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Written Answers

Volume 114: debated on Tuesday 7 April 1987

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Written Answers To Questions

Tuesday 7 April 1987

Environment

London Docklands Development Corporation

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment what percentage of the houses and flats built on land owned by the London Docklands Development Corporation which were sold between July and December 1986 were sold to persons on the housing waiting list of the London boroughs of Southwark, Tower Hamlets and Newham.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave to the hon. Member for Newham, North-West (Mr. Banks) on 1 April 1987, at column 553.

Commercial And Industrial Premises (Revaluation)

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment when he proposes to lay the order regarding the revaluation of commercial and industrial premises in England.

My right hon. Friend today laid the two orders needed to provide for a revaluation of non-domestic properties in England and Wales, to take effect in 1990. This will be the first such revaluation since 1973. It will generally assist businesses in those areas and sectors of the economy which have been most affected by the recession. They have been carrying an unfair share of the rates burden in recent years.The revaluation is timed to coincide with the introduction of the proposed uniform non-domestic rate poundage. This will remove the present distortions in non-domestic rates. The uniform rate will then increase no faster than the rate of inflation, giving businesses the benefit of stable and predictable rate burdens.

Research And Development

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment what is his Department's planned expenditure on research and development for 1987–88; and what are the main areas of research selected by his Department under the Rothschild principles of the customer-contractor relationship.

My Department plans to spend £51·4 million on research and development for 1987–88. All the Department's research and development is selected in accordance with the customer-contractor principle, as defined by Lord Rothschild in his report to the Government in 1971, with the exception of the "discretionary" programme of the director of the Building Research Establishment.The areas of research covered by the Department's research programme are; environmental protection, water, countryside, planning, local government, housing and building and construction.

Council House Sales

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment if he will list the number of council houses (a) sold and (b) built in Fenland district council and East Cambridgeshire district council in the last five years.

The reported sales of dwellings by the authorities and completions of dwellings for the authorities appear in the following issues of -Local Housing Statistics", which are available in the Library.

Sales of Council Dwellings
Financial yearsissue number
1981–8263
1982–8367
1983–8475
1984–85 and 1985–8679
Completions of New Dwellings
Calendar yearsissue number
1981, 1982, 198373
198477
198578

Ministerial Visits

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment if he will list his official visits throughout the United Kingdom during the month of March.

The information is as follows:

  • Friday 13 March—Swindon
  • Wednesday 18 March—Cleveland
  • Friday 20 March—Newton Abbot

Agricultural Land (Development)

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment what reply he has made to the request by the National Association of Local Councils to grant an extension of time for the consideration of his Department's circular on development involving agricultural land.

I shall send my hon. Friend a copy of my reply to the National Association of Local Councils' request. There has been very lull public discussion of the matter since the draft circular was published on 9 February and I see no reason to extend the usual two-month consultation period.

Redundant Hospital Sites

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment what is his policy for the future use of redundant hospital sites in the green belt.

In the next few years many older hospitals, especially those for the mentally ill or mentally handicapped, will no longer be needed. A number of these hospitals are located in the green belts. The Government have been considering how planning for the future of these redundant hospitals can best be handled having regard to green belt policy as set out in DOE circular 14/84.Local planning authorities are responsible for considering the future of individual sites. When it is known that particular sites are likely to become redundant, it will often be appropriate to bring forward policies or proposals for the future use of those sites when considering alterations to structure or local plans. Some planning authorities are already doing this. Because there are a number of sites in several areas my Department has prepared guidelines to assist local planning authorities in preparing policies for the sites and in dealing with any planning applications relating to them. I and my inspectors will have regard to the guidelines when dealing with any planning appeals or structure plan alterations which come to me for decision.Many of the sites share common characteristics. The original hospitals are often large groups of buildings and were typically built between 50 and 150 years ago. Many ancillary buildings for different purposes have been added since. The hospitals are often on the edges of built-up areas and stand in large open grounds.In planning for the future of these buildings and their sites the aim should be to use them for purposes compatible with the green belt as set out in circular 14/84, which can include institutional uses. The size, layout and form of the buildings may, however, make them unsuitable for such purposes. In such cases it will be necessary to consider whether, in the terms of the green belt circular, "very special circumstances" exist that would warrant the change of use of the buildings or the construction of new buildings.In some cases it may be possible to convert the existing buildings for housing or other uses, perhaps with some demolition of ancillary buildings. But if that is not a practical solution the future of the buildings and the site, and the possibility of redevelopment, will need to be carefully considered. Putting the sites to beneficial use will be preferable to allowing the buildings to remain empty and the site to become derelict. Those are special circumstances that may warrant a change of use or new development. Planning permission will be required if there is to be a change of use of the existing buildings or if new buildings are to be put up.Whatever the future use of the site it should be planned with careful regard to its contribution to the green belt and to the amenity of the area—for example, landscaped grounds and mature trees should be preserved and maintained and opportunities should be sought to open up parts of the site to public access.

Guidelines for the future use of redundant hospital sites in the Green Belt

  • i. Re-use of the existing buildings for purposes within the accepted green belt categories (as set out in DOE circular 14/84) is the preferred option, especially where the buildings are of architectural and historical importance. There may in particular be scope for re-use by institutions.
  • ii. However, if there is little or no prospect of viable re-use within those categories, other uses are preferable to allowing the buildings to remain empty or grossly underoccupied. The aim should be to achieve redevelopment for other suitable uses by conversion of the existing buildings.
  • iii. If the existing buildings, or part of them, are unsuitable for conversion, redevelopment should not normally occupy a larger area of the site nor exceed the height of the existing buildings. The location of the new buildings should be decided having regard to the main features of the landscape and the need to integrate the new development with its surroundings (for example it may be more appropriate to site new development closer to existing developent).
  • iv. The amenity value of the site should be retained or enhanced where practical by preserving mature trees and keeping or laying out landscaped areas, and if possible opening them to public access with adequate provision for their maintenance.
  • v. Redevelopment should not normally involve additional expenditure by the public sector on the provision of infrastructure (for example on roads and sewerage) nor should it overload local facilities such as schools and health care facilities.
  • vi. Local planning authorities should where appropriate include policies on these lines in their development plans.
  • Cash Limits

    asked the Secretary of State for the Environment whether he has any changes to announce to his Department's 1986–87 cash limits.

    The cash limit for local authorities' capital expenditure (DOE/LA1) has been increased by £0·5 million from £2,368·12 million to £2,368·62 million. This increase follows a transfer from the Department of Energy towards additional costs of the homes insulation scheme and a corresponding reduction in the cash limit for Class VI, Vote 2.

    Sports Grounds (Safety)

    asked the Secretary of State for the Environment (1) what alterations to the November 1985 building regulations have been made following the recommendations contained in paragraph 3.90 of the final report of Mr. Justice Popplewell into safety at sports grounds;(2) what guidance has been issued to local authorities, sporting bodies and other interested organisations regarding the criteria applied by the November 1985 building regulations to the construction of sports stands, including the materials which may be used; and if he will make a statement.

    [pursuant to his reply, 3 April 1987, c. 635]: The Building Regulations 1985 require buildings (which include covered sports stands) to be built so that the structure adequately resists the spread of fire and maintains its stability in fire for a reasonable period.The approved documents supporting the regulations give guidance on the measures that should be taken to achieve adequate fire resistance. Additional guidance is being incorporated into the approved documents as part of the current review of the technical requirements of the regulations, particularly to improve precautions in new single storey stands.Also the "Guide to Safety at Sports Grounds" (the green guide) issued by the Home Office in October 1986 advises that new stands should incorporate from the start comprehensive measures for safety including adequate structural resistance to fire, fire resisting separation from any spaces below or communicating with the stand, escape routes which are planned to keep people well clear of the smokey gases produced by a fire, a roof geometry which should restrict smoke and flame travel along the underside of the roof and internal finishes which have low flammability. In particular, the guide gives advice on the fire risk associated with the existence of voids under the seating in stands which should be excluded if practicable, or completely sealed off to stop litter accumulating in them.

    Copies of the guide were sent to local authorities, independent tire authorities, certified sports grounds and all major sporting organisations; and are available from Her Majesty's Stationery Office.

    Transport

    Road Accidents

    asked the Secretary of State for Transport if he will list the numbers of people killed in motor car accidents in each of the last five years; and if he will divide these figures according to whether the person killed was (a) a driver, (b) a passenger or (c) a pedestrian.

    Information for the years 1975 to 1985 is given in table 5 of "Road Accidents Great Britain (the Casualty Report) 1985." A copy is in the Library. Results for 1986 will not he available before May 1987.

    Fatalities in car accidents
    Car driversCar passengersPedestrians
    19851,2538081,258
    19841,2379421,310
    19831,1988211,362
    19821,4729711,217
    19811,3469411,265
    19801,3399391,272
    19791,4799501,374
    19781,5251,0441,600
    19771,4291,0121,492
    19761,4411,0791,561
    19751,4171,0271,550

    Thames Crossing

    asked the Secretary of State for Transport what study he has given to plans for a new vehicular crossing of the Thames in London between Chelsea and Putney.

    I have no such plans. Consultants carrying out the west London assessment study will be considering a wide range of possible options for dealing with problems in the area, which could include a new crossing, when they move on to stage 2 of the study later this year.

    North Circular Road

    asked the Secretary of State for Transport when he proposes to announce the result of the public inquiry completed in 1985 on the proposed widening of the north circular road between Popes Lane and the A40.

    My right hon. Friends the Secretaries of State for the Environment and for Transport are still considering the inspector's report. I cannot yet say when a decision will be announced.

    Roade (Bypass)

    asked the Secretary of State for Transport whether he has had any proposal from Northamptonshire county council for the construction of a bypass to Roade.

    A proposed bypass to Roade is included in Northamptonshire's 1987–88 transport policies and programme submission to the Department for construction after 1992.

    Light Dues

    asked the Secretary of State for Transport what is the total revenue received from light dues on shipping in the United Kingdom, and the cost to his Department of collection, in the latest year for which figures are available.

    The revenue in 1985–86 was £41,749,852. The costs of collection are not met by my Department but by the general lighthouse fund : in 1985–86 these costs were £203,874.

    Research And Development

    asked the Secretary of State for Transport what is his Department's planned expenditure on research and development for 1987–88; and what are the main areas of research selected by his Department under the Rothschild principles of the customer-contractor relationship.

    My Department plans to spend £29·803 million gross (£27·537 million net) on research and development in 1987–88. The main areas of research are highways, road and marine safety, land transport, prevention of marine pollution, and work on repayment for the Overseas Development Administration of the Foreign and Commonwealth Office. All research undertaken by my Department is commissioned under the Rothschild principles of the customer-contractor relationship.

    Official Visits

    asked the Secretary of State for Transport if he will list his official visits throughout the United Kingdom during the month of March.

    I made the following official visits in the United Kingdom during March 1987:

    2 March

    Launch of Eurotunnel publicity train at Paddington station,

    London.

    3 March

    Visit to British Caledonian at Gatwick airport.

    4 March

    Launch of new Highway Code at Coteford school, Pinner.

    13 March

    Visit to Kings Lynn to open new BR travel centre and tour Kings Lynn port.

    18 March

    Opening of M5/M42 southern extension, Bromsgrove (Hertfordshire).

    20 March

    Visit to Ashford, Kent at invitation of borough council to see Channel tunnel related development plans and mock-up of the Eurotunnel car shuttle train.

    27 March

    Visit to Sussex police headquarters at Lewes, to see traffic management systems and enforcement in operation.

    Coach Terminals (London)

    asked the Secretary of State for Transport, pursuant to his reply to the hon. Member for Westminster, North (Mr. Wheeler) 17 November, Official Report, columns 20–21, if he will make a further statement about the future of London coach terminals.

    On 17 November I announced that I was considering what could be an appropriate form of inquiry to enable the arguments for a single hub terminal compared with the merits of a number of smaller terminals to be properly aired in public. I understand that London Regional Transport is proposing to submit a planning application for a new coach terminal, to be developed at Paddington, in accordance with the report of its own transportation consultants.I have consulted my right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for the Environment, who is satisfied that the planning aspects of any proposed coach terminal development will involve issues of more than local importance, and that he should himself deal with any application made in this respect by LRT. He will therefore shortly issue a direction under section 35 of the Town and Country Planning Act 1971 to the Westminster city council, requiring the council to refer any such application to him. A public local inquiry will be held with appropriately wide terms of reference, which will allow the consideration of both single and multi-site solutions, at which interested persons may attend and give their views.The Government would wish to see the maximum possible private setor involvement in the financing and operation of any new coach terminal, or terminals, in London. No decision has yet been taken on the provision of public sector finance.

    Home Department

    Civil Servants

    asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will publish a table showing those black and Asian civil servants who hold the rank of executive officer and above (a) in the immigration services and (b) in the remainder of his Department.

    The information available relates to those members of the staff of the Department who responded to the recent surveys of ethnic origins. Of those respondents, in the immigration service grades (all of which are equivalent to executive officer or above) six were black and 15 were of Asian origin. Outiside the immigration service grades, the equivalent figures from these voluntary responses for staff at the rank of executive officer or above were 26 black and 42 Asian.

    Police Stations (Merseyside)

    asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will state the location of manned police stations (a) closed down and (b) opened, on Merseyside, since 1970.

    I understand from the chief constable that, since 1974 when the Merseyside police was formed, one new manned police station, at Copy lane, Bootle, has been opened. No police stations have been closed except for the purpose of replacement by a new station.

    Animals (Experiments)

    asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will list in the Official Report how many establishments are registered for the purposes of experiments of a non-medical nature using animals.

    There are some 450 establishments at which licensed experimentation involving animals is carried out. Our records do not distinguish between extablishments on the basis of the nature of the experimental work they carry out.

    Rescue Services (Working Group)

    asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) pursuant to the written answer of 10 March, Official Report, columns 122–23, if he will list the titles and grades of the Home Office representatives on the working group considering guidance on rescue services;(2) if he will list the titles and employing authorities of the local authority representatives on the working group considering guidance on rescue services;(3) if he will make a statement on the basis for choosing representatives to the working group considering guidance on rescue services from both the Home Office and local authorities.

    Membership of the working group comprises : the Co-ordinator of Volunteer Effort in Civil Defence (grade 5) (Chairman); the Home Office Civil Defence Adviser (grade 7); representatives at grade 7 and senior executive officer level from the Fire and Emergency Planning Department, a Regional Fire Adviser; a grade I Inspector of Fire Services; and local authority representatives comprising one nominee each from the Society of Local Authority Chief Executives, the County Emergency Planning Officers' Society and the Association of Civil Defence and Emergency Planning Officers. Members of the working group represent Home Office policy interests, and operational interests concerned with emergency planning.

    Research And Development

    asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what is his Department's planned expenditure on research and development for 1987–88; and what are the main areas of research selected by his Department under the Rothschild principles of the customer-contractor relationship.

    It is estimated that £16·4 million will be spent on research and development in 1987–88. The main areas of research to which the Rothschild principles apply are police services, fire prevention, civil defence, prisons, forensic science, telecommunications, criminal justice, community services, immigration and nationality, race relations and equal opportunities. Further details are given in the "Annual Review of Government Funded R & D", copies of which are in the Library.

    Citizenship

    asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether he has any plans to introduce a concessionary rate for those people above retirement age who are seeking to register for British citizenship; and if he will make a statement.

    No: such a concession would lead to the cost of the service being spread over fewer applicants and so to an increase in the fee.

    Financial Management Initiative

    asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether he will make a statement on the effect on his Department of' the financial management initiative.

    The financial management initiative forms part of the Government's continuing effort to improve the management of resources and obtain value for public money, and its effects are increasingly indistinguishable within those wider improvements. While much remains to be done, I believe that there has been a significant change of attitude and managements style within the Home Office, with much greater attention being paid to the costing of policies and functions and the setting of clear objectives and targets.Among the developments designed to strengthen accountable management in the Home Office in recent years have been : the establishment of the annual performance review, in which line managers and senior officials assess performance against previously declared objectives, and identify fresh objectives for the year ahead; the establishment of cost and responsibility centres around the office, to improve accountability in resource allocation; the provision of increased training in financial management; improved information about costs and output to provide a better basis for management and control; progress towards the introduction of clearer objectives and performance indicators in relation to local authority services and the greater use of accountants and other specialists.The head of the immigration and nationality department, and all prison regional directors and governors, have been allocated individual budgetary responsibility, and work is in hand to extend this principle to other parts of the Home Office. Some of these improvements are reflected in the targets and performance measures in the public expenditure White Paper (Cm. 56) and the evidence which the permanent secretary gave to the Public Expenditure Committee on 17 December 1986. Examples of better value for money in 1986–87 have been : the targets which were set and met for containing, and slightly reducing, in real terms the cost per inmate of operating prisons, and for reducing prison industry losses by over 20 per cent.; the targets for improvement in the procurement field which are forecast to result in savings of the order of £10 million; and the civilianisation of over 680 posts in police forces, permitting more effective deployment of police officers.

    Official Visits

    Brown asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will list his official visits throughout the United Kingdom during the month of March.

    March 4

    NUJ Conference on the future of broadcasting.

    Association of Chief Police Officers/International Police Exhibition and Conference launch.

    March 5

    Birmingham Chamber of Trade and Commerce.

    March 11

    Gaming Board.

    March 13

    Leicestershire Probation Service.

    March 18

    BIS Applied Systems.

    Royal College of Defence Studies.

    March 19

    South Yorkshire Police.

    March 23

    William Hill Organisation.

    March 25

    Overseas Women's Club.

    Tamils

    asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many of the original 64 Tamil refugees are currently in detention; if he will list the locations of the detainees and the number per centre, giving a breakdown by sex; and if he will list the dates and numbers of those given temporary admission.

    On 6 April, 32 of the 64 Sri Lankans who sought entry on arrival on 13 February were still detained in the following places:

    LocationMaleFemale
    Harmondsworth (10)19
    Foston Hall (12)12
    Latchmere House (10)10
    Temporary admission was authorised for 32 on the following dates:
    DateNumber
    13 February 19876
    13 March 19877
    20 March 198716
    24 March 19871
    31 March 19872

    Nuclear Disasters

    asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will call for a report from the chief constable of Cumbria as to, in the event of a civil nuclear disaster at Chapel cross (a) what evacuation time estimates have been prepared for the evacuation of the most populated 22½ deg sector from the power station out to (i) five miles, and (ii) 10 miles, (b) what time estimates have been prepared for the evacuation of the population within (i) five miles, and (ii) 10 miles of the power station, (c) what time estimates have been made for the evacuation of the population of Carlisle, (d) what time estimates have been made for the evacuation of high risk groups from Carlisle, (e) what time estimates have been made for the evacuation of low mobility groups from Carlisle, and (f) what time estimates have been made for the distribution of potassium iodate tablets to the population of Carlisle; and if he will arrange for the basis and calculation of any such time estimates to be placed in the Library.

    Metropolitan Police

    asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will place in the Library a copy of the Metropolitan police 1986 force strategic appraisal.

    I understand from the Commissioner of Police of the Metropolis that the force appraisal is one of a number of internal management documents prepared as the basis for discussion of future force strategy. It is not intended for publication.

    Maguire Case

    asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will call for a report from the Commissioner of Police of the Metropolis as to the conclusions of the internal Scotland Yard inquiry instigated last March by the present Commissioner designate of the Metropolitan police, Mr. Peter Imbert, into the Maguire case; and what part Mr. Imbert himself played in interrogations of those subsequently convicted for the Guildford and Woolwich pub bombings.

    I understand that there has been no formal internal inquiry by the Metropolitan police into the Maguire case. Following a meeting with Mr. Robert Kee in March last year,>Mr. Imbert asked one of his officers to examine case papers in advance of the publication of Mr. Kee's book. The Metropolitan police subsequently assisted our review of the case by responding to specific questions which we put to them : their responses are full reflected in the memorandum on the case which was placed in the Library on 20 January.Mr. Imbert, who was then a superintendent serving in the bomb squad, assisted in 1974 in the questioning of Carol Richardson, Paul Hill, Garard Conlon and Patrick Armstrong about the Woolwich pub bombing.

    Canine Faeces

    asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will make a statement on the pilot scheme to test the effectiveness of the byelaws relating to the removal of canine faeces.

    On 2 September 1985 new byelaws came into force in four local authority areas which made it an offence for a person in charge of a dog to fail to remove any faeces it might deposit in designated parks, recreation grounds and open spaces. The authorities were the London borough of Barking and Dagenham, Gosport borough council, North-West Leicestershire district council and Rochester-upon-Medway city council. Gosport and Rochester-upon-Medway also adopted similar new byelaws for footways and grass verges adjacent to the carriageways of highways. The four local authorities conducted a pilot scheme to test the effect of the new byelaws.We have placed in the Library a copy of a report prepared by a steering committee of officers from these authorities and Home Office officials which has been monitoring the scheme. The report concludes that, because the parks and other controlled areas are now much cleaner than before the scheme began, similar byelaws should now be offered as models for adoption by other local authorities in England and Wales. It is also clear from the report that the success of the scheme has depended on the willingness of the local authorities concerned to allocate the resources necessary for publicity, waste disposal and enforcement, and above all on the hard work they have all put into making the byelaws work.Taking account of the results of the pilot scheme we have now considered in greater depth whether to offer the new byelaws as models for adoption by other local authorities. In reaching our decision we have applied the tests of whether it is both reasonable and necessary to subject dog owners to these byelaws, whether such an obligation is capable of enforcement and whether if enforced it is likely to be unreasonably oppressive in its operation.Applying these tests we have concluded that the proposed new byelaws for parks, recreation grounds and open spaces should be made available to local authorities as model byelaws, provided there is somewhere else people can exercise their dogs without having to clear up after them. There is s strong case for allowing local authorities to apply these controls to such areas if they wish to do so. The alternative could, in rural areas, be local areas of countryside. We hope that before deciding which areas should be controlled local authorities will ensure that their proposals are well publicised in their localities and will where appropriate consult local organisations of dog owners and other residents. We would not approve the new byelaws for areas such as heaths and woodlands and areas used by horses and grazing animals, because it would be unreasonable to expect people to clear up after their dogs there. We are willing to allow the new byelaws for the whole of parks which are completely, or almost completely, used as children's play areas and sports grounds, even if they are not enclosed, and even though alternative areas do not exist.Different considerations however apply to the proposed new model byelaws for footways and grass verges. It would be an unreasonable burden on a dog owner to expect him on pain of prosecution to comply with the new byelaws whenever he took his dog out for a walk. We have also concluded that there would be grave difficulties associated with the enforcement of these new byelaws. We can also foresee the risk of serious disputes between dog owners and other users of footways and grass verges. We have therefore decided that we are not prepared to confirm further the new byelaws as in the pilot scheme in so far as they relate to footways and grass verges, but district and borough councils will continue to be able to adopt and enforce the existing model byelaws which make it an offence for a person in charge of a dog to permit it to foul such areas.Local authorities can do much by enforcing the revised byelaws for footpaths and applying the new byelaws to some parks and recreation areas. They can also promote campaigns to encourage dog owners to comply with the law. A number of local authorities have done so, and in the longer term public education of this kind is more effective than recourse to the criminal law. We are therefore issuing a circular to local authorities to draw their attention to the valuable experience gained from the pilot scheme and the criteria which will be applied in considering applications for the new and revised byelaws. We hope that this will assist councils to deal effectively with the fouling of public areas by dogs. We are also inviting the local authority associations to submit comments and suggestions relating to the details of the operation of the byelaws.

    We are grateful to the four local authorities which conducted the pilot scheme for making this action possible.

    Immigration

    asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what plans he has to introduce selective immigration controls on embarkation; and if he will make a statement.

    In the context of our membership of the European Communities I have decided that we can introduce simpler and more rapid procedures for the control by immigration officers of passengers leaving the country without impairing the overall effectiveness of immigration control. Arrangements will shortly be introduced for the selective control on the embarkation of British and other EC nationals. Arrangements will be made to ensure that immigration officers continue to assist in the identification of wards of court and others whom the police and other agencies wish to identify. I have no plans to introduce selective embarkation controls for other nationals or to introduce selective immigration controls for any passengers seeking to enter this country.

    Duchy Of Lancaster

    Official Visits

    asked the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster if he will list his official visits throughout the United Kingdom during the month of March.

    My sole official visit in March, excluding my constituency engagements and engagements as chairman of the Conservative party, was to address the annual lunch of the Central and West Lancashire chamber of commerce on 10 March in Blackpool.

    Energy

    Research And Development

    asked the Secretary of State for Energy what is his Department's planned expenditure on research and development for 1987–88; and what are the main areas of research selected by his Department under the Rothschild principles of the customer-contractor relationship.

    The Department plans to spend £217 million on R and D and related work in 1987–88. Details are set out in the Supply Estimates (Class VI, Vote 2, sections C1 and D1).The Department has no in-house R and D facilities. It operates on a customer-contractor basis as far as that is possible on all the work that it funds.

    Financial Management Initiative

    asked the Secretary of State for Energy whether he will make a statement on the effect on his Department of the financial management initiative.

    My Department has implemented a range of measures to improve management and value for money.Budgets for programme expenditure on research and development and industrial support, totalling some £250 million in 1987–88, have been fully devolved to managers in divisions, and line managers have also been given devolved responsibility for elements of administrative expenditure.The Department's management information systems have been developed and refined to assist the top management in its annual review of divisions' objectives, priorities and resources.Targets and output measures are being progressively developed, wherever possible; for example the Department has achieved a target of securing a 50 per cent. contribution by non-Government participants in funding offshore safety R and D; and the Energy Efficiency Office has a target to achieve energy savings of 3 million tonnes of coal equivalent by June 1988 through the energy efficiency demonstration scheme.Initiatives taken in the Department to improve management and efficiency has resulted in important savings; for example, accommodation costs have been reduced by nearly £1 million since 1984–85, and savings amounting to over £0·5 million were secured in the first nine months of 1986–87 on the Department's purchasing of goods and services. Departmental manpower has been reduced by some 20 per cent. since April 1979.

    Dungeness A Power Station (Geological Fault)

    asked the Secretary of State for Energy when he expects the investigations by the Central Electricity Generating Board, into the geological fault discovered near Dungeness A power station, to be complete.

    The CEGB has advised me that at present there is no evidence of any threat to the continued operation of either the A or B stations as a result of the geological fault. Further investigations of the site are being undertaken, and the CEGB hopes to complete the work this summer. I am advised that it is likely to take up to six months to complete the analysis.

    Official Visits

    asked the Secretary of State for Energy if he will list his official visits throughout the United Kingdom during the month of March.

    Oil And Pipelines Agency

    asked the Secretary of State for Energy if the Oil and Pipelines Agency has published its first year's accounts; and if he will make a statement.

    The agency submitted its first report and accounts to me today. These cover the 13 months ended 31 December 1986. I have laid copies before both Houses.The accounts show that the agency had a successful first 13 months operations, in which it made an operating profit of just over £6 million. The agency also substantially completed its duty under the Oil and Pipelines Act 1985 to realise the surplus net assets which it inherited from the British National Oil Corporation. Details are given in the notes to the accounts. As shown there, I have determined, with the approval of the Treasury. that the agency should retain an amount of £2,380,000 as its initial capital. This is £380,000 more than the figure shown in the public expenditure White Paper published in January (Cm. 56-II, page 407). This increase was agreed following discussions with the agency during preparation of its accounts, and reflects the need to treat as a capital item the costs which the agency incurred in establishing itself in smaller offices.

    Education And Science

    Medical Research

    59.

    asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science what is the total amount of public money devoted to medical research since 1979.

    The information is as follows:

    Financial year£ million
    1979–8091·8
    1980–81108·1
    1981–82143·7
    1982–83151·6
    1983–84159·3
    1984–85162·6
    1985–86169·2
    1986–87176·4
    The figures shown for the years 1979–80 and 1980–81 are on a different basis from those shown for later years. Before 1981–82 figures exclude the Health Department's commissioning funds for biomedical research because these figures cannot be identified separately. In 1981–82 these funds were transferred to the Medical Research Council and are included in that year and the subsequent years shown.The figures include the Medical Research Council's grant-in-aid and expenditure on medical research by the DHSS and the Scottish Home and Health Department.Expenditure on medical research in universities and medical schools is excluded. Information about such expenditure is not collected.

    Gcse

    asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science what representations he has received from the NAS/UWT on the GCSE examination; if he has any plans to alter the funding that has been made available by the Government to local education authorities for this examination; and if he will make a statement.

    Discussions were held with NAS/UWT in March as part of the Government's early monitoring of GCSE resourcing. The NAS/UWT's representations were based on a sample survey conducted in the early weeks of GCSE courses. For 1987–88 the Government have made further substantial provision for the GCSE, as detailed in my right hon. Friend's reply of 31 March, at column 447 to my hon. Friend the Member for Erith and Crayford (Mr. Evennett). We will continue to monitor the needs of the GCSE and to make appropriate provision.

    asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science what representations he has received from local education authorities about late arrival of materials necessary for the teaching of GCSE in schools.

    A small number of local education authorities earlier reported difficulties in taking up their 1986–87 education support grant allocations for GCSE books and equipment, but current indications are that these allocations have been fully taken up before the close of the financial year.

    asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science what percentage of schools in England have now received all necessary materials for the teaching of the GCSE.

    Her Majesty's Inspectorate has reported that, on average, the material resources available in schools are sufficient at this stage. There is concern, however, about the disparity of resources between individual schools. The Government's planned provision for £115 million expenditure on GCSE in 1987–88 will enable local education authorities to meet in full their assessment of further GCSE needs of schools in that year.

    Teachers (Statistics)

    asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science what is his Department's estimate of the number of qualified teachers in (a) all subjects and (b) science and technology subjects who are presently not employed but are of employable age.

    Information is held by the Department on qualified teachers in England and Wales who are not in teaching posts. However, it does not distinguish those who are not employed from those who are in non-teaching employment. The latest date for which information is readily available in 1984. There were then some 400,000 qualified teachers aged under 60 who were recorded as being out of teaching service: 150,000 graduates and 250,000 non-graduates. Information on subjects of teachers' qualifications is not recorded for non-graduates. The majority of out-of-service teachers with qualifications in craft, design and technology of engineering would be likely to come into this category. Among the 150,000 graduates were 87,000 whose last service had been in secondary schools or establishments of further education and 18,000 of those had a science of technology subject recorded as the main specialism in their degree.

    Women Graduates

    asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science what financial help is available to women science and technology graduates wishing to return to work.

    Graduates who wish to train as teachers will be eligible for mandatory awards for study leading to the post-graduate certificate of education from local education authorities. If they study to become secondary mathematics, physics or technology teachers, they will attract a £1,250 tax-free national bursary in addition to the award.Discretionary and postgraduate training awards for other courses may be available from LEA's or research councils respectively.

    asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science what courses sponsored by his Department are provided to re-equip women science and technology graduates to return to work after leaving to start a family.

    The Government have made available £6·4 million to higher education for specially designed courses to increase the supply of teachers in shortage subjects, including physics and craft, design and technology.These courses are open equally to men and women graduates. Some have been specially designed to include part-time study and distance learning with women graduates returning to teaching after starting a family in mind.

    asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science if he will take steps to attract women science and technology graduates back into teaching after they have left the profession to start a family.

    We are trying hard to attract women science and technology graduates back to teaching. Expenditure on updating courses will qualify for grant under the new in-service training scheme. New forms of training are being designed which will allow part-time and distance learning study which should be especially helpful for women. Discussions with local authorities about more flexible employment practices are taking place.The Government are involved in a number of publicity initiatives, and the new teaching as a career unit will encourage women teachers to return to the profession.

    St Mary's Parish Church School, Stockport

    asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science if he will give his reasons for agreeing to the closure of St. Mary's parish church school, Stockport.

    My right hon. Friend agreed with the educational and financial case for the school's closure put forward by Stockport education authority.

    Research And Development

    asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science what is his Department's planned expenditure on research and development for 1987–88; and what are the main areas of research selected by his Department under the Rothschild principles of the customer-contractor relationship.

    The Department's expenditure through the science budget, which funds the research councils, is planned to be £675 million in 1987–88. It is estimated that a further £710 million will be spent in 1987–88 on research in universities from UGC grants and tuition fee income. In addition, the Department has a small budget — £13 million in 1987–88—from which it commissions research into educational matters.

    Official Visits

    asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science if he will list his official visits throughout the United Kingdom during the month of March.

    Tuesday 10 March:

    Workbase Adult Literary Initiative Polygram Operations Limited, Walthamstow

    Friday 13 March:

    The Royal Observatory, Edinburgh

    Wednesday 18 March:

    Manchester Business school

    Monday 23 March:

    Wells Cathedral school

    Wednesday 25 March:

    Visit to Durham LEA

    Friday 27 March:

    BP research centre, Sunbury-on-Thames

    Monday 30 March:

    Visit to Kent LEA

    Teachers (Special Qualifications)

    asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science what information is available to his Department on the numbers of teachers in each local education authority with special qualifications relevant to the teaching of pupils with statements under the Education Act 1981, other than teachers employed full-time in special schools; if he will publish what information is available for the last year; and if he will make a statement.

    [pursuant to his reply, 2 April 1987, c. 579–82]: The printed table gave incorrect figures for Somerset and omitted the authorities of Staffordshire, Suffolk, Surrey, Warwickshire, West Sussex and Wiltshire.Pursuant to my reply of 23 March, column

    32, individual teachers' records held by this Department for pension purposes include information on some special qualifications for teaching children with handicaps. Not all of the qualifications covered carry a salary benefit so there may be some under-recording. The latest available information is for 31 March 1985 and is given for each local education authority in England.

    Full-time teachers with special qualifications for leaching children with handicaps

    England: maintained nursery, primary and secondary schools 31 March 1985 (provisional)

    Teaching in

    Special classes

    Other classes

    Total

    Barking437
    Barnet5914
    Bexley8311
    Brent459
    Bromley10313
    Croydon5611
    Ealing6511
    Enfield235
    Haringey2810
    Harrow7411
    Havering369
    Hillingdon2911
    Hounslow448
    Kingston303
    Merton112
    Newham224
    Redbridge347
    Richmond033
    Sutton134
    Waltham Forest044
    ILEA1896114
    Birmingham133346
    Coventry71623

    Teaching in

    Special classes

    Other classes

    Total

    Dudley6511
    Sandwell71118
    Solihull7714
    Walsall6814
    Wolverhampton161329
    Knowsley358
    Liverpool33336
    St. Helens41216
    Sefton31114
    Wirral21012
    Bolton055
    Bury4711
    Manchester066
    Oldham055
    Rochdale7815
    Salford5510
    Stockport7411
    Tameside347
    Trafford527
    Wigan257
    Barnsley5712
    Doncaster4913
    Rotherham7411
    Sheffield132134
    Bradford6915
    Calderdale088
    Kirklees9817
    Leeds02020
    Wakefield033
    Gateshead21113
    Newcastle62430
    North Tyneside4610
    South Tyneside4913
    Sunderland7411
    Isles of Scilly000
    Avon65965
    Bedfordshire32326
    Berkshire132235
    Buckinghamshire12425
    Cambridgeshire33639
    Cheshire331649
    Cleveland12728
    Cornwall161329
    Cumbria14519
    Derbyshire273562
    Devon53540
    Dorset9918
    Durham41923
    East Sussex102535
    Essex262551
    Gloucestershire42933
    Hampshire163652
    Hereford and Worcester182341
    Hertfordshire101121
    Humberside273764
    Isle of Wight336
    Kent123951
    Lancashire242751
    Leicestershire313768
    Lincolnshire161632
    Norfolk121325
    North Yorkshire92332
    Northamptonshire201636
    Northumberland81018
    Nottinghamshire152338
    Oxfordshire91322
    Shropshire5914
    Somerset151732
    Staffordshire181735
    Suffolk101929
    Surrey251944
    Warwickshire101323
    West Sussex71623
    Wiltshire41418

    Wales

    Marginal Land

    asked the Secretary of State for Wales how many farmers on Anglesey have applied for reconsideration of marginal land status; how many decisions have now been made; how many decisions have allowed an increase in marginal land; on what grounds applications have been refused; and if he will make a statement.

    The position on representations and decisions concerning farmers on Anglesey is as follows:

    Number
    Number of representations against exclusion from the less favoured area314
    Number of decisions made and conveyed to the farmer119
    Number of representations accepted for inclusion in United Kingdom case to European Commission provided that economic and demographic tests are satisfactory:10
    Number of representations rejected on:
    (a) non contiguity grounds46
    (b) land quality grounds48
    (c) lack of defensible boundary grounds15

    asked the Secretary of State for Wales if he will set out the various extra grants and advantages available to farmers who have marginal land; and how many of these involve funding by (a) his Department and (b) the European Commission.

    Hill livestock compensatory allowances (HLCAs) are payable to specialist beef and sheep farmers within the less favoured area. LFA sheep farmers eligible for the sheep annual premium (SAP) also benefit from advance part-payments of that premium. The European Commission funds approximately 25 per cent. of HLCA expenditure and 100 per cent. of SAP expenditure.LFA farmers are eligible for higher rates of grant on certain capital investments. Such grants have been provided under the agriculture and horticulture grant scheme and two European schemes (the farm and horticulture development scheme and the agriculture and horticulture development scheme). The European schemes attract 25 per cent. funding from the European Commission. The agriculture improvement scheme has now replaced the earlier schemes. With some exceptions, it also offers higher rates of grant in the LFA. LFA farmers are also able to benefit from grant assistance towards the provision and development of on-farm tourism and craft facilities. The European element of this scheme is funded by the European Commission at the rate of 25 per cent., except for the young farmer supplement where the rate is 50 per cent.The agriculture and horticultural co-operation scheme 1985 offers forage co-operatives in the LFA grant of 25 per cent. towards the cost of forage machinery and 15 per cent. towards the cost of tractors. This scheme is totally funded by the United Kingdom Government.Dairy farmers in the LFA receive a concession on the co-responsibility levy on milk. In 1986, non-LFA producers paid 2 per cent. of the target price, 0·364p per litre, whilst LFA producers paid 1·5 per cent. of the target price, 0·273p per litre, on the first 60,000 kg of milk.

    asked the Secretary of State for Wales by whom the requirements as to boundaries of marginal land have been laid down; what representations he has made to the European Commission about such boundaries; whether grants presently available to farmers are payable on the basis of (a) farm boundaries or (b) any other features of delineation; and if he will make a statement.

    For land to be granted less favoured area status it must meet physical, economic and demographic criteria laid down by the European Commission. Each member state has discretion to set its own requirements in the determination of the boundary of land meeting these criteria. In the United Kingdom Ministers have decided that to facilitate administration, the LFA boundary shall normally be defined by hard natural or man-made physical features in the landscape. Thus the LFA boundary may encompass whole farms or part farms. In the latter case, the extra financial assistance associated with LFA status is payable on that part of the farm falling within the boundary.

    asked the Secretary of State for Wales if all farms in respect of which applications have been made for redesignation of marginal land have been or will be visited by his officials.

    Following the enlargement of the less favoured area in 1984, it was announced that farmers could make representations against exclusion but only with regard to land immediately adjacent to the existing LFA boundary or pockets of non-adjacent land extending to at least 1,200 hectares in size. All land subject to representations and falling within either category has been or will be inspected by my officials.

    asked the Secretary of State for Wales by what amount marginal land may be increased in Wales, as a percentage of the total, under European Community directives; if he will identify the European Community directives; what representations he has made to the European Commission about any increase in this percentage; what are the financial implications for his Department; and if he will make a statement.

    There are no restrictions under EC directives concerning a limit by which the LFA in Wales may he extended, and, consequently, no representations to the European Commission on this subject have been necessary. The financial implications of any extension to the LFA cannot be assessed until the current representations exercise is completed.

    National Art Collections

    asked the Secretary of State for Wales what specific undertakings he has received from the Court of Governors and Council that adequate manpower resources and operating funds will in future be provided by those bodies to ensure that the Welsh national art collections are curated and conserved to the professional standards observed by other national museums funded by British taxpayers; and whether he will place a set of the relevant documents in the Library.

    In the context of the proposals for the extension and upgrading of the Cathays park building announced by my right hon. Friend the Secretary of State last December, discussions are taking place between the museum authorities and the Welsh Office about the staffing and other needs of the art department to establish what provision is needed for the care and display of the art collection. In the meantime action has already been taken to improve the management of the art department and conservation facilities.

    National Museum Of Wales (Japanese Exhibition)

    asked the Secretary of State for Wales what proportion of the £200,000 fee payable for the exhibition of masterpieces from the national museum of Wales at present touring Japan is intended to meet the museum's costs in preparing for the exhibition and undertaking the necessary research and work in preparation of photographs and catalogue material; and if he will place a set of detailed accounts in the Library.

    About half the receipts represent a contribution towards the costs incurred by the museum, including estimated apportioned costs of the time of museum staff for which detailed accounts are not kept. The museum's annual accounts are placed in the Library of the House.

    Nhs (Manpower Steering Group)

    asked the Secretary of State for Wales if he is now in a position to report on the findings of the Health Service manpower steering group; what manpower supply problems have been brought to the group's attention; and what recommendations and results have ensued.

    The manpower steering group (MSG) was set up last year as a sub-committee of the executive committee of the Health Policy Board. Its establishment and terms of reference were announced in circular WHC(86)8, a copy of which I have placed in the Library of the House. MSG has given early attention to the development of a comprehensive manpower strategy for the NHS in Wales. This will be published shortly. The group is also giving consideration to issues of manpower supply in a variety of staff, groups including medical, nursing, finance and the therapies. This work has only just begun, and it is too early to say when recommendations will be made to the executive committee.

    Potato Industry

    asked the Secretary of State for Wales if he is satisfied with the state of the potato industry in Wales; and if he will make a statement.

    Yes. If market prices are depressed, I believe that support arrangements will provide growers with a reasonable level of fall-back support.

    Trade And Industry

    Ecgd (Computers)

    asked the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry if he will give details of the costs of the Export Credits Guarantee Department's computerisation programme and anticipated future developments.

    The costs of the Export Credits Guarantee Department's computerisation operations and developments were £4,952,000 in 1986–87 and are estimated to be £6,628,000 in 1987–88. These figures include staff, operation and full capital costs.

    Japan

    asked the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry whether, in view of Japan's trading practices, the Government will give their support to the European Community Commission proposal for a Council regulation amending Regulation (EEC) No. 217684 on protection against dumped or subsidised imports from countries not members of the European Economic Community.

    I have nothing to add to my reply on this subject to the hon. Member on 17 February 1987 at column 523.

    Homelocators (Uk) Ltd

    asked the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry, if the Director General of Fair Trading now has sufficient evidence to seek an assurance under Part III of the Fair Trading Act 1973 from the national directors of Homelocators (UK) Ltd., Mr. Dank and Mr. Jones, and from their associate franchise holders; and if he will make a statement.

    This is a matter for the Director General of Fair Trading, and I will ask him to write to the hon. Member direct.

    Research And Development

    asked the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry what is his Department's planned expenditure on research and development for 1987–88; and what are the main areas of research selected by his Department under the Rothschild principles of the customer-contractor relationship.

    My Department plans to spend £415 million in support of research and development in 1987–88.Of this total, £44 million is for the running of the Department's four research establishments, the National Physical Laboratory, the National Engineering Laboratory, the Laboratory of the Government Chemist and the Warren Spring Laboratory, where the customer-contractor principle helps to direct work undertaken on a number of industrially relevant subjects.The remainder of the Department's expenditure will support R and D across a range of industrial sectors with the largest shares being accounted for by information technology and advanced electronics and aerospace.

    Financial Management Initiative

    asked the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry whether he will make a statement on the effect on his Department of the financial management initiative.

    The Department has introduced a large number of reforms aimed at increasing efficiency and achieving better value for money since the FMI was launched in 1982. In the early stages the reforms could be clearly attributed to the FMI, but with the passage of time, and consistent with the main thrust of the FMI, its effects have become increasingly indistinguishable from the Department's improvements in management and value for money generally.The Department has achieved a more structured approach to decision taking through the annual activity and resource management review, greater attention to evaluation and the widespread adoption of work programmes, objectives and targets which are approved by DTI Ministers. Greater and better management awareness of costs has been secured by the establishment of responsibility cost centres, deputy secretary running cost budgets, the provision of management information systems, more comprehensive training, and the introduction of performance measures where practicable.

    Austin Rover (Information Exchange)

    asked the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry pursuant to his reply of 30 March, Official Report column 358, what guidance was given by his Department between December 1985 and February 1986 to Austin Rover about exchanging information with the Ford Motor Company.

    As I informed the hon. Member in my answer on 30 March, at column 358, Ford and the Rover Group Board agreed to open exploratory talks in December 1985. My Department was kept informed in broad terms of progress in these talks, but the specific information exchanged was a matter for the judgment of the commercial parties.

    Strategic Mineral Stockpile

    asked the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry what further disposals from the strategic mineral stockpile will be effected during 1987–88; and on what basis the sales will take place.

    Plans are being made for the disposal in 1987–88 of about one quarter of the present contents of the strategic mineral stockpile.The material will be offered for sale on a competitive tender basis, in the first instance to those companies for which the material was purchased. No price preference will be given. Disposals will continue to take place in a manner which seeks to avoid undue disruption of the market.

    Official Visits

    Brown asked the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry if he will list his official visits throughout the United Kingdom during the month of March.

    On Saturday, 14 March I visited Worcester. On Monday, 16 March I visited Brough, Hull and Scunthorpe.

    Foreign And Commonwealth Affairs

    Soviet Jews

    asked the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs if he will give his estimate of the numbers of Soviet Jews who were allowed to emigrate from the Soviet Union during the month of March.

    Four hundred and seventy. This is the highest monthly total for some years. We hope this encouraging trend will continue.

    Official Visits

    asked the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs if he will list his official visits throughout the United Kingdom during the month of March.

    I had no official engagements outside London during March, apart from official visits overseas.Other Foreign and Commonwealth Ministers had the following engagements outside London during March:

    • Mr. Renton addressed the World Veterans Federation conference in Brighton on 9 March.
    • Mrs. Chalker attended a briefing lunch for businessmen on the EC internal market at a Heathrow hotel on 2 March.
    • Lady Young spoke at King's school, Canterbury on 4 March.

    Prime Minister

    Crown Estate Commissioners

    Q138.

    asked the Prime Minister if she has any plans to alter the existing ministerial responsibilities for the Crown Estate Commissioners; and if she will make a statement.

    Engagements

    asked the Prime Minister if she will list her offical engagements for Tuesday 7 April.

    asked the Prime Minister if she will list her offical engagements for Tuesday 7 April.

    asked the Prime Minister if she will list her offical engagements for Tuesday 7 April.

    asked the Prime Minister if she will list her offical engagements for Tuesday 7 April.

    asked the Prime Minister if she will list her offical engagements for Tuesday 7 April.

    asked the Prime Minister if she will list her offical engagements for Tuesday 7 April.

    asked the Prime Minister if she will list her offical engagements for Tuesday 7 April.

    This morning I had meetings with ministerial colleagues and others. In addition to my duties in this House, I shall be having further meetings later today. This evening I am attending a dinner to mark the 30th anniversay of the Institute of Economic Affairs.

    Official Visits

    asked the Prime Minister if she will list her offical visits throughout the United Kingdom during the month of March.

    Nuclear Weapons (Modernisation)

    asked the Prime Minister what is her policy towards the modernisation of British nuclear weapons in the light of the study by the Bradford School of Peace Studies, a copy of which has been sent to her.

    I have nothing to add to the reply I gave the hon. Member for Newport, East (Mr. Hughes) on 24 March, at column 162

    Employment

    Apprenticeships

    asked the Paymaster General if he will list the numbers (a) entering apprenticeships (b) in apprenticeships and (c) completing apprenticeships in each of the industries for which industrial training boards have operated in each year since 1964.

    asked the Paymaster General what was the level of Exchequer support for apprenticeships at current and constant prices in each of the years from 1964 to 1985.

    Information is not available for the financial years 1964–65 to 1974–75. Between 1975–76 and 1982–83, support was provided in the form of premium grants for first year apprentices and grants for award holders, as well as support for redundant apprentices and unplaced award holders, as follows:

    YearAt cash priceAt constant price (1985–86 base)1
    £ million£ million
    1975–7618·951·0
    1976–7736·085·7
    1977–7838·981·4
    1978–7937·871·5
    1979–8024·038·8
    1980–8133·245·3
    1981–8236·044·7
    1982–83238·744·8
    1 Prices adjusted by the GDP Deflator
    2 For financial years 1983–84 and 1984–85, expenditure covering residual payments for apprentice training under these schemes which commenced prior to September 1983, and continued support for redundant apprentices, was as follows:
    YearAt cash priceAt constant price (1985–86 base)
    £ million £ million
    1983–8420·322·5
    1984–853·23·4
    Since September 1983 substantial support for long duration training including apprenticeships has been provided through the youth training scheme. It is not possible to identify the direct level of Exchequer support on a comparable basis with the table.

    Labour Statistics

    asked the Paymaster General what are the month-by-month unemployment figures for the constituency of Gainsborough and Horncastle since June 1983; and if he will state for each figure what percentage this represents of the work force of the Gainsborough and Horncastle constituency.

    The following information is in the Library. The table gives the number of unemployed claimants in the Gainsborough and Horncastle parliamentary constituency between June 1983 and February 1987. This comparison is affected by changes in the method of collection and compilation of the data. Equivalent estimates of the work force are not available.

    Unemployed claimants in Gainsborough and Horncastle Parliamentary Constituency
    Number
    June 19833,597
    July3,573
    August3,397
    September3,593
    October3,479
    November3,551
    December3,603
    January 19843,775
    February3,810
    March3,749
    April3,690
    May3,632
    June3,534
    July3,722
    August3,731
    September3,875
    October3,729
    November3,820
    December3,846
    January 19854,065
    February4,105
    March3,964
    April3,980
    May3,918
    June3,846
    July3,947
    August3,871
    September3,946
    October3,852
    November4,014
    December4,152
    January 19864,358
    February4,369
    March4,252
    April4,172
    May4,197
    June4,175
    July4,276
    August4,113
    September4,182
    October3,964
    November4,028
    December4,018
    January 19874,233
    February4,260

    asked the Paymaster General what are the month by month unemployment figures for the town of Gainsborough since June 1983; and if he will state for each figure what percentage this represents of Gainsborough's work force.

    The following information is in the Library. The table shows the number of unemployed claimants in the wards of Gainsborough, East, Gainsborough, North and Gainsborough, South-West from June 1983 to February 1987. This comparison is affected by changes in the method of collection and compilation of the data. Equivalent estimates of the work force are not available.

    Unemployed claimants in Gainsborough
    Number
    June 19831,282
    July1,285
    August1,182
    September1,253
    October1,253
    November1,278
    December1,298
    January 19841,352
    February1,359
    March1,340
    April1,333
    May1,304
    June1,260
    July1,306
    August1,310
    September1,350
    October1,321
    November1,347
    December1,349
    January 19851,399
    February1,372
    March1,346
    April1,340
    May1,319
    June1,296
    July1,284
    August1,248
    September1,289
    October1,363
    November1,406
    December1,456
    January 19861,499
    February1,472
    March1,442
    April1,393
    May1,420
    June1,401
    July1,391
    August1,340
    September1,359
    October1,412
    November1,437
    December1,431
    January 19871,493
    February1,465

    asked the Paymaster General if he will show from the 1986 labour force survey the number of people in Great Britain who are economically active and (a) in employment, (b) unemployed and (c) others on Government training schemes, broken down (i) by ethnic origin and (ii) by age in five-year age bands and the comparable figures from the 1984 and 1985 labour force surveys.

    Preliminary labour force survey results for the spring of 1986, together with comparable estimates from the 1984 and 1985 surveys, on the employment status of the economically active by ethnic origin and age are shown in the following table:

    Economically active persons in Great Britain—employment status, ethnic origin and age (thousands)
    Ethnic originEconomically activeIn Employment4Unemployed
    Employees and self employedOn Government employment and training schemes
    19841
    White24,89521,9482952,652
    Non-White1,04281216213
    Of which:
    West Indian/Guyanese293217567
    Indian371311556
    Pakistani/Bangladeshi12883544
    Other249202546
    All Ethnic Origins326,30423,0723152,916
    Age
    16–192,4321,690227515
    20–243,5412,90334604
    25–293,0042,34212390
    30–342,8382,53210296
    35–393,2773,0025267
    40–442,7242,5025216
    45–492,5342,3555174
    50–542,3492,1825162
    55–591,9911,8165171
    60–641,2051,104598
    65–69237222515
    70 and over17116355
    All Ages26,30423,0723152,916
    19851
    White25,25722,3023732,582
    Non-White1,01379218203
    Of which:
    West Indian/Guyanese2992271062
    Indian304248552
    Pakistani/Bangladeshi13795542
    Other272223546
    All Ethnic Origins126,53323,3433962,814
    Age
    16–192,4401,685290464
    20–243,6433,03341568
    25–293,1162,71317387
    30–342,8452,54110294
    35–393,3423,0625274
    40–442,8092,6025202
    45–492,5732,3695197
    50–542,2982,1305161
    55–591,9861,8205157
    60–641,084999583
    65–69245228518
    70 and over17116255
    All Ages26,53323,3433962,814
    19861
    White25,30822,3453772,585
    Non-White1,07184117213
    Of which:
    West Indian/Guyanese283214561
    Indian352289561
    Pakistani/Bangladeshi13997540
    Other297241552
    All Ethnic Origins326,65723,3413992,827
    Age
    16–192,4091,674264471
    20–243,6653,02462579
    25–293,2212,78720414
    30–342,8982,59011297
    35–393,3293,04812268
    40–442,9282,7155205
    45–492,5592,3745180
    50–542,2792,1145160
    55–591,9451,7865151
    60–641,041956580

    Ethnic origin

    Economically active

    In Employment

    4Unemployed

    Employees and self employed

    On Government employment and training schemes

    65–69232216

    5

    17
    70 and over151147

    5

    5

    All Ages26,65723,3413992,827

    1 Estimates relate to the spring of each year and to resdient in private households.

    2 Preliminary results.

    3 Includes those who did not state their ethnic origin.

    4 Those persons without a job who were looking for work in the survey reference week or prevented from seeking work by temporary sickness or holiday, or who were waiting for the results of a job application or waiting to start a job they had already obtained.

    5 Less than ten thousand.

    asked the Paymaster General if he will provide a breakdown of the latest national unemployment figures according to standard under 18, 18 to 24, 25 to 44, and 45 years plus age groupings, by the standard under 26, 26 to 52, 52 to 104, 104 to 156, 156 to 208, 208 to 260, and 260 plus weeks duration of unemployment groupings as a total, and by sex; and how these figures compare to those of 11 April 1985.

    Unemployment analysed by age and duration for the United Kingdom is published in table 2.6 of the Employment Gazette, a copy of which is in the Library. The most recent data relate to 8 January 1987, which are published on page S25 of the March 1987 Gazette. Figures for 11 April 1985 on page S31 of the June 1985 Gazette.

    asked the Paymaster General (1) if he will list, for each year of the age range 16 to 25, the number and proportion of those in school, work, further education, higher education, community programmes, or other specified schemes;

    Spring 1986
    Thousands
    Less than a week1 week but less than 44 weeks but less than 1212 weeks but less than 2626 weeks but less than 52Total
    Manufacturing11729412647260
    Services4629817771171988
    Other55111124108
    Not specified1111113
    Total6351382301092581,370
    1 Cell size less than 10,000.
    Equivalent figures on expenditure are not currently available.The Manpower Services Commission's study of funding of vocational and education and training should provide more information on training expenditure, both public and private, in all industry sectors. This study is due to report in spring 1988.

    Vocational Qualifications (Jts)

    asked the Paymaster General what steps he has taken to make available recognised vocational qualifications for those on the job training scheme.

    (2) what was the number and percentage rate of unemployment among 16 and 17-year-olds (a) nationally, (b) by ethnic origin, (c) by region and (d) by sex at the latest available date and for September, January and June in each of the past five years.

    asked the Paymaster General if he will estimate the numbers of people receiving training for less than a week, 1 to 4 weeks, 4 to 12 weeks, 12 to 26 weeks, and 26 to 52 weeks, in each of the industries in the standard industrial classification; and what is his estimate of training expenditures, private and public, on training in each of those industries.

    Preliminary results from the 1986 "Labour Force Survey", which are not separately available by public and private sector, indicate that the following people in employment were receiving job-related training lasting up to a year in the four weeks before the survey interview.

    Managing agents are required to ensure that every trainee entering new JTS has the opportunity to gain a recognised vocational qualification or credits towards one.

    Professionally Qualified Women

    asked the Paymaster General what is his Department's estimate of the number of professionally qualified women who are not presently working and who could potentially be attracted back into work.

    Preliminary labour force survey results for the spring of 1986 estimate that 184,000 women of working age (ie 16 to 59) with a degree or equivalent qualification were either unemployed or economically inactive in Great Britain.

    asked the Paymaster General, if he will estimate, for the latest available date the total known annual amount of income received by individuals; of this, how much is paid (a) in wages and salaries to employees, (b) through other forms of remuneration deriving from employment, (c) from the profits of or remuneration of self-employment, (d) by way of interest, dividends and

    £ million
    198019811982198319841985
    Total of which200,178221,221242,535261,473281,427308,426
    (a) Wages and salaries including pay in cash of HM Forces117,151125,441134,302143,926153,288166,612
    (b) Income in kind and employers' contributions20,20122,74024,11326,13727,06028,738
    (c) Income from self-employment 113,86215,29117,29119,55122,44224,240
    (d) Rent, dividends and interest (gross receipts)13,60513,88915,82815,56217,40121,986
    (e) State retirement pensions, widows benefit etc10,94612,84614,23115,32516,31416,999
    (f) Other Social Security benefits and other grants from general government 212,96816,50920,16022,06023,95526,414
    (g)(i) Other current transfers1,4481,6201,8152,0822,2902,450
    (ii) Pensions and other benefits from life insurance and pensions9,99712,88514,79516,83018,67720,987
    1 After deducting interest payments, depreciation and stock appreciation.
    2 Includes family benefits, supplementary benefit, unemployment benefit other social security benefits and remission of rent.

    Source: Derived from tables 4.1 and 4.4 of "United Kingdom National Accounts" 1986 edition.

    Enterprise Allowance Scheme

    asked the Paymaster General how many out of the total number of those still trading six months after completing the enterprise allowance scheme had been unemployed for more than a year at the time of their entry into the scheme; and how this figure compares with that available at the end of 1985.

    The first 18-month survey of the enterprise allowance scheme which reported in 1986 showed that 24 per cent. of those still trading six months after completion of the enterprise allowance scheme had been unemployed for more than a year at the time of their entry to the scheme. The figure for 1985, which related to survivors at the 15-month point, was 27 per cent.

    Earnings

    asked the Paymaster General if, pursuant to his answer of 25 March, Official Report, columns 171–2, concerning the numbers of full-time and part-time workers, he will provide an estimate of the median and quartile earnings in each case, together with his forecast of the percentage increase from April 1986 in earnings in the financial year 1987–88.

    The available information on the median and quartiles of earnings is published in table 19 of part A of the 1979 "New Earnings Survey" report and in table 34 of part B of the 1986 "New Earnings Survey" report. Copies of these reports are available in the Library.The latest information from the average earnings index indicates that in the 12-month period ending in January 1987 the underlying earnings increase was 7·5 per cent. Forecasts are a matter for my right hon. Friend the Chancellor of the Exchequer.

    other benefits of investment, (e) in non-state pensions, annuities and similar payments, (f) in social security benefits including the remission of rent and rates through housing benefit, free prescriptions, and similar remissions or (g) in any other way; and how all these figures compare with the previous year's estimates.

    Information is not available in the form requested. The table shows the latest estimates of the nearest equivalent items which are available.

    asked the Paymaster General if, pursuant to his answer of 25 March, Official Report, columns 171–2, concerning the number of full-time and part-time workers, he will provide figures showing the number of males and females on full-time adult rates divided between manual and non-manual workers, together with their average, median and quartile earnings.

    In April 1979 it was estimated that there were 1·6 million full-time manual adult female employees and 3·6 million full-time non-manual adult female employees. Comparable estimates for adult males are not available.Estimates of the earnings in April 1979 of manual and non-manual adults are published in table 15 of part A of the 1979 "New Earnings Survey" report.Estimates for April 1986 of the numbers and earnings of full-time manual and non-manual employees on adult rates are published in table 29 and 30 respectively of part B of the 1986 "New Earnings Survey" report.Copies of these reports are available in the Library.

    Research And Development

    asked the Paymaster General what is his Department's planned expenditure on research and development for 1987–88; and what are the main areas of research selected by his Department under the Rothschild principles of the customer-contractor relationship.

    Financial Management Initiative

    asked the Paymaster General whether he will make a statement on the effect on his Department of the financial management initiative.

    The financial management initiative (FM I) covers a wide range of reforms aimed at improving financial management. It is integral to our efforts to secure improved value for money generally.Within my Department introduction of the FMI has been given top priority by senior management. Managers at all levels now have responsibility for setting and reviewing running costs budgets and where relevant for programme budgets. Increasing use is being made in budgeting and planning of challenging but realistic value for money targets and measurement of output and performance. Top management regularly reviews the performance of all parts of my Department.Some of these improvements can be seen in the targets, output and performance measures and value for money savings in the public expenditure White Paper (Cm. 56); the second report of the Treasury-Cabinet Office joint management unit (JMU) on the implementation of the efficiency unit's report on consultancy, inspection and review services in Government departments and the JMU's progress report on action following the multi-departmental review of budgeting.Other major examples of better management contributing to improvements in value for money are TRES, a two-year programme for introducing computer terminals for improving and making more cost-effective the payment of unemployment benefit and work on benefit inquiries, which will be completed at the end of this year, achieving over 1,900 staff savings worth some £1 5 million a year. These savings should cover the costs of the programme within about four years. The 1986 efficiency scrutiny on value for money in the community programme—which has a programme budget of about £1 billion a year—had as its main recommendation the aim to improve the outputs of the programme (for example, improving the employment prospects of participants and achieving the maximum possible benefit to the Community) and this is being carried forward actively. In addition, the Department attaches importance to developing the management skills and experience of its staff through training and management development programmes to ensure that staff can identify and implement improvements in value for money.

    Training And Job Creation

    asked the Paymaster General if he will list each of the schemes currently run by the Manpower Services Commission and the Department of Employment in the area of training and job creation, together with expenditure on each scheme for the last year and estimated expenditure for the next five years, and together with the number of places on each scheme and the number of people expected to benefit from each scheme.

    The employment, training and enterprise measures run by my Department and the Manpower Services Commission are listed in the "Action for Jobs" booklet. Details of provision for last year and planned provision for these measures for the period up to 1989–90 are contained in chapter 3.7 of "The Government's Expenditure Plans 1987–88 to 1989–90", volume II (Cm. 56-II), a copy of which is in the Library. Beyond this period, plans are received annually. On 28 January I announced a further expansion of certain programmes which will increase my Department's total provision beyond that shown in Cm. 56-II without adding to public expenditure. A detailed breakdown of all this provision for 1986–87 and 1987–88 is contained in class VII of the "Government's Supply Estimates 1987–88", volume 227-VII. All of this provision is subject to parliamentary approval.

    Training Allowances

    asked the Paymaster General if he will give the number of people over 18 years who receive training allowances through the Manpower Services Commission to support them in their training; and how this figure compares with each of the last eight years.

    16-Year-Olds

    asked the Paymaster General if he will list his estimates of the number of 16-year-olds in the nation in each of the next 10 years.

    The following table lists the projected numbers of people in Great Britain aged 16 at the end of June each year from 1987 to 1996, as given by the 1985-based projections of the Government Actuary's Department:

    Population aged 16 at mid-year Great Britain
    Thousand
    1987850
    1988797
    1989748
    1990697
    1991673
    1992648
    1993630
    1994630
    1995683
    1996709

    Wages

    asked the Paymaster General what was the average wage of (a) 16 to 17-year-old women and men, (b) 18 to 20-year-old women and men and (c) over 21-year-old women and men in 1979, 1984 and 1986; what was the unemployment figure for each group in 1979, 1984 and 1986; and what was the percentage rise over the periods.

    The information from the "New Earnings Survey" in April each year is as follows:

    Average gross weekly earnings (£) of full-time employees in Great Britain whose pay was unaffected by absence
    Percentage Increase
    Age1979198419861979–841984–86
    Males
    Under 1840·363·372·757·114·8
    18 to 2061·9101·0113·563·212·4
    21 and over101·4181·6210·779·116·0
    Females
    Under 1836·658·672·160·123·0
    18 to 2048·782·393·364·013·4
    21 and over65·3121·2141·885·617·0
    Following is the available information about unemployment which is also in the Library. The table shows the numbers of unemployed registrants in the under 18, 18 to 19 and over 20 years age groups in Great Britain on 5 April 1979.The table also shows the numbers of unemployed claimants in the same age groups in Great Britain on 5 April 1984 and 10 April 1986. However, direct comparison of the figures between these dates is not possible because of changes in the method of collection and compilation of the data.
    Unemployed Registrants in Great Britain—5 April 1979
    Number
    Age under 18 years73,257
    Age 18 to 19 years117,467
    Age over 20 years1,089,084
    Unemployed Registrants in Great Britain
    5 April 198410 April 1986
    Age under 18 years155,580181,336
    Age 18 to 19 years353,654301,820
    Age over 20 years2,478,3922,715,713

    Skillcentres (Entrants)

    asked the Paymaster General if he will provide, for the last two years, a breakdown of entrants into skillcentres according to marital status by (a) under 24 years, (b) 25 to 44 years and (c) 45 plus years of age groups; and if he will give for each grouping the further breakdown according to the to-open and to-close status of the centres.

    Of 23,000 skillcentre trainees sponsored by the Manpower Services Commission's vocational education and training group who started training between 1 April 1986 and 27 December 1986, some 8,000 were less than 25 years of age when they started training, and 15,000 were aged 25 years or over.The other information requested can be obtained only at disproportionate cost in the case of VETG-sponsored trainees, and is not available in the case of industry-sponsored trainees. There are no present plans to open or close skillcentres.

    Youth Training Scheme

    asked the Paymaster General how many young people entered the youth training scheme in 1986; how many places they occupied; and how these figures compare with 1985.

    The table shows the available information; it is not possible to provide all the information in the precise form requested.

    1985–861986–87
    Startsalign="right">1405,9381397,581
    Contracted places2378,242379,488
    Average occupancyalign="right">370 per cent.384 per cent.
    1 The figure for YTS starts includes some individuals who entered more than one YTS programme during the course of the year and therefore slightly overstates the number of individuals participating in the scheme as a whole.
    2 As the information is not available for 1985–86, the figure for that year is an estimate.
    3 These figures show the average number of young people actually in training during the period as a percentage of contracted places. For 1985–86 this figure is an estimate.

    Area Manpower Boards

    asked the Paymaster General which area manpower boards have no members who are from ethnic minorities; what is the proportion of ethnic minorities in the general population in the area they serve; and how these figures have changed over the last two years.

    Up-to-date information on the proportion of ethnic minorities in the general population in the areas served by area manpower boards is not available. The rest of the information requested is as follows. Currently 29 of the 58 boards have no member representing ethnic minorities as compared with 36 of the 55 boards in 1985.AREA MANPOWER BOARDS WITH NO MEMBERS (FULL OR CO- OPTED) REPRESENTING ETHNIC MINORITIES.SOUTH EAST REGION

    • March 1985
    • Hampshire and Isle of Wight
    • Kent
    • Surrey
    • Sussex
    • Essex
    • Buckinghamshire and Hertfordshire
    • February 1987
    • Hampshire and Isle of Wight
    • Kent
    • Surrey
    • Sussex
    • Essex

    SOUTH WEST REGION

    • March 1985
    • Dorset and Somerset
    • Devon and Cornwall
    • February 1987
    • Dorset and Somerset
    • Devon and Cornwall
    • Gloucester and Wiltshire

    WEST MIDLANDS REGION

    • March 1985
    • Shropshire, Hereford, Worcester
    • Staffordshire
    • Wolverhampton and Walsall
    • February 1987
    • Hereford and Worcester
    • Staffordshire
    • Shropshire

    EAST MIDLANDS REGION

    • March 1985
    • Norfolk and Suffolk
    • Derbyshire
    • Lincolnshire
    • February 1987
    • Norfolk and Suffolk
    • Nottinghamshire

    YORKSHIRE AND HUMBERSIDE REGION

    • March 1985
    • North Yorkshire
    • Humberside
    • South Yorkshire
    • February 1987
    • North Yorkshire
    • Humberside

    NORTH WEST REGION

    • March 1985
    • Cheshire
    • Cumbria
    • February 1987
    • Cheshire
    • Cumbria

    NORTHERN REGION

    • March 1985
    • Cleveland
    • Durham
    • North Tyne

    WALES

    • March 1985
    • Gwynedd
    • Dyfed and West Glamorgan
    • Clwyd and Powys
    • Gwent
    • Mid and South Glamorgan
    • February 1987
    • Gwynedd
    • Dyfed and West Glamorgan
    • Clwyd and Powys

    SCOTLAND

    • March 1985
    • Highlands and Islands
    • Grampian and Tayside
    • Central and Fife
    • Glasgow
    • Lanarkshire
    • Renfrewshire
    • Ayrshire
    • Dumfries and Galloway
    • Lothian and Borders
    • February 1987
    • Highlands and Islands
    • Grampian and Tayside
    • Central and Fife
    • Glasgow

    March 1985

    February 1987

    Number

    Per cent.

    Number

    Per cent.

    Full members

    (a) Black/other ethnic minority

    8(0·8)21(2·0)

    (b) Women

    82(8·2)153(14·4)
    Co-opted members

    (a) Black/ethnic minority

    19(1·9)27(2·5)

    (b) Women

    14(1·4)20(1·9)
    Co-opted members with voting rights1(a) Black/ethnic minority3(0·3)

    1 Following the review of Area Manpower Boards in October 1985 co-opted members do not have voting rights.

    Official Visits

    asked the Paymaster General if he will list his official visits throughout the United Kingdom during the month of March.

    On Wednesday 4 March and Friday 13 March, I visited the north Peckham and Bristol

    • Lanarkshire
    • Renfrewshire
    • Ayrshire
    • Dunfries and Galloway
    • Lothian and Borders

    Notes:

    (1) The number of boards was increased by three to 58 in July 1986 as follows:

    The Leicestershire-Northamptonshire board was split into two boards, one covering Leicestershire, one covering Northamptonshire.

    The Shropshire, Hereford and Worcester board was split into two boards one covering Shropshire, one covering Hereford and Worcester.

    The Buckinghamshire and Hertfordshire board was split into two boards one covering Buckinghamshire, one covering Hertfordshire.

    (2) The number of MSC regions was increased by one (midlands) in July 1987. Boards shown in east midlands in March 1985 were, in fact, in other regions, but they are listed in this way for convenience and case of reference.

    asked the Paymaster General how many members of area manpower boards are (a) black or other ethnic minority origin, (b) women and (c) young people under 25 years; and, in each case, how many are full members, co-opted members with voting rights, and co-opted members without voting rights; and what proportion these represent of total membership, together with the comparable figures from two years ago.

    Information on the age of area manpower board members is not available. The breakdown of area manpower board membership by black/ethnic minorities and women in March 1985 and February 1987 is as follows (with proportions against total membership shown in brackets):inner city task force areas. On Tuesday 10 March, I launched the new enterprise training in the YTS, in Reading.My political engagements during the month took me to Nottinghamshire, Clitheroe, Liverpool, Truro, Derby, Cheshire and Torquay.

    Construction Industry Training Board

    asked the Paymaster General what recent representations he has received concerning the future of the Construction Industry Training Board's involvement in the youth training scheme.

    [pursuant to his reply, 6 April 1987, c. 38]: Since the beginning of the year I have received representations on this subject from the Construction Industry Training Board and from the Federation of Master Builders.

    asked the Paymaster General if he will publish in the Official Report the text of the letter which he has recently received from Mr. Derek Gaulter of the Construction Industry Training Board on the subject of the Construction Industry Training Board's involvement in the YTS; and if he will also arrange for his reply to that letter to be published.

    [pursuant to his reply, 6 April 1987, c. 38]: No. This was a private exchange of correspondence.

    asked the Paymaster General how many trainees have so far been affected in each year by the involvement of the Construction Industry Training Board in the YTS.

    [pursuant to his reply, 6 April 1987, c. 38]: The numbers of trainees who have started on the Construction Industry Training Board scheme are as follows:

    Number
    1983–8418,980
    1984–8517,884
    1985–8617,742
    1986–8719,317
    Total73,923

    asked the Paymaster General how many trainees the Construction Industry Training Board have proposed to involve in future years on their YTS.

    Total YTS starts
    1983–841984–851985–861 year Entitlement 1986–872 year Entitlement 1986–88
    Scotland:
    North38934334634317
    East1,0121,01397449808
    West1,5191,1891,223881,133
    North80580074322815
    Yorks & Humberside1,9361,8561,822721,856
    North West2,0331,9931,928862,077
    East Midlands1,3331,2581,294621,218
    West Midlands1,6751,6011,529911,758
    East Anglia1,2941,0431,031421,108
    Greater London2,0091,7481,8591801,809
    South East935995998731,114
    South1,4271,4401,5411211,550
    West1,3401,4141,3351111,452
    Wales1,0971,0741,014661,106
    18,80417,76717,6371,09718,121

    [pursuant to his reply, 6 April 1987. c. 38]: The Manpower Services Commission has received a proposal for some 21,500 YTS places for the hoard's 1987–89 two-year programme.

    asked the Paymaster General if he will make a statement on the record of the Construction Industry Training Board's past involvement in the YTS.

    [pursuant to his reply, 6 April 1987, c. 38]: The Construction Industry Training Board has made a valuable contribution to YTS. The Government hope that the board's contribution to YTS will continue and be developed.

    asked the Paymaster General if he will make a statement on the placement record of youngsters who have taken part in the Construction Industry Training Board's YTS.

    [pursuant to his reply, 6 April 1987, c. 38]: By 14 October 1986, 17,742 young people had started the board's 1985–86 one-year YTS programme. Of those, 3,486 had left the scheme prematurely, including 1,607 who left because they had found employment.Some 12,967 young people had completed the scheme, of whom the board estimate that about 91 per cent. had been placed in employment.

    asked the Paymaster General how many individual construction companies have so far been involved in the Construction Industry Training Board's YTS.

    [pursuant to his reply, 6 April 1987, c. 38]: The Construction Industry Training Board estimates that the number of construction companies which have participated so far in YTS is between 21,000 and 23,000 in total.

    asked the Paymaster General if he will give a regional breakdown for each of the years for which the scheme has existed of the number of youngsters taking part in the Construction Industry Training Board's YTS.

    [pursuant to his reply, 6 April 1987, c. 38]: The information is as follows:

    1983–84

    1984–85

    1985–86

    1 year Entitlement 1986–87

    2 year Entitlement 1986–88

    19,218
    Bircham Newton Tring Centre1761771051881
    99
    18,98017,88417,74219,317

    Moss Side Task Force

    asked the Paymaster General (1) if he will make a statement on the progress made by his Department in the Moss Side task force area;(2) if he will give details of actions taken by the Moss Side task force since it was established;(3) if he will give details of the budget allocated to the Moss Side task force during 1986–87; how much will be spent by 31 March and on what projects; and what will happen to any unspent funds after 31 March;(4) if he will give details of the budget to be allocated to the Moss Side task force during 1987–88;(5) if he will give details of the Moss Side task force's relationship with the local community, including the extent to which their views are taken into account and influence decisions on how the task force's budget is allocated.

    [pursuant to his reply, 27 March 1987, c. 294–95]: I refer the hon. Member to my reply to his earlier questions on 28 November 1986 at columns 391–92, in which I made a full statement on the activities and progress of the Moss Side and Hulme task force. Since that time, the task force has continued to make useful progress in developing initiatives centred on employment, enterprise and training.I regard the close involvement of the local residents in the work of the task force as extremely important and it is focused through a steering group of local residents and workers, and councillors. The task force ensures that this group is aware of all projects and project ideas. The group discusses each funding proposal before any submission is put to me and I pay strong regard to its views.No set budget has been allocated to the Moss Side and Hulme task force or any other inner city task force. Task force projects are financed out of the budgets of Government and Manpower Services Commission topped up as necessary out of the central project fund, of the inner cities initiative. Central unit funds are subject to the normal Treasury rules. on annuality, in common with the rest of my Department.During 1986–87, it is anticipated that projects sponsored by the task force will spend more than £747,000 in public funds including about £200,000 from the task force top-up funds. These projects include support for

    (a) positive action for training in housing (PATH), a 12-month training scheme aimed at increasing employment opportunities for black people in housing associations; (b) Prince's Youth Business Trust, which supports business start-up by young people; (c) Selcare trust, a community programme engineering workshop; (d) the Northern Black Business Association.

    For 1987–88 the task force is currently working up and progressing those initiatives mentioned in my reply of 28 November, including the establishment of managed workshops in association with a large private sector company; and a number of more recent proposals. Discussions are continuing with a wide range of local organisations, including the university of Manchester and the chamber of commerce and with private sector employers in the area about ways in which employers and others can help the task force to meet its objectives. A number of initiatives are being jointly pursued, including the possibilities of local procurement, training and land development.

    National Finance

    Occupational Pension Schemes

    asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer what tax treatment will be given, in the light of the proposal that pension rights accruing under the new free-standing additional voluntary contributions shall not be commutable into a tax-free lump sum, to existing additional voluntary contributions paid under an employer's occupational pension scheme.