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Written Answers

Volume 115: debated on Friday 1 May 1987

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Written Answers To Questions

Friday 1 May 1987

Education And Science

Assisted Places Scheme

asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science if he will list the schools which have (a) over 20 per cent., (b) over 30 per cent. and (c) over 40 per cent. of their pupils paid for under the assisted places scheme.

The information requested for the school year 1986–87 is as follows:

(a) Schools with 20 per cent. to 30 per cent. of their pupils paid for under the assisted places. scheme (APS)

  • Alleyns School, Dulwich
  • Belvedere School, Liverpool
  • Birkenhead High School
  • Birkenhead School
  • Bristol Cathedral School
  • Bury Grammar School (Boys)
  • Carmel College, Wallingford
  • Churcher's College. Petersfield
  • Colfe's School, London
  • Dame Allan's Boys' School, Newcastle-upon-Tyne
  • Dame Allan's Girls' School, Newcastle-upon-Tyne
  • Denstone College, Uttoxeter
  • Edgehill College, Bideford
  • Exeter School
  • Friends School, Saffron Walden
  • Godolphin and Latymer School, London
  • Hulme Grammar School (Boys), Oldham
  • Hulme Grammar School (Girls), Oldham
  • King Edward VI High School, Birmingham
  • King Edward VII School, Lytham
  • King Edward VI School. Southampton
  • King's High School for Girls, Warwick
  • Kingston Grammar School
  • La Sagesse Convent School, Newcastle-upon-Tyne
  • Latymer Upper School, London
  • Liverpool College
  • Magdalen College School, Oxford
  • Maynard School, Exeter
  • Merchant Taylors' School, Liverpool
  • Mount St. Mary's College, Derbyshire
  • Northampton High School
  • Norwich High School
  • Queen Mary School, Lytham
  • Red Maids' School, Bristol
  • Royal Grammar School, Newcastle-upon-Tyne
  • St. Bees School, Cumbria
  • St. Joseph's Convent, Reading
  • St. Mary's College, Crosby
  • Streatham Hill and Clapham High School
  • Talbot Heath School, Bournemouth
  • Upton Hall Convent School, Wirral
  • Ursuline High School, Ilford
  • Wellington School, Somerset
  • William Hulme Grammar School, Manchester

(b) Schools with 31 per cent. to 40 per cent. of APS pupils

  • Batley Grammar School
  • Emanuel School, London
  • Farnborough Hill School
  • Hereford Cathedral School
  • King Edward's School, Birmingham
  • Newcastle-under-Lyme School, Staffordshire
  • Queen Elizabeth's Hospital School, Bristol
  • St. Edward's College, Liverpool
  • Wisbech Grammar School
  • Wolverhampton Grammar School

(c) Schools with over 40 per cent. APS pupils

None

Fee-Charging Schools

asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science what have been the levels of public expenditure on fee-charging schools by (a) central Government and (b) local government in each of the last five years in constant 1986–87 prices.

The information requested is given in the following table:

Financial YearDES expenditure (£m)Local government expenditure (£m)
1982–8315·0136·0
1983–8421·0135·0
1984–8527·0132·0
1985–8633·01125·0
1986–8742·02125·0
1 Provisional.
2 Estimated.
These figures do not include expenditure by the Foreign and Commonwealth Office or the Ministry of Defence on fee-charging schools. Such expenditure is the responsibility of my right hon. Friends the Secretaries of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs and for Defence.

Science And Engineering Research Council

asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science how much has been awarded in grants by the Science and Engineering Research Council to education institutions and others in each year since 1979: how much the council will disburse in the current year; and if he will make a statement.

[pursuant to his reply, 8 April 1987, c. 220]: The question printed in the Official Report did not relate to the answer given. The question is as above; the answer remains as printed at column 220:The information requested is as follows:

SERC research grants to education institutions and others
Financial yearAmount £ million (Cash)
1979–8043·3
1980–8156·2
1981–8262·3
1982–8367·6
1983–8470·4
1984–8578·8
1985–8687·0
1986–87198·4
1987–882103·7
1 Provisional outturn
2 Estimates
The Science and Engineering Research Council's total grant-in-aid from the science budget in 1987–88 is £350 million. SERC's overall allocation is determined by my right hon. Friend in the light of advice from the Advisory Board for the Research Councils. The SERC is primarily responsible for deciding priorities within its overall allocation.

asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science how much has been disbursed by the Science and Engineering Research Council teaching in companies scheme in each year since the scheme was introduced; how much has been disbursed to (a) individuals and (b) companies in Yorkshire and Humberside in each year since this scheme was introduced; how much is to be disbursed to individuals and companies in Yorkshire and Humberside under the council's latest allocation; what representations about this allocation he has received; and if he will make a statement.

[pursuant to his reply, 31 March 1987, c. 447]: The answer printed in the Official Report is incorrect. The answer is as printed in the Official Report for 3 April at column 631:The following table shows the information requested in the first part of the question:

Amount disbursed by SERC on teaching company scheme
£K
Financial YearNet Expenditure3
1976–7724·5
1977–7881·5
1978–79177·5
1979–80231·5
1980–81606·0
1981–82663·5
1982–831,006·0
1983–841,600·0
1984–852,027·0
1985–862,452·5
1986–8712,760·0
1987–8823,585·0
1 Provisional outturn
2 Estimates
3 The teaching company scheme is jointly funded. Up to 1984–85, it was funded on a 50–50 basis by the SERC and the Department of Trade and Industry. Since 1985–86, the Economic and Social Research Council has contributed an additional £80,000 a year matched by the DTI. The Northern Ireland Department of Economic Development joined the scheme in 1986–87 when it contributed £20,000. Its estimated contribution in 1987–88 is £150,000.
Because of the way in which TCS records are held disproportionate cost would be involved in extracting figures for a particular region such as Yorkshire and Humberside. No representations about regional allocations have been received.TCS grants are made to education institutes and not to individuals or companies.

asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science how much has been awarded in grants by the Science and Engineering Research Council to (a) education institutions and (b) others in Yorkshire and Humberside in each year since 1979; how much the council will disburse in the current year; and if he will make a statement.

[pursuant to his reply, 8 April 1987, c. 220]: The answer printed in the Official Report is incorrect. The answer is as printed in the Official Report for 31 March at column 447:

The Science and Engineering Research Council has been asked for this information. I shall reply as soon as possible.

Environment

Community Charge

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment what representations he has received about the minimum level of the community charge to be paid by those on low incomes.

We have received, and continue to receive, a substantial number of representations on this issue.

Council House Sales

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment how many council dwellings were sold in the Corby district during 1986–87.

Corby district has reported selling 229 council dwellings during the first nine months of 1986–87.

Litter

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment what information he has on the adequacy of the litter bins in (a) Kensington Gardens and (b) other royal parks; and if he will ensure that more and larger receptacles of decent design are provided before the summer season.

We are currently reviewing our arrangements for litter collection in Kensington Gardens and the other royal parks. We are looking for improvements in both the collection arrangements and in the design and distribution of bins. We already provide extra bins for the summer season and bins are regularly emptied. But we are clearly not coping satisfactorily with removing the vast amounts of litter produced by visitors, particularly on warm weekends and bank holidays.

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment if he has any plans to introduce legislation providing for fixed penalty fines for offences committed under the Litter Act 1983; and if he will make a statement.

The Government have no plans to introduce legislation providing for fixed penalties for littering. There are doubts about the practicability of applying such a system, bearing in mind the additional strain that it would place on the police and criminal justice system.

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment if he has any plans to introduce legislation to empower traffic wardens to enforce anti-litter legislation; and if he will make a statement.

We have no plans to introduce legislation to empower traffic wardens to enforce anti-litter legislation. The service is already fully stretched in performing the duties currently allotted to it, and to extend its range of activities would serve only to spread the scarce manpower resources more thinly and thus reduce the effectiveness of the service.

Flats

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment if he will publish in the Official Report the number of premises which contain 10 or more flats and which have 10 per cent. or more more vacant flats in (a) England and Wales and (b) London at the latest convenient date.

Foreign And Commonwealth Affairs

Fisheries (South Atlantic)

asked the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs if he will publish the dates, locations and names of participants in the meetings with the Argentine Government, or their representatives, concerning the future of fisheries in the South Atlantic; and if he will make a statement.

Crown Agents Stamp Company

asked the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs if he will make it his policy not to allow Volpone Investments to take over the Crown Agents Stamp Company.

Any request which may be made for my consent for the sale by Crown Agents of the Crown Agents Stamp Company Ltd. will be carefully considered on is merits. No such request at present exists. It would be wrong for me to comment on particular companies in such circumstances.

asked the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what proposals he has to ensure that staff transferred from the control of Crown Agents with the Crown Agents Stamp Company have their redundancy and transfer entitlements protected; and whether staff made redundant at a later date would be eligible to re-enter the Crown Agents or Civil Service.

The Crown Agents are, of course, aware of their obligations to their staff, and will take full account of them in any detailed negotiations for the sale of the Crown Agents Stamp Company.

asked the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what assessment he has made of the effects of the sale of the Crown Agents Stamp Company on its reputation for impartiality; what steps he has taken to ensure the maintenance of high standards in the operations of the Crown Agents Stamp Company following its sale; and if he will make a statement.

The board of Crown Agents has concluded that it would he in the best interests of all concerned for both stamp companies (Crown Agents Stamp Company Ltd. and Crown Agents Philatelic Corporation) to be sold to an enterprise which would provide the commercial skills of an experienced private sector marketing organisation. No specific proposal for the sale of the companies has yet been put to me for consent under the 1979 Act. If and when one is, my decision will take into account factors such as those mentioned by the hon. Member.

asked the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs whether the Crown Agents or any other body will have a duty to ensure the proper conduct of the Crown Agents Stamp Company operation after the controlling interest is removed from the Crown Agents.

Detailed terms and conditions of sale of a controlling interest in the Crown Agents Stamp Company have yet to be formulated. The Crown Agents board is well aware of the need to take account of the interests and concerns of its present clients.

Wales

Surgical Operations

asked the Secretary of State for Wales what were the number of surgical operations carried out in Wales in the years (a) 1970 to 1975, (b) 1975 to 1980 and (c) 1980 to 1985.

The information is as follows:

Number of surgical operations performed in Wales
Numbers
197089,796
197192,788
1972107,583
1973104,860
1974108,647
1975104,231
1976105,732
1977122,066
1978120,913
1979118,898
1980126,938
1981130,184
1982129,790
1983159,911
1984172,759
1985173,445

Hospital Building

asked the Secretary of State for Wales (1) how many district general hospitals are under construction at the present time in Wales;(2) how many district general hospitals are planned to be built in Wales

(a) in the next five years and (b) in the next 10 years.

Major phases of construction are under way at four district general hospitals and are currently planned at seven. Two new district general hospitals are in the preliminary planning stage. Additionally, a large new hospital being built in Llanelli.

Mental Handicap

askded the Secretary of State for Wales what was the expenditure on providing (a) National Health Service residential and (b) other residential care for mentally handicapped people in Wales (a) in the years 1970 to 1975, (b) in the years 1975 to 1980 and (c) in the years 1980 to 1985, expressed in actual and in 1975 adjusted terms.

The readily available information is as follows:

Net expenditure on in-patients1 at mental handicap hospitals
Actual (£000's)21975–76 prices (£000's)
1976–778,7757,753
1977–789,8957,674
1978–7911,5338,083

Actual (£000's)

21975–76 prices (£000's)

1979–8013,9578,371
1980–8117,7928,996
1981–8219,7109,074
1982–8321,3859,180
1983–8421,9069,002
1984–8523,4019,220
1985–8624,4589,071

1 The figures exclude expenditure on mental handicap patients in units at non-psychiatric hospitals.

2 Re-priced to 1975–76 prices using the GDP deflator.

Net expenditure on other residential care for the mentally handicapped1

Actual (£000's)

21975–76 prices (£000s)

1976–773,8923,439
1977–784,2473,291
1978–795,1503,610
1979–806,3663,818
1980–817,6583,872
1981–828,7744,039
1982–839,9404,267
1983–8410,8894,475
1984–8512,1094,771
1985–8612,8764,775

1 Other residential care for the mentally handicapped includes homes and adult training centres.

2 Re-priced to 1975–76 prices using the GDP deflator.

Mental Illness

asked the Secretary of State for Wales (1) what was the expenditure on providing (a) National Health Service residential and (b) other residential care for mentally ill people in Wales (i) in the years 1970 to 1975, (ii) in the years 1975 to 1980 and (iii) in the years 1980 to 1985 expressed in actual and in 1975 adjusted terms;(2) what was the expenditure on providing community care for mentally ill people in Wales

(a) in the years 1970 to 1975 (b) in the years 1975 to 1980 (c) in the years 1980 to 1985 expressed in actual and in 1975 adjusted terms.

The readily available information is as follows:

Net expenditure on in-patients1 at mental illness hospitals
Actual (£000's)21975–76 prices (£000's)
1976–7721,74519,212
1977–7824,27818,833
1978–7926,51018,581
1979–8031,57218,935
1980–8140,23020,340
1981–8243,89320,208
1982–8348,27520,723
1983–8450,45620,734
1984–8553,30921,003
1985–8655,72620,668
1 The figures exclude expenditure on mental illness patients in units at non-psychiatric hospitals.
2 Re-priced to 1975–76 prices using the GDP deflator.

Net expenditure on other residential care for the mentally ill1

Actual (£000's)

21975–76 prices (£000's)

1976–77203179
1977–78328254
1978–79529371
1979–80678407
1980–81703355
1981–82841387
1982–831,035444
1983–841,111457
1984–851,131446
1985–861,108411

1 No information is available on expenditure incurred for providing other forms of community care for mentally ill people.

2 Re-priced to 1975–76 prices using the GDP deflator.

Executive Committee Nhs Directorate

asked the Secretary of State for Wales (1) what are the anticipated eventual capital costs in setting up the Executive Committee and the National Health Service Directorate for Wales;(2) what are the anticipated eventual revenue costs in operating the Executive Committee and the National Health Service Directorate for Wales.

The establishment of the Executive Committee of the Health Policy Board and the NHS Directorate are a consequence of a reorganisation of existing staff at the Welsh Office Health and Social Work Service Department following the implementation of the report of the Griffiths inquiry. The revenue costs of these staff in 1987–88 are expected to be about £1·75 million. There are no anticipated capital costs.

Cervical Carcinoma

asked the Secretary of State for Wales what steps he is taking to reduce the maximum waiting time for in-patient treatment of cervical carcinoma at Singleton hospital, Swansea.

The radiotherapy and oncology service, including in-patient treatment of cervical carcinoma at Singleton hospital, Swansea, has been the subject of a review which has recently been completed. The results of this review are being considered.

M4 (Safety)

asked the Secretary of State for Wales if he will make a statement on road safety conditions on the M4 motorway between the junctions with the A470 and the A48(M); what steps he is taking to monitor traffic density on this stretch of the M4; and if he will make a statement.

Accident records for the years 1984–86 indicate that road safety conditions on the M4 between junctions 29 and 32 compare very favourably with the rest of the motorway network. Traffic density on this stretch of the motorway is monitored by South Glamorgan county council and current indications are that traffic flows are well within its design capacity.

Hospital Waiting Lists

asked the Secretary of State for Wales if he will improve the technological facilities available to general practitioners in Wales to enable them to provide up-to-date information to patients on waiting lists for hospital treatment everywhere in the United Kingdom.

GPs are private contractors and any improvement of technological facilities is therefore a matter for each practice to consider. The dissemination of hospital waiting list information is a matter for the district health authority. Generally in Wales such information is sent to GPs within the district, who are free to refer patients as they deem appropriate, both within and outside Wales, if the patients are willing to travel.

asked the Secretary of State for Wales if he will list by hospital the waiting lists for in-patient and out-patient treatment in the South Glamorgan area health authority.

The requested information is given in the following table:

Total waiting list as at 31 December 1986
Hospital/ClinicIn-patientsOut-patients
University Hospital of Wales4,98111,523
Dental Hospital1,675
Children's ENT424480
Cardiff Royal Infirmary823314
Prince of Wales1,472
Rookwood
St. Davids3
Lansdowne
Glan Ely
Llandough412595
Barry Community
Sully
Amy Evans Clinic822
Neale Kent
Royal Hamadryad
Whitchurch
Ely
Velindre5059

Trade And Industry

Shareholders

asked the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry if, pursuant to his answer of 15 December, Official Report, column 345, on shareholders' lists, he will summarise the views of companies in relation to the supply of names and addresses of shareholders under section 356 of the Companies Act 1985.

The consultative document on "Delivery of Annual Accounts and Returns to the Registrar of Companies" raised a number of issues on registers of shareholders. It sought views on a proposal to change the requirement for companies annually to file a full copy of the register of shareholders at company registration offices, where they may be inspected or copied. It proposed, while retaining the duty of companies themselves to maintain full registers of shareholders and permit public inspection and copying of them, that filing of full lists be restricted to companies with fewer than 10 members; with other companies being required to file only the total number of shareholders together with a full list of those individually holding 1 per cent. or more of the company's shares. A majority of the 994 companies and representative organisations who responded favoured some change along the lines proposed, but there were mixed views about the degree of disclosure.However, nearly all respondents agreed with a related proposal to raise the fees for inspection and copying of lists of members taken from company registers. Most also agreed that the Companies Act should be amended to allow these fees to be fixed by order.

House Of Fraser

asked the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry what are the terms of reference of the inspectors appointed under the Companies Act to investigate the circumstances surrounding the acquisition of shares in House of Fraser during 1984 and 1985.

The inspectors were appointed under section 432 of the Companies Act 1985 to investigate and report on the affairs of House of Fraser Holdings plc. As I said in my answer of 27 April, at column 4, I have referred the inspectors in particular to the circumstances surrounding the acquisition of shares in House of Fraser plc in 1984 and 1985.

British Waterways Board

asked the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry when the Monopolies and Mergers Commission report on the maintenance activities of the British Waterways Board will be published; and if he will make a statement.

The report is published today.The commission was asked to investigate the efficiency and costs of BWB's maintenance of its waterways. Particular aspects mentioned in the terms of reference included the scope for additional use of contractors or consultants, BWB's procedures for appraising maintenance requirements and assessing priorities, setting and implementing maintenance standards and estimating costs for in-house and contracted-out work. The commission was also asked to comment on how far BWB's maintenance operations were programmed to fit the current and future priorities of the leisure and freight departments.The commission has made serious criticisms of much of BWB's management and procedures but noted that improvements in management and planning were taking place. The commission found that BWB was only just beginning to define national standards for maintenance. It needed to define maintenance tasks in detail as a step towards being able to compare in-house and contractors' costs systematically. These comparisons would help BWB to decide what work to do with its own labour force and what to contract out. The commission recommended that BWB should decide on the size and deployment of its labour force on the basis of a detailed assessment of work load, using the new definitions of maintenance standards and tasks, and of the cheapest ways of doing the work using reliable cost comparisons.The commission considered that BWB's maintenance programme should reflect more closely the relative contributions of leisure and freight uses to revenue. It recommended that in appraising project proposals BWB should have regard to the relationship between income (or usage) and maintenance expenditure on individual waterways. While BWB's published objectives acknowledged that leisure use offered better prospects for increasing its income, the commission felt that this needed to have more practical recognition in the remit given to the area engineers about deciding what maintenance should be done.The commission noted that BWB cannot in practice charge the users or beneficiaries for much of the maintenance work it does for public safety and health reasons, for drainage purposes and for some public leisure use. The commission suggested that the Department of the Environment should consider relating part of its grant to BWB to its costs arising from the public service aspects of maintenance. BWB's revenue from users, and its ability to increase such revenue, could then be more readily seen in the context of those costs relating to work done for users who could be charged.Finally, as is usual in such references, the commission was asked to consider whether BWB is pursuing a course of conduct which operates against the public interest. It concluded that, in view of the difficult circumstances in which BWB had to operate, and its acknowledgement of the need for change, the shortcomings identified could not be judged to operate against the public interest. But the commission stressed the need for BWB to deal expeditiously with the report's recommendations and suggested that a further external review should take place in five years' time.BWB will be producing its preliminary response to the commission's findings within three to four months, in the light of which my right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for the Environment will make a statement.

Prime Minister

Financial Management Initiative

asked the Prime Minister when she expects the main programme of the financial management initiative in relation to non-departmental public bodies to be completed; and if she will make a statement.

The programme of work I announced on 19 November 1984, at columns 57–58, has now largely been completed. The purpose of the programme was to produce progressive value for money improvements in executive non-departmental public bodies.

Un Environment And Development Report (Ministerial Speech)

asked the Prime Minister if the speech by the Minister for Environment, Countryside and Planning on the occasion of the launch of the United Nations world commission on environment and development report on 27 April represents Government policy; and if she will make a statement.

Yes. My hon. Friend welcomed the report of the World Commission on Environment and Development on behalf of the Government. The report raises a number of complex issues which we are now studying in detail. In his remarks, my hon. Friend referred to the initiative taken by the Government on the problem of the debt burden of the poorest Sub-Saharan African countries which was announced by my right hon. Friend the Chancellor of the Exchequer at the spring meetings of the World Bank and the IMF at the beginning of April.

Attorney-General

Waltham Forest Demonstration

asked the Attorney-General if he intends to prosecute any of the speakers at a demonstration outside Waltham Forest town hall on 9 April for racial abuse, incitement to racial harassment or incitement to violence.

No complaints of criminal offences arising out of this incident have been received by the Crown prosecution service or by my right hon. and learned Friend the Attorney-General.

Land Registry

asked the Attorney-General what plans the Government have to make the Land Registry more accessible to the public, in line with the 1985 Law Commission recommendations; and if he will make a statement.

The Government will make a decision on the proposals contained in the Law Commission's report No. 148 on opening the land register when it has completed its consideration of the representations received.

Agriculture, Fisheries And Food

Common Agricultural Policy

asked the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food if the Commission has now brought forward proposals for the revaluation of the deutschmark for purposes of the common agricultural policy; and to what extent common agricultural policy prices for the United Kingdom will be affected.

As part of the 1987 price fixing the Commission has proposed revaluation of the green deutschmark by 2·9 points for milk and milk products, 2·4 points for cereals, eggs and poultry, and 1·8 points for other sectors. Common agricultural policy support prices in the United Kingdom will not be affected by the adoption of this proposal.

Monetary Compensatory Amounts

the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food what was the result of his representations to the Republic of Ireland about delays in payments of monetary compensatory amounts to farmers in Northern Ireland; if these delays are still continuing; and if he will make a statement.

Payments generally are now being made more promptly by the Republic of Ireland authorities, but there are still some monetary compensatory amount claims under query for which payments have been outstanding for some time. It is hoped that measures taken as a result of the useful discussions my officials have had with officials from the Republic of Ireland will enable these payments also to be released before long.

Sea Defence And Coast Protection

asked the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food what steps he is taking towards harmonising the grant rates for sea defence and coast protection.

I announced in February that the maximum rate of grant for sea defence schemes carried out by water authorities was being increased to 65 per cent. with effect from 1 April 1987. The Secretary of State for Wales and I have also decided that the maximum rate of grant for schemes under the Coast Protection Act 1949 should be reduced from 79 per cent. to 70 per cent. for all schemes where the full application for approval is received by the Department concerned on or after 1 October 1987.From the same date we will also be introducing for such schemes a condition under which the rate of grant notified when the scheme is approved will be available for a fixed

£ million
1982–831983–841984–851985–86Estimated Outturn 1986–87Budget Provision 1987–88
Wind2·52·54·85·43·73·20
Wave3·11·00·40·40·10·10
Geothermal Aquifers1·51·81·10·30·10·20
Geothermal Hot Dry Rocks3·02·94·63·53·53·20
Solar1·40·90·50·70·81·10
Biomass11·20·71·10·81·31·30
Tidal0·30·10·11·00
Hydro Electric0·10·15
General and Strategic Studies0·95
Technology Transfer0·40
External Contributions including EEC receipts3·22·03·32·123·422·90
ETSU R and D Management2·01·92·12·02·32·10
Grand Total17·913·718·215·3215·4216·60
1 Where available figures include expenditure on waste as a fuel and passive solar design under the energy efficiency demonstration scheme. It is not possible to segregate a 1987–88 budget for demonstration projects on waste as a fuel from the total budget provision for the EEDS of £6·5 million.
2 Estimate

Coal Industry

asked the Secretary of State for Energy if he will publish, by areas, figures for fatalities in the coal industry for 1985–86.

I refer the hon. Gentleman to the answer I gave him on 12 March at columns 280–81.

asked the Secretary of State for Energy if he will publish, by areas, figures of serious accidents in the coal industry in 1985–86.

Figures of serious accidents in the coal industry for 1985–86 are as follows:

AreaNumbers
Scottish63
North Yorkshire100
North Derbyshire59
South Midlands40
Western65
North East80
South Yorkshire86
Nottinghamshire115
Kent5
South Wales91

period which will normally allow two years for the construction work. Work not completed within this period will qualify for the rate of grant applicable at the time it is carried out.

Energy

Renewable Energy

asked the Secretary of State for Energy if he will provide a detailed breakdown of funds provided for research into renewable energy forms for each of the past five financial years, and the amounts currently allocated for the present financial year.

My Department's expenditure on individual technologies for each of the past five financial years and the budget provision for the current financial year is as follows:I regret that the footnote to my answer of 12 March, at columns

281–82, should have read:

"The Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations 1985, which came into effect on 1 April 1986, required the reporting of accidents which were not originally included. The figures for 1986–87 will therefore be calculated on a different basis to earlier years."

Source: British Coal Corporation.

asked the Secretary of State for Energy whether he has received any representations from the British Coal Corporation under sections 6 and 7 of the Coal Industry Act 1987.

I have received representations from the British Coal Corporation under section 7 of the Coal Industry Act 1987 stating that the UDM represents a substantial proportion of the members of the mineworkers pension scheme (MPS) but lacks the right to participate fully in that scheme.I have also received representions from the British Coal Corporation under section 6 of the Coal Industry Act 1987 stating that there are four organisations representing a substantial proportion of the corporation's employees or of any class of them who do not enjoy as of right full participation in the social welfare body known as the Coal Industry Social Welfare Organisation (CISWO). These are the Union of Democratic Mineworkers (UDM) and the Association of Professional, Executive, Clerical and Computing Staff (APEX), the British Association of Colliery Management (BACM) and the National Association of Colliery Overmen, Deputies and Shotfirers (NACODS).Having considered these representations, I propose to make orders under sections 6 and 7 to permit such participation, and my Department has sent formal letters of consultation on the appropriate changes to the memorandum and articles of association of CISWO and to the MPS to the corporation, those organisations and the National Union of Mineworkers (NUM), as required under the Act. They have been asked to make such representations as they may wish by 15 June.The Government made clear during the passage of the Act their determination to see removed injustices in these areas caused by NUM intransigence.

Coal Industry (Accidents)

asked the Secretary of State for Energy, pursuant to his answer of 6 April, Official Report, column 6, if he will take steps to produce details of all fatal accidents which have occurred in the coal industry for the year 1986–87, broken down according to coalfield areas, as soon as possible.

[pursuant to his reply, 10 April 1987, c. 447–48]: Details of fatal accidents in the coal industry for 1986–87 are as follows:

AreaNumbers
Scottish1
North Yorkshire4
North Derbyshire1
South Midlands0
Western0
North East0
South Yorkshire4
Nottinghamshire2
Kent0
South Wales3

Source: British Coal Corporation.

Transport

Summer Morn

asked the Secretary of State for Transport if, in view of the Summer Morn incident in the Irish sea on 18 February 1987, he will now ensure that all inspectors' reports into the disappearance of vessels in the Irish sea over the period of five years are published in full.

Three United Kingdom fishing vessels have disappeared in the Irish sea in unexplained circumstances between 1982 and 1986. Inspectors' reports are confidential to my Department and the reports on these three losses will not be published, but the Department's investigations found no evidence of submarine involvement as there was in the Summer Morn incident.

North Circular Road

asked the Secretary of State for Transport (1) when the public inquiry concerning the upgrading of a section of the north circular road at Ealing in west London commenced; when it was completed; when the inspector's report was received; and when a decision concerning this road improvement will be announced;(2) if he will state the reasons for the delay in reaching a decision concerning proposals to upgrade a section of the north circular road at Ealing in west London following submission of the inspector's report after the public inquiry.

The public inquiry into the proposed improvement of the north circular road between Popes lane and the A40 opened in December 1983 and closed in June 1984. The inspector submitted his report in April 1985. I refer my hon. Friend to the reply I gave my hon. Friend the Member for Ealing, Acton (Sir G. Young) on Tuesday 7 April 1987 at column 125.

Channel Tunnel

asked the Secretary of State for Transport what account he took of the possibility of earth tremors in approving plans for the Channel tunnel.

The possibility of earth tremors affecting the tunnel was examined in detail for the 1973 Channel tunnel project by distinguished geologists from the Institute of Geological Science (now the British Geological Survey), the Bureau de Recherches Geologiques et Minieres, and the British and French consulting engineers employed on the project. After examining all the historical evidence of earthquakes in the area, including the one in 1580 referred to in a recent article in the New Scientist, and undertaking sophisticated measurements of the present geology of the area, the conclusion was that the risk to a bored tunnel was very low indeed.This evidence was reviewed again by consultants to the present promoters, who included a special section on seismicity in their proposal. The Government assessors who examined the engineering aspects of all the proposals put forward agreed with the view that the risk was very slight, and stated that

"displacements during a very large earthquake would be in the order of millimetres and damage would be nominal only."

Dangerous Chemicals (Transport)

asked the Secretary of State for Transport what action his Department takes to monitor the carriage of dangerous chemicals by road within the United Kingdom; and how many breaches of the relevant regulations have been drawn to his attention in each of the past four years for which statistics are available.

Responsibility for enforcing the regulations on the carriage of dangerous substances by road rests with the Health and Safety Executive. It is supported in this by the police and by my Department's traffic examiners, who carry out checks on vehicles carrying out dangerous substances from time to time.There is no central record of offences.

Disabled People, Merseyside

asked the Secretary of State for Transport what information he has on transport provision made for disabled people on Merseyside; and if he will make a statement.

Passenger transport authorities and their executives have a statutory duty to have regard to the transport needs of the disabled in arranging for public transport provision in their area. It is for them to judge how best this duty can be met.I understand that in Merseyside the passenger transport executive recently let a fresh contract for the provision of special transport for the disabled. It has set aside £500,000 for this purpose in 1977–88—an increase of £200,000 on last year's expenditure.

Pedestrian Crossings

asked the Secretary of State for Transport if he will make a statement on his policy towards the provision of zebra crossings and on circulars issued to local authorities on the safety of such crossings.

Zebra crossings can improve road safety in certain circumstances where there is high conflict between pedestrian and vehicular traffic. We commend their use. The Department issued advice on these crossings covering inter alia, road safety aspects in advice note TA/10/80 "Design Considerations for Pelican and Zebra Crossings", a copy of which is in the Library. This advice has recently been revised. I will write to the hon. Member enclosing the latest information.

asked the Secretary of State for Transport how many zebra crossings and how many pelican crossings with lights have been authorised on roads for which he is responsible in each year since 1979.

The approximate numbers of such crossings are as follows:

Pelican CrossingsZebra Crossings
1979293
1980252
1981195
1982160
1983181
1984161
1985411
1986261

Sail Training Vessel Marques (Loss)

asked the Secretary of State for Transport whether he has received the report of the investigation into the loss of the Marques; and whether he will make a statement.

I have now received the report of the formal investigation into the loss of the sail training vessel Marques in the Atlantic in June 1984 with a loss of 19 lives, and I have placed a copy in the Library.The report concludes that the cause of the loss of the Marques was an unexpected and violent squall which resulted in the severe heeling, flooding and sinking of the ship. The report finds that it was not the fault of any person or persons that the Marques had insufficient stability to resist the squall, but comments that, if judged by the knowledge and experience now available, the stability of the Marques would be found to have been inadequate and the vessel unseaworthy for operation as a sail training ship in non-coastal waters.The report finds that the Marques was in a proper state of repair, and that so far as the structure of the vessel was concerned she was in a safe and seaworthy condition. It also finds that, with certain reservations, she was properly manned and sailed.The report's main recommendation is that criteria should be developed for assessing safe standards of stability for sail training ships. As the report notes, the Department of Transport has already commissioned technical studies with this in view. This work will be taken forward as rapidly as possible, in conjunction with the organisations responsible for sail training, with a view to the publication of a merchant shipping notice on standards of stability for sailing ships. These criteria will in future be applied in considering applications for load line certificates or load line exemption certificates in respect of sail training ships. The report also contains a number of other recommendations concerned with the operation of ships of this kind and with the conduct of races involving sail training ships. These recommendations will all be followed up in consultation with the organisations involved.The report contains a number of criticisms, including criticism of the Department of Transport's decision to issue a load line exemption certificate for the vessel when stability data were not available, and concludes that without such stability information the ship was unseaworthy: however, it finds that the failure to provide this information did not cause the loss of the vessel. The Department notes this finding, which relates to a difficult judgment which was required to be taken about a vessel with a long record of safe operation worldwide in all weather conditions. Load line exemption certificates will not in future be issued in the absence of stability data.

Lorries (Offences)

asked the Secretary of State for Transport if he will list in the Official Report the number of convictions obtained in each magistrates court area since May 1985 against owners and drivers of motor lorries which were being used when the permitted second axle weight was exceeded and against owners and drivers of motor lorries which were used when the permitted gross weight was exceeded, both offences contrary to section 40(5) of the Road Traffic Regulation Act 1972, and the level of fine imposed on each occasion on the driver and the owner.

I have been asked to reply.No reliable information is available separately for goods vehicles. The readily available information relates to all findings of guilt for offences of exceeding the gross weight or axle weight and is published annually in "Offences Relating to Motor Vehicles England and Wales … Supplementary Tables" (table 5 of the issue for 1985). Table 6 of the same publication gives information on fines imposed and table 17 on findings of guilt in each police area for all types of load offence. More detailed information could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Northern Ireland

Prisons (Integration)

asked the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland if he will make a statement on the practice of integration in Northern Ireland prisons, stating what practices apply in which prisons.

The Government remain of the view that the allocation of prisoners to accommodation without regard to paramilitary affiliation or religious denomination makes for more effective security and control and gives prisoners a better opportunity to serve their sentences free from paramilitary influence. Segregation can provide the opportunity for paramilitary organisations to increase their hold on prisoners and to organise cohesive action of a disruptive nature.The remaining special category prisoners continue to be housed in compounds at Her Majesty's prison Maze according to paramilitary faction and there is de facto seregation in some cellular wings in the prison; prisoners in all other prisons are housed in mixed accommodation.

Ace Programme

asked the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland how many jobs are currently available through the ACE programme; how many applicants have sought the chance to establish an ACE project in Northern Ireland since its inception; how many jobs have been created; how many proposals have been turned down; and how many are awaiting a decision.

There are currently 6,886 ACE jobs in existence; 1,591 applicants have applied to establish an ACE project since the scheme was introduced. The average number of ACE jobs created each year since 1981 is as follows:

PeriodAverage number of jobs created
1981–82430
1982–831,270
1983–842,529
1984–853,080
1985–863,890
1986–876,150

Note: 26 proposals have been rejected; and 118 new proposals at present await a decision.

Integrated Education

asked the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland whether any of the funds being made available to Northern Ireland from American sources will be used for integrated education.

The disbursement of funds from the International Fund for Ireland is a matter for the independent board appointed by the Governments of the United Kingdom and the Republic of Ireland.

Prisoners

asked the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland if he will make a statement on the levels of education, pastoral care and psychological help available to prisoners in Northern Ireland prisons.

The level of care and attention given to prisoners in these and other respects is of a high standard and I am satisfied with the services provided by teachers, medical staff and prison chaplains. In common with all aspects of the regime, the provision of education, religious ministration and health care are kept under review.

Devolution

asked the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland if he will make a further statement on his policy towards devolved government in Northern Ireland in the light of the proposals contained in the Ulster Defence Association's document, entitled "Commonsense," a copy of which has been sent to him.

It remains the Government's objective to establish in Northern Ireland a system of devolved government that would command widespread acceptance throughout the community. Any recognition of the need for the involvement of the minority in such a system is welcome, since it would be essential to the achievement of widespread acceptance. Progress towards devolution now depends on the constitutional political parties. I hope, therefore, that talks involving those parties may soon take place.

St Angelo Airport

-Davison asked the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland if he will make a statement about the future of St. Angelo airport.

This is a matter for Fermanagh district council, the owner of the airport. but I understand that the council is currently negotiating an agreement with a private aviation interest under which the company concerned would accept full responsibility for maintaining and running the airport.

Terrorists

asked the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland how many persons convicted of terrorist offences are currently in prison in the Province; how many are men and how many women; and what is the average length of sentence served in prison for such crimes.

Employment

Yts

asked the Paymaster General what has been the percentage job placement from the YTS in the Shrewsbury travel-to-work area in the last period for which figures are available.

The information is not available in the form requested.The MSC conducts a regular follow-up survey of YTS leavers. The latest results for the local authority district of Shrewsbury, covering leavers during the period 1 April 1986 to 31 September 1986, show that some three months after leaving 63 per cent. were in full-time employment; 5 per cent. were in part-time employment; 3 per cent. Were on a full-time course; 9 per cent. were on another YTS scheme; 4 per cent. were doing something else; and 16 per cent. were unemployed.

asked the Paymaster General if he will announce the numbers currently leaving YTS and going into employment.

The Manpower Services Commission conducts a regular follow-up survey of all YTS leavers. The latest results, covering leavers during the period 1 April 1986 to 31 September 1986, show that some three months after leaving 65 per cent. were in full-time employment; 4 per cent. were in part-time employment; 4 per cent. were on a full-time course at a college or training centre; 5 per cent. were on another YTS scheme; 3 per cent. were doing something else; and 20 per cent. were unemployed.The figures do not total 100 per cent. due to rounding.

Labour Statistics

asked the Paymaster General if he will give the number of unemployed people in Basildon for the last month for which he has figures and for each equivalent period in each of the past five years.

The following information is in the Library.The table shows the numbers of unemployed claimants in the Basildon local authority area from March of each year from 1984. Statistics of unemployment for local areas are derived from the ward-based system and are available only from June 1983. The comparison is affected by the change in the timing of the compilation of the count in March 1986.

Number
March 19848,775
March 19859,331
March 19868,823
March 19878,018

asked the Paymaster General if he will list the unemployment figures for Exeter for March in each of the years 1975 to 1987.

The following information is in the Library.The table shows the number of unemployed claimants in the Exeter local authority district for March of each year from 1984. This comparison is affected by the change in the timing of the compilation of the count in March 1986. Statistics of unemployment for local authority districts are derived from the ward-based system and are available only from June 1983.

Number
March 19844,430
March 19854,998
March 19864,982
March 19874,676

Redundancies

asked the Paymaster General what was the. cost to public funds of redundancies in the following firms: (a) Webglow Limited, (b) Summit Operation Services Limited, (c) Recording Audio Myers Limited, (d) Bulldog Reclamations Limited and (e) Taylor Stenmec Limited; and whether the firms named met part of the cost of redundancies.

There has been no cost to public funds in respect of any redundancies which may have occurred at these firms.

asked the Paymaster General what was the cost to public fund of redundancies in the following firms: (a) Hymid Graemross Limited, (b) Homebean Limited, (c) Benchase Limited, (d) Cliffmore Limited and (e) Powerspeed Limited; and whether the firms named met part of the cost of redundancies.

The information requested is shown in the table:

FirmCost to public funds1Firm's contribution to cost2
££
Hymid Graemross Ltd.Niln/a
Homebean Ltd.Niln/a
Benchase Ltd.Niln/a
Cliffmore Ltd.Niln/a
Powerspeed Ltd.27,360·0120,004·46
1 The sum represents redundancy payments made direct to employees out of the redundancy fund.
2 When a direct redundancy payment is made to an employee, the employer automatically incurs a debt to the redundancy fund. The sum therefore represents the amount repaid to the fund, less any rebate that would otherwise be due.
n/a Not applicable

asked the Paymaster General what was the cost to public funds of redundancies in the following firms: (a) Birkett-Ycol Limited, (b) Boulton Fabrications Limited, (c) Whitfield Wylie Limited, (d) The Long Wire Company Limited, (e) The Manor Engineering Company Limited and (f) Brownsior Caludon Engineering Limited; and whether the firms named met part of the cost of redundancies.

The information requested is shown in the table:

Firm1Cost to Public Funds2Firm's Contribution to cost
££
Birkett Wycol Ltd.nil3n/a
Boulton Fabrications Ltd.2,859·56139·56
Whitfield Wylie Ltd.nil3n/a
The Longford Wire Co. Ltd.112,342·011,962·81
The Manor Engineering Co. Ltd.96,328·9215,982·14
Brownscov Caludon Engineering Co. Ltd.52,126·9310,276·63
1 The sums represent both redundancy payments made direct to employees out of the redundancy fund and rebates paid to the firm out of the fund in the last three years.
2 When a direct redundancy payment is made to an employee, the employer automatically incurs a debt to the redundancy fund. The sums therefore represents the amount repaid to the fund, less any rebate that would otherwise be due.
3 n/a Not applicable

asked the Paymaster General what was the cost to public funds of redundancies in the following firms: (a) Hayes Shellcast Limited, (b) South Wales Forgemasters Limited, (c) Belgrave Engineering Limited, (d) Belgrave Parsons Limited, (e) Belgrave Transmission Limited and (f) Belgrave Finery Limited.

The information requested is shown in the table:

Firm1Cost to Public Funds2Firm's Contribution to cost
££
Hayes Shellcast Ltd.59,731·481,731·48
South Wales Forgemasters Ltd.274,236·76
Belgrave Engineering Ltd.77,325·4243,867·32
Belgrave Parsons Ltd.77,201·4911,135·73
Belgrave Transmission Ltd.nil3n/a
Belgrave Finery Ltd.nil3n/a
1 The sums represent both redundancy payments made direct to employees out of the redundancy fund and rebates paid to the firm out of the fund in the last three years.
2 When a direct redundancy payment is made to an employee, the employer automatically incurs a debt to the redundancy fund. The sums therefore represents the amount repaid to the fund, less any rebate that would otherwise be due.
3n/a Not applicable.

Health And Safety

asked the Paymaster General whether Her Majesty's Government have complied with European Community amending directive 82/501/EEC on the major accident hazards of certain industries.

Directive 82/501/EEC is implemented on Great Britain by the Control of Industrial Major Accident Hazards (CIMAH) Regulations 1984. Directive 87/216/EEC, which amends directive 82/501/EEC, was adopted in 19 March 1987 and notified to Her Majesty's Government on 24 March 1987. Member states must comply with the amendment within 18 months of notification, and work has already commenced to amend the CIMAH regulations.

Home Department

Care Proceedings

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) how many applications for care proceedings were made in juvenile courts in 1984, 1985 and 1986;(2) if he will estimate the number of applicants for care proceedings in the juvenile courts for the first quarter of 1987.

The information which is readily available to me and is known to be incomplete, relates to applications for orders in civil care proceedings under the Children and Young Persons Act 1969. This indicates that there were about 5,200 such applications in 1984, and 5,600 in 1985. Information for 1986, and for the first quarter of 1987, is not yet available.

Correspondence

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department when he hopes to reply to the letter from the hon. Member for Falmouth and Camborne, dated 21 February, concerning matters raised by Mrs. Vivienne Stephens, of 1 North Roskear village, Camborne, Cornwall.

Trevi Ministers (Meeting)

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will make a statement about the outcome of the recent meeting of Trevi Ministers in Brussels.

Trevi Ministers met in Brussels on 28 April under the Belgian presidency. This meeting was part of the regular pattern of Trevi business and follows on from the previous meeting in London on 9 December last, under my chairmanship, and later work by officials.Ministers agreed to establish new arrangements for the exchange of information on significant thefts of arms or explosives, or discovery of arms or explosives, which might be of terrorist significance. We also approved practical arrangements whereby a Community country which refused to admit or deport a non-Community national for reasons connected with terrorism would inform other Community countries of its decision, together with identifying particulars. We further agreed to inform the European Commission of our view that any new measures to facilitate the free movement of goods within the Community should not inhibit national authorities making such checks as they thought appropriate on the movement of firearms across Community frontiers.Ministers welcomed progress towards full operation of a secure communications link between police forces, and approved plans for the regular updating of the assessment of the terrorist threat to Community countries which had been adopted at our meeting in London last December.The United Kingdom will organise and host two Trevi conferences later this year: one of directors of forensic and scientific laboratories to discuss the detection of firearms and explosives at airports; the other of national correspondents of member states dealing with the problem of football hooliganism.We agreed principles for the sharing of information and practical co-operation so that a drugs liaison officer representing one Community country in a country outside the Community could, by agreement, conduct inquiries on behalf of, and provide information to, other Community countries. More detailed arrangements will be developed further by officials.For obvious reasons, much of what Trevi discusses, especially on terrorism, cannot be made public. But this was a productive meeting which carried still further the co-operation within the Community on matters of crimes of terrorism.The growing importance of Trevi was shown by the fact that the US Attorney-General, the Canadian Solicitor-General and the Austrian Minister of the Interior came to discuss in the margins of our meeting how their countries should be associated with our work.

Immigration

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will make a statement about the outcome of the recent meeting of the Ministers of the European Community responsible for immigration.

At a meeting in London in October, during the United Kingdom presidency, the Ministers of the states of the European Community responsible for immigration set up an ad hoc working group of senior officials. At our meeting in Brussels on 28 April, which was also attended by my noble Friend Lord Cockfield, a vice-president of the European Community, my ministerial colleagues and I, considered the first report from this group and agreed on a number of important steps to co-ordinate our methods of immigration control and our response to the growing abuse of the right to claim asylum, and the increased use of forged or fraudulent documents.The meeting recognised that the strengthening of immigration controls at the external frontiers of the Community was a necessary complement to the movement towards gradual abolition of border checks at its internal frontiers. Ministers instructed officials to pursue vigorously their work on the greater harmonisation of the visa policies of the different countries in the Community since this had an important part to play in the strengthening of controls.As regards claims to asylum Ministers agreed to recommend all member states to take a number of measures, in line with action that some countries, including the United Kingdom had taken, or were considering. These included making provision which would

make carriers responsible for removing someone brought by them into a Community country without the required documents and meeting the cost involved; make possible the impositon of penalties on carriers who bring passengers without the required documents; establish simplified procedures for reaching decisions where asylum was claimed but the application was unjustified because it clearly failed to meet the requirements of the 1951 contention.

Finally, my colleagues and I endorsed recommendations from officials to combat the use of forged and fraudulent documents. These included the preparation and circulation to the immigration authorities of all our countries of an information bulletin giving particulars of cases of fraud that had been detected.

The working group of officials will continue its study of the response that the countries of the Community can make to what are common problems, and will report again to Ministers later in the year.

Immigration (Detention)

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what plans he has to increase the accommodation available for the detention of persons under the Immigration Act 1971.

In the light of continuing pressure on existing accommodation for the detention of persons under the Immigration Act 1971, I have decided that the most effective and economic way to provide more detention accommodation for immigration purposes quickly will be to lease a ship. My Department has therefore agreed to charter from Sealink the motor vessel Earl William. The charter is for three months in the first instance.The ship will be moored at Harwich and will remain alongside the quay throughout its use as an immigration detention centre. In common with existing immigration detention centres, care of the detainees will be the responsibility of Securior. Catering services will be provided by a private contractor.The Earl William is a modern car ferry; sleeping accommodation is in four-berth cabins, each with integral sanitation. In practice we would expect the number accommodated to be no more than 120, which is about half the total passenger capacity of the vessel. The public rooms on the ship will provide adequate space for relaxation and visits by relatives, friends and lawyers in comfortable but not luxurious conditions. The ship will be available to the Home Office from about II May and the first detention cases will go on board about the middle of May.

Drug Misuse And Crime

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will set out in the Official Report details of the research known to his Department on the relationship between drug misuse and crime.

There has been a great deal of research on this subject. Three recent major studies are referred to in "Criminal Justice: A Working Paper", a copy of which is in the Library. An account of present and proposed studies funded by the Home Office will be included in the Home Office research programme 1987–88, which is to be published shortly.

Prisons (Medical Services)

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) if he will set out in the Official Report details of research commissioned by his Department into the psychiatric needs of the prison population;(2) what research has been commissioned by his Department into the case for specialist psychiatric units within the prison system for prisoners not regarded as detainable under the Mental Health Act; and when he expects a decision to be taken on the case for such units.

The study referred to in the reply given to a question to the hon. Member for St. Helens, South (Mr. Bermingham) on 16 February, at column 436, will provide definitive data on which the prison medical service may consider the particular needs for this part of the prison population. The study is expected to take three years. In the meantime, censuses of mentally disturbed prisoners undertaken by medical officers provide a starting point for the development of improved arrangements for their care and management. It is riot envisaged that such arrangements will amount to separate psychiatric units.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department when he expects the study of the practicability, costs and benefits of clustering prison establishments in groups to enable one establishment to act as a main centre providing medical services for the others to be completed.

This is a long-term study, for which a completion date has yet to be set.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department when the visit to Scotland by the head of prison nursing services to examine arrangements for nurse officer training in the Scottish prison service is expected to take place.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department on how many occasions in the last five years prisoners have petitioned him seeking a second medical opinion; and what response was made to each such petition.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many consultant psychiatrists employed by the prison service do not have control of National Health Service beds.

The information requested is not readily ascertainable from central records and could be obtained only at disproportionate cost.

Prisons (Hygiene)

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will set out the professional qualifications held by each of his Department's safety officers responsible for carrying out hygiene inspections of prison service establishments; and how many such officers are currently in post.

There are six health and safety officers in post and two vacancies are being advertised. All hold the Royal Institute of Public Health and Hygiene certificate in food hygiene and the handling of food; five hold the Royal Institute of Public Health and Hygiene diploma in food hygiene.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will publish the recent instructions issued by his Department on hygiene inspection of prison establishments and on procedures to be followed in cleaning prison kitchens.

No. The recent instructions on hygiene inspections set out detailed arrangements for the cleaning of prison kitchens to ensure that the Department meets the requirements of the Food Hygiene (General) Regulations 1970. But it is not normal practice to publish management instructions to staff.

Occupational Health Review

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will set out the main steps being taken to implement the recommendations of the occupational health review, referred to in the Government reply to recommendation 21 of the Third Report from the Social Services Committee in Session 1985–86.

The main steps being taken to implement the recommendations of the occupational health review carried out by the Department are as follows:

  • 1. The reintroduction of medical exainations for new recruits.
  • 2. The further development of a pilot scheme designed to enhance staff fitness.
  • 3. The development of a training package specifically designed for prison staff on AIDS.
  • 4. Consideration of the possibility of producing a training package to help staff cope with the stress of working in the prison environment.
  • 5. A preventive health campaign on smoking.
  • Public Disorder (Police Reserves)

    asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if, pursuant to his answer of 26 March, Official Report, column 224, he will call for a report from the Commissioner of Police of the Metropolis as to the number of officers held in reserve on 21 March and the anticipated scene of possible public disorder.

    The Commissioner informs me that 460 officers were held in reserve for use if there had been an outbreak of public disorder in Tottenham. Fortunately. there was not.

    The Arts

    Disabled People

    asked the Minister for the Arts what opportunities there are for arts organisations working with disabled people to benefit from arts sponsorship.

    The business sponsorship incentive scheme encourages businesses to sponsor the arts, including arts organisations working with the disabled. I am particularly pleased that the latest list of awards under the scheme, announced on 7 April, included six projects designed to bring arts to the disabled and disadvantaged. I hope this success will encourage other businesses to follow suit.

    "Stratford Mill" (Valuation)

    asked the Minister for the Arts what criteria were used in selecting the two sources of outside advice on the valuation proposed by the offerers of Constable's Stratford Mill in satisfaction of inheritance tax; what steps were taken to avoid a potential conflict of interest on the part of those sources of advice; what attempts were made to obtain a counter-check on their valuations; and if he will make a statement.

    The Government are advised on valuations for works of art by their expert advisers in particular fields. The expert advisers, who are selected according to their professional expertise, act independently on behalf of the Government. In this case, in view of the importance of the painting, two separate valuations were obtained from advisers in the National gallery and the Tate gallery.

    asked the Minister for the Arts what indications he received as to the precise time limit governing a decision on whether or not to accept Constable's Stratford Mill, in satisfaction of inheritance tax; what steps he took to check the necessity for such a time limit; and if he will make a statement.

    It was important to reach a decision as quickly as possible in this offer of a painting of great quality.

    asked the Minister for the Arts what discussions he had with the chairman of the Museums and Galleries Commission regarding the implications of the deadline for a decision on acceptance of Constable's Stratford Mill in' lieu of tax for the practicability and desirability of consulting the Commission as a whole; how many members of the Commission were actually consulted and by what criteria they were selected; and if he will make a statement.

    I have discussed with the chairman of the Museums and Galleries Commission the arrangements for acceptances in cases where a short deadline for decision may be imposed, and I have asked him to consult the commissioners on how best to ensure that I receive good and speedy advice in such cases.

    Young Artists

    asked the Minister for the Arts if he is in a position to give further details of his scheme for assisting young artists by displaying their work in Government offices.

    I am introducing an experimental scheme whereby works of art which have not previously been exhibited widely will be reproduced and displayed in selected Government offices for the benefit of those who visit those offices and of the staff who work in them. Initially, the scheme will be limited to the Management and Personnel Office and the Office of Arts and Libraries, for which I am directly responsible. I am selecting a consultant to advise me on the details and the purchase of the works of arts. If the experiment is a success, other Government Departments will be invited to join in and the scheme will be operated on a large scale.

    Social Services

    Pensions

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services what percentage of men have a sufficient national insurance contribution record by the age of 60 years to entitle them to a 100 per cent. basic pension.

    I regret that the information requested is not available and could be obtained only at disproportionate cost.

    Benefits

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services if he will publish figures for the latest date available, showing the average annual number of people in receipt of each of the following benefits, distinguishing in each case between claimants, adult dependants and child dependants: national insurance unemployement benefit, sickness benefit, invalidity, widows and retirement pensions, non-contributory invalidity pension and supplementary benefit without any national insurance benefit; and if he will estimate the corresponding figures for 1987–88.

    Secure Units

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services when he now expects the regional secure unit programme to he completed; and which health authorities have not yet opened a purpose-built secure unit.

    Eleven of the 14 regional health authorities now have permanent regional secure units (RSUs) in operation. Permanent RSUs can either be purpose-built or adaptations of existing hospital facilities.Of the remaining three regions, a permanent RSU at Rubery hill hospital, Birmingham (west midlands) is scheduled to open this year. A permanent unit in the Oxford region is also expected to open at Borocourt hospital in 1987. A further two permanent RSUs are being planned in the Oxford region. South-West Thames region is planning a permanent RSU at Netherne hospital, which will function in association with several "close supervision" units already operating in existing hospitals.

    In addition, the North-East Thames region has plans to provide two further pemanent RSUs to complement the one already in operation at Runwell hospital, Southend. A second permanent RSU in South-Western region is due to be completed at Glenside hospital, Bristol, in 1988.

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services if he will make a statement on the role proposed for non-regional secure unit facilities in the psychiatric assessment of offenders, referred to in the Government response to recommendation 25 of the third report from the Social Services Committee, Session 1985–86, indicating which other facilities it is intended to utilise.

    Liverpool Women's Hospitai (Cervical Cancer Tests)

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services why 45,000 records of women tested at Liverpool women's hospital for cervical cancer have been re-examined; and if he will make a statement.

    Disabled People

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services, pursuant to the reply to the right hon. Member for Manchester, Wythenshawe on 10 April, Official Report, column 503, if he has yet written to the voluntary organisations' steering group on the Disabled Persons (Services, Consultation and Representation) Act 1986 with proposals for their involvement in planning the implementation of the Act; and if he will make a further statement.

    I am still considering the points made by the members of the steering committee at the meeting on 1 April. As indicated in my earlier reply, I shall write to them as soon as possible suggesting a framework for involving voluntary organisations, where appropriate, in future work on the implementation of the Act.

    1991 Census

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services whether any decision has been taken on the inclusion of a religious question in the 1991 census; and whether he will make a statement.

    Waiting Lists

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services what plans he has to improve the accuracy of the information available to him about National Health Service waiting lists.

    All health authorities are asked to ensure that their waiting lists accurately reflect the demand for services and I am not aware of any specific problems with the data they supply. Since 1 April an improved system for collecting waiting list data has been in operation. This will provide the Department with more frequent and more comprehensive information about waiting times.

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services when the hon. Member for Holborn and St. Pancras can expect a substantive reply to his question about hospital waiting lists to which a holding answer was given on 23 March, Official Report, columns 75–76.

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services if he will set out, region by region, district health authority in-patient waiting lists, the total population living in each district, the percentage which the former represents of the latter and their national ranking by that percentage.

    Number of cases on in-patient waiting list at 30 September 1986 and resident population (mid 1985) with total cases as a percentage of population
    District Health AuthorityTotal casesResident population (hundreds)Total cases as a percentage of resident population
    Northern Regional Health Authority
    Hartlepool1,4619161·6
    North Tees9251,7580·5
    South Tees5,9962,9252·0
    East Cumbria3,2531,7661·8
    South Cumbria1,3331,7150·8
    West Cumbria1,2151,3630·9
    Darlington2,4491,2412·0
    Durham9952,3650·4
    North West Durham6908630·8
    South West Durham6711,5400·4
    Northumberland1,9283,0060·6
    Gateshead1,2622,0810·6
    Newcastle9,1402,8223·2
    North Tyneside1,0661,9320·6
    South Tyneside7561,5760·5
    Sunderland3,7402,9881·3
    Yorkshire Regional Health Authority
    Hull6,7973,1032·2
    East Yorkshire1,3651,8660·7
    Grimsby1,3691,5970·9
    Scunthorpe2,9071,9341·5
    Northallerton7841,1260·7
    York2,5722,5931·0
    Scarborough1,7691,4261·2
    Harrogate1,7591,3391·3
    Bradford6,8743,3882·0
    Airedale2,4041,7291·4
    Calderdale9721,9170·5
    Huddersfield2,2002,1251·0
    Dewsbury5601,6440·3
    Leeds Western4,4763,6011·2
    Leeds Esstern5,1443,5041·5
    Wakefield2,2161,4221·6
    Pontefract2,4291,6801·4
    Trent Regional Health Authority
    North Derbyshire2,6523,6100·7
    Southern Derbyshire6,3505,2201·2
    Leicestershire8,1698,7220·9
    North Lincolnshire2,6722,6571·0
    South Lincolnshire4,1692,9461·4
    Bassetlaw8971,0420·9
    Central Nottinghamshire5,7542,8512·0
    Nottingham7,5706,1661·2
    Barnsley2,3712,2331·1
    Doncaster4,8512,8851·7
    Rotherham4,3852,5271·7
    Sheffield11,0025,3872·0
    East Anglian Regional Health Authority
    Cambridge4,9532,6861·8
    Peterborough3,6341,9661·8
    West Suffolk2,5922,2491·2

    [pursuant to his reply, 23 March 1987. c.76]: Information on in-patient waiting lists, and total resident populations is given in the following table. A significant, though varying, proportion of patients on the waiting list are referred by general practitioners in other districts. The relevant population for comparison is therefore the "catchment" population which can, and in many cases does, vary substantially from the resident population. The percentage figures may therefore have little significance, and any national ranking based on them may be seriously misleading.

    District Health Authority

    Total cases

    Resident population (hundreds)

    Total cases as a percentage of resident population

    East Suffolk3,3363,1521·1
    Norwich6,9364,6061·5
    Great Yarmouth and Waveney3,4841,9201·8
    West Norfolk and Wisbech2,1051,8131·2
    Huntingdon8201,2550·7

    North-West Thames Regional Health Authority

    North Bedfordshire2,0392,4200·8
    South Bedfordshire2,3542,7470·9
    North Hertfordshire3,0351,8661·6
    East Hertfordshire1,1972,9270·4
    North West Hertfordshire1,8962,6170·7
    South West Hetfordshire2,0542,4510·8
    Barnet4,0593,0121·3
    Harrow1,2572,0170·6
    Hillingdon7,7902,3213·4
    Hounslow and Spelthorne5,3372,8581·9
    Ealing1,8152,9240·6
    Brent1,9972,5490·8
    Paddington and North Kensington3,2891,2262·7
    Riverside5,5912,8841·9

    North-East Thames Regional Health Authority

    Basildon and Thurrock6,0712,8072·2
    Mid Essex5,0492,8381·8
    North East Essex3,5322,9501·2
    West Essex4,8612,5511·9
    Southend3,4143,1911·1
    Barking, Havering and Brentwood6,6364,5811·4
    Hampstead2,6681,0732·5
    Bloomsbury14,7331,29711·4
    Islington2,5091,6791·5
    City and Hackney7,1121,9263·7
    Newham1,1882,0860·6
    Tower Hamlets7,0211,4714·8
    Enfield2,9972,6501·1
    Haringey9281,9720·5
    Redbridge2,0952,2800·9
    Waltham Forest4,1122,1621·9

    South-East Thames Regional Health Authority

    Brighton3,7622,9701·3
    Eastbourne2,7452,2361·2
    Hastings2,9511,6181·8
    South East Kent2,6012,6161·0
    Canterbury and Thanet4,5072,9961·5
    Dartford and Gravesham4,4342,2142·0
    Maidstone2,4101,9411·2
    Medway3,2023,2231·0
    Tunbridge Wells4,8691,9622·5
    Bexley1,5352,1850·7
    Greenwich2,8052,1621·3
    Bromley2,1072,9790·7
    West Lambeth7,7021,6264·7
    Camberwell2,6162,1201·2
    Lewisham and North Southwark8,5223,1722·7

    South-West Thames Regional Health Authority

    North West Surrey2,7062,0811·3
    West Surrey and North East Hampshire4,4402,7701·6
    South West Surrey3,0411,8351·7
    Mid Surrey2,4901,6671·5
    East Surrey1,9351,8611·0
    Chichester2,5081,7571·4
    Mid Downs2,1902,7190·8
    Worthing3,1952,4011·3
    Croydon2,1463,1900·7
    Kingston and Esher2,6191,7941·5
    Richmond, Twickenham and Roehampton3,2332,2991·4
    Wandsworth2,8381,9041·5
    Merton and Sutton2,7323,3410·8

    Wessex Regional Health Authority

    East Dorset5,5854,3481·3
    West Dorset1,9921,9291·0

    District Health Authority

    Total cases

    Resident population (hundreds)

    Total cases as a percentage of resident population

    Portsmouth and South East Hampshire7,1395,2431·4
    Southampton and South West Hampshire8,3854,1402·0
    Winchester2,4842,0821·2
    Basingstoke and North Hampshire2,7642,1441·3
    Salisbury4,3351,2213·6
    Swindon2,9242,2451·3
    Bath5,5353,9581·4
    Isle of Wight1,5831,2291·3

    Oxford Regional Health Authority

    East Berkshire7,6703,5982·1
    West Berkshire4,5084,3671·0
    Aylesbury Vale3,4161,3942·5
    Wycombe1,1812,7210·4
    Milton Keynes2,4641,5321·6
    Kettering3,2012,4981·3
    Northampton5,0202,9631·7
    Oxfordshire5,7895,3001·1

    South- Western Regional Health Authority

    Bristol and Weston8,3193,6282·3
    Frenchay3,3782,1881·5
    Southmead1,7602,3090·8
    Cornwall and Isles of Scilly4,9384,4381·1
    Exeter4,6393,0091·5
    North Devon1,4871,2991·1
    Plymouth5,4533,2481·7
    Torbay2,0422,3240·9
    Cheltenham2,1262,0691·0
    Gloucester4,4643,0451·5
    Somerset5,0803,9451·3

    West Midlands Regional Health Authority

    Bromsgrove and Redditch2,0031,6271·2
    Herefordshire2,8901,5271·9
    Kidderminster and District1,3291,0111·3
    Worcester and District3,2762,3431·4
    Shropshire8,1613,9032·1
    Mid Staffordshire1,6093,0610·5
    North Stafforshire9,1594,6302·0
    South East Staffordshire2,7212,5131·1
    Rugby5538560·6
    North Warwickshire2,0061,7271·2
    South Warwickshire2,8712,2141·3
    Central Birmingham5,4481,7993·0
    East Birmingham3,3672,0171·7
    North Birmingham1,5641,6341·0
    South Birmingham7,7942,4913·1
    West Birmingham4,1002,1341·9
    Coventry5,7293,1221·8
    Dudley3,9603,0081·3
    Sandwell1,4253,0330·5
    Solihull2,0162,0191·0
    Walsall2,7582,6291·0
    Wolverhampton4,5222,5321·8

    Mersey Regional Health Authority

    Chester2,1141,7791·2
    Crewe4,6002,4571·9
    Halton2681,4230·2
    Macclesfield8801,7840·5
    Warrington1,8241,7921·0
    Liverpool8,6574,9151·8
    St. Helens and Knowsley3,9553,5461·1
    Southport and Formby1,1791,1801·0
    South Sefton3,5191,8042·0
    Wirral3,1303,5540·9

    North-Western Regional Health Authority

    Lancaster2,2641,2851·8
    Blackpool, Wyre and Fylde4,4773,1731·4
    Preston4,3991,2443·5
    Blackburn, Hyndburn and Ribble Valley2,4012,7230·9
    Burnley, Pendle and Rossendale2,3862,3011·0
    West Lancashire2,2101,0752·1

    District Health Authority

    Total cases

    Resident population (hundreds)

    Total cases as a percentage of resident population

    Chorley and South Ribble7201,9270·4
    Bolton2,8352,6121·1
    Bury7111,7330·4
    North Manchester2,6091,4681·8
    Central Manchester6,1041,2604·8
    South Manchester5,9421,7833·3
    Oldham4,6702,1972·1
    Rochdale2,7982,1361·3
    Salford4,3782,4001·8
    Stockport4,3672,9121·5
    Tameside and Glossop1,6142,4490·7
    Trafford1,6372,1780·8
    Wigan4,6213,0671·5

    asked the Secretary of State for Social Services (1) if he will set out, region by region, the hospital urgent in-patient waiting list in each district, together with the number of urgent cases waiting more than a month, the percentage the latter presents of the former and their national ranking by that percentage;(2) if he will set out, region by region, the hospital non-urgent in-patient waiting list in each health district together with the number of non-urgent cases waiting more than a year, the percentage the latter represents of the former and their national ranking by that percentage.

    Number of urgent cases and number of urgent cases waiting for more than one month on in-patient wailing list at 30 September 1986 with over one month cases as a percentage of all cases
    District Health AuthorityTotal urgent casesNumber waiting over one monthPercentage of urgent cases waiting over one month
    Northern Regional Health Authority
    Hartlepool45511·1
    North Tees00
    South Tees1374835·0
    East Cumbria4125·0
    South Cumbria3133·3
    West Cumbria32721·9
    Darlington111090·9
    Durham30723·3
    North West Durham1100·0
    South West Durham00
    Northumberland20717584·5
    Gateshead261350·0
    Newcastle1,30485565·6
    North Tyneside600·0
    South Tyneside00
    Sunderland13911280·6
    Yorkshire Regional Heath Authority
    Hull00
    East Yorkshire00
    Grimsby1100·0
    Scunthorpe00
    Northallerton00
    York1200·0
    Scarborough34823·5
    Harrogate291551·7
    Bradford1868947·8
    Airdale1027270·6
    Calderdale1100·0
    Huddersfield00
    Dewsbury500·0
    Leeds Western44334177·0
    Leeds Eastern49343387·8
    Wakefield29827·6
    Pontefract36929379·4

    [pursuant to his reply, 23 March 1987, c. 76.]: Information on the numbers of urgent cases and non-urgent cases in each district and the percentages waiting over a month and a year respectively are given in the following tables. National ranking according to these percentages would be misleading since in many districts the actual numbers waiting are very low. Nor is there any common definition of what constitutes an "urgent" case. That means that comparison between districts, even in terms of actual numbers, has little significance.

    District Health Authority

    Total urgent cases

    Number waiting over one month

    Percentage of urgent cases waiting over one month

    Trent Regional Health Authority

    North Derbyshire1254233·6
    Southern Derbyshire21911753·4
    Leicestershire87535240·2
    North Lincolnshire894853·9
    South Lincolnshire1346347·0
    Bassetlaw453271·
    Central Nottinghamshire1373626·3
    Nottingham521325·0
    Barnsley901011·1
    Doncaster42625559·9
    Rotherham1054946·7
    Sheffield1,5151,00866·5

    East Anglian Regional Health Authority

    Cambridge63841865·5
    Peterborough624064·5
    West Suffolk533464·2
    East Suffolk1526844·7
    Norwich1,22794276·8
    Great Yarmouth and Waveney28824083·3
    West Norfolk and Wisbech900·0
    Huntingdon794455·7

    North-West Thames Regional Health Authority

    North Bedfordshire22100·0
    South Bedfordshire100·0
    North Hertfordshire331545·5
    East Hertfordshire800·0
    North West Hertfordshire900·0
    South West Hertfordshire292586·2
    Barnet54315829·1
    Harrow44100·0
    Hillingdon80351263·8
    Hounslow and Spelthorne30316052·8
    Ealing36431686·8
    Brent19947·4
    Paddington and North Kensington15112180·1
    Riverside81375192·4

    North-East Thames Regional Health Authority

    Basildon and Thurrock96370573·2
    Mid Essex23914259·4
    North East Essex28415855·6
    West Essex967982·3
    Southend69539857·3
    Barking, Havering and Brentwood1436746·9
    Hampstead432353·5
    Bloomsbury70215421·9
    Islington40433683·2
    City and Hackney2,5711,32251·4
    Newham736589·0
    Tower Hamlets1,6291,40085·9
    Enfield5311·9
    Haringey1133026·5
    Redbridge958387·4
    Waltham Forest975051·5

    South-East Thames Regional Health Authority

    Brighton1626439·5
    Eastbourne674059·7
    Hastings1479866·7
    South East Kent500·0
    Canterbury and Thanet38715740·6
    Dartford and Gravesham3512·9
    Maidstone784051·3
    Medway1386043·5
    Tunbridge Wells31821367·0
    Bexley00
    Greenwich3400·0
    Bromley4000·0
    West Lambeth1,79673540·9
    Camberwell1788346·6
    Lewisham and North Southwark97377880·0

    District Health Authority

    Total urgent cases

    Number waiting over one month

    Percentage of urgent cases wailing over one month

    South-West Thames Regional Health Authority

    North West Surrey523261·5
    West Surrey and North East Hampshire1,41596067·8
    South West Surrey991515·2
    Mid Surrey421228·6
    East Surrey1955427·7
    Chichester1257761·6
    Mid Downs1144539·5
    Worthing33119960·1
    Croydon965254·2
    Kingston and Esher33620962·2
    Richmond, Twickenham and Roehampton16911970·4
    Wandsworth29812943·3
    Morton and Sutton30714547·2

    Wessex Regional Health Authority

    East Dorset1,05069265·9
    West Dorset19915778·9
    Portsmouth and South East Hampshire38116342·8
    Southampton and South West Hampshire1,11873565·7
    Winchester1142320·2
    Basingstoke and North Hampshire462043·5
    Salisbury1917338·2
    Swindon52917·3
    Bath46435376·1
    Isle of Wight900·0

    Oxford Regional Health Authority

    East Berkshire49937474·9
    West Berkshire1645734·8
    Aylesbury Vale412151·2
    Wycombe2400·0
    Milton Keynes623454·8
    Kettering896674·2
    Northampton75064786·3
    Oxfordshire1482416·2

    South- Western Regional Health Authority

    Bristol and Weston76930339·4
    Frenchay893134·8
    Southmead341338·2
    Cornwall and Isles of Scilly25719776·7
    Exeter1748951·1
    North Devon1500·0
    Plymouth1123934·8
    Torbay403382·5
    Cheltenham11100·0
    Gloucester30613042·5
    Somerset84645954·3

    West Midlands Regional Health Authority

    Bromsgrove and Redditch2528·0
    Herefordshire846779·8
    Kidderminster and District1900·0
    Worcester and District594271·2
    Shropshire38523561·0
    Mid Staffordshire2123416·0
    North Staffordshire1,09589781·9
    South East Staffordshire302480·0
    Rugby00
    North Warwickshire28414·3
    South Warwickshire462758·7
    Central Birmingham72257379·4
    East Birmingham41526263·1
    North Birmingham6357·9
    South Birmingham1,01189588·5
    West Birmingham1198067·2
    Coventry53533963·4
    Dudley1164740·5
    Sandwell00
    Solihull55100·0
    Walsall241145·8
    Wolverhampton15412178·6

    District Health Authority

    Total urgent cases

    Number waiting over one month

    Percentage of urgent cases nailing over one month

    Mersey Regional Health Authority

    Chester772127·3
    Crewe20917282·3
    Halton00
    Macclesfield1479363·3
    Warrington191894·7
    Liverpool50434468·3
    St. Helens and Knowsley754965·3
    Southport and Formby00
    South Sefton642539·1
    Wirral1144741·2

    North-Western Regional Health Authority

    Lancaster32515·6
    Blackpool, Wyre and Fylde62049880·3
    Preston561017·9
    Blackburn, Hyndburn and Ribble Valley1815·6
    Burnley, Pendle and Rossendale30625081·7
    West Lancashire1200·0
    Chorley and South Ribble6116·7
    Bolton855969·4
    Bury00
    North Manchester813745·7
    Central Manchester1577447·1
    South Manchester58214825·4
    Oldham36627073·8
    Rochdale1086863·0
    Salford2444920·1
    Stockport44031972·5
    Tameside and Glossop1205445·0
    Trafford12433·3
    Wigan28828·6

    Number of non-urgent cases and number of non-urgent cases waiting for more than one month on in-patient waiting list at 30 September 1986 with over one month cases as a percentage of all non-urgent cases

    District Health Authority

    Total non-urgent cases

    Number waiting over one year

    Percentage of non-urgent cases waiting over one year

    Northern Regional Health Authority

    Hartlepool1,41630021·2
    North Tees925242·6
    South Tees5,8591,67128·5
    East Cumbria3,24984325·9
    South Cumbria1,33025319·0
    West Cumbria1,1831149·6
    Darlington2,43861225·1
    Durham965717·4
    North West Durham67913820·3
    South West Durham67110415·5
    Northumberland1,72131818·5
    Gateshead1,23619615·9
    Newcastle7,8361,15914·8
    North Tyneside1,06013412·6
    South Tyneside756668·7
    Sunderland3,60142311·7

    Yorkshire Regional Health Authority

    Hull6,7972,43435·8
    East Yorkshire1,36525919·0
    Grimsby1,3581118·2
    Scunthorpe2,90780127·6
    Northallerton78460·8
    York2,5602469·6
    Scarborough1,7351307·5
    Harrogate1,73021012·1
    Bradford6,6881,42221·3
    Airedale2,30277733·8
    Calderdale961687·1
    Huddersfield2,20028613·0
    Dewsbury55512322·2
    Leeds Western4,03373618·2
    Leeds Eastern4,65196220·7
    Wakefield2,1871908·7

    District Health Authority

    Total non-urgent cases

    Number waiting over one year

    Percentage of non-urgent cases waiting over one year

    Pontefract2,06055927·1

    Trent Regional Health Authority

    North Derbyshire2,52781832·4
    Southern Derbyshire6,13198216·0
    Leicestershire7,2941,14615·7
    North Lincolnshire2,58337214·4
    South Lincolnshire4,0351,37034·0
    Bassetlaw85215818·5
    Central Nottinghamshire5,6172,41343·0
    Nottingham7,5182,15028·6
    Barnsley2,2812149·4
    Doncaster4,4251,37831·1
    Rotherham4,2801,50935·3
    Sheffield8,4873,60138·0

    East Anglian Regional Health Authority

    Cambridge4,3151,58036·6
    Peterborough3,57251914·5
    West Suffolk2,53953621·1
    East Suffolk3,18466420·9
    Norwich5,7092,19238·4
    Great Yarmouth and Waveney3,1961,01831·9
    West Norfolk and Wisbech2,09626312·5
    Huntingdon741212·8

    North-West Thames Regional Health Authority

    North Bedfordshire2,03759529·2
    South Bedfordshire2,35328612·2
    North Hertfordshire3,00277225·7
    East Hertfordshire1,189675·6
    North West Hertfordshire1,8871095·8
    South West Hertfordshire2,02523111·4
    Barnet3,51684023·9
    Harrow1,253957·6
    Hillingdon6,9874,04958·0
    Hounslow and Spelthorne5,0341,26925·2
    Ealing1,45197667·3
    Brent1,97826713·5
    Paddington and North Kensington3,13836711·7
    Riverside4,77891419·1

    North-East Thames Regional Health Authority

    Basildon and Thurrock5,1082,48548·6
    Mid Essex4,8101,02721·4
    North East Essex3,24843713·5
    West Essex4,76591419·2
    Southend2,71973527·0
    Barking, Havering and Brentwood6,4932,69641·5
    Hampstead2,62571427·2
    Bloomsbury14,0313,49524·9
    Islington2,10570933·7
    City and Hackney4,5411,73238·1
    Newham1,11516514·8
    Tower Hamlets5,3923,04656·5
    Enfield2,94471724·4
    Haringey815678·2
    Redbridge2,00035717·9
    Waltham Forest4,01574718·6

    South-East Thames Regional Health Authority

    Brighton3,60066518·5
    Eastbourne2,67861623·0
    Hastings2,80449317·6
    South East Kent2,5962469·5
    Canterbury and Thanet4,12093222·6
    Dartford and Gravesham4,39985019·3
    Maidstone2,33245519·5
    Medway3,06444614·6
    Tunbridge Wells4,5511,62235·6
    Bexley1,5351167·6
    Greenwich2,77145316·3
    Bromley2,06753425·8
    West Lambeth5,9062,86448·5
    Camberwell2,43831312·8

    District Health Authority

    Total non-urgent cases

    Number waiting over one year

    Percentage of non-urgent cases waiting over one year

    Lewisham and North Southwark7,5492,26830·0

    South-West Thames Regional Health Authority

    North West Surrey2,65441815·7
    West Surrey and North East Hampshire3,02573124·2
    South West Surrey2,94264922·1
    Mid Surrey2,44891037·2
    East Surrey1,74032718·8
    Chichester2,38383435·0
    Mid Downs2,07627713·3
    Worthing2,86466323·1
    Croydon2,05026112·7
    Kingston and Esher2,28388938·9
    Richmond, Twickenham and Roehampton3,0641,68555·0
    Wandsworth2,54036614·4
    Merton and Sutton2,42528111·6

    Wessex Regional Health Authority

    East Dorset4,53586919·2
    West Dorset1,79337921·1
    Portsmouth and South East Hampshire6,7581,39520·6
    Southampton and South West Hampshire7,2672,28531·4
    Winchester2,37073831·1
    Basingstoke and North Hampshire2,71861422·6
    Salisbury4,1441,35932·8
    Swindon2,87235912·5
    Bath5,0711,33326·3
    Isle of Wight1,574935·9

    Oxfordshire Regional Health Authority

    East Berkshire7,1712,41933·7
    West Berkshire4,34465515·1
    Aylesbury Vale3,3751,37640·8
    Wycombe1,1571028·8
    Milton Keynes2,40267728·2
    Kettering3,11282526·5
    Northampton4,2701,64738·6
    Oxfordshire5,64185515·2

    South-Western Regional Health Authority

    Bristol and Weston7,5501,36918·1
    Frenchay3,2891,77554·0
    Southmead1,72639222·7
    Cornwall and Isles of Scilly4,6811,51732·4
    Exeter4,46575917·0
    North Devon1,47215810·7
    Plymouth5,3411,62730·5
    Torbay2,00240420·2
    Cheltenham2,12561729·0
    Gloucester4,1581,06525·6
    Somerset4,2341,42733·7

    West Midlands Regional Health Authority

    Bromsgrove and Redditch1,97836918·7
    Herefordshire2,80686931·0
    Kidderminster and District1,31014811·3
    Worcester and District3,21759818·6
    Shropshire7,7762,29929·6
    Mid Staffordshire1,39729421·0
    North Staffordshire8,0642,97636·9
    South East Staffordshire2,69133712·5
    Rugby5539216·6
    North Warwickshire1,97844922·7
    South Warwickshire2,82591732·5
    Central Birmingham4,7261,23126·0
    East Birmingham2,9521,36946·4
    North Birmingham1,50131721·1
    South Birmingham6,7833,62053·4
    West Birmingham3,9811,10127·7
    Coventry5,1941,87436·1
    Dudley3,84488923·1
    Sandwell1,42514510·2
    Solihull2,01146923·3
    Walsall2,73469925·6
    Wolverhampton4,3681,10825·4

    District Health Authority

    Total non-urgent cases

    Number waiting over one year

    Percentage of non-urgent cases waiting over one year

    Mersey Regional Health Authority

    Chester2,03730314·9
    Crewe4,3912,08847·6
    Halton26872·6
    Macclesfield73323031·4
    Warrington1,80543724·2
    Liverpool8,1531,44517·7
    St. Helens and Knowsley3,88097125·0
    Southport and Formby1,17929625·1
    South Sefton3,45554415·7
    Wirral3,01633611·1

    North-Western Regional Health Authority

    Lancaster2,23252223·4
    Blackpool, Wyre and Fylde3,85782121·3
    Preston4,3431,41232·5
    Blackburn, Hyndburn and Ribble Valley2,38349520·8
    Burnley, Pendle and Rossendale2,08067732·5
    West Lancashire2,19836416·6
    Chorley and South Ribble71427238·1
    Bolton2,75063122·9
    Bury711213·0
    North Manchester2,52835013·8
    Central Manchester5,9471,33222·4
    South Manchester5,3601,26123·5
    Oldham4,3041,97946·0
    Rochdale2,69087632·6
    Salford4,1341,01524·6
    Stockport3,9271,19430·4
    Tameside and Glossop1,49425817·3
    Trafford1,6251167·1
    Wigan4,5931,26227·5

    Scotland

    Housing Stock

    asked the Secretary of State for Scotland what is the estimate of the value of the housing stock in Scotland in April 1986 and of the percentage increase in value since then; what are the comparable rateable values; and what is his estimate of the amount collected in rates on dwellings in the year 1986–87.

    Information on the market value of housing stock in Scotland is not held centrally. The total rateable value of domestic subjects in Scotland as at 1 April 1986 was £1,327 million. Information regarding any increase since then is not yet available. The estimated amount collected in rates on domestic subjects in 1986–87 was £527 million.

    Drug Abuse (Edinburgh And Lothian)

    asked the Secretary of State for Scotland if he will finance urgent studies into the co-factors affecting drug abuse and AIDS identifiable in the drug abusing population in Edinburgh and Lothian region since 1983.

    The Scottish Home and Health Department is at present providing funding for seven relevant projects in this general area of research, of which four have direct relevance to the drug abuse population in Edinburgh and Lothian region. In addition, additional relevant studies have recently been funded by the Medical Research Council and further proposals are under assessment.

    Aids

    asked the Secretary of State for Scotland if he will arrange for urgent studies into the possibilities for, and effects of, treatment on HIV infected babies identified in and near Edinburgh since 1983.

    All the known HIV infected babies in or near Edinburgh are to be included in a research study which is under assessment by the Medical Research Council. My officials will be involved with that assessment.

    asked the Secretary of State for Scotland if he will finance urgent studies into the transmission of HIV from mothers to children in Edinburgh and Lothian since 1983.

    Discussions between my officials, the Medical Research Council and the Lothian and Tayside health boards are likely to lead to proposals for research in due course.

    Road Works (Objectors)

    asked the Secretary of State for Scotland if he will make it his policy to release the names of objectors to trunk road alterations and bypasses to hon. Members as well as public inquiries.

    No; the degree of confidentiality which those opposing trunk road schemes can expect at present is a valuable safeguard of their rights. It ensures that people are not deterred from lodging objections by fear of pressure being brought to bear on them by other interested parties. Where a public inquiry is held, however, there is no option but to make public the names of those who have maintained their objections, since the proceedings are held in public.

    Children's Panels

    asked the Secretary of State for Scotland for what purpose he introduced rule 13 for the conduct of children's panels relating to the custody of persons by police or prison officers; and on what date did it become effective.

    [pursuant to his reply, 30 April 1987, c. 214]: The rule was introduced so that an escorting officer who considers that he must accompany his prisoner throughout a children's hearing shall have the right to be present in the hearing room. It remains open to the chairman of a hearing to suggest to an escorting officer that he should remain outside to allow the hearing to proceed with maximum privacy. Chief constables and prison authorities have been asked to ensure that such requests are treated sympathetically, where possible. The new rule became operative on 2 February 1987.

    asked the Secretary of State for Scotland for what reason did he not reappoint from the children's panels in Ayrshire Mr. Alexander Baird and Mr. Ian Bigham; on what date this action became effective; and what representations he has received on this matter.

    [pursuant to his reply, 30 April 1987, c. 214]: Mr. Baird's term of appointment ended on 18 May 1986 and I accepted a recommendation from the Children's Panel Advisory Committee that he should not be offered a further term. Mr. Bigham was removed from office on 9 September 1986. I shall write to the hon. Member about the background to these decisions.

    asked the Secretary of State for Scotland what are the powers of the children's panels in relation to

    Effect of non-transferable allowances1 at 1987–88 income levels
    Paying less taxPaying more tax
    Total income (lower limit)NumbersAnnual tax changeNumbersAnnual tax changeAnnual tax change
    £ per weekthousands£ millionthousands£ million£ million
    Married couples—both earning
    Under 6010
    60 to 1002806565
    100 to 150580245245
    150 to 20052negligible800340340
    200 to 30052negligible2,190845845
    300 to 400102negligible1,610600600
    Over 40090-551,190430370
    All120-606,6502,5252,465
    Married couples—one earning
    Under 601801515
    60 to 100705195195
    100 to 15052negligible1,100360360
    150 to 2001,110390390
    200 to 30040-51,635575575
    300 to 40025-555196180
    Over 40055-70390220150
    All120-805,6401,9501,870