Skip to main content

Written Answers

Volume 114: debated on Wednesday 8 April 1987

The text on this page has been created from Hansard archive content, it may contain typographical errors.

Written Answers To Questions

Wednesday 8 April 1987

The Arts

Patent Information

asked the Minister for the Arts whether he has any plans to review the dissemination of patent information.

An efficiency scrutiny is being undertaken jointly by the Department of Trade and Industry, the Office of Arts and Libraries and the British Library to review existing arrangements for the dissemination of patent information in the United Kingdom and for the exchange of British and overseas patent documentation.

Libraries (Damage)

asked the Minister for the Arts if the British Library has completed its assessment of the damage to its collections inflicted by Miss Norma Hague and discovered in 1984.

[pursuant to his reply, 27 March 1987, c. 291]: The British Library has completed its assessment. I understand that all the property for which there was conclusive evidence of theft by Miss Hague was subsequently recovered.

asked the Minister for the Arts if he will list the individual and total value of the damage inflicted by Miss Norma Hague on the collections of (a) the British Library, (b) the Birmingham public library and (c) the Liverpool public library, including in each case the token value mentioned as their share of the damage on the charge when Miss Hague pleaded guilty and was convicted in November 1984.

[pursuant to his reply, 27 March 1987, c. 291]: Miss Norma Hague was convicted in 1984 of stealing property to an estimated value of £21,847 from these libraries. The individual values were £12,847 for Liverpool city libraries, £5,000 for the city of Birmingham public libraries, and £4,000 for the British Library. A considerable proportion of the stolen property was subsequently recovered. I understand that there is no conclusive evidence that further damage was inflicted by Miss Hague beyond the amounts with which she was charged.

Solicitor-General For Scotland

Zircon

40.

asked the Solicitor-General for Scotland what is the amount of the additional costs falling on the Crown Office to date of inquiries in relation to the Zircon affair.

Almost all the additional costs falling on the Crown Office to date of the inquiries in question have been those caused by parliamentary interest in the matter. It is not, however, possible to quantify the costs involved.

Scottish Law Commission

41.

asked the Solicitor-General for Scotland if he will make a statement on the work of the Scottish Law Commission.

In the period from 1980 to date the Scottish Law Commission has produced 27 reports on its law reform projects. Legislation has been passed or introduced to implement, wholly or partially, 21 of these reports. Two of these reports did not require legislation and the remaining reports are under consideration.

Procurators Fiscal

42.

asked the Solicitor-General for Scotland if he will give details of plans to increase the work load of procurators fiscal.

The work load of procurators fiscal is dictated by the number of reports received from the police and other agencies and will vary from office to office. Case tracking computers have been installed in the two biggest offices, Glasgow and Edinburgh, which will deal more efficiently and effectively with the work load of these offices.

Education And Science

Science And Engineering Research Council

asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science how much has been awarded in grants by the Science and Engineering Research Council to (a) education institutions and (b) others in Yorkshire and Humberside in each year since 1979; how much the council will disburse in the current year; and if he will make a statement.

The information requested is as follows:

SERC research grants to education institutions and others
Financial yearAmount £ million (Cash)
1979–8043·3
1980–8156·2
1981–8262·3
1982–8367·6
1983–8470·4
1984–8578·8
1985–8687·0
1986–87198·4
1987–882103·7
1 Provisional outturn
2 Estimates
The Science and Engineering Research Council's total grant-in-aid from the science budget in 1987–88 is £350 million. SERC's overall allocation is determined by my right hon. Friend in the light of advice from the Advisory Board for the Research Councils. The SERC is primarily responsible for deciding priorities within its overall allocation.

asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science how much grant has been paid to the Science and Engineering Research Council in cash and real terms in each year since 1975; and if he will make a statement.

The information requested is as follows:

Grant-in-aid to science and engineering research council
£'000
Cash termsReal terms (at 1986–87 prices)
1975–76106,277294,610
1976–77125,243306,735
1977–78136,765294,088
1978–79153,308297,871
1979–80175,466291,731
1980–81201,377282,229
1981–82216,720276,463
1982–83234,806279,337
1983–84254,278289,505
1984–85277,866303,383
1985–86298,534307,490
1986–87316,187316,187
1987–88350,252335,169
The amount of grant-in-aid allocated to the Science and Engineering Research Council is decided by my right hon. Friend on the advice of the Advisory Board for the Research Councils.

Further Education (Examinations)

asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science what proportion of full-time students in non-advanced further education are pursuing GCSE or GCE-O, A-level courses.

In November 1985, 25 per cent. of full-time and sandwich students in non-advanced further education were enrolled on GCE O and A-level courses.

Financial Management Initiative

asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science whether he will make a statement on the effect on his Department of the financial management initiative.

The financial managememt initiative covers a wide range of management reforms to improve management in central Government in support of the Government's commitment to improve value for money. In my Department it has given added impetus to work which had already begun and has also led to new initiatives.The introduction of the FMI has encouraged the further development of performance indicators and output measures for individual programmes and policies. It has also led to the creation of a financial information system covering the Department's running costs. These and other initiatives, such as a new coherent top management system

Thousands
Academic year beginning in1979198019811982198319841985
Great Britain
Home/full-time initial entrants
University74·776·474·071·669·270·570·3
All initial entrants142·0146·3155·9160·9160·7163·2164·6
Home full-time students
Higher education451·2465·5488·9504·9517·9524·9531·0
610

and improved financial management training, have encouraged a greater awareness among managers at all levls of the need for good financial management, both in the Department's own spending and in the spending of those bodies for which it has responsibility within the Government.

The effect can be seen over a range of the Department's work. Examples include the targets and performance indicators contained in the Department's chapter in the public expenditure White Paper (Cm.56), and the chapter on quality and efficiency in the recent White Paper on higher education (Cm.114). Control of the Department's own running costs has been delegated to four cost centre managers.

School Building Projects

asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science what is the total national financial provision for school building projects in the financial years 1986–87, 1987–88 and 1988–89.

Information is not available in the form requested. The Government's expenditure plans have included the following provision for schools in England.

£ million
11986–8721987–8821988–89
Central Government:
Building grants to voluntary and special schools3465450
Local authority capital:
Schools4217299290
1 Cmnd. 9702.
2 Cm. 56.
3 Includes repairs-maintenance, purchase of sites and buildings and building work.
4 Includes building work and purchase of sites, furniture and equipment. Provision is net of in-year receipts.
Schools in Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland are the responsibilities of my right hon. Friends the Secretaries of State for Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland.

Higher Education

asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science (1) what has been the total number of home full-time and sandwich students in higher education in each year since 1979;(2) what has been the total full-time equivalent number of part-time students in higher education in each year since 1979;(3) what has been the total number of home full-time entrants to universities in each year since 1979.

The information is shown in the following table :

Academic year beginning in1979198019811982198319841985
FTE1 of part-time students Higher Education93·82100·92104·02105·92109·12109·1114·0
1 Conversion factors vary in the different sectors and for different levels of course. An illustrative average factor of 35 per cent. has been used for all part-time students.
2 Including about 1,000 non-advanced full-time equivalents in Scotland. The figures are to be revised.

asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science, on the basis of the revised projections of future higher education student numbers announced in the White Paper, "Higher Education: Meeting the Challenge", what he estimates average unit costs in 1986–87 prices will be in 1988–89 for the universities, for the polytechnics and local authority colleges and for the voluntary and grant-aided colleges.

Unit costs in 1988–89 will depend on various decisions still to be taken by the institutions in recruiting students, by the Government in the annual public expenditure survey, and by local authorities and others in providing additional income. However, it is worth noting that against the 2·1 per cent. increase in student numbers between 1986–87 and 1988–89 adopted as the planning target in the recent White Paper, current plans for centrally provided or determined recurrent funding allow for an increase, at 1986–87 prices, over the same period of 6 per cent. for universities, 7 per cent. for local authority polytechnics and colleges, and 2 per cent. for voluntary and other grant-aided colleges.

School Meals Supervisory Assistants

asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science what national agreements exist regarding the rates of pay to he paid to school meals supervisory assistants.

I understand that the latest manual workers pay settlement was agreed by the National Joint Council of Local Authority Services (Manual Workers) in October 1986.

Career Education And Guidance

asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science what improvements are being made in the provision of career education and guidance.

Following from the White Paper "Working Together", I am pleased to say that my right hon. Friends the Secretaries of State for Employment and Wales and myself today launched a new initiative designed to improve the effectiveness of the provision of career education and guidance. A copy of the booklet "Working Together for a Better Future" has been placed in the Library.

Energy

Community Insulation Projects

asked the Secretary of State for Energy what arrangements will be made to the fuel community insulation projects in 1988; and if he will make a statement.

At present the Department of Health and Social Security makes single payments to recipients of supplementary benefit for the cost of materials to draughtproof their homes. The work of draughtproofing is normally undertaken by community insulation projects, under the auspices of NEA, and carried out by long-term unemployed people on the Manpower Services Commission's community programme. There are now 384 of these projects, and over 300,000 homes have already been insulated under this programme, to which the Manpower Services Commission, DHSS, the DOE and my Department have all contributed.I have drawn hon. Members' attention to the success of this programme because in many of their constituencies it is helping the old to keep warm and providing the younger with worthwhile jobs, as well as improving the energy efficiency of the 300,000 homes.Present arrangements for single payments for draught-proofing will end in April 1988 as part of the social security reforms. The Government have, however, made clear their commitment to continue help with the cost of draughtproofing materials where it is needed. The Departments supporting this programme have therefore been considering how this can best be done.My right hon. Friends and I have now decided that in the long term the right solution will be to extend the home improvement grant scheme to include the cost of draughtproofing materials within a revised system. The new arrangements for the home improvement grant scheme will not, however, be in place before the social security changes.As an interim measure, therefore, the Government have decided that from April 1988 help with the cost of draughtproofing materials will be provided through the Manpower Services Commission. The commission will be well placed to undertake this task because of its responsibility for operating the community programme through which the actual work of draughtproofing is now done. It will operate a scheme in consultation with my Department and others with an interest.Eligibility for the scheme will be widened in April 1988 to include all households in receipt of income support, housing benefit or family credit. This means an increase in eligible households from under 3 million to about 7 million. A small contribution will be sought from householders benefiting from the scheme, but this will amount to no more than about 3 per cent. of the cost of the draughtproofing service provided.As a result of these decisions the future of the community insulation projects is now assured. We estimate that Government support for them in 1988–89 will be worth some £55 million to £60 million, of which £14·5 million will be for draughtproofing materials alone. This would represent an increase of 80 per cent. on 1986–87 and nearly 30 per cent. on 1987–88. Discussions will now be taking place with NEA and other organisations involved in draughtproofing work in order to finalise the administrative arrangements which will come into force from April 1988.

Foreign And Commonwealth Affairs

Afghanistan

asked the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs if he will make a statement on his discussions on Afghanistan during his recent visit to the Soviet Union.

My right hon. and learned Friend made clear to Mr. Shevardnadze, as did my right hon. Friend the Prime Minister to Mr. Gorbachev, that we would support a neutral and non-aligned Afghanistan, but that this could emerge only by early Soviet withdrawal and the creation of conditions enabling the Afghan people freely to decide their own future.

Financial Management Initiative

asked the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs whether he will make a statement on the effect on his Department of the financial management initiative.

The FCO response to the financial management initiative involves a wide range of management reforms which have built on work already being done by the FCO to improve management and value for money. The precise effects of the financial management initiative cannot therefore be defined.Both the diplomatic and aid wings of the Foreign and Commonwealth Office have introduced top management systems, which provide a structured framework for planning the strategic deployment of resources. All posts and departments in the diplomatic wing and all staff in the aid wing have an agreed set of objectives against which performance is regularly assessed.Computerised management information systems provide managers at all levels with information on the costs of their programmes. The aid wing has a long-established system of budgeting for programme expenditure. Further delegated budgeting has been introduced, notably overseas. Thirty per cent. of local expenditure is now controlled directly by posts and greater responsibility has been devolved to Overseas Development Administration's development divisions.These reforms have led to a clearer setting of priorities, more effective targeting of activities and greater awareness

Experiments by primary purpose: Scotland
Thousands
198319841985
Study of normal or abnormal body structure or function119·3115·6122·1
To select, develop or study the use etc. of medical, dental and veterinary products54·449·242·0
Development of transplant techniques0·40·91·3
To select, develop or study the use, hazards or safety of:
Plant pesticides (including fungicides)1·00·54·1
Herbicides or substances modifying plant growth10–51
Substances used in industry2·61·33·4
Substances used in the household10·10·1
Cosmetics and toiletries0·90·20·9
Food additives3·80·41·1
Tobacco and its substitutes
Injurious plants or metazoan animals and their toxins1·80·80·5

of the financial implications of policy decisions. The results of these improvements are reflected in the specific output measures published in Cm. 56 and in the Foreign and Commonwealth Office's success in meeting many of the additional demands on its services through efficiency savings without recourse to extra resources from central funds.

Foreign Compensation (Ussr)

asked the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, pursuant to his answer of 11 March, Official Report, column 212, to the hon. Member for Teignbridge (Mr. Nicholls) if he will make a further statement on the response to the advertisement about the Foreign Compensation (USSR) (Registration and Determination of Claims) Order 1986.

The closing date for claims in respect of bonds was 31 March 1987. As there was a last-minute rush to register claims for bonds by some major institutions which hold large numbers of them, it will be several weeks before accurate figures for the number of bonds received and their total face value is known. However, provisional estimates, and I would emphasise that these are only estimates, put the number of bonds received at half a million, with a face value of approximately £20 million. Up to the end of March some 3,300 requests for application forms in respect of other claims were received and dealt with by Foreign Compensation Commission. The closing date for these other claims is 30 June 1987.

Home Department

Animals (Experiments)

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will list in the Official Report the number of experiments on animals carried out in (a) Scotland and (b) the United Kingdom during the last three years which were of a non-medical nature.

Information is not available in the precise form requested. However, information on the primary purpose of experiments on living animals in Great Britain started in the years 1983 to 1985, the latest year for which information is currently available, is given in table 15 of "Statistics of Experiments on Living Animals Great Britain, 1985" (Cmnd. 9839). Corresponding information for Scotland is given in the following table; corresponding information for Northern Ireland is not available.

1983

1984

1985

General environmental pollutants1·95·66·7
To demonstrate known facts (Certificate C)0·40·30·3
For other purposes73·372·372·2
For more than one purpose2·36·015·1
TOTAL262·1254·2269·7

1 Less than 50.

Passport Application Forms

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department when post offices in The Wrekin constituency will be provided with passport application forms.

This is part of a general problem. Shortages have arisen as a result of an exceptionally high level of demand for passports. Steps are being taken to increase the number of forms being printed and to restock any post offices in short supply as quickly as possible.

Aids

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what estimates are available to him as to the number of prisoners who are HIV positive.

On 7 April the prison population of England and Wales included 44 inmates reported as having been identified as HIV antibody positive. There is no statistically reliable estimate of the number of unidentified cases.

Police Manpower

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what increases in police and other manpower he has approved for the six metropolitan joint police authorities in 1987–88.

The following increases are contained in the establishment schemes for the six authorities for 1987–88, which I have laid before Parliament today.

AuthorityAdditional Police PostsAdditional Civilian Staff
Merseyside49 full-time
Northumbria1755 full-time
South33 full-time
Yorkshire502 part-time
West Midlands2427 full-time
West Yorkshire5050 full-time

Notes

1 The increase of 75 police posts for Northumbria was announced on 18 December 1986. Thirty-five of the posts were with immediate effect and 40 with effect from 1 April 1987.

2 The increase in the number of civilians in the West Midlands police is expected to release 382 police officers to operational duties.

Durham Prison

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many category A women prisoners there in Her Majesty's prison, Durham; how many strip searches have been made on category A prisoners in Her Majesty's prison, Durham in March, indicating (a) strip searches before and after consultation with legal advisers, (b) after visits and (c) after cell change, wing search and cell search.

Last month there were, until 25 March, four women category A prisoners in Durham prison. There have been three since that date. During the month strip searches were carried out on women prisoners in this category in the circumstances and the number of occasions shown:

Number
After legal visitsNil
After other visits4
At the time of cell changes and wing and cell searches11
Total15

Metropolitan Police (Raid)

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will call for a report from the Commissioner of Police of the Metropolis as to how many police officers attended at 34 Carson road, Canning Town, E16, on the morning of 28 March, as to the purpose of the raid, as to how many occupants were in the flat, as to whether a warrant was presented and as to who was arrested and on what charge.

I understand from the Commissioner of Police of the Metropolis that five police officers entered 34 Carson road, Canning Town, E16 on the morning of 28 March 1987. Four uniformed officers arrived in response to a call for assistance from an officer who had arrested a man for road traffic offences. The man had assaulted the officer and then run to 34 Carson road. The only other person on the premises at the time was a woman alleged to be the man's girlfriend. No warrant was presented, nor was one necessary in the circumstances.The man was arrested and charged with driving while unfit through alcohol, driving with excess alcohol and two charges of assaulting a police officer with intent to resist arrest.

Wheel Clamping

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will call for a report from the Commissioner of Police of the Metropolis as to the number of police engaged in wheel-clamping duties.

A maximum of 14 police constables supervise wheel clamping units from Mondays to Fridays, while six constables are deployed on such duties on Saturdays. In addition, the inspector, sergeant and six constables at the Hyde Park car pound spend a proportion of their time on duties arising from wheel clamping as does the chief inspector in charge.

Crime Statistics

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what plans he has for changing the area analyses of the crime figures.

I have no plans to change the area analyses of the recorded crime figures which are published annually by police force area in the Home Office "Statistical Bulletin" issued in March and later in the year in more detail in "Criminal Statistics". Separate figures for London boroughs will continue to be placed in the Library of the House each quarter. More detailed analyses of the figures may be prepared and published from time to time.

Community Radio

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether he has yet had an opportunity to consider claims for compensation from applicants to the community radio experiment.

We have received 35 claims for compensation from the final total of 270 applicants to the scheme. We have also considered the case for making a modest ex gratia payment to each applicant, in view of the cancellation of the experiment. However, we have decided that such payments from public funds would not be justified, in particular since it was made clear that applicants should not incur the expense of elaborate applications.

Terrorism

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what plans he has to review the prevention of terrorism legislation before the Prevention of Terrorism (Temporary Provisions) Act 1984 expires in March 1989.

I have asked Viscount Colville of Culross, QC, who carried out the 1986 annual scrutiny of the operation of the Prevention of Terrorism (Temporary Provisions) Act, 1984 and will perform the same function in 1987, to carry out a general review of the Act. I am pleased to announce that Lord Colville has accepted my invitation. The terms of reference of his inquiry will be based on those given to Lord Shackleton and Lord Jellicoe when they reviewed the Prevention of Terrorism (Temporary Provisions) Acts, 1974 and 1976, and will be as follows:

"Accepting the continuing need for legislation against terrorism, to assess the operation of the Prevention of Terrorism (Temporary Provisions) Act, 1984, with particular regard to the effectiveness of the legislation and its effect on the liberties of the subject, and to report".
Lord Colville's report will be published as a Command Paper.Any individual or organisation who wishes to submit written observations on matters relevant to Lord Colville's terms of reference should write to him, before 31 July at: Room 14, Hepburn House, Marsham Street, London SWIP 4HW.

Prime Minister

Press Releases

asked the Prime Minister, pursuant to her reply of 17 March, Official Report, column 457, if she will list all press releases prepared with the aid of the new computer system in her Press Office since it was installed.

I have nothing to add to the reply that I gave to the hon. Gentleman on 17 March at columns 457–58.

House Of Commons

Self-Adhesive Envelopes

asked the Lord Privy Seal what representations he has made to the suppliers of the House of Commons self-adhesive envelopes about the non-adhesiveness of those envelopes currently supplied to the Serjeant at Arms Department.

A number of examples have been found in a batch of self seal envelopes code number 23(146)S where the adhesive on the top flap has been inadequate. HMSO was asked to pursue the matter with the manufacturer as soon as it came to light in February, and arrangements have recently been made for the remainder of the batch to be withdrawn from the Serjeant at Arms Stores. HMSO did check samples before delivery but has been asked to carry out a more extensive check in future.

European Legislation

asked the Lord Privy Seal when Her Majesty's Government expect to reply to the Second Special Report of Session 1985–86 from the Select Committee on European Legislation.

The Government's response to the report is published today as a Command Paper (Cmnd. 123). Copies of the response have been placed in the Library.

Wales

Financial Management Initiative

asked the Secretary of State for Wales whether he will make a statement on the effect on his Department of the financial management initiative.

The financial management initiative covers a range of reforms aimed at obtaining the best possible return for public expenditure. The principles have been incorported into, and are increasingly indistinguishable from, my Department's drive towards more responsive management.Budgeting is being extended; increasingly officials are accountable for the resources under their control and this has led to an improved awareness of costs and value for money. Every six months divisions report to me on the cost of their operations and progress towards agreed objectives; they also set targets for the period ahead. This informs me in the discussions which I have in the public expenditure cycle and has led generally to the better use and direction of resources. Some of the improvements can be seen in the tables of indicators of output incorporated into Cm. 56. Examples of others are savings of 15 per cent. achieved by adopting new methods of distributing mail and up to 13 per cent. in respect of telephone call charges.I am taking steps to improve the quality of the information provided and wherever it is sensible and practicable to do so to achieve a more consistent approach across my multi-functional Department. Approximately 80 per cent. of the public expenditure which falls within my responsibility is made available to local authorities, district health authorities and other public bodies. I expect them also to apply the principles of the initiative. An example of better management contributing to improved value for money is the closer attention to energy efficiency measures by the National Health Service in Wales which aims to realise savings of 20 per cent. in the five-year period to 1988–89.

Milk Outgoers Scheme

asked the Secretary of State for Wales if he has any proposals to change the present milk outgoers scheme; and if he will make a statement.

The first phase of the Milk (Community Outgoers Scheme) closed on 15 February 1987. We shall shortly be announcing details of a new national outgoers scheme under which the rate of compensation will be 27·49p per litre payable over seven years.

Welsh Language

asked the Secretary of State for Wales how many primary schoolchildren in each local education

Percentage
197719781979198019811982198319841985
Clwyd5·76·96·15·45·66·97·88·18·3
Dyfed8·810·011·412·512·313·614·215·017·4
Gwent0·20·40·40·70·70·91·01·11·2
Gwynedd17·418·419·820·422·122·426·627·131·9
Mid Glamorgan3·94·65·45·96·36·87·37·68·2
Powys6·36·94·44·97·15·87·16·96·5
South Glamorgan1·01·21·31·83·01·71·52·32·6
West Glamorgan2·82·83·24·04·93·23·43·03·2

asked the Secretary of State for Wales if he will list the secondary schools in each local education authority in Wales in which it is possible for pupils (a) to undertake most or all of their education through the medium of the Welsh language, and (b) to undertake part of their education through the medium of Welsh; and if he will indicate the schools in which no teaching, or very little teaching is done through the medium of Welsh.

Information in the form requested is not readily available.The following provisional information for September 1986 indicates, however, those schools in which none of the teaching is undertaken through the medium of Welsh and those in which at least some of the teaching is undertaken through the medium of Welsh. For each school in the latter category the number of subjects offered through the medium of Welsh is given.

Schools In Which At Least Some Of The Teaching Is Undertaken Through The Medium Of Welsh

  • Clwyd
  • Ysgol Uwchradd Maes Garmon3

authority area in Wales (a) speak Welsh as their principal language/home language and (b) speak Welsh fluently as a second language.

The information, which relates to pupils aged five and over in maintained primary schools, as at September 1985, is given in the following table:

Number of pupils assessed as being fluent
First language1Second language2
Clwyd1,4012,367
Dyfed4,7834,032
Gwent17393
Gwynedd6,6385,114
Mid Glamorgan2643,307
Powys454520
South Glamorgan278700
West Glamorgan685837
1 Pupils whose home language is Welsh.
2 Pupils whose home language is not Welsh.

asked the Secretary of State for Wales what percentage of primary school children in each local education authority area in Wales speak Welsh fluently as a second language; and what are the corresponding figures for each year since 1977.

The percentages of pupils, aged 5 and over in maintained primary schools, who speak Welsh fluently as a second language are given in the following table. The figures, which relate to September of each year, exclude pupils whose principal language is Welsh.

  • Ysgol Glan Clwyd4
  • Brynhyfryd2
  • Ysgol Morgan Llwyd4
  • Dyfed
  • Llandovery County High2
  • Llandeilo County Secondary1
  • Amman Valley Comprehensive1
  • Ysgol y Preseli3
  • Lampeter County Secondary Comprehensive2
  • Aberaeron Comprehensive3
  • Cardigan County Secondary1
  • Ysgol Uwchradd Tregaron2
  • Ysgol Gyfun Y Strade4
  • Ysgol Gyfun Bro Myrddin3
  • Ysgol Gyfun Ddwyieithog Teifi4
  • Ysgol Gyfun Ddwyieithog2
  • Fishguard Comprehensive1
  • Gwynedd
  • Ysgol Dyffryn Ogwen5
  • Ysgol Botwnnog4
  • Ysgol Brynrefail4
  • Ysgol Dyffryn Nantlle4
  • Ysgol Eifionydd3
  • Ysgol Syr Thomas Jones3
  • Ysgol Uwchradd Caergybi1
  • Ysgol Gyfun Llangefni3
  • Ysgol David Hughes4
  • Ysgol Uwchradd Bodedern5
  • Ysgol y Gader3
  • Ysgol y Moelwyn3
  • Ysgol Uwchradd Tywyn1
  • Ysgol Y Berwyn4
  • Ysgol Ardudwy4
  • Ysgol Dyffryn Conwy5
  • Ysgol Friars2
  • Ysgol Tryfan4
  • Ysgol Y Creuddyn5
  • Ysgol Syr Hugh Owen4
  • Ysgol Glan y Mor4
  • Mid Glamorgan
  • Ysgol Gyfun Rhydfelen5
  • Ysgol Gyfun Llanhari5
  • Ysgol Gyfun Cwm Rhymni5
  • Powys
  • Caereinion High2
  • Llanfyllin High3
  • Llanidloes High1
  • Ysgol Bro Ddyfi4
  • Llandrindod High1
  • Builth Wells High1
  • Maesydderwen Comprehensive1
  • Brecon High1
  • South Glamorgan
  • Ysgol Gyfun Gymraeg Glantaf5
  • West Glamorgan
  • Ysgol Gyfun Ystalyfera4
  • Ysgol Gyfun Gwyr4

  • 1 Schools in which one to four subjects are taught through the medium of Welsh.
  • 2 Schools in which five to nine subjects are taught through the medium of Welsh.
  • 3 Schools in which 10 to 14 subjects are taught through the medium of Welsh.
  • 4 Schools in which 15 to 19 subjects are taught through the medium of Welsh.
  • 5 Schools in which 20 subjects and over are taught through the medium of Welsh.

Schools In Which No Teaching Is Undertaken Through The Medium Of Welsh

  • Clwyd
  • Hawarden High
  • Rhyl High
  • Mold Alun
  • Elfed High
  • Holywell High
  • St. David's High
  • Prestatyn High
  • The Maelor
  • Castell Alun High
  • Deeside High
  • Flint High
  • Connah's Quay High
  • Ysgol Bryn Elian
  • Ysgol Emrys Ap Iwan
  • Eirias High
  • Denbigh High
  • Ysgol Dinas Bran
  • Ysgol-y-Grango
  • Ysgol Bryn Alyn
  • Darland
  • St. David's
  • Ysgol Bryn Offa
  • Yate Sixth form College
  • Ysgol Uwchradd Argoed
  • Ysgol Rhiwabon
  • The Groves High School
  • St. Richard Gwyn High
  • Blessed Edward Jones High
  • St. Joseph's RC High
  • Dyfed
  • Ysgol Gruffydd Jones
  • Milford Haven CS
  • Ysgol Dewi Sant
  • Greenhill Comprehensive
  • Milford Haven Grammar
  • Pembroke Comprehensive
  • Penglais Comprehensive
  • Coedcae Comprehensive
  • Graig Comprehensive
  • Glan-y-Mor Comprehensive
  • Bryngwyn Comprehensive
  • Sir Thomas Picton Comprehensive
  • Queen Elizabeth Mandunum Comprehensive
  • Ysgol Gyfun Emlyn
  • Gwendraeth Valley Comprehensive
  • Whitland Grammar School
  • Tasker Milward VC Comprehensive
  • St. John Lloyd RC Comprehensive
  • Queen Elizabeth Cambria Comprehensive
  • Gwent
  • Newport St. Julian's Comprehensive
  • Newport Dyffryn Comprehensive
  • Hartridge Comprehensive Newport
  • Newport Bettws Comprehensive
  • Liswerry Comprehensive Newport
  • Newport Queens Comprehensive
  • Brynmawr Comprehensive
  • Bassaleg Comprehensive
  • Newbridge Comprehensive
  • Pontllanfraith Comprehensive
  • Glynocoed Junior Comprehensive
  • Blackwood Comprehensive
  • Llantarnam Comprehensive
  • Croesyceiliog Comprehensive
  • Oakdale Comprehensive
  • Glanyrafon Junior Comprehensive
  • Cwmcarn Comprehensive
  • Caerleon Comprehensive
  • Monmouth Comprehensive
  • Tredegar Comprehensive
  • Fairwater Comprehensive
  • King Henry VIII Comprehensive
  • Chepstow Comprehensive
  • Caldicot Comprehensive
  • Ebbw Vale Senior Comprehensive
  • Risca Comprehensive
  • Abersychan Comprehensive
  • Trevethin Comprehensive
  • West Monmouth Comprehensive
  • Nantyglo Comprehensive
  • Abertillery Comprehensive
  • St. Joseph's Comprehensive
  • St. Alban's RC Comprehensive
  • Gwynedd
  • Ysgol John Bright
  • Ysgol Aberconwy
  • Loreto RC Middle School
  • Mid Glamorgan
  • Afon Taf High
  • Pen-y-Dre High
  • Cyfarthfa High
  • Vaynor and Penderyn Comprehensive
  • Bryn Celynnog Comprehensive
  • Coedylan Comprehensive
  • Hawthorn Comprehensive
  • Mountain Ash County Comprehensive
  • Blaengwawr Comprehensive
  • Tonyrefail Comprehensive
  • Cynffig Comprehensive
  • St. Cenydd Comprehensive
  • St. Ilan Comprehensive
  • Bryntirion Comprehensive
  • St. Martins Comprehensive
  • Maesteg Comprehensive
  • Heolddu Comprehensive
  • Ynysawdre Comprehensive
  • Lewis Boys Comprehensive
  • Pencoed Comprehensive
  • Lewis Girls Comprehensive
  • Brynteg Comprehensive
  • Porthcawl Comprehensive
  • Treorchy Comprehensive
  • Ferndale Comprehensive
  • Ogmore Comprehensive
  • Porth County Comprehensive
  • Rhymney Comprehensive
  • Bedwas Comprehensive
  • Tonypandy Comprehensive
  • Y Pant Comprehensive
  • Cymmer Comprehensive
  • Aberdare Boys' Comprehensive
  • Aberdare Girls' Comprehensive
  • Bedwellty Comprehensive
  • Bishop Hedley High
  • Archbishop McGarth
  • Cardinal Newman Catholic Comprehensive
  • St. John Baptist Comprehensive
  • Powys
  • Newtown High
  • Welshpool High
  • John Beddoes County Secretary
  • Gwernyfed High
  • Crickhowell High
  • South Glamorgan
  • Rumney High
  • Glyn Derw High
  • Cardiff High
  • Glan Ely High
  • Willows High
  • Fitzalan High
  • Llanedeyrn High
  • Cantonian High
  • Whitchurch High
  • Llanishen High
  • Llanrumney High
  • Hawardian High
  • Cathays High
  • Llanilltud Fawr Comprehensive
  • Barry Boy's Comprehensive
  • Bryn Hafren Comprehensive
  • Stanwell Comprehensive
  • St. Cyres Comprehensive
  • Cowbridge Comprehensive
  • Radyr Comprehensive
  • St. Illtyds VA College
  • Heathfield House High
  • Archbishop Mostyn RC High
  • The Bishop of Llandaff High
  • St. Teilo's CIW High
  • Bishop Hannon High
  • Lady Mary RC High
  • St. Cadoc's RC Comprehensive
  • West Glamorgan
  • Mynyddbach Comprehensive
  • Penlan Boys Comprehensive
  • Cefn Hengoed Comprehensive
  • Olchfa Comprehensive
  • Morriston Senior Comprehensive
  • Llansamlet Junior Comprehensive
  • Dynevor Comprehensive
  • Pentrehafod Comprehensive
  • Bishop Gore Comprehensive
  • Cymer Afan Comprehensive
  • Glan Afan
  • Sandfields Comprehensive
  • Dyffryn Comprehensive
  • Penyrheol Comprehensive
  • Gowerton Comprehensive
  • Llangatwg Comprehensive
  • Dwr y Felin Comprehensive
  • Cwrt Sart Comprehensive
  • Bishopston Comprehensive
  • Dillwyn Llewlyn Comprehensive
  • Pontarddulais Comprehensive
  • Bishop Vaughan Comprehensive
  • St. Joseph's RC Comprehensive
  • Cefn Saeson Comprehensive
  • Cwmtawe Comprehensive

asked the Secretary of State for Wales what percentage of primary school children in each local authority area in Wales do not receive Welsh language lessons.

The percentages of pupils who are not taught Welsh in maintained primary schools, as at September 1985, are given in the table:

Percentage
Clwyd3·8
Dyfed19·1
Gwent98·7
Gwynedd1·0
Mid Glamorgan13·4
Powys19·8
South Glamorgan54·9
West Glamorgan38·0

Regional Services (North Wales)

asked the Secretary of State for Wales when he proposes to announce decisions on the recommendations of the review of regional services to north Wales; and if he will make a statement.

I am pleased to be able to announce the decisions which will take forward the review of regional services to north Wales. These have been set out in a Welsh health circular which has been issued today.The review constituted a thorough appraisal of the adequacy of regional services provided for patients in north Wales. It also covered those major regional services which are available elsewhere in Wales and those operated by authorities in England to which patients in north Wales have access.The recommendations of the review were the subject of wide consultation with health authorities and other interested bodies. The great majority of responses received supported the report's findings. As a consequence it is my right hon. Friend's intention to implement the report in the light of the comments received and in collaboration with the district and English regional health authorities concerned as quickly as possible. The following action is to be taken:

burns and plastic surgery services are to be improved by additional out-patient sessions at Bangor and Wrexham funded by the Welsh Office;
together with North Wales health authorities, the Welsh Office will examine options for providing additional facilities for cardiac services with Welsh Office funding;
the medical oncology service in North Wales is to be designated as a regional service. Discussions with the relevant health authorities to that end will be initiated soon by the Department; in addition, to ensure that cancer treatment services are organised as effectively as possible I propose to fund a study of the provision of those services to include the feasibility of providing a satellite radiotherapy centre in North Wales;
the Department is to initiate discussions with the relevant health authorities on the location in North Wales of a satellite artificial limb and appliance centre which will reduce significantly the need of disabled persons to make the journey to Merseyside;
funds are to be made available to provide fast, comfortable ambulance transport for those patients who have to travel the long distance from Gwynedd to the Artificial Limb and Appliance Centre and to the Radiotherapy Centre in Merseyside;
the service to Wales of the Welsh Poisons Information Centre is to be improved and consideration is being given to its relocation in association with toxicological services;
the Department will also be pursuing with the appropriate health authorities the implementation of a number of more detailed recommendations for improving district and regional services.

These decisions should lay the foundation for a significant improvement in the coverage and quality of health care services available to people in north Wales.

Welsh Development Agency

asked the Secretary of State for Wales when copies of the report of the review of the Welsh Development Agency will be made available.

Copies of the report have now been placed in the Library of the House.

Appeals (Ministerial Adjudication)

asked the Secretary of State for Wales in what circumstances he has the role of adjudicator in appeals against decisions made by local authorities and public bodies in Wales; and if he will list the powers under which he fulfils that role.

[pursuant to his reply, 18 March 1987, c. 516]: A list of the various appellate powers given to the Secretary of State for Wales against decisions made by local and public bodies in Wales are shown in the following tables :

  • General Dental Services Regs 1973
  • National Health Service
  • Sch 1, Para 17
  • Decision of Executive Council and Dental Estimates Board.
  • NHS Regs 1974. SI 160
  • Reg 12
  • Refusal of Family Practitioner Committee to include doctor on Medical List etc.
  • Reg 30(6)
  • Decision of Rural Dispensng Committee that pharmaceutical services be provided.
  • Reg 30G(1)
  • Decision of Rural Dispensing Committee on pharmaceutical services application.
  • Reg 3
  • Refusal of Family Practitoner Committee of deputising services.
  • Reg 3
  • Refusal by F.P.C. on approval of consultation premises.
  • Reg 3
  • Conditions imposed by Medical Practices Committee.
  • NHS Service Committees etc Regs 1974
  • Reg 11
  • Decision of F.P.C.
  • Reg 21
  • Decision of Dental Estimates Board.
  • Reg 48
  • Decision of tribunal constituted under s. 42 of NHS Act 1946.
  • NHS Act 1977
  • Section 33
  • Refusal by Medical Practices Committee of application for inclusion in list to provide general medical services.
  • Section 40
  • Determination of a recognised committee re general ophthalmic services.
  • Section 46
  • Direction of a Tribunal that a practitioner's name be removed from the list.
  • Community Health Regulations 1985
  • Reg 20
  • Refusal of District Health Authority to disclose information.
  • NHS General Ophthalmic Services Regs 1986
  • Reg 5
  • Decision of Ophthalmic Qualifications Committee that appellant is disqualified.
  • Welsh Office Planning Procedure Paper 1975
  • Proposals of District Health Authority re closure of Health Service buildings.
  • Terms and Conditions of Service of Hospital Staff 1981 Para 190
  • Termination of appointment.
  • Agriculture and Land Drainage
  • Agriculture Act 1967—
  • Section 49
  • Witholding of consent by a Rural Development Board to land transfer.
  • Section 52
  • Refusal of licence to plant trees.
  • Land Drainage Act 1976—
  • Section 68
  • Refusal of Internal Drainage Board re exemption of rates.
  • Section 84
  • Resolution of water authority requiring contribution to expenses.
  • Section 86
  • Resolution specifying amounts in lieu of contribution.
  • Environmental Protection
  • Public Health Act 1936—
  • Section 17
  • Local authority declaration re adoption of sewers.
  • Public Health (Drainage of Trade Premises) Act 1937—
  • Section 3
  • Local authority decision as to discharge of trade effluent.
  • Coast Protection Act 1949—
  • Section 7
  • Determination of a coast protection authority.
  • National Parks and Access to Countryside Act 1949—
  • Section 29
  • Draft maps etc prepared by surveying authorities.
  • Clean Air Act 1968—
  • Section 4
  • Local authority decision re arrestment plant.
  • Section 6
  • Local authority decision not to approve chimney height.
  • Control of Pollution Act 1974—
  • Section 10
  • Decision on licence for waste disposal.
  • Section 39
  • Decision on inland water protection.
  • Section 43
  • Water authority notices controlling discharges of trade effluent.
  • Sections 64, 65 & 67
  • Decision of local authority on noise pollution protection.
  • Section 87
  • Local Authority notice requiring air pollution information.
  • Special Waste Regulations 1980—
  • Regulation 9
  • Refusal to give directions concerning special waste.
  • Highways etc.
  • Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981, Schedule 14
  • Decision by Authority not to make Modification Order.
  • Highways Act 1980
  • Section 183
  • Local highway authority refusal of licence to lay apparatus.
  • Section 220
  • Application of advance payments code.
  • Section 233
  • Application of private street works code.
  • Town and Country Planning
  • Town and Country Planning Act 1971, Section 36
  • Planning decision of local planning authority.
  • Section 37
  • Default of planning decision.
  • Section 88
  • Enforcement notice.
  • Section 95(2)
  • Established use certificate.
  • Section 103
  • Replacement of trees in a Tree Preservation Order.
  • T.P.O. Regulations 1969, Paragraph 21, Article 25
  • LPA's refusal to consent to cutting etc.
  • Control of Advertisements Regulations 1984, Regulation 22 Refusal of consent for display of advertisement.
  • Land Compensation Act 1961, Section 18
  • Certificate of appropriate alternative development.
  • Water
  • Water Act 1945, Section 18
  • Byelaws for preventing pollution of water of undertakers.
  • Water Resources Act 1963
  • Section 39
  • Decision of water authority re licence.
  • Section 40
  • Failure of water authority to determine application for licence.
  • Section 72
  • Refusal of water authority's consent re control of discharges into underground strata.
  • Section 78
  • Conservation notice.

Social Services

Pensioners

asked the Secretary of State for Social Services whether all pensioners whose sole income is the full national insurance pension are entitled to some supplementary benefit; and how the figures for the national insurance pension for a single person and married couple compare with the minimum they would be entitled to have their incomes increased to by supplementary benefit.

The amount of supplementary benefit payable, if any, is dependent upon the claimant's circumstances. Pensioners who have available capital in excess of £3,000 are not entitled to supplementary benefit. Unless they are entitled to special additions, pensioners in the following categories who are in receipt of standard rate basic retirement pension (in respect of couples, where their pensions are based on the contribution record of only one partner) would not be entitled to supplementary benefit:

  • (a) Single person living as member of someone else's household.
  • (b) Single resident in accommodation provided by a local authority under part III of the National Assistance Act 1948 (unless they have continuing housing requirements for example water rates).
  • (c) Single person or both partners of a couple in hospital.
  • (d) Exceptionally, a single woman householder aged under 65 or a married couple with very low net housing requirements (but they may be entitled to housing benefit supplement).
  • The relevant rates of retirement pension and supplementary benefit are as follows.

    Current rate £

    Rate from 6 April £

    Retirement pension
    On own insurance38·7039·50
    On spouse's insurance23·2523·75
    Supplementary pension
    Householder
    Single aged under 65

    137·90

    138·65

    Single aged 65 and over

    l 239·10

    1 239·85

    Couple3

    1 261·85

    1 263·05

    Non-householder
    Single

    434·25

    435·00

    Couple

    464·55

    465·90

    Boarder personal expenses5
    Single10·9511·15
    Couple21·9022·30
    Resident in Part III
    accommodation6
    Single38·7039·50
    Couple77·4079·00
    Hospital in-patient (personal expenses)7
    Single7·757·90
    Couple (both in-patients)15·5015·80

    1 Housing requirements not covered by housing benefit (for example water rates) payable in addition.

    2 Figures include heating addition of £2·20 paid automatically to householders aged 65 and over, less £1 available scale margin.

    3 Where at least one of the couple is aged 65 or over.

    4 Figures include a housing addition of £3·90 (£4·05 from 6 April).

    5 Paid in addition to an amount for the board and lodging charge plus any meals not included in the charge (subject to certain limits).

    6 The rate for single persons coincides with the standard retirement pension rate. For married couples the figure is doubled.

    7 Continuing housing requirements paid in addition. Where only one of a couple are in hospital, the basic supplementary benefit is unchanged for eight weeks when it is reduced in line with the reduction in retirement pension.

    Child Abuse

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services what further steps he is taking to seek to protect children from abuse.

    The second stage of our training initiative to tackle child abuse will consist initially of four projects and cost £200,000 in 1987–88.The first of the four will involve the Open University in a two-year project to produce an introductory course on the problems of recognition and referral in cases of child abuse for professionals and others.The second is for a video and training pack on child sexual abuse for medical practitioners under the auspices of the Royal Society of Medicine.The other two projects will cover inter-disciplinary working: Professor Stevenson of Nottingham university will be developing training materials on the inter-agency aspects of case conferences; and the NSPCC will be developing training for social workers and health visitors who need to provide expert advice to colleagues in their own agencies.This programme complements other work already announced which the Department has in hand, including a new guide on inter-agency co-operation ("Working Together") and on the handling of child abuse ("Inquiries"); the preparation of practice guidance for social workers and health visitors; conferences organised by the Social Services Inspectorate on child sexual abuse; and the preparation of new legislation as envisaged in the White Paper "The Law on Child and Family Services".I believe that the four projects, together with the first stage of our training initiative which my right hon. Friend announced last October and the work which the Department has on hand, will make a useful contribution to improving practice in this area of child care, which is of concern to us all.

    Mid Staffordshire (Hospital)

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services if he will make a statement on the reasons for the delay in the construction of the new hospital planned to serve the Mid-Staffordshire parliamentary constituency and neighbouring constituencies.

    My hon. Friend will be aware that the West Midlands regional health authority is responsible for the management of individual building schemes contained in its operational capital programme. However, I understand that work on the new Lichfield/Tamworth district general hospital will commence in July 1989. The adjustment of the starting date arises from a review of the region's £870 million capital programme to ensure that the year-on-year expenditure remains within budget.

    Severe Weather Payments

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services how many applications for severe weather payments have been made in Dundee since 1 January; and how many applications have been granted.

    Information concerning the number of applications made in Dundee for exceptionally cold weather payments is not available. However, for the period from 1 January 1987 to 10 March 1987, the latest date for which figures are available, the two Dundee local offices made approximately 8,000 £5 weekly payments.

    National No-Smoking Day

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services how much public money paid directly or indirectly has been used in the national no-smoking day campaign.

    I refer my hon. Friend to my reply to my hon. Friend the Member for Brigg and Cleethorpes (Mr. Brown) on 18 December 1986, at column 702.

    Nhs (Building Projects)

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services what is the total national financial provision for building projects for (a) National Health Service hospitals and (b) other National Health Service facilities in the financial years 1986–87, 1987–88 and 1988–89.

    Information is not available in the form requested. The table shows the provision for hospital and community health services capital and other National Health Service capital for 1986–87 and 1987–88 and planned provision for 1988–89. Allocations are not aligned to particular projects. Their deployment and the use of income generated locally from the sale of surplus land and buildings is a matter for individual spending authorities.

    Capital Provision (£ million)

    1986–87

    1987–88

    1988–89 (plans)

    Hospital and community health services capital:

    gross894922952
    receipts141136140
    net753786812

    Other National Health Service capital:

    gross433737
    receipts110
    net423637

    Total National Health Service capital:

    gross937959989
    receipts142137140
    net795822849

    Note:

    Capital receipts for 1986–87 and 1987–88 are taken from the published Supply Estimate and for 1988–89 are provisional.

    Mediparks

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services if he will make it his policy to encourage the development of mediparks making use of surplus land with a view to encouraging technological innovation.

    It is for the regional and district health authorities concerned to consider in the light of local circumstances any specific proposals which are put to them for the use of surplus National Health Service land, including development of mediparks.

    Referral Patterns

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services if he will consult the Royal College of General Practitioners as to whether referral patterns can be changed to make maximum use of new hospital facilities provided in recent years.

    General medical practitioners usually prefer to refer their patients to hospitals conveniently situated, but they may refer to any National Health Service hospital consultant able to accept them. Referral patterns and waiting lists are amongst the topics currently being discussed with the medical profession.

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services what are his proposals for reducing cross-boundary patient flows in the context of resource allocation policy.

    Our policy is to distribute resources more fairly across the country so as to ensure equal opportunity of access to health care for people in equal need. We expect regions to follow the same principles in planning services and allocating resources across their districts.Patterns of patient flows across health authority boundaries will change and in many cases may reduce as this process continues, but the pace and extent of such changes will depend on local circumstances. District self-sufficiency is not an aim; patient flows will continue for specialist treatment, or where natural catchment areas of hospitals or other facilities do not exactly match health authority boundaries. In addition, general medical practitioners remain free to refer patients to the hospital consultant of their choice.

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services what is the estimated number of patients treated in hospitals in the London borough of Hillingdon referred by general medical practitioners in practice in the boroughs of Watford, Harrow and Ealing and in the counties of Hertfordshire and Buckinghamshire; and what additional financial resources are received by Hillingdon district health authority to take account of these cross-boundary flows.

    Information about hospital referrals by general medical practitioners is not collated centrally.My hon. Friend may wish to contact the chairman of the Hillingdon district health authority for any information about the location of practices of general medical practitioners referring patients to hospitals in the district, and the chairman of the North West Thames regional health authority, which is responsible for resource allocation to individual districts. The general principle followed by regional health authorities is that district funding takes account of cross-boundary flows of patients.

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services (1) if he will consult the North West Thames regional health authority about the extent to which general medical practitioners in the boroughs of Ealing, Watford and Harrow and in the counties of Buckinghamshire and Hertfordshire are encouraged to refer patients to consultants in the hospitals that have been newly provided in their boroughs and counties in recent years;(2) if he will make it his policy to seek to ensure that regional health authorities in the Thames regions consult their respective family practitioner committees with a view to achieving a change in referral patterns so that patients can take advantage of the facilities provided by the National Health Service in the boroughs and districts in which they are resident.

    We encourage regional and district health authorities to consult family practitioner committees and local medical commitees with the aim of encouraging general medical practitioners to make the most appropriate referrals for their patients bearing in mind the needs of individual patients and the location and availability of appropriate services.

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services if he will review the extent of the interim relief money recently allocated to Hillingdon district health authority to take account of cross-boundary flows.

    Hillingdon district health authority has been awarded £450,000 from the £2·6 million allocated to North West Thames regional health authority. This allocation was from a special fund of £30 million over two years designed to assist regions with less than average growth.Decisions on how the £2·6 million should be distributed to districts were a matter for North West Thames regional health authority.

    Hillingdon District Health Authority (Finance)

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services if he will make it his policy to seek to accelerate the rate at which patients from Ealing, Watford, Harrow, Buckinghamshire and Hertfordshire are treated at hospitals in their respective areas and to ensure that the movement of financial resources from Hillingdon is deferred until this has been achieved.

    Strategic planning for the region as a whole, and resource allocation to district health authorities, is primarily a matter for the North West Thames regional health authority. Where new facilities are being developed and resources redeployed within or between regions, which may have effects on referral patterns, the extent and pace of change is also primarily a matter for the authorities concerned.

    Pathology

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services what plans there are to encourage health authorities to put pathology services out to competitive tendering; and if he will make a statement.

    There are no present plans to encourage health authorities to put pathology services out to competitive tendering.

    Deaf-Blind People

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services how much money his Department is making available for the purchase of Hasicom equipment for use by the deaf-blind.

    The Department has not provided funding, but the Department of Track and Industry helped to set up the Hasicom project by providing £85,000 towards equipment costs and £10,000 in consultancy fees. Local authorities, if they consider that there is a need for such equipment, have a duty to provide it under section 2 of the Chronically Sick and Disabled Persons Act 1970. 'The Manpower Services Commission can also loan equipment if it is considered that this will help a disabled person overcome problems in the workplace and work efficiently.

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services what information he has about the number of deaf-blind persons in England and Wales.

    The information available centrally relates to the numbers of persons registered with social services departments in England as being blind with an additional handicap. The information cannot be considered comprehensive because registration is voluntary, the registers may not reflect migration or deaths and additional handicaps may not be categorised. The latest information is given in the table. Figures for Wales are a matter for my right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Wales.

    Number of Persons Registered as Blind who are also Deaf or Hard of Hearing at 31 March 1986
    EnglandNumber
    MalesFemalesTotal
    Blind-Deaf without speech126153279
    Blind-Deaf with speech5018681,369
    Blind-Hard of hearing1,0491,9523,001

    Breast Cancer Screening

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services if he has yet made an appointment to the chairmanship of the Advisory Committee on Breast Cancer Screening.

    We have appointed professor Martin Vessey, professor of social and community medicine in the university of Oxford, as chairman of the Advisory Committee on Breast Cancer Screening. Other members will be appointed shortly.The role of the advisory committee will be to advise on the development of the breast cancer screening service, to monitor its effectiveness and its efficiency and to advise on research concerned with the provision of the service.Responsibility for ensuring that a call and recall service for breast cancer screening for all women in England in the 50 to 64 age group has been set up by the target date of 31 March 1990 will lie with the small team led by Sir Roy Griffiths, which, as my right hon. Friend announced on 1 April, will also be overseeing the implementation of the call and recall system for cervical cancer screening.

    Aids

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services what guidance the chief medical officer at his Department has given on the professional position of doctors suffering from AIDS; what information he has as to the number of (a) general practitioners, (b) hospital doctors and (c) other doctors suffering from AIDS; and if he will make a statement.

    [pursuant to his reply, 23 March 1987, c. 74]: Like any other sick person, doctors with AIDS would receive advice from their own medical practitioners on whether they were fit to continue at work. The expert advisory group on AIDS, which is chaired by the chief medical officer, is currently preparing guidance on whether any restrictions are needed on the employment of HIV-infected doctors. The current advice from the United States, where there is far greater experience of HIV infection, is that it is not necessary to recommend restrictions on the activity of health care workers who are infected with HIV. The Department does not have information on the occupation of patients with AIDS and is unable to provide the information requested.

    Death Grant

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services how many death grant payments were made in the London borough of Southwark in each of the last three years and how many of those who received the payments will be eligible for the new means-tested death grant.

    [pursuant to his reply, 6 April 1987, c. 110]: Information is not available in the precise form requested. The London borough of Southwark is covered by the Department's offices in Peckham, Southwark, Brixton, Kennington Park and Lewisham, although their boundaries are not conterminous with the borough. The number of claims for death grant received in each of the five local offices during the last three years (April to April) were as follows:

    1984–85198–861986–87
    Peckham1,2451,3311,126
    Southwark723728649
    Brixton800926739
    Kennington Park598610495
    Lewisham1,1981,5311,224
    1 To 10 March 1987.
    It is not possible to predict how many people in the borough of Southwark will qualify for funeral payments from the social fund from April 1987.

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services what information he has as to what percentage of the residents of the London borough of Southwark will be eligible for the new means-tested death grant.

    [pursuant to his reply, 6 April 1987, c. 110]: Such a prediction depends, in part, on the number of people in the London borough of Southwark who receive supplementary benefit, or housing benefit, or family income supplement. Since all of this information is not available on the basis of local authority areas, no estimates of local levels of eligibility have been made.

    Northern Ireland

    Financial Management Initiative

    asked the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland whether he will make a statement on the effect on his Department of the financial management initiative.

    The Northern Ireland Office has implemented a programme of work to improve the value for money obtained from the Department's expenditure. Line managers have been given greater responsibility for, and better information on, expenditure in their areas of responsibility. This includes a management information system under which managers set objectives and targets and identify output and performance measures. The redesign and computerisation of the Department's accounting and financial information systems has accompanied the delegation of responsibility for the management of expenditure to line managers, including scope to redeploy resources across programme and running cost budgets.The Northern Ireland Civil Service, in parallel with developments in the Home Civil Service, has also engaged in a programme to improve financial management and efficiency by a variety of means. These include the use of top management systems to bring together information on objectives, resources, and performance, the development of computerised financial information and accounting systems to assist in budgeting and control of departmental expenditure and in the progressive application of the cost centre concept, and new initiatives on training and personnel management.The practical effects of the FMI within my area of responsibility can be seen in two particular respects. First, there are real long-term benefits emerging in the form of enhanced managerial awareness of the need to define clear objectives for the use of resources, to use these to set challenging targets and to measure performance against targets through the use of relevant management information. Secondly, this work has already led to greater efficiency in a number of areas where progress can more readily be quantified. Examples include a projected 5 per cent. decrease in energy consumption in Northern Ireland prisons, a reduction of£7·3 million in Northern Ireland electricity generating costs, a 5 per cent. reduction in unit costs per student at agricultural colleges, a Province-wide reduction in water leakage levels from 21 to 26 litres per property per hour to 13·19 litres by 1988–89, and the redeployment of £28 million in the Northern Ireland Health Service over the next five years to higher priority areas through better use of resources.

    Motor Vehicles (Offences)

    asked the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland if he will publish in the Official Report figures for Northern Ireland corresponding to those published for England and Wales in "Offences Relating to Motor Vehicles England and Wales" issued by the Secretary of State for the Home Department; and if he will make a statememt.

    [pursuant to his reply, 23 March 1987, c. 67]: Figures corresponding to those published in "Offences Relating to Motor Vehicles England and Wales" are not available for Northern Ireland. However, I have today placed in the Library, a copy of "A Commentary on Northern Ireland Crime Statistics 1985" published by the Northern Ireland Office, which give, amongst other data, information on motoring in Northern Ireland.

    Housing Executive

    asked the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland (1) what was the allocation of funds to the Northern Ireland Housing Executive for capital works to existing dwellings as at 1 April 1986;(2) what was the outturn figure for capital works carted out to existing dwellings owned by the Northern Ireland Housing Executive as at 31 March 1987;(3) what was the funding allocation to the Northern Ireland Housing Executive for capital works to existing dwellings in the south region as at 1 April 1986;(4) what was the outturn figure for capital works to existing dwellings in the south region of the Northern Ireland Housing Executive as at 31 March 1986;(5) what increased funding was requested by the Northern Ireland Housing Executive for capital expenditure to existing dwellings at the last autumn review; and what increase was allocated;(6) what increased funding was requested by the Northern Ireland Housing Executive for the south region at the last autumn review; and what increase was allocated.

    [pursuant to his reply, 6 April 1987, c. 118–19]:The Housing Executive's budget for capital works existing dwellings approved by the Department of the Environment (NI) for 1986–87 was £64 million. Additional capital receipts, savings elsewhere within the Executive's budgets and the transfer of a surplus of £1·5 million from the co-ownership scheme led the Executive to seek a number of revisions to its approved budgets in the autumn, including an increase to £68 million in the budget for work to existing dwellings. I understand from the Housing Executive that, on the basis of provisional figures, outturn for capital works to existing dwellings in 1986–87 is estimated to have been £67·9 million.

    The distribution of resources to its regions within agreed objectives and priorities is a matter for the Housing Executive and I shall arrange for the chairman to write to the hon. Member about the position in the south region.

    asked the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland (1) what was the period of the delay in a payment from the Masonic Housing Association to the Northern Ireland Housing Executive for a housing development in Donaghadee, established by a local government audit; and if he will make a statement;(2) if the normal accounting procedures of the Northern Ireland Housing Executive were implemented in relation to a payment from the Masonic Housing Association in respect of a housing development in Donaghadee; and if he will make a statement.

    [pursuant to his reply, 6 April 1987, c. 118–19]:A payment of £322,000 was made to the Masonic Housing Association (NI) Ltd. by the Department of the Environment (NI) on 23 March 1984 to allow the association to meet part of the cost of 20 dwellings constructed for it at Donaghadee by the Northern Ireland Housing Executive, within a total contract of 40 dwellings.I understand from the chairman of the Housing Executive that a recoverable charge was not formally raised against the association at the time in accordance with normal procedures. Payment was not, therefore, demanded by the executive and made by the association until February 1987. I also understand that the Housing Executive's procedures have now been revised to ensure that similar delays will not recur.

    asked the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland (1) what was the approved budget of the Northern Ireland Housing Executive nursery at Dundonald between 1983 and 1985;(2) how great was the loss to public funds deriving from overspending of the approved budget during 1983 to 1985 at the Northern Ireland Housing Executive nursery at Dundonald;(3) by how much the approved budget of the Northern Ireland Housing Executive nursery at Dundonald for 1983 to 1985 was exceeded.

    [pursuant to his reply, 6 April 1987, c. 118–19]: This is a matter for The chairman of the Housing Executive, who has informed me that the Housing Executive's financial systems did not entail the setting of a specific budget for the nursery. Financial provision for planting and general landscaping services which have been provided partly by the executive's own nursery but also by private contractors is made by each region within approved capital and revenue budgets; it would not be possible without disproportionate cost to identify the costs of services provided by the nursery, which is to close at the end of May.

    Agriculture, Fisheries And Food

    Rspca (Complaint)

    asked the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food if he has yet received notification of any decision taken by the EEC Commission indicating its response to a complaint lodged by the Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals in February 1985; and if he will make a statement.

    [pursuant to his reply, 7 April 1987]: I received such a communication late yesterday.

    Transport

    Motorways (Barriers)

    asked the Secretary of State for Transport what steps he has taken since June of 1986 to have inspections made to the footings of motorway barriers; what defects or deficiencies have been found; what steps he intends to take as a result; what proportion of total motorway mileage has been covered by such inspections; and if he will make a statement.

    Detailed inspections are being made this year to a sample of concrete post-footings during major maintenance works to carriageways where lane closures are required that give access to safety fences. These inspections are designed to identify the likely extent of misshapen footings. Any such footings found are being replaced. These inspections are in addition to those being carried out under a new code of practice for routine maintenance introduced in 1985.Comprehensive information on mileages inspected, defects found and remedial action taken is not yet available. We estimate that detailed inspections this year will cover a sample of up to about 150 miles of motorway safety fences. Complete results of detailed inspections to footings will not be available until the end of this year.I refer the hon. Member to my reply of 25 March to my hon. Friend the Member for Ealing, Acton (Sir G. Young) and my subsequent letter to him of 27 March, a copy of which is in the Library.

    Light Dues

    asked the Secretary of State for Transport whether his Department has initiated studies about the effect of light dues on the use of British ports.

    The light dues regime has virtually no effect on the volume of trade at many ports, but my Department is studying the extent to which the regime leads to trans-shipment of liner container traffic, which is of special importance to some ports.

    Motorway Lane Closures

    asked the Secretary of State for Transport if he will list the dates, times and places during which stretches of the M1 motorway between Derby (junction 25) and London have been reduced to single file traffic since January 1986.

    The information requested is not available. Where work involving single file running is planned, it is where possible carried out overnight or at other times when traffic volumes are at a minimum. We try to keep traffic disruption and delays to a minimum. Single lane running is only employed where there is no reasonable alternative.

    Motorways (Signs)

    asked the Secretary of State for Transport what was the cost of construction and erection of the "Keep Your Distance" signs on the MI motorway at junction 6A.

    The two signs on M1 at junction 6A now used to display the message "Keep Your Distance" cost £50,000 to install. They were first used for traffic management purposes during the final stages of completion of M25.

    asked the Secretary of State for Transport if he has any plans to erect further "Keep Your Distance" signs on motorways.

    Further use of "Keep Your Distance" signs will depend on the outcome of the experiment currently being conducted at the southern end of the M1. This experiment at present consists of nine permanent display motorway signs and a pair of variable message signs near junction 6A. There is also a pair of variable message signs on the M25 at junction 18 which are normally devoted to this purpose.The southern end of the M1 was chosen for this experiment because of the very heavy traffic density. The effectiveness of the signs is being monitored by the various police forces which patrol the sections of the motorway on which they have been erected.

    Marine Surveying (Reorganisation)

    asked the Secretary of State for Transport if he will publish the report on the reorganisation of the marine surveying department.

    I have placed in the Library a copy of the departmental notice describing the reorganisation of the Surveyor General's Organisation, which came into force on 1 April.

    Wheelchairs (Station Access)

    asked the Secretary of State for Transport when there will be a fully wheelchair-accessible station-to-station service after the existing contract has expired.

    Decisions on the future of the existing service beyond the present contract have not been taken. I understand that LRT intends to review the inter-station service in the light of experience once the wheelchair-accessible airbus service to Heathrow is in operation.

    London Underground

    asked the Secretary of State for Transport what are the estimated yearly savings on staff costs to London Regional Transport from the introduction of the Underground ticketing system.

    The current estimate from London Underground is that annual savings in staff costs of around £10 million will be achieved when the new Underground ticketing system is fully operational.

    asked the Secretary of State for Transport what applications he has received from London Regional Transport for the purchase of replacement rolling stock for the Central Line of the Underground.

    None. The requirements for replacement rolling stock have yet to be fully defined, following technical trials of prototype trains later this year.

    asked the Secretary of State for Transport what studies have been undertaken in the past two years by London Regional Transport or consultants appointed by them on the extension of existing Underground lines; and if he will make a statement.

    A number of enhancements to the Underground network are under consideration by the London passenger transport group. These include extensions to the Bakerloo, Jubilee East London, Metropolitan and Victoria lines.

    London Passenger Transport Group

    asked the Secretary of State for Transport when was the last meeting of the London Passenger Transport Group; and what was discussed at that meeting.

    The group met on 1 April, and discussed a range of matters concerning British Rail and London Regional Transport. These included joint ticketing, interchange improvements and rail planning issues.

    Lrt (Strategy)

    asked the Secretary of State for Transport when the next statement of strategy will be produce by London Regional Transport; and what public consultation there will be.

    London Regional Transport is required by the London Regional Transport Act 1984 to prepare and publish every three years a statement of strategy after consultation with the railways board, the local authorities concerned, the passengers' committee, and such other persons as it may think fit. The next such statement is to be published by June 1988. The nature of any public consultation on the statement and precise timing are matters for LRT.

    Bus Deregulation (London)

    asked the Secretary of State for Transport what studies into the effects of deregulation of bus services in Greater London are currently being carried out (a) by his Department and (b) by outside consultants; and if he will make a statement.

    My Department has commissioned no studies by consultants into the effects of deregulation in Greater London. The Department has a programme of monitoring deregulation outside London: the first report was published in January of this year.

    British Rail Stations (London)

    asked the Secretary of State for Transport how many British Rail stations there are in the Greater London area; how many are open only at peak times; how many are open only from Monday to Friday; how many are closed on Saturdays; and how many are closed on Sundays.

    British Transport Police

    asked the Secretary of State for Transport, how many British Transport police were employed in each of the years 1977 to 1987 on (a) London Regional Transport and (b) Southern region of British Rail.

    The British Transport police have provided the following figures:

    Year-endLRTBR Southern Region
    1977125n/a
    1978141n/a
    1979139n/a
    1980161n/a
    1981279n/a
    1982284193
    1983272191
    1984248196
    1985271205
    1986327206
    1987 (March)325214

    Note: Separate figures for BR Southern Region are not available for 1977 to 1981.

    Fishing Vessels (Loss Inquiries)

    asked the Secretary of State for Transport what plans he has for increasing the number of public inquiries held (a) when fishing vessels are lost or (b) when there are deaths at sea in connection with fishing vessles.

    In deciding whether to order a formal investigation into a shipping casualty my right hon. Friend will take into account: the number of lives lost; the degree of public concern; the desirability for the cause to be more clearly established; the likelihood that there are lessons to be learnt; and the possible need for disciplinary action against the master or a member of the crew. The decision is made on the individual facts of each casualty and to project a trend would be inappropriate.

    Fishing Vessels (Accident Statistics)

    asked the Secretary of State for Transport how many deaths there were on United Kingdom fishing vessels during the periods 1975 to 1980 and 1981 to 1985 arising from personal accidents.

    The number of deaths on United Kingdom fishing vessels from personal accidents was 88 for the period 1975–80 and 50 for the period 1981–85. These figures include those recorded as "missing at sea" but exclude those resulting from casualties to vessels.

    Vessel Losses

    asked the Secretary of State for Transport what change there has been in the number of vessels lost below 12 m in length during the periods 1975 to 1980 and 1981 to 1985.

    The number of fishing vessels less than 12 m in length recorded in the Department's annual publication "Casualties to Vessels and Accidents to Men" as lost in the periods 1978–80 and 1981–85 are 40 and 102 respectively. (Until 1978 records list these casualties in terms of gross tonnage and not length and a ship of 20 gross tons has been taken to approximate to one of 12 m). During this period the number of ships at risk has increased by about 40 per cent.

    Car Imports (Type Approval)

    Mr. Gale asked the Secretary of State for Transport if he has concluded his review of the terms of the personal import exemption from the national type approval requirements for cars; and if he will make a statement.

    The Government have decided to make no change in the present arrangements. This will enable consumers to continue to have the widest choice about where to buy their cars.I advise people intending to buy abroad to confirm with the manufacturer or his agent that the car meets our safety and environmental standards. That will be most readily evident if it has been type approved for use in this country.

    Navigational Aids

    asked the Secretary of State for Transport what studies he has undertaken into future developments in navigational aids.

    In April last year my right hon. Friend invited Dr. D. G. Kiely, a consultant electronics engineer, to undertake a study into developments in marine navigational aids in relation to users' long-term requirements. I have now received Dr. Kiely's report and I am arranging for its publication. Copies have been placed in the Library of the House. I am grateful to Dr. Kiely for undertaking this task and I am sure his conclusions and recommendations will command wide attention. I will be considering them most carefully and I would welcome views on them from all the interested parties.

    Environment

    London Docklands Development Corporation

    asked the Secretary of State for the Environment which borough councils have been consulted in respect of the master building agreement between the London Docklands Development Corporation and the developers of Canary wharf.

    I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave to the hon. Member for Newham, North-West (Mr. Banks) on 25 March at column 164.

    Housing

    asked the Secretary of State for the Environment if he will list those local authorities which have received ministerial visits from his Department in the last six months in connection with housing matters.

    There are 367 housing authorities in England. In the last six months, Ministers from the Department of the Environment have made visits to the following local authorities connected with housing matters.

    • Bracknell
    • Broxtowe
    • Cambridge
    • Daventry
    • Havering
    • Kensington and Chelsea
    • Kettering
    • Lewisham
    • Manchester
    • Nottingham
    • Pendle
    • Redditch
    • Rushcliffe
    • Solihull
    • South Tyneside
    • Stratford
    • Thamesdown
    • Wandsworth
    • Westminster
    • Wolverhampton

    British Waterways

    asked the Secretary of State for the Environment what has been the level of Government funding to the British Waterways Board in each year since 1979; and what has been the percentage change in each year in constant prices.

    The table shows the British Waterways Board's external financing limit, which covers both grant and borrowing, for the years 1979–80–1987–88, together with its expression in 1986–87 prices and the annual and overall percentage changes on this constant price base.

    EFL (cash)EFL (1986–87 prices)Annual percentage changeOverall percentage change
    £m£m
    1979–8025·742·8
    1980–8130·042·1-1·6
    1981–8231·640·4-4·0
    1982–8339·346·9+ 16·1
    1983–8440·846·6-0·6
    1984–8542·846·8+ 0·4
    1985–8644·145·4-3·0
    1986–8745·045·0-0·9
    1987–8845·043·1-4·2+ 0·7

    Nuclear Waste

    asked the Secretary of State for the Environment if he will publish the full list from which he selected Bradwell, Elstow, Fullbeck and Killingholme as sites for testing for suitability for receiving low-level nuclear waste.

    I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave in reply to a question by the hon. Member for Birmingham, Erdington (Mr. Corbett) on 6 April at column 29.

    Sewerage And Water Supply Building Projects

    asked the Secretary of State for the Environment what is the total national financial provision for sewerage and water supply building projects in the financial years 1986–87, 1987–88 and 1988–89.

    The information requested was presented to Parliament in January 1987 by my right hon. Friend the Chancellor of the Exchequer in the White Paper. "The Government's Expenditure Plans 1987–88 to 1989·90" Cm. 56-II.

    Households (Power Supplies)

    asked the Secretary of State for the Environment what information he has to how many households live in local authority accommodation which has only an electricity supply and no gas supply.

    Based on information from the "Family Expenditure Survey", an estimated 1·65 million local authority and new town tenants in Great Britain had electricty in their homes but not a gas supply in 1985.

    Satellite Television (Antenna)

    asked the Secretary of State for the Environment what representations he has received seeking an amendment to planning regulations to increase the permitted size of a satellite antenna to enable people in the north to install an antenna of sufficient size to receive satellite television without recourse to planning permission.

    From time to time we receive representations from different parts of the country seeking an increase in the size of satellite antennas which are permitted by the general development order. We consider that the present size limit of 90 cm for such antennas permitted by the GDO is appropriate given the possible environmental effect of an uncontrolled proliferation of larger dishes, but we shall continue to monitor the situation carefully.

    Hampstead Heath

    asked the Secretary of State for the Environment if he intends to accept the proposal from the City of London to be given responsibility for Hampstead Heath; and if he will make a statement.

    Decisions on the future ownership and management of Hampstead Heath will be taken only after

    Net current expenditure per head 1978–79 to 1985–86
    Expenditure per head 1978–79 £Expenditure per head 1985–86 £Percentage change in current expenditure (cash terms)Percentage change in current expenditure (real terms)
    Greater London CL3693158·336·8
    City of London2,76012,122339·2132·4
    Camden162483198·157·8
    Greenwich109279156035·4
    Hackney138385179·047·5
    Hammersmith and Futham152322111·812·2
    Islington163340108·610·4
    Kensington and Chelsea12925194·62·9
    Lambeth148355139·926·8
    Lewisham123266116·314·2
    Southwark171411140·427·2
    Tower Hamlets187403115·514·2
    Wandsworth12923582·2-3·7
    Westminster162370128·420·9
    Barking and Dagenham21337977·9-6·0
    Barnet19434477·3-6·3
    Bexley20635069·9-10·0
    Brent254587131·122·3
    Bromley18832070·2-9·9
    Croydon19335181·9-3·8
    Ealing22141487·3-1·0
    Enfield19033274·7-7·5
    Haringey262606131·322·4
    Harrow19535180·0-4·9
    Havering20035577·5-6·1
    Hillingdon23336965·5-12·6
    Hounslow21341795·83·5
    Kingston-upon-Thames19033877·9-5·8
    Merton21032454·3-18·4
    Newham236589149·632·1
    Redbridge18234086·8-1·2
    Richmond-upon-Thames18532977·8-6·0

    the London residuary body has put forward recommendations following its current consultation on the four options.

    Local Authority Expenditure

    asked the Secretary of State for the Environment what would be the cost to the taxpayer this year of increasing the proportion of local authority relevant expenditure in England met by Exchequer grant to 60 per cent.

    If English local authorities were spending at the level consistent with that contained in the 1987–88 RSG Settlement approved by the House on 25 March, and 60 per cent. of this was met by Exchequer grant (the same level as in 1979), the cost to the taxpayer would be equivalent to the yield of about an additional 3·5p on the standard rate of income tax. It seems that actual relevant expenditure is likely to be somewhat higher, so the cost would probably be nearer 4p.If the taxpayer had been obliged to underwrite 60 per cent. of whatever local authorities had chosen to spend over the years since 1979, local authorities would probably have spent more, and the cost to the taxpayer in 1987–88 would be greater still.

    asked the Secretary of State for the Environment if he will give for each individual London local authority net current expenditure per head of population in 1978–79 and in 1985–86, and the percentage increases in net current expenditure per head of population between 1978–79 and 1985–86 in cash and in real terms.

    Expenditure per head 1978–79 £

    Expenditure per head 1985–86 £

    Percentage change in current expenditure (cash terms)

    Percentage change in current expenditure (real terms)

    Sutton17732181·4-4·2
    Waltham Forest220466111·812·0
    ILEA173380119·716·2

    Rate Support Grant

    asked the Secretary of State for the Environment, if he will now answer the question to which a holding reply was given on 21 January at column 590 concerning rate support grant.

    [pursuant to his reply, 30 March 1987, c. 421]: The figures for 1987–88 requested at items (a) and (b) of the question have been placed in the Library. They include an adjustment for the costs of the teachers' pay settlement. The figures for 1978–79 have not been provided as grant was not paid on a comparable basis. The figures provided at (c) and (d) refer to 1981–82, the earliest year for which grant was paid on a comparable basis to 1987–88. The figures at (e) represent the percentage change in grant per head from 1981–82 to 1987–88 expressed as a percentage of the 1981–82 figures.

    Notes

    Rate Support Grant comprises Block Grant and Domestic Rate Relief Grant.

    The figures for 1981–82 are final entitlements expressed in 1986 prices using the GDP deflator. In 1981–82 Metropolitan police and GLC entitlements were paid to the rating authorities in their areas.

    The figures for 1987–88 are based on estimates of authorities' entitlements to grant following the first supplementary report which is expected to be laid before the House after Easter. The estimates, which are provisional, are on the basis of the expenditure figures provided by local authorities on form BG14, adjusted where necessary to include estimates of the cost of the teachers' pay settlement. Figures for London boroughs include abolition-related LRES receipts.

    In addition to the adjustments requested, the 1987–88 figures for the London boroughs and the districts of Broxbourne, Elmbridge, Epping Forest, Epsom and Ewell, Hertsmere, Reigate and Banstead, Spelthorne and Welwyn Hatfield include a proportion of the Receiver for the Metropolitan police district's rate support grant. For Broxbourne, Elmbridge, Epping Forest, Hertsmere, Reigate and Banstead and Welwyn Hatfield this grant has been distributed on the basis of estimates of the population of the parts of each council's area which fall within the Metropolitan police area.

    National Finance

    Investment Income (Disaggregation)

    asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer what is his estimate of the cost in 1987–88 of taking the investment income of husbands and wives separately, including occupational pensions.

    I regret the delay in answering this question. The revenue cost would depend on the detailed tax rules and on any consequential behavioural effects such as the transfer of assets between spouses. If the only changes to the tax rules were to allow the existing wife's earned income allowance against both the wife's investment income and category B state retirement pension and for the wife to have her own tax rate bands for these sources of income, the direct revenue cost (making no allowance for behavioural effects) would be about £500 million at 1987–88 levels of income. This figure is based on projections from information recorded on the survey of personal incomes, which does not have complete coverage of investment income taxed at source, and could therefore be an underestimate. An occupational pension arising from the wife's employment is treated as the wife's earned income under the current rules and qualifies for the wife's earned income allowance.

    Personal Equity Plans

    asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer what information he has about the size of the companies in which the managers of personal equity plan funds are concentrating their investments.

    It has been reported that, as I expected, most of the subscriptions to personal equity plans are invested in shares in the leading 100 British companies. It is, of course, for investors and plan managers to decide what shares are bought. The regulations for personal equity plans allow investment in shares of any United Kingdom company quoted on the stock exchange or dealt with on the unlisted securities market.

    Housing Costs

    asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer whether he will publish in the Official Report a table showing the price of a three-bedroom semidetached house in terms of the number of years' average earnings for an adult male in London and in the south-east in 1957, 1967, 1987 and 1986 together with the annual interest payable after tax on the purchase price, assuming a 90 per cent. mortgage and maximum relief.

    Average prices of three-bedroom semi-detached houses are not available. The table gives average house prices for all properties bought with building socieity mortgages in 1977 and 1986: figures for the earlier years requested are not available. Because of the large number of commuters in the south-east, it is not possible to provide separate estimates for London and the rest of the south-east of house prices related to the earnings in each locality.

    London and the South East

    Average house price1 £

    Ratio of house price to earnings2

    Annual net interest on 90 per cent. mortgage3£

    197716,5403·851,080
    198650,3754·164,213

    1 Source: Department of Environment's survey of building society mortgages at completion stage.

    2 Average gross weekly pay of full time males on adult rates whose pay was not affected by absence, in April each year; source: New Earnings Survey.

    3 Assuming 11 per cent, interest rate in 1977 with tax relief at 34 per cent. and 11·5 per cent, interest rate in 1986 with tax relief at 29 per cent, on the first £30,000.

    Company Cars

    asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer what is his best estimate of the value of petrol purchased by businesses for (a) their own use and (b) that of their employees in 1986–87; what was the value of the benefit paid to the directors and to higher-paid employees; how much of this was subject to the scale charge; and what is his estimate of the amount of revenue from income tax and national insurance contributions in 1987–88 due from assessments under the same charge.

    It is estimated that the value of petrol purchased by sectors other than the personal sector was about £2·4 billion in 1985, the latest year for which information is available. This estimate includes purchases by companies and the public sector but excludes unincorporated businesses. I regret that information about the use of petrol purchased is not available.The taxable value of any free fuel provided for the private use of a director or higher paid employee is determined by reference to a set of scale charges and does not depend on the amount of fuel provided. It is estimated that, in 1987–88, the taxable value of free fuel provided for private use will be £450 million leading to an income tax yield of around £160 million. The provision of free fuel for private use does not affect national insurance contributions.

    Maturity Loans And Home Income Plan Mortgages

    asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer what representations he has received seeking amendment of the law so that interest as well as capital on maturity loans and on home income plan mortgages can be rolled up during the lifetimes of the borrowers; and if he will make a statement.

    My right hon. Friend has received representations about tax relief on the interest on loans to purchase life annuities taken out by elderly home owners and secured on their homes. Repayment arrangements on such loans, including any provision for rolling up interest, are matters for agreement between the lender and the borrower.

    Small Businesses

    asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer how the need to obtain a European Community derogation for the proposed scheme of value added tax cash accounting for small businesses will affect the timing of legislation and whether he will make a statement.

    As my right hon. Friend announced in his Budget Statement on 17 March, he proposes to introduce the facility of cash accounting for businesses with an annual turnover not exceeding £250,000 on 1 October 1987, and the Government's request for a derogation from the sixth VAT directive to permit this was notified to the European Commission on Budget day. The Finance Bill, published today, contains in clause 10 powers for the Commissioners of Customs and Excise to make detailed regulations to implement the cash accounting scheme. In order to ensure compliance with European Community law these regulations will not be made until the EC derogation has been approved. Later this month I shall be placing in the Library a draft of the regulations in time to assist the House in its detailed consideration of the Finance Bill provisions.

    Taxation

    asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer if he will list (a) the number of married women whose investment income was assessed to tax as that of their husbands' during the tax years 1982–83, 1983–84, and 1984–85, (b) the total gross income so assessed in each year and (c) the tax received thereon.

    [pursuant to his reply, 16 March 1987, c. 387]:The Surveys of Personal Income for the years specified indicate that about 1½ million married women

    Effect of Transferable Allowances1 at 1987–88 Income levels
    Paying less taxPaying more tax
    Total Income (lower limit) £ per weekNumbers thousandsAnnual tax change £ millionNumbers thousandsAnnual tax change £ millionAnnual tax change £ million
    Married Couples aged under 65—both earning
    Under 60
    60–10030-520-5
    100–15090-15270+ 70+ 55
    150–200140-20530+ 155+ 135
    200–300250-351,790+ 580+ 545
    300–40090-101,460+ 510+ 500
    Over 400130-451,070+ 340+ 295
    All730-1305,140+ 1,655+ 1,525
    Married Couples aged under 65—one earning
    Under 6010
    60–100210-3510+ 5-30
    100–150620-17070+ 15-155
    150–200910-25550+ 10-245
    200–3001,550-44040+ 10-430
    300–400500-14510-145
    Over 400390-19510-195
    All4,180-1,240200+ 40-1,200
    Married Couples aged 65 and over
    Under 60
    60–100140-10-10
    100–150440-12090+ 20-100
    150–200200-6090+ 20-40
    200–300140-50100+ 10-40
    300–40050-2040+ 5-15
    Over 40080-9050+ 10-80
    All1,050-350370+ 65-285
    All Groups5,960-1,7205,710+ 1,760+ 40
    1 At £2,425 for non-aged and with age allowances of £2,690 for aged 65–79 and £3,070 for aged 80 and over.

    had investment income amounting to some £1¼ billion per annum on which the tax due would be about £500 million. This calculation treats the wife's investment income as the top slice of the couple's joint income. In practice, these figures underestimate the full amounts, because the surveys do not provide comprehensive coverage of investment income on which the liability to basic rate tax has been satisfied at source.

    Married Women (Taxation)

    asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer whether he will publish in the Official Report a table showing by personal category and range of income for elderly and for other taxpayers the gross and net cost to the Exchequer of separate taxation, without aggregation, of married women in the coming financial year on the assumption that each spouse has a transferable allowance equal to the single allowance and that the wife's earned income all6wance will be abolished; and how much of the loss would be in respect of higher rate tax on earned income and of standard rate and higher rate tax, respectively, on unearned income.

    [pursuant to his reply, 23 March 1987, c. 40]:The table shows the effects for married couples, at 1987–88 income levels, of transferable allowances at the levels for single persons proposed in the 1987 Budget. Further analyses could only be provided at disproportionate expense.

    Wife's Earned Income Allowance

    asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer whether he will publish in the Official Report a table showing the numbers and estimated cost of the wife's earned income allowance in the next financial year by range of the wife's income and of the joint incomes of husband and wife.

    [pursuant to his reply, 23 March 1987, c. 40]:The latest estimates are given in the tables. They are based on a projection from the 1984–85 survey of personal incomes and are therefore provisional. They exclude wives who have no Inland Revenue tax record because their earnings are below the PAYE reporting limit.

    Numbers and cost of the wife's earned income allowance, 1987–88 by range of wife's income1
    Wife's income1 lower limit (£ pa)Number of earning wives2 '000s)Cost of wife's earned income allowance3(£ million)
    1960105
    1,0001,010385
    2,0001,150700
    3,000830550
    4,000590390
    5,000560385
    6,000600415
    7,000380265
    8,000280200
    9,000170135
    10,000300265
    12,000170165
    15,0007075
    20,0002030
    30,0001015
    All ranges7,1004,080
    1 Wife's total earned income.
    2All married women with earned income benefit from the wife's earned income allowance. The figures exclude those with earnings below the PAYE reporting limit and self-employed wives making a net loss.
    3 Including personal allowance claimed by wives with separate earnings election.
    Distribution of total income11987–88
    Numbers
    Tax units aged under 65Tax units aged over 65
    Range of total income Lower limit (£ pa)Single people ('000s)Married couples without wife's earned income ('000s)Married couples with wife's earned income ('000s)Single people ('000s)Married couples without wife's earned income ('000s)Married couples with wife's earned income ('000s)
    1,00021,1201703030205
    2,00021,150260604603010
    3,0009001607036012030
    4,000900190100220210110
    5,0001,07024014014022090
    6,00091028014010011080
    7,000810310170909070
    8,000690380210608060
    9,000560370280504050
    10,000800820700606070
    12,0005008601,230604070
    15,0003205701,650404070
    20,000100190710202050
    25,00050100340101010
    30,00040110380102020
    50,00020507051010
    1 Total income for income tax purposes.
    2 Excluding those who have no Inland Revenue tax record because their earnings are below the PAYE reporting limit.

    Numbers and cost of the wife's earned income allowance, 1987–88 by range of joint total income of husband and wife1

    Joint total income1 lower limit (£ pa)

    Number of earning wives2 ('000s)

    Cost of wife's earned income allowance3 (£ million)

    1200
    1,000300
    2,000700
    3,0001100
    4,00020015
    5,00022055
    6,00022050
    7,000240110
    8,000280125
    9,000330160
    10,000770390
    12,0001,300725
    15,0001,7201,035
    20,0001,120830
    30,000470545
    All ranges7,1004,080

    1 Total income for income tax purposes

    2 All married women with earned income benefit from the wife's earned income allowance. The figures exclude those with earnings below the PAYE reporting limit and self-employed wives making a net loss.

    3 Including personal allowance claimed by wives with separate earnings election.

    Gross Incomes

    asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer whether he will publish in the Official Report his estimate of the distribution of gross incomes in the coming financial year by range of income in steps of £1,000 to £20,000 and £5,000 to £50,000 divided between elderly and other taxpayers and between single persons and one-earner and two-earner households.

    [pursuant to his reply, 25 March 1987, c. 216]:The latest available estimates are given in the table. They are based on a projection from the 1984–85 survey of personal incomes and are therefore provisional. In order to provide reliable estimates some of the requested income ranges have been combined.

    Vat Inputs Frauds

    asked the Chancellor of the Excequer if he is able to give the latest information with regard to the precise or estimated amounts of value added tax inputs frauds; and if he will make a statement.

    [pursuant to his reply, 6 April 1987, c.76]:Amounts of value added tax input frauds are not recorded separately from those for output tax, and the information could be provided only at disproportionate cost and effort.

    Central Office Of Information (Survey Research)

    asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer if he will state the sum expended on survey research by the Central Office of Information in each year since 1982.

    [pursuant to his reply, 6 April 1987, c. 76–7]: The amount spent by the Central Office of Information on all research in connection with the planning, execution and evaluation of Government publicity was:

    £
    1982–83408,000
    1983–84589,000
    1984–85591,000
    1985–86911,000
    1986–871,924,000

    Manufacturing Industry

    asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer what has been the level of investment, capital consumption and net investment each year in manufacturing industry since 1970.