

    Total

    South-East17548416359291,756
    South-West3485581391,1812,226
    East Midlands3064091513231,1612,350
    Yorkshire and Humberside598607177477461,1773,082
    North-West1,929624167402182,6385,616
    Northern1,2754421323341,4703,653
    Wales5028965481,4182,878
    Scotland2348611552,4633,713
    West Midlands966481101169371,3043,058
    London1887247942041,217
    Total6,5216,0865771,53415573113,94529,549

    asked the Paymaster General how much money has been paid in unemployment benefit to people on the community programme to date.

    Unemployment benefit is not payable to people working full time on the community programme; in general, those working part time have not been eligible for unemployment benefit because they were regarded as working to their full normal extent. However, they may have qualified for other benefits.Information about benefits paid to people in part-time work is not available because such claims are not separately identified in the central computer records.

    Labour Statistics

    asked the Paymaster General if he will publish a table based on the 1984 and 1985 labour force

    People without jobs looking for a job in the four week reference period1 who were available to start work within two weeks Great Britain
    Thousands
    MenWomenTotal
    Spring 1984Spring 1985Spring 1984Spring 1985Spring 1984Spring 1985
    Claiming benefits1,5811,6045365352,1172,140
    Not claiming257184720645977828
    Total, Great Britain of which:1,8381,7881,2561,1803,0942,968
    South East416406343301759707
    (including Greater London)(202)(189)(159)(135)(361)(324)
    East Anglia404534437487
    South West107948982196175
    West Midlands219222134136352357
    East Midlands1151167380187196
    Yorks and Humberside175184114118289303
    North West277264169161446424
    North1471438975236217
    Wales1101057362183168
    Scotland231210140123370333
    Note: The figures, from the labour force survey, are subject to sampling errors. In some cases figures may appear not to add because of rounding.
    1 Including some waiting to start a new job already obtained, as in the definition of unemployment using broad ILO guidelines.

    asked the Paymaster General if he will publish a table, based on the 1985 labour force survey, showing by region including Greater London, and by male and female, the numbers of people who (a) were without jobs and who looked for work in the four weeks before their labour force survey interview and were available to

    surveys, for each region in Great Britain and for Greater London, by male/female, and claimant status, the numbers of people who had looked for a job in the four-week reference period, and who were available to start work within two weeks.

    The available information by claimant status from the 1984 and 1985 labour force survey is given in the following table. The surveys also showed that 938,000 and 1,080,000 people in 1984 and 1985 respectively were claiming benefits, so counting as unemployed in the monthly count, but either had a job or were not looking for work.It is not possible to provide a reliable analysis of the regional figures by claimant status.start work within two weeks who (i) wanted full-time jobs, (ii) wanted part-time jobs and (iii) who had no preference,

    (b) were unemployed according to the standard labour force survey definition who were looking for full-time jobs and the number looking for part-time jobs and the number who had no preference, (c) were in part-time jobs who

    were looking for a different job with longer hours or looking for an additional job, (d) were looking for a different job with shorter hours, (e) were claimants not unemployed by the definition using broad International

    (a) People without jobs who had looked for work in the previous four weeks3 and were available to start within two weeks.

    Great Britain Spring 1985

    Thousands

    Men seeking:

    Women seeking:

    All seeking:

    Full time work

    Part time work

    No preference

    Did not apply1

    Total

    Full time work

    Part time work

    No preference

    Did not apply1

    Total

    Full time work

    Part time work

    No preference

    Did not apply1

    Total

    Great Britain1,42484190891,788455495202281,1801,8805793921182,968
    of which:
    South East30331363640611513440123014171667648707
    (including Greater London)135142019189545617

    2

    135189713826324
    East Anglia34

    2

    2

    2

    451421

    2

    2

    43472313

    2

    87
    South West65

    2

    101094254214

    2

    8290502412175
    West Midlands183

    2

    27

    2

    222515330

    2

    1362346057

    2

    357
    East Midlands92

    2

    12

    2

    116293810

    2

    801214422

    2

    196
    Yorkshire and Humberside149

    2

    23

    2

    184435320

    2

    1181936043

    2

    303
    North West214112811264656031

    2

    161279725915424
    North119

    2

    14

    2

    143292916

    2

    751493230

    2

    217
    Wales91

    2

    2

    2

    105272213

    2

    621172719

    2

    168
    Scotland175

    2

    27

    2

    210574322

    2

    1232324549

    2

    333

    Note: The figures are subject to sampling errors. In some cases figures may appear not to add because of rounding.

    1 Those seeking work as self-employed were not asked whether they wished to work full or part time.

    2 Sample size too small to provide a reasonable estimate.

    3 Including some waiting to start a new job already obtained, as in the definition of Unemployment using broad ILO guidelines.

    (b) People unemployed according to conventional labour force definition

    Great Britain Spring 1985

    Thousands

    Men seeking:

    Women seeking:

    All seeking:

    Full time work

    Part time work

    No preference

    Did not apply1

    Total

    Full time work

    Part time work

    No preference

    Did not apply1

    Total

    Full time work

    Part time work

    No preference

    Did not apply1

    Total

    Great Britain1,38162182901,715456414196331,0981,8374763781222,814
    of which:
    South East29923343639312412138132954231447249688
    (including Greater London)136121920187625318

    2

    140198653826327
    East Anglia33

    2

    2

    2

    421415

    2

    2

    37471613

    2

    79
    South West63

    2

    101290253214

    2

    7388382414163
    West Midlands176

    2

    25

    2

    212494629

    2

    1272265154

    2

    339
    East Midlands89

    2

    12

    2

    111283210

    2

    731173622

    2

    183
    Yorkshire and Humberside145

    2

    21

    2

    179433918

    2

    1041884639

    2

    282
    North West203

    2

    27

    2

    247624831

    2

    145265555813392
    North114

    2

    12

    2

    134292716711432928

    2

    205
    Wales86

    2

    2

    2

    101251613

    2

    561112021

    2

    157
    Scotland173

    2

    26

    2

    207563820

    2

    1172294047

    2

    324

    Note: The figures are subject to sampling errors. In some cases figures may appear not to add because of rounding.

    1 Those seeking work as self-employed were not asked whether they wished to work full or part time.

    2 Sample size too small to provide a reasonable estimate.

    3 Including some waiting to start a new job already obtained, as in the definition of Unemployment using broad ILO guidelines.

    People in part-time employment Great Britain Spring 1985


    (thousands)

    (c) Looking for a different job with longer hours or for an


    additional job

    Men

    Women

    Total

    Great Britain of which113243355
    South East3580114
    (including Greater London)132840
    East Anglia

    1

    1317
    South West

    1

    1624
    West Midlands142034
    East Midlands

    1

    1826
    Yorks and Humberside

    1

    2837
    North West143246

    Organisation guidelines on the grounds that they were employed, and (f) were claimants not unemployed by the conventional labour force survey definition on the grounds that they were employed.

    The available information is given in the following tables.

    MenWomenTotal
    North11219
    Wales1113
    Scotland11826
    1 Sample size too small to provide a reliable analysis of these figures by region.
    (d) Looking for a different job with shorter hours
    MenWomenTotal
    Great Britain1101727
    1 Sample size too small to provide a reliable analysis of these figures by region.
    See notes to table

    (a).

    (e) Employed claimants1
    Spring 1985 (thousands)

    Men

    Women

    Total

    Great Britain210890198

    1 Employed according to both broad ILO guidelines and conventional labour force definition.

    2 It is not possible to provide a reliable analysis of these figures by region.

    Job Training Scheme

    asked the Paymaster General under what mechanism he proposes to ensure that claimants refusing, or leaving early, a new job training scheme place will not be subject to reference to the benefit authorities and disqualification from benefit under the provisions of the Social Security Act 1976.

    The instructions issued to local offices of my Department, the Manpower Services Commission and the Department of Health and Social Security state that there is no disqualification of benefit for not joining or not completing training under the scheme.

    asked the Paymaster General if any recruits to the job training scheme are to be over 25 years of age; and what arrangements will be made to pay a training allowance to those recruits who are not entitled to unemployment benefit or supplementary benefit.

    [pursuant to his reply, 30 March 1987, c. 356]: We will he giving priority for places on the job training scheme to those who are under 25 and unemployed for six months or more, but older long-term unemployed people may apply.If trainees did not receive benefit immediately before starting training, but claimed credits for national insurance contributions, they will receive a training allowance whenever a change in their circumstances would have entitled them to benefit had they remained unemployed.

    Availability For Work Test

    asked the Paymaster General what is the latest estimated number of people who have ceased receiving benefits following the introduction of the availability for work test.

    Claimants to unemployment benefits have always been disallowed benefit by independent statutory adjudicating authorities in accordance with long-standing legal rules adopted by successive Governments, when they are not available for work.If the hon. Member is asking how many claims have been disallowed for this reason since we introduced modified procedures to enforce the existing rules, the answer, as at 27 February 1987, was 8,866 claimants nationally, which is 1·1 per cent. of those at the new claims stage.

    asked the Paymaster General how many people in the London borough of Hammersmith and Fulham have had their unemployment benefit suspended because of the new availability for work test; and what percentage of the unemployment register in that borough they represent.

    Under long-standing legal rules adopted by successive Governments it has always been the practice that wherever a doubt arises as to whether a benefit claimant is available for work, payments are suspended until the independent statutory adjudicating authorities decide entitlement.If the hon. Member is asking how many claims in the London borough of Hammersmith have been suspended in this way since we introduced improved procedures to apply to existing rules, the answer, as at 27 February 1987, is 388 people. This represents 2·6 per cent. of those who have claimed at these offices since the modifications were introduced.

    asked the Paymaster General what action has been taken by local unemployment benefit officers to encourage the taking up of alternative benefits, should people prove to be ineligible for unemployment benefit as a result of an availability for work test.

    Our improvements in the arrangements for establishing the availability for work of claimants have made it easier for staff in unemployment benefit offices to identify claimants who may be eligible for an alternative social security benefit. We draw the attention of claimants to the existence of such benefits in the explanatory leaflet they each receive and by the posters in benefit offices. Our benefit office staff have been given guidance about those claimants who may be eligible.In addition my Department's new claimant advisers work closely with our local staff and play an important role in advising claimants about all social security benefits, including those which do not require the claimant to be available for work. Where necessary our claimant advisers will help claimants in making their applications.

    asked the Paymaster General if he will detail the cost of conducting the availability for work test experiment on the over 50s age group of unemployed; and if he will make a statement on the outcome of the tests and plans for extending them nationwide.

    [pursuant to his reply, 30 March 1987, c. 356]: The cost of conducting the improved availability for work test experiment relating to unemployed claimants aged over 50 who sign-on only once a quarter was approximately £3,000.The results of the experiment were inconclusive and we have no present plans to extend the procedure.

    Self-Employed Persons

    asked the Paymaster General of the 445,000 estimated increase in self-employed individuals between 1983 and 1986 how many were previously (a) employees, (b) unemployed, (c) on the youth opportunities programme/youth training scheme, (d) other special employment measures, and (e) economically inactive.

    The estimated 445,000 increase in the number of self-employed persons cannot be classified in the way requested, since it represents the net difference between the numbers entering and leaving self-employment between March 1983 and September 1986.The published employed labour force series does not identify the previous situation of those entering self employment. However, the labour force survey provides information on a different basis. Preliminary LFS results for the spring of 1986 estimate that of 2,723,000 self-employed persons in Great Britain at that time the great majority had been self-employed one year previously, while 202,000 had been employees, 85,000 unemployed and 92,000 economically inactive. Because of considerations of sample size it is not possible to provide a reliable estimate of the number who had been on Government employment and training schemes a year earlier.

    Hotels (London)

    asked the Paymaster General what steps his Department is taking to promote an increase in the supply of low to medium-cost hotel accommodation in London.

    My Department is supporting the initiatives being taken by the English Tourist Board, British Tourist Authority and London Tourist Board to follow up the recommendations in the consultancy study which they commissioned last year on "London's Tourist Accommodation in the 1990s". The English Tourist Board is involved in discussions with hotel operators and financial institutions to encourage them to take up opportunities to develop less expensive types of hotel accommodation in London, particularly in non-central areas. In addition, the London tourism forum is actively considering the need for additional hotel capacity in London and the importance of making adequate provision for this in the planning policies of London boroughs.

    asked the Paymaster General what is his Department's estimate of the shortfall in hotel accommodation in the low to medium price bracket in London.

    A consultant's report commissioned last year by the English Tourist Board, British Tourist Authority and other sponsors has suggested that while there is no evidence of a current shortage of tourist accommodation in London, there could be a potential overall shortfall of 16,000 to 28,000 rooms by the early 1990s. The ETB estimates that a fairly high proportion of these could be in the low and medium price range.

    asked the Paymaster General what discussions he has had with (a) the British Tourist Authority, (b) the English Tourist Board and (c) the London Visitors' Convention Bureau on the lack of budget class hotels in the capital.

    Officials of my Department are in regular contact with all these boards about the measures they are taking to encourage an increase in the supply of London's hotel accommodation so that it is capable of meeting the full range of future tourist demand, including that for low and medium price hotel rooms.

    asked the Paymaster General what information he has as to how many beds in (a) one, (b) two, (c) three, (d) four and (e) five star hotels are now available in the central London areas and as to how this compares with five and 10 years ago.

    Neither the English Tourist Board nor the London Tourist Board keeps comprehensive information on the numbers or grades of hotel bedrooms in different areas of London. The information requested is therefore not available.

    Workfare

    asked the Paymaster General if he is now able to state when he expects his study on Workfare to be completed; and if he will publish the results.

    I understand that the research study on Workfare by the employment research centre of the University of Buckingham is almost complete, and that the employment research centre expects to publish the results in the near future.

    Enterprise Allowance Scheme

    asked the Paymaster General whether he will now arrange for public access to lists of businesses in each Manpower Services Commission board with authority receiving support under the enterprise allowance scheme.

    I have no plans to allow public access to lists of businesses supported under the enterprise allowance scheme. Disclosure of this information would require the individual agreement of all participants in the scheme and lists would be administratively expensive to compile and maintain.

    Industrial Tribunals

    asked the Paymaster General how many people other than those from ethnic minorities have been recruited on to the Nottingham panel of the Industrial Tribunals Board over the last nine years for which figures are available.

    There have been 38 people other than those from ethnic minorities who have been recruited on to the Nottingham panel of industrial tribunals since 1982, the first year for which figures are readily available.

    asked the Paymaster General how many people from ethnic minorities now sit on the Nottingham panel of the Industrial Tribunals Board: and how many people sit on that panel who are not members of ethnic minorities.

    There is one panel member on the Nottingham Industrial Tribunals Board who is from the ethnic minorities out of a total membership of 96. One other person from an ethnic minority has recently accepted an invitation to serve.

    asked the Paymaster General what area is now covered by the Nottingham panel of the Industrial Tribunals Board; and what is the estimated population of that area.

    The area covered by the Nottingham panel of the Industrial Tribunals Board includes Leicestershire; Nottinghamshire except for Bassetlaw; Derbyshire except for High Peak, Bolsover, Chesterfield and north east Derbyshire; east Staffordshire in Staffordshire; Lincolnshire except for West Lindsey and East Lindsey, Lincoln and North Kesteven; and Corby and Kettering in Northamptonshire. The population is estimated at some 3 million.

    asked the Paymaster General how many applications he has received from people from eithnic minorities and from people who are not from ethnic minorities for seats on the Nottingham tribunals board.

    In 1986, when the current appointments to the Nottingham regional office of the industrial tribunals were made, we received nominations from one person from an ethnic minority and 34 from people who were not from ethnic minorities.

    Job Release Scheme

    asked the Paymaster General if he will announce the results of the review of the rates of allowance payable under both the job release scheme and the part-time job release scheme.

    Following our annual review of allowances, the rates payable under the job release schemes from 6 April, will be as follows:

    Full-time scheme

    For disabled men aged 60, 61, 62 and 63 who are married with a dependent wife whose net income from all sources does not exceed £13 a week, £74·50 a week taxable; for all others £61·15 a week, taxable.
    For women aged 59 and men aged 64 who are married with a dependent spouse whose net income from all sources does not exceed £13 a week, £67·55 a week, tax free; for all others £53·90 a week, tax free.

    Part-time scheme

    The part-time job release scheme closed on 30 May 1986. However, rates of allowance for those who entered the scheme on or before that date will be as follows:
    For disabled men aged 60 and 61 and men aged 62 and 63 who are married with a dependent wife whose net income from all sources does not exceed £13 a week, £43 a week taxable; for all others £35·80 a week, taxable.
    For women aged 59 and men aged 64 who are married with a dependent spouse whose net income from all sources does not exceed £13 a week, £38·05 a week tax free; for all other £31·15 a week, tax free.

    Benefits

    asked the Paymaster General if he is considering proposals or investigating the feasibility of depriving unemployed 16 and 17-year-olds of the right to claim supplementary benefit.

    [pursuant to his reply, 26 March 1987, c. 241]: The Government have successfully met their guarantee each year of a place on YTS for all unemployed 16 year olds, and we have now extended that guarantee this year to unemployed 17-year-olds. As a result, from April 1987 onwards there will no longer be a need for anyone under 18 to be unemployed, for everyone will have the choice of a place in school or college or on YTS or a job. We hope that no signficant number of young people will choose to remain unemployed and claim benefit. Any that do so will have to satisfy the long-standing legal rule that they are available for work and actually seeking work before they will receive benefit. We have not taken any decision about the continuing benefit entitlement of under-18s, but we will keep the position under review as we acquire experience of the effect of the new YTS guarantee.

    Manpower Services Commission

    asked the Paymaster General if he will publish the names of the members of each of the area manpower boards of the Manpower Services Commission.

    [pursuant to his reply, 30 March 1987, c. 354]: I am sending my hon. Friend a copy of the area manpower board membership list and will place additional copies in the Library.

    Departmental Staff

    asked the Paymaster General how many staff are employed in all aspects of paying unemployment benefit and dealing with tribunals and fraud; and how many separate premises they occupy.

    [pursuant to his reply, 30 March 1987, c. 356] Some 29,200 people are currently employed by the unemployment benefit service, of whom approximately 26,400 are directly involved in paying benefits at local offices, 1,000 are engaged in fraud investigation and 600 on the adjudication of benefit claims.There are 1,100 local unemployment benefit offices, of which some 300 are part-time or offer only limited services.

    Agriculture, Fisheries And Food

    Fish Stocks

    55.

    asked the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food what measures he has recently taken to maintain and improve fish stocks in the risers of England and Wales.

    Responsibility for maintaining, improving and developing salmon, eel and freshwater fisheries in the rivers of England and Wales, as well as for regulating those fisheries, is placed on the water authorities under the Salmon and Freshwater Fisheries Act 1975. The Government recently took steps to add to the effectiveness of the legislative framework within which the water authorities perform these duties through those sections of the Salmon Act 1986 which apply to England and Wales. They also established the salmon advisory committee earlier this year to examine and advise Ministers on matters relating to the conservation and development of salmon fisheries in England and Wales as well as in Scotland.

    Council Of Agriculture Ministers

    asked the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food what was the outcome of the Council of Agriculture Ministers' meeting held in Brussels on 30–31 March; and if he will make a statement.

    I represented the United Kingdom at this meeting, together with my right hon. Friend, the Minister of State.The Council had a first discussion of the Commission's proposals for agricultural support prices and arrangements for 1987–88. No decisions were reached on these proposals, and the Council will take them up again at its next meeting on 27 April. The marketing years for beef and dairy products, which otherwise would have expired, were therefore extended until 31 May. The Council also decided to continue for a similar period the suspension of part of the French and United Kingdom monetary compensatory amounts on eggs and poultrymeat, thus maintaining the benefit of these arrangements to our producers.Against a background of the very high cost of the common agricultural policy, which is threatening to exceed budgetary ceilings, I supported the main elements of the proposals, namely a tough policy on the prices themselves, the strengthening and extension of guarantee threshold mechanisms, and a weakening of the support provided through intervention buying. In several areas I felt the proposals did not go far enough in these directions.I made clear my opposition to certain parts of the proposals: first and foremost to the tax on vegetable and marine oils and flats, which would place a burden on consumers, besides risking a major dispute with overseas suppliers; and also to the proposals to limit the payment of the ewe premium to a given number of ewes per farm, and to end intervention for salted butter.

    Dairy Inspection

    asked the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food, further to his answer of 16 March, Official Report, column 417, to the hon. Member for Ynys Môn, if he will set out what other work is included in the definition of statutory work beyond dairy inspection, the constituent elements of subsistent costs including allowances for meals and accommodation; which senior Agricultural Development Advisory Service staff are involved with dairy inspection and what is the extent of their work; and if he will make a statement.

    The figure of 45·7 man years for statutory work includes not only time which dairy husbandry staff spend on farms but also their travelling time and the time they spend writing up reports, writing to producers and preparing for further visits: it also includes time which grades I and II devote to managing statutory work in order to ensure that the regulations are interpreted consistently across the country. The figure of 1·5 man years reflects the fact that, in addition, some 30 senior ADAS staff located at headquarters, in the regions and in Wales, devote a small proportion of their time to managing statutory work. There are standard, service wide, rates for travel and subsistence.

    Greater London

    asked the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food what arrangements exist within his Department, within the central headquarters or in any regional or sub-regional organisation, for dealing with his responsibilities regarding public services or any other function in respect of the Greater London area; and how many full-time equivalent staff are involved in such work.

    Many aspects of my responsibilities affect the Greater London area as other parts of the country. These are dealt with by the appropriate units such as animal and plant health, horticulture, flood defence and land sales divisions and the south-east and eastern regions. No central record is kept of the manpower used for the Greater London area alone.

    asked the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food with which Departments and non-departmental bodies his Department, and its related non-departmental public bodies has consulted during 1986–87 in respect of services provided within Greater London; approximately how often such consultations have taken place; and what issues were discussed.

    Consultation takes place as and when necessary. No central record is kept of oral or written consultations.

    asked the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food whether there are any proposals to change the arrangements for discharging his Department's responsibilities regarding public services or any other function in respect of the Greater London area during the forthcoming year.

    International Bee Research Association

    asked the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food if he has any plans to reintroduce the grant of £20,000 to the International Bee Research Association formerly given by the Development Commission; and if he will make a statement.

    No. My Department's research funds are spent on commissioning specific work, including over £100,000 on topics of interest to beekeepers, rather than on grants to particular organisations.

    Dairy Industry

    asked the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food if he will introduce legislation to prevent dairies or dairy farmers from adding a substance to milk to nullify the effect of antibiotics to enable it to be processed into cheese.

    Environment

    Inner City Initiatives

    asked the Secretary of State for the Environment how much his Department has spent on the urban programme and other inner city initiatives since 1979.

    Expenditure on my Department's urban group of programmes has more than doubled in real terms from £114 million in 1978–79 to £531 million in 1987–88. Since 1979 more than £3,500 million has in total been allocated to these programmes, generating more than £2,000 million in investment from other resources, including expenditure on the urban programme, urban development grant, urban development corporations and derelict land grant.

    Planning Appeals

    12.

    asked the Secretary of State for the Environment what percentage of planning applications has gone to appeal in each year since 1979; and what percentage of these appeals has been successful in each year.

    The information for England is as follows:

    YearNumber of planning applications receivedAppeals received as percentage of applications received in the yearProportion of appeals decided which were allowed
    Per cent.Per cent.
    1979129.1
    1980527,7003·130·8
    1981450,4003·732·7
    1982399,2003·531·0
    1983428,2003·232·4
    1984427,6003·832·4
    1985430,8004·037·4
    1986140·5
    1 Full figures for applications received are not available for the calendar years 1979 and 1986.
    Only about 2 per cent. of all planning permissions are given on appeal. Between 1983 and 1986 the proportion of planning applications refused by local planning authorities went up from 12·8 per cent. to 14·9 per cent.

    Clearance Areas (Compulsory Purchase)

    13.