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Written Answers

Volume 116: debated on Thursday 14 May 1987

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Written Answers To Questions

Thursday 14 May 1987

Overseas Development

St Helena (Pianos)

asked the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs how many pianos in reasonably good playable condition are available to the education service on St. Helena; and in which schools they are placed.

Eight pianos in good condition, including six electronic ones, are in the following schools:

  • Country Senior
  • Pilling Senior
  • Secondary Selective
  • Longwood Junior
  • Jamestown Junior
  • Half Tree Hollow
  • Sandy Bay
  • Country Junior

"Britain And Africa's Development"

asked the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs how much it cost to produce the booklet "Britain and Africa's Development"; how many copies have been printed; and at what cost.

Eight hundred copies of my address "Britain and Africa's Development" to the Royal Commonwealth Society were reproduced in the Overseas Development Administration at a total cost of £208·34.

"British Aid"

asked the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs how much it cost to produce the booklet "British Aid" by the Overseas Development Administration; how many copies have been printed; and at what cost.

It cost £20,760 to produce 30,000 copies of the booklet "British Aid".

Home Department

Naturalisation

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will list the changes in the fee charged for naturalisation of an alien since 1975 indicating what proportion of the costs of the scheme were intended to be borne by the changes at each stage at which they were increased.

The changes in the fee charged for naturalisation since 1975 are as follows:

Naturalisation Fees: Changes
Date£
April 197540
October 197670
March 197885

Date

£

April 197990
April 1980150
April 1982200
April 1984160
April 1986170

A separate fee of £70 was charged for the naturalisation of the spouse of a British citizen from January 1983. The changes in this fee since then were as follows:

Naturalisation Fees: Spouse of British Citizen

Date

£
April 198455
April 198660

In the years up to 1980 the fees charged were forecast to recover about 50 per cent. of the costs of dealing with the application. From 1982, fee levels have been set to recover the full cost of processing successful applications.

Immigration

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many visas have been issued in (a) Ghana, (b) Bangladesh, (c) India, (d) Pakistan and (e) Nigeria since the scheme began; and how many of these were issued without an interview.

The information available centrally, which does not include separate figures on those visas granted without interview, is given in the following table:

Applications granted for visas to the United Kingdom1
Number of persons
Ghana
1986 October2 to December2,890
1987 January, February1,260
Bangladesh
1986 October3 to December2,920
1987 January to March2,610
India
1986 October3 to December20,130
1987 January to March16,570
Pakistan
1986 October3 to December11,540
1987 January to March10,530
Nigeria
1987 February42,600
1 For settlement or temporary purposes.
2 Including applications granted for entry clearance in the period 1 to 22 October 1986.
3 Including applications granted for entry clearance in the period 1 to 14 October 1986.
4 Provisional figure.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will provide a breakdown of the immigration status on arrival in the United Kingdom of all those (a) granted refugee status on asylum and (b) refused it over the latest 12-month period.

I refer the hon. Member to the reply my right hon. and learned Friend gave to a question from my right hon. Friend the Member for Aylesbury (Mr. Raison) on 16 March, at column 360. The hon. Member may like to know that the annual statistical bulletin on refugee statistics for the calendar year 1986 is being published on 19 May.

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many (a) visitors and (b) business

Ordinary visitors and business visitors admitted to the United Kingdom between October 1986 and January 1987
Number
NationalityOctober 1986November 1986December 1986January 1987
Ordinary visitorsBusiness visitorsOrdinary visitorsBusiness visitorsOrdinary visitorsBusiness visitorsOrdinary visitorsBusiness visitors
Bangladesh85017050015051011040090
Ghana1,290570810570970370680460
India8,5202,7805,4502,4904,7301,4803,7301,950
Nigeria5,6703,3303,4802,8204,4001,8203,5001,850
Pakistan4,3401,0502,6109303,0906902,130780

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many (i) visitors and (ii) business visitors (a) applied for visas, (b) were granted visas, (c) were refused visas and (d) had their applications referred for further consideration at each of the British posts in India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Nigeria and Ghana for each month since October 1986.

I refer the hon. Member to the reply given to a question from the hon. Member for Islington, North (Mr. Corbyn) on 22 April 1987 at columns 521–29. Separate information for ordinary visitors and business visitors is not available. The other information requested which is available centrally is given in the following table.

Applications for a visit visa to the United Kingdom
Number of persons
Applications
1Newly received2GrantedRefused initially3Deferred
Dhaka
1987 March68049016030
Bombay
1987 March3,0802,8305020
New Delhi
1987 March2,7302,23021060
Calcutta
1986 October4500500+10
November350340++
December260250-10
1987 January270270+-
February290280+20
March480470+10
Madras
1986 October4590580+10
November4504201010
December32029010+
1987 January310300++
February42038010+
March85081020-
Islamabad
1987 March2,6501,980250190
Karachi
1987 March1,8701,70018040

visitors were admitted to the United Kingdom from (i) India, (ii) Bangladesh, (iii) Pakistan, (iv) Ghana and (v) Nigeria in each month since October 1986.

The latest available information is given in the following table:

Applications
1 Newly received2 GrantedRefused initially3Deferred
Kaduna
1987 March1,7801,60040..
Accra
1987 February880580220..
..Not available. +5 or fewer.
1 Including applications subsequently withdrawn.
2 Including applications granted on appeal.
3 Including applications referred to the Home Office for decision.
4 Including applications for entry clearance in the period 1 to 14 October 1986.

Crime Prevention

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department how much was spent on crime prevention by each police authority for each year from 1979 to 1986; and what these amounts represent as a proportion of each police authority's expenditure.

The information requested is not available centrally and could be obtained only at disproportionate cost.

Police (Hours Of Work)

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department what is the average number of hours worked each week by police officers for each police authority; and what is the average number of hours overtime worked each week by police officers for each police authority.

Federated ranks in the police service are required to work eight hours per day with two rest days in seven. Information on the number of hours worked by police officers and the number of hours overtime worked by police officers is not held centrally and could be obtained only at disproportionate cost.

Police Officers

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many police officers were employed in the United Kingdom in each year from 1979 to the most recent year for which figures are available; and what estimate he has of the number currently employed.

The information requested is as follows:

Police officer strength: United Kingdom
Position on 31 DecemberNumbers
1979133,165
1980137,619
1981140,103
1982141,881
1983142,214
1984141,925
1985142,265
1986143,212
31 March
1987143,908

Community Police Officers

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many designated community police officers are employed by each police authority; and what proportion of the total number of police officers this represents in each police force.

I regret that this information is not held centrally and could be obtained only at disproportionate cost.

Overseas Voters

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) to which branches of the organisation known as Conservatives Abroad overseas registration documents have been supplied;(2) by whom the review of the need for guidance on the distribution methods of overseas electors' declaration forms referred to in his answer to the hon. and learned Member for Leicester, West on 22 April,

Official Report, column 531, is being carried out.

[pursuant to his reply, 8 May 1987, c. 548]: I regret that my original reply was incomplete. The full reply is as follows.Overseas electors' declaration forms were distributed widely by our diplomatic missions. Information is not available centrally on all the bodies which received copies of the forms, but in practice missions would have supplied copies to anybody, including a branch of Conservatives Abroad, which requested them.The need for guidance on the methods of distribution was considered jointly by this Department and the Foreign and Commonwealth Office. The Foreign and Commonwealth Office issued guidance on 5 May on the lines indicated in my answer of 22 April at column

531.

Italian Nationals

asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he has any plans to seek further information from Italian police regarding members of an organisation responsible for bombings in Bologna who are resident in the United Kingdom; and if he will make a statement.

[pursuant to his reply, 23 February 1987, c. 36]: I shall write to my hon. Friend.

Attorney-General

Civil Actions (Northern Ireland)

asked the Attorney-General why it is intended to abolish the right to trial by jury in civil action cases in Northern Ireland; what representations he has received from the Northern Ireland Bar, and elsewhere, for and against such abolition; when he proposes to proceed with the requisite regulations under the Judicature Act 1978; and if he will make a statement.

In January this year it was announced that the Lord Chancellor had concluded that there was no compelling reason why Northern Ireland should differ from England and Wales in the use of juries in personal injury actions. This decision was reached at the conclusion of a review during which submissions from known interested parties, including the Northern Ireland Bar, were considered. The Lord Chancellor indicated that he proposed to bring forward legislation to give effect to this decision and a draft order (The Jury Trial (Amendment) (Northern Ireland) Order 1987) was laid in the House on 11 May 1987. As a result of the curtailment of the parliamentary timetable the order will not be reached before the dissolution of this Parliament.

Lord Rothschild

asked the Attorney-General if he will make a statement on the interim report from the Metropolitan police on Lord Rothschild.

I have discussed the case with the Director of Public Prosecutions. He is considering the interim report and may need to request the police to make certain further inquiries.

Prime Minister

Scottish Development Agency

Q120.

asked the Prime Minister what conclusion she has drawn from the recent performance of the Scottish Development Agency as to the appropirate role of the state in the Scottish economy; and if she will make a statement.

Since 1979 the Scottish Development Agency has become widely accepted as one of the most effective development agencies in Europe. The agency is committed to working with the grain of the market, encouraging entrepreneurship and private sector initiatives. This approach to economic development is fully in line with the Government's philosophy, and it will continue of offer substantial benefits for Scotland. The work of the agency was commended by the review carried out and published last year. A copy of the report was placed in the Library.

Engagements

asked the Prime Minster if she will list her official engagements for Thursday 14 May.

This morning I presided at a meeting of the Cabinet and had meetings with ministerial colleagues and others. In addition to my duties in the House, I shall be having further meetings later today.

Public Expenditure

asked the Prime Minister if she will publish a table or tables listing the identifiable public expenditure per capita for (a) Scotland, (b) England, (c) Northern Ireland and (d) Wales, for each of the last years for which figures are available, giving a separate breakdown for housing, health, education, social services, tourism, transport, roads, industrial support, local government, special employment measures, fire and emergency services, police and prisons.

I refer my hon. Friend to the answer given by my right hon. Friend the Member for Norfolk, South (Mr. MacGregor) to my hon. Friend the Member for Darlington (Mr. Fallon) on 16 December 1986, at columns 488–498. More detailed figures are not readily available. Figures for local authority expenditure

(£ Million)
Area1978–791979–801980–811981–821982–831983–841984–851985–8611986–87
North East123·0107·0101·1109·791·468·861·646·489·8
North West76·574·1122·2177·5133·1115·5107·483·0113·7
Yorkshire & Humberside30·221·538·747·136·423·526·824·227·2
East Midlands2·32·43·27·28·88·23·84·48·4
West Midlands
South West6·05·08·510·311·07·89·58·614·6
Scotland107·370·2133·3142·7287·3143·0109·2107·5170·0
Wales71·550·7103·5122·2121·572·192·784·488·9
Great Britain Total416·8330·9490·5616·7689·5438·9411·0358·5512·6
1Figures for 1986–87 are provisional.
Provision for expenditure on regional development grants for financial years 1987–88 to 1989–90, as set out in the Supply Estimates for 1987–88 and as incorporated in the public expenditure White Paper for later years, is as follows

1 :

£ millions

1987–88

1988–89

1989–90

England2105·090·0100·0
Scotland67·057·065·0
Wales32·026·727·3
Great Britain Total204·0173·7192·3

1 The figures for future years are net of recoveries but gross of European Community receipts. The figures for past years are for gross payments made.

2 Estimates for future expenditure are produced only for England as a whole and are not broken down by region.

The projected fall in expenditure between 1986–87 and 1987–88 is the result of the Government's 1984 decision to replace the old RDG scheme, which supported capital investment without reference to employment, by a new and more cost-effective scheme linked to the creation of jobs.

Environment

Community Charge

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment what is his estimate of the likely level of the community charge in the London borough of Wandsworth; and if he will make a statement.

in Great Britain by territory were published in table 4.1 of the 1987 public expenditure White Paper (Cm. 56, volume II).

Trade And Industry

Regional Development Grant

asked the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry what was the expenditure on regional development grant in each region of England Scotland and Wales for each year from 1978–79 to 1986–87; and what expenditure is planned on regional development grants in each of the regions of England, Scotland and Wales in each of the years from 1987–88 to 1989–90.

If the new system had been introduced in full in 1986–87, the community change in respect of Wandsworth borough council's own services would have been £59. There would have been an additional £27 for miscellaneous services, including the Metropolitan police, and £311 for expenditure by the Inner London education authority. The total community charge would have been £397. All these figures are inevitably highly speculative. By the time the community charge is introduced in 1990–91 each authority may spend more—or less—than it did in 1986–87. There will be plenty of scope for ILEA in particular to reduce its expenditure before 1990. If, in 1986–87, it had spent at the Government's assessment of its need to spend, instead of what it actually spent, ILEA's community charge would have been only £65, and the total community charge in Wandsworth only £157.

Council House Sales

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment how many a) council houses and (b) council flats have been sold by each local authority in each year from 1981 to 1986.

A table showing the available information for financial years will be placed in the Library as soon as possible.

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment (1) what information he has as to the reasons for the delay in the purchase by Mr. A. Jamieson of his council home at 8 Spring Hill Close, Champion Hill, London SE5;

(2) what information he has as to the reasons for the delay in the purchase by Mr. and Mrs. Wellbrook of their council house at 11 Sunray Avenue, London, SE24;

(3) what information he has as to the reasons for the delay in the purchase by Mrs. H. Maher of her council home at 11 Priory Court, Cheltenham Road, London, SE15.

I understand that the tenants mentioned are among many who have met delay in exercising the right to buy their homes from Southwark borough council. The Department is discussing with the council the reasons for the delays and its proposals for dealing with them.

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment how many council houses and flats, sold since 1979, have been repossessed because the owners could not afford the mortgage repayments.

The available information on properties taken into possession by building societies and local authorities does not distinguish former council dwellings from other housing.

Local Government Finance

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment how much money each local authority received in capital receipts in each year from 1981 to 1986; and how much money each local authority has in the form of accumulated capital receipts at present.

I have today placed in the Library a table showing for each local authority and in total (a) for each financial year from 1981–82 to 1985–86 the amount authorities have reported they have received from disposals of fixed assets, repayments of grants and advances, and capital receipts by virtue of regulations made under section 75(5) of the Local Government, Planning and Land Act 1980; and (b) the amount of accumulated capital receipts at the end of 1985–86 which could be converted into cash. Figures for capital receipts in 1986–87 or accumulated receipts at the end of that year are not yet available.

Acidic Environment

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment if he will make a statement on the details supplied to date by his Department, concerning estimates of future energy demand and fuel mix required, as input to the individual studies comprising the Fellowship of Engineering's project entitled, "Acidic Emissions: Study of Combustion Processes and Abatement Technologies"; and if he will outline progress with the project and the results which have so far been produced.

Estimates of future energy demand and fuel mix have not been required for any of the individual studies within the fellowship's project and none have been suplied by the Department. The final report is due to be submitted by 31 March 1988, but good progress by the fellowship means that the detailed technical and economic assessment of abatement technologies will probably be available earlier.

Air Chief Marshal Lord Dowding

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment whether, in the light of the public support for a statute of Air Chief Marshal Lord Dowding, as well as support from within the House of Commons itself, he will now give consideration to erecting such a statue.

My right hon. Friend will give favourable and urgent consideration to the application under the Public Statues (Metropolis) Act 1854 which has just been submitted.

Rating Reform

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment (1) what estimate he has made of the effect of the poll tax in the city of Sheffield on a family of two in (a) a terraced house with a rateable value of £120, (b) a semi-detached house with a rateable value of £200 and (c) a detached house with a rateable value of £400;(2) what estimate he has made of the effect of a poll tax on an average family of four in the city of Sheffield.

The Government have proposals for a community charge and not a poll tax.Illustrative figures were placed in the Library on 1 April showing the community charge figure in each area if the system had been fully in operation in 1986–87, and on the basis of expenditure and grant figures applicable to that year. On these assumptions, the community charge in Sheffield would have been £322. It would have been only £170 if spending had been in accordance with our assessment of need to spend, instead of what was actually spent.The average domestic rate bill in Sheffield in 1986–87, using adjusted poundages, was £450 per hereditament. On the same basis, houses with rateable values of £120, £200 and £400 would have had rate bills of £397, £662 and £1,325 respectively.

Empty Houses And Rent Arrears

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment how many flats and houses owned by local authorities were vacant at the latest available date; and what were the rent arrears of the same authorities for the last convenient financial year.

Estimates derived from English local authorities' housing investment programme returns showed that there were 113,300 vacant local authority dwellings at 1 April 1986, including 1,700 which were closed awaiting demolition. Based on figures supplied to the Department by English local authorities in their housing subsidy claim forms, cumulative rent arrears at 1 April 1986 amounted to £211 million.

Construction Industry (Symposium)

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment what representations he has received regarding the forthcoming international symposium on the organisation and management of construction organised by the Chartered Institute of Building due to be held between 7 and 10 September; and if he will make a statement.

My predecessor, the hon. Member for Eastbourne, (Mr. Gow) gave his support to the Chartered Institute of Building's successful application to hold this international symposium in London. I subsequently agreed to give the opening address. I am sure that the symposium, which is addressing issues of particular interest to the United Kingdom construction industry, will be an enormous success.

House Building

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment how many houses are currently under construction; and how this number compares with the position in May 1979.

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment what is his policy towards the public sector building houses to rent.

The aim of the Government is to encourage the maximum provision of rented housing outside the public sector. Local authorities should target their own provision more closely on those in greatest housing need.

Improvement Grants

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment when he proposes to announce modifications to the improvement grant procedure following the consultation he carried out with the publication of the Green Paper "Home Improvement—New Approach".

Shortly.

CoventryWest MidlandsEngland
No.Percentage of stockNo.Percentage of stockNo.Percentage of stock
Unfit dwellings9440·8103,8005·2654,0003·5
Dwellings fit but lacking basic amenities4,9354·164,1003·2501,0002·7
Non-standard dwellings in need of renovation14,1823·5308,50015·42,890,00015·4
1 Dwellings requiring repairs estimated at more than £3,000 (£4,200 in Greater London).

Pressurised Water Reactors

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment, pursuant to his answer of 6 May, Official Report, columns 713–4, what information he has on the area required for a pressurised water reactor installation similar in size to that which was the subject of the Sizewell inquiry, and on whether such a unit would fit on to the existing site at Hinkley Point.

I have been asked to reply.Plans of Sizewell B were submitted by the Central Electricity Generating Board in its application for consent to construct the station. This, together with considerable further evidence on the site, was given to the inquiry held by Sir Frank Layfield. The area required for permanent operational works is about 40 acres.It is for the CEGB to consider the suitability of a site for the construction of a power station before making an application for consent to my right hon. Friend, the Secretary of State. My right hon. Friend has not yet received an application for consent to build a pressurised water reactor at Hinkley Point.

Rates

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment if he will seek to amend the law relating to the effect on the rateable value of homes of installing central heating; and if he will make a statement.

We intend to abolish domestic rates starting in 1990. This will sweep away all the anomalies of the present rating system including those associated with the installation of central heating systems since 1974. I trust that we shall have the hon. Member's support.

Housing Statistics

asked the Secretary of State for the Environment what is his latest estimate of the numbers of houses, also expressed as a percentage of the total, in Coventry, west midlands and nationally which are (a) substandard dwellings; unfit, (b) fit but lacking one or more basic amenity, (c) non-substandard dwellings in need of renovation.

[pursuant to his reply, 12 May 1987]: Local authorities are asked for these figures in their annual housing investment programme returns; the figures are not necessarily comparable as authorities' criteria differ and they are not consistent with national estimates from the English house condition survey of 1981.The figures provided by Coventry and estimates for the west midlands and for England, including allowance for any missing returns, are as follows:

The Arts

Attenborough Report

asked the Minister for the Arts what is his policy towards the recommendation of the Attenborough report on access to the arts for the disabled, a copy of which has been sent to him.

Many of the Attenborough recommendations have been acted upon. The Arts Council and other funding bodies have issued codes of practice; in addition, the Arts Council has appointed a full-time disability officer. I am satisfied that the arts bodies for which I am responsible are fully aware of the needs and aspirations of disabled people, and are doing all that they can in their support.

National Finance

Ships' Stores (Duty)

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer what provision he intends to make to relieve from duty stores imported for use by ships lying in United Kingdom ports; and if he will make a statement.

There is already adequate provision for stores to be shipped free of duty direct from the United Kingdom. However, it is the Government's intention to introduce legislation as early as possible in the next Parliament which will enable imported stores to be transhipped in the United Kingdom without payment of duty and tax. Provision will also be made for customs duty to be relieved on certain imported stores consumed in port prior to departure.

Capital Gains Tax

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer if he will make a statement about the availability of capital gains tax rollover relief for oil licence gains.

For a number of years the Inland Revenue has proceeded on the basis that the present law does not allow capital gains tax rollover relief in respect of gains on the disposal of any oil licence interests. A recent decision of the special commissioners indicates that this understanding of existing law was incorrect, and that an oil licence may be a qualifying asset for rollover relief purposes. The Government propose, as early as possible in the next Parliament, to bring forward legislation with retrospective effect to make clear that this relief is not in fact available for oil licence gains.

Ecofin

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer if he will make a statement on the latest meeting of the European Community's Economic and Finance Council.

The Community's Economic and Finance Council met in Brussels on 11 May. I represented the United Kingdom.The Council discussed the Commission's proposals for the future financing of the Community. I made clear our view that ways must be found of controlling Community expenditure, on agriculture and other programmes, before it was appropriate even to consider possible increases in own resources, and that any changes in the Fontainebleau abatement system would have to be for the better. The Council will resume discussion at its June meeting.The Council also considered the budgetary situation in the current year. I suggested that the anticipated expenditure overrun be financed by use of headroom within the 1·4 per cent. VAT ceiling, by savings in the 1987 agricultural price fixing and by a switch from advances to reimbursement of agricultural guarantee expenditure. I

Distribution of Total Income 1987–88 for Higher Rate Tax Payers1
Range of total income Lower limitTotal number of incomesNumber of incomes with investment incomeNumber of incomes with mortgage interest reliefTotal number of incomesNumber of incomes with investment incomeNumber of incomes with mortgage interest relief
(£ pa)('000s)('000s)('000s)('000s)('000s)('000s)
Single peopleMarried couples without wife's earnings
20,000654515604020
25,0005540201007570
30,000252010504030
35,00010105353020
40,000202010454030
50,000252010554530

made clear the United Kingdom's firm opposition to supplementary financing through an intergovernmental agreement.

The Council had a first discussion on the Commission's proposals on financial engineering and the financing of large scale infrastructure projects of European interest. The topic was referred without commitment to officials for further consideration.

The Council agreed in principle by qualified majority, pending discussion with the European Parliament at its June meeting, on a reference framework for the 1988 Community budget of 36·6 billion ecu (about £25·5 billion at current exchange rates) in accordance with the budgetary discipline conclusions of December 1984. The framework provides for expenditure on agricultural market support and non-obligatory expenditure to be kept within the budget discipline guideline limit, now adjusted to cover expenditure in Spain and Portugal, and the maximum rate of increase as laid down in the treaty respectively. In respect of the agricultural guideline, the Council noted that it might be necessary to take exceptional circumstances into consideration in due course in accordance with article 2 of the Council's December 1984 budget discipline conclusions.

The Council discussed a draft directive on credit and suretyship insurance, and agreed to refer it back to permanent representatives for further work.

Following discussion at its March meeting, the Council received a report from the Commission on the financial effects for Spain and Portugal of the Council's decision to delay reimbursement to member states of losses incurred on the disposal of butter stocks. The Council asked permanent representatives to examine the Commission's report with a view to possible discussion at a fu lure meeting of the Council.

Mortgage Interest Relief

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer if, pursuant to his reply dated 6 April, Official Report, column 74, showing the average unearned income and average amount of mortgage interest relief in each income band at higher rates, he will publish in the Official Report the number of incomes in each of these two categories in the same detail.

[pursuant to his reply, 13 May 1987]: Information is given in the tables. The estimates are based on a projection from the 1984–85 survey of personal incomes and are therefore provisional.

Range of total income Lower limit

Total number of incomes

Number of incomes with investment income

Number of incomes with mortgage interest relief

Total number of incomes

Number of incomes with investment income

Number of incomes with mortgage interest relief

(£ pa

('000s)

('000s).

('000s)

('000s)

('000s)

('000s)

Two-earner married couples

Without a wife's earnings election

With a wife's earnings election

20,000554015000
25,000225175150503525
30,0009080701108075
35,000403530705550
40,000303020504530
50,000303020504530

1 Includes some 130,000 tax units that are taken out of higher rate tax following the wife's earnings election.

Private Schools (Charitable Status)

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer how much tax revenue it is estimated his Department loses as a result of the charitable status enjoyed by private schools.

to his reply, 13 May 1987]: I regret that the information is not available.

Mr D P Morris

asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer when the hon. Member for Rugby and Kenilworth might receive a reply to his letter dated 4 April referring to Mr. D. P. Morris of Jully and Barber Ltd., Rugby.

I have today replied to my hon. Friend's letter of April 8 concerning Jully and Barber.

Foreign And Commonwealth Affairs

Chieftain Tanks (Iran)

asked the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs if he will make representations to the West German Government about the supply to Iran by MAN of Germany of replacement power packs for Chieftain tanks supplied by the United Kingdom before the Iran-Iraq war; and if he will make a statement.

We are not aware of this specific proposal, but if my hon. Friend would care to pass on to me any details he may have, we would be happy to raise the matter with the Federal German authorities. As recorded in my answer to my hon. Friend on 9 December 1986, we have in the past raised with the FRG the supply of Chieftain tank engines to Iran, and it is our understanding that their policy of neutrality in the conflict does not permit the export of goods for military use to areas of tension.

Advertisements

asked the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs on how many occasions his Department sponsored advertisements in national newspapers in the last three years; which newspapers were chosen for these campaigns; which local newspapers were used in these campaigns; and which newspaper publishing groups received payment for advertising space.

The diplomatic and aid wings of the Foreign and Commonwealth Office have sponsored advertisements in national newspapers on 216 occasions during the three years to 31 March 1987. The majority of these advertisements were for recruitment purposes.

The national and local newspapers in which advertisements were placed during this period are:

National

  • The Daily Express
  • The Daily Mail
  • The Daily Telegraph
  • The Financial Times
  • The Guardian
  • The Independent
  • The Sun
  • The Observer
  • The Sunday Times

Local

  • Adur Heral
  • Aylesbury and Wendover Times
  • Bedfordshire Times
  • Belfast Telegraph
  • Birmingham Evening Mail
  • Brighton Evening Argus
  • Buckingham Advertiser
  • Buckingham Herald
  • Bucks and Herts News
  • Citizen
  • Croydon Advertiser
  • Edinburgh Evening News
  • Glasgow Herald
  • Herald
  • Kent and Sussex Courier
  • Liverpool Echo
  • London Evening Standard
  • Manchester Evening News
  • Mid Sussex Times
  • Milton Keynes Gazette
  • Milton Keynes Mirror
  • Milton Keynes Standard
  • Newcastle Evening Chronicle
  • Newport Pagnell and Olney Standard
  • Northampton Chronicle and Echo
  • Post
  • Scotsman
  • South Wales Echo
  • Sussex Express and County Herald
  • West Sussex Gazette
  • Yorkshire Evening News

The following newspaper publishing groups received paid advertising space as a result of this newspaper advertising:

  • Associated Newspapers Group Plc.
  • Bedfordshire Times Group
  • Birmingham Post and Mail Ltd.
  • Bucks and Herts Newspaper Group
  • Chiltern Newspapers
  • Courier and Printing Publishing Company
  • Daily Telegraph Plc.
  • Croydon Advertising Group
  • EMAP Provincial News Ltd.
  • Fleet Holdings
  • George Outram and Company Ltd.
  • Guardian and Manchester Evening News Plc.
  • Herald Newspaper Group
  • Hillingdon and South Bucks Newspaper Group
  • International Thompson Organisation
  • Liverpool Daily Post and Echo Plc.
  • Lonrho Plc.
  • Mid Sussex Times Group
  • News Corporation
  • Newspaper Publishing Plc.
  • Pearson Plc.
  • Post Newspaper Group
  • United Newspaper Group
  • United Newspaper Plc.
  • Westminster Press Limited
  • Worthing Gazette and Herald Group

Iraqi Pilots (Training)

asked the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs if he will make a statement regarding the training of Iraqi pilots at Kidlington, including (a) the number of Iraqi pilots currently at Kidlington, (b) whether their training is intended to equip them as military or civilian pilots, and (c) whether and on what basis his Department is satisfied that the skills acquired in the United Kingdom will not be used in the war against Iran.

We do not have details of the number of foreign students, including Iraqis, currently training at the privately owned and run Oxford air training school at Kidlington. We are aware, however, that the training leads to civilian pilots licences, both private and commercial, and we understand that the skills obtained cannot of themselves be used in an offensive role.

Residence Re-Entry Visas

asked the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs on what basis the cost of residence re-entry visas to the United Kingdom is calculated; and what information he has as to how this figure compares with the fee charged by other Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development countries.

"Visa exempt" stamps issued in the United Kingdom and "returning resident" visas issued overseas to nationals of India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Nigeria and Ghana are issued free of charge. For other visa nationals residence re-entry visas issued in the United Kingdom and returning resident visas issued overseas cost £20 for a single entry visa and £40 for a multiple entry visa. These are the United Kingdom's standard worldwide charge for all short-term and multiple entry visas. They are calculated on the basis that income from fees should as much as possible offset the costs of the entry clearance operation. Details of comparative fees charged by other OECD member states are not available centrally.

Council Of Europe

asked the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs if he will make a statement regarding the level of support in the United Kingdom for the work of the Council of Europe in terms of publicity.

Publicising the work of the Council of Europe in member states is the responsibility of the council's directorate of press and information.

Western European Union

asked the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs if he will make a statement regarding the level of support in the United Kingdom for the work of the Western European Union in terms of publicity.

The WEU Secretary General has responsibility for publicising Western European Union activities. British Ministers keep Parliament and the public informed on a regular basis. I refer my hon. Friend to the answer given by the Minister of State, Foreign and Commonwealth Office, my hon. Friend the Member for Wallasey (Mrs. Chalker) on 30 April at column 197.

Hong Kong

asked the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs (1) what stage the discussion and negotiations with the People's Republic of China have reached with regard to the Fugitive Offenders Act (Hong Kong) Order 1967;(2) if he will make a statement on the timetable for enacting legislation with regard to the Fugitive Offenders Act (Hong Kong) Order 1967;(3) what is his intention regarding the application of safeguards embodied in the Fugitive Offenders Act (Hong Kong) Order after the termination of British sovereignty and jurisdiction;(4) what safeguards will be contained within the terms of Fugitive Offenders Act, disregarding the external relations provisions of section 2.2

(a), after the termination of British sovereignty and jurisdiction over Hong Kong;

(5) what information he has as to what amendments to the People's Republic of China constitution halve been agreed in order that for the purposes of extradition Hong Kong will not be deemed a colony of the People's Republic of China;

(6) whether the safeguards embodied in the Fugitive Offenders Act (Hong Kong) Order will be formalised in treaty form with the People's Republic of China;

(7) what guarantees have been agreed on behalf of the new sovereign power regarding post-custodial treatment of any person extradited to Hong Kong under the provisions of the Fugitive Offenders Act;

(8) whether the localisation of all legislation that is presently derived from the United Kingdom includes power to amend the Fugitive Offenders Act (Hong Kong) Order prior to 1997;

(9) what information he has as to whether the proposed amendment to the constitution of the People's Republic of China is to include a reference to the speciality principle.

The arrangements currently in force in respect of Hong Kong as regards the return of fugitive offenders to and from the territory cannot subsist in their present form, beyond the resumption by China of sovereignty over Hong Kong in 1997. We are considering what action would be appropriate to ensure that suitable arrangements can continue in force in respect of Hong Kong after that date. The continuity after 1997 of such arrangements affecting Hong Kong will require consultation with the Chinese Government.

Entry Clearance Applications

asked the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what is the income per month from entry clearance applications for each post in India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Nigeria and Ghana since October 1986.

Receipts from entry clearance fees at posts in India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Nigeria and Ghana are as follows. Figures currently available centrally relate only to the final quarter of 1986.

Pounds Sterling (to the nearest £50)
New Delhi136,150
Bombay194,650
Calcutta32,100
Madras25,650
Islamabad147,650
Karachi154,200
Dhaka611,350
Lagos102,550
Kaduna30,550
Accra72,100
Total1,506,950

Sellafield

asked the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what information he has concerning the decision in the Energy, Research and Technology Committee of the European Parliament on 29 April to initiate proceedings against the European Commission in the European Court over the apparent refusal of Euratom to release to the European Parliament specific safeguards documentation on the Magnox reprocessing line at Sellafield.

Although its meeting on 29 April was held in camera, the Committee has for some time sought full details of the arrangements, announced by my right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Energy on 4 June 1986, between the Commission and the United Kingdom authorities on the implementation of Euratom safeguards at Sellafield.I understand that the Commission had refused to release these details on the grounds that the information is, like all such arrangements, confidential, and that as a result the Committee is considering taking action in the European Court against the Commission.

Graduates in foreign languages
Thousands
1976197719781979198019811982198319841985
University (Great Britain)—Year of completion of course
First degree graduates
Foreign languages4·75·05·25·45·75·96·16·26·35·3
Foreign languages except French3·84·04·24·44·74·95·05·15·24·2
Foreign languages except French and German2·93·23·43·63·94·04·04·04·13·7
Higher degree graduates
Foreign languages0·70·60·70·80·70·80·80·80·80·9
Foreign languages except French0·60·60·60·70·70·70·70·70·70·8
Foreign languages except French and German0·50·50·60·60·60·70·70·60·60·8
CNAA1 (United Kingdom)—Year of confirment
First degree graduates
Foreign languages0·30·30·40·40·40·60·40·50·50·9
Foreign languages except Frenchn/an/an/an/an/an/an/an/an/an/a

Argentina (Arms)

asked the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs if he will publish the assurances received from the Libyan Government that Libyan arms were not being made available to Argentina at the time of the Falklands conflict.

It is not our practice to publish confidential exchanges between Governments.

Voluntary Fund For Victims Of Torture

asked the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs whether Her Majesty's Government will make a further contribution to the United Nations voluntary fund for the victims of torture.

I am pleased to announce that we have decided that the United Kingdom should make a contribution of £25,000 to this fund.

Women (Discrimination)

asked the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs if he will make a statement on the Government's initial report to the United Nations due under article 18 of the 1979 convention on the elimination of all forms of discrimination against women.

The report is being finalised and will shortly be submitted to the United Nations Secretary-General. Copies will be placed in the Library as soon as possible.

Education And Science

Foreign Languages

asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science what is the number of students in foreign languages expected to graduate in 1987; what was the number for each of the last 10 years; and what are the numbers for (a) all languages except French and (b) all languages except French and German.

The latest available information is shown in the following table. The Department has not produced projections for future years at this level of detail. A small fall is expected in the numbers graduating in 1986, followed by a small increase in 1987 and following years.

1976

1977

1978

1979

1980

1981

1982

1983

1984

1985

Foreign languages except French and Germann/an/an/an/an/an/an/an/an/an/a

Higher degree graduates

Foreign languages0·1
Foreign languages except Frenchn/an/an/an/an/an/an/an/an/an/a
Foreign languages except French and Germann/an/an/an/an/an/an/an/an/an/a

1 Council for National Academic Awards. These statistics relate to the numbers of awards conferred by CNAA during the year and differ from the numbers of students completing their courses. In particular figures for the years 1982, 1983 and 1984 underestimate the latter and the figure for 1985 is an overestimate.

n/a Not available.

16 To 19-Year-Olds

asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science how many students aged between 16 and 19 years of age entered full-time courses of non-advanced further education in England and Wales as a proportion of all 16 year-olds in each academic year from 1979–80 to 1986–87.

The figures as a percentage of all 16 to 18-year-olds are as follows. It would not be meaningful to express this as a percentage of 16-year-olds only. Figures for Wales are the responsibility of my right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Wales.

Students in full-time non advanced further education England
NovemberPercentage of all 16–18's1
19799·2
19809·7
198111·1
198212·4
198311·8
198411·8
198512·2
2198612·3
1 Those aged 16, 17 and 18 as at the previous 31st August.
2 Provisional.

Leeds

asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science if he will institute an inquiry under section 93 of the Education Act 1944 into the administration of education in Leeds; and if he will make a statement.

asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science what recent representations he has had seeking a formal investigation into the administration of education in Leeds.

My right hon. Friend has received no recent representations on this matter.

Comprehensive Education

asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science what information he has as to how many other EEC countries have a comprehensive system of education similar to that which exists in the United Kingdom.

: Education in EC member states differs according to history, culture and political development. Direct comparisons are not possible. Denmark, France, Greece, Ireland, Italy and Spain operate a non-selective approach to education up to the end of compulsory schooling (variously 14 to 16).

Expenditure Policy

asked the Secretary of State for Education and Science (1) when the analysis was completed for the 1986 report by Her Majesty's inspectors on the effects of local authority expenditure policies on education provision in England;(2) if he will publish the 1986 report by Her Majesty's inspectors on the effects of local authority expenditure policies on education provision in England.

I understand from Her Majesty's senior chief inspector of schools that work has not yet been completed on the analysis for and the content of the annual expenditure report for 1986. The timing of its submission to Ministers is entirely and solely a matter for HM inspectorate. The question of publication can only be considered when I receive the report.

Gcse Teachers (In-Service Training)

asked the secretary of State for Education and Science what further action the Government plan to take to promote opportunities for in-service training for GCSE teachers.

From the beginning of the next academic year, the Education (School Teachers' Pay and Conditions of Employment) Order 1987 provides that teachers will be available for work on five days a year beyond those days on which they will be required to teach pupils. It will be for schools and local education authorities to decide how best to use those five days. The Government expect that a substantial part of the available time will be devoted to in-service training, including training related to GCSE.The Government's monitoring of the introduction of the GCSE has shown that for schools and teachers the provision of two days' closure for GCSE in-service training last summer term was helpful. Many local education authorities, schools and teachers think it would be beneficial if a similar provision during the present academic year was provided, before the second and final year of the first GCSE courses begins in September.The Government have therefore decided to make further, special provision in the intervening period before the new conditions of service come into force. Accordingly, my right hon. Friends the Secretaries of State for Education and Science and for Wales have today laid before the House regulations which amend the number of days on which a school shall meet, consequential to the Education (School Teachers' Pay and Conditions of Employment) Order 1987, and also enable local education authorities in England and Wales to close their schools to pupils for one day before 31 July 1987 in order to allow teaching staff to undertake GCSE in-service training.

Wales

Chernobyl Disaster

asked the Secretary of State for Wales how many meetings he has had with the farming unions during the past three months, at which the losses arising from the Chernobyl disaster have been discussed; and if he will now make a further statement on improving his compensation scheme for farmers in Wales affected by this disaster.

I have had a number of meetings with the farming unions during the last three months to discuss compensation arrangements for producers affected by the Chernobyl incident. I and my ministerial colleagues have concluded that a further element of compensation is justified for the extra costs of monitoring and marking sheep before they can be released from the restricted area. We expect to make an early announcement on the details of this scheme.

Advertisements

asked the Secretary of State for Wales on how many occasions his Department sponsored advertisements in national newspapers in the last three years; which newspapers were chosen for these campaigns; which local newspapers were used in these campaigns; and which newspaper publishing groups received payment for advertising space.

I have not sponsored any advertising in national newspapers in the last three years. I have, however, sponsored local advertising for the right-to-buy campaign in the South Wales Echo, the South Wales Evening Post, the South Wales Argus and the Wrexham/Chester Evening Leader.Where the Welsh Office has been associated with national campaigns on AIDS, drugs misuse and road safety sponsored by major Whitehall Departments, I have sponsored advertisements in the Welsh language newspaper

Y Cymro and in the Western Mail, the Liverpool Daily Post and the South Wales Argus.

The South Wales Echo, and the Western Mail are part of the Thomson publishing group. The Liverpool Daily Post is a member of the Trinity International Publishing Group. The South Wales Argus is a member of Express Newspapers plc; the South Wales Evening Post is part of the Northcliffe Newspapers Group.

Both the Wrexham/Chester Evening Leader and Y Cymro are part of the North Wales Newspaper group.

Thoracic Medicine (Consultants)

asked the Secretary of State for Wales if he has plans to increase the number of consultants in thoracic medicine in Wales.

It is for individual health authorities to assess the need for additional consultants in thoracic medicine in Wales, on the basis of local needs, priorities and resources. We are always ready to consider requests by authorities to approve additional consultant posts, in the light of advice from the Welsh Medical and Dental Manpower Committee.

Health Services (Capital Provision)

asked the Secretary of State for Wales if he will give details of capital provision for hospital and community health services in Wales in 1987–88.

A capital spending programme totalling £53·4 million has been approved for hospital and community health services in Wales in 1987–88.The programme includes expenditure of £13·3 million for major schemes already in progress, the greatest part of which goes towards the continuing construction of Llanelli general hospital. Other schemes which benefit include developments at Llandough near Cardiff, Morriston and Singleton in Swansea and Withybush in Haverfordwest, remedial work at West Wales general hospital, Carmarthen and the University hospital of Wales, Cardiff and renovation work and the Prince of Wales hospital Rhydlafar and St. David's hospital, Carmarthen.Some £3·7 million has been allocated for centrally funded developments and regional services which include the improvement of cardiac services in South Glamorgan, the implementation of recommendations made in the report on regional services in north Wales and the provision of the first of the medium secure psychiatric units. Three further computerised tomography scanners are to be purchased and will he located at Ysbyty Gwynedd in Bangor, East Glamorgan hospital, Church Village and Velindre hospital in Cardiff, thus further extending the availability of this valuable diagnostic technique.Other allocations include £3·6 million for computer and information technology developments and the establishment of a resource management pilot scheme in West Glamorgan, £1·5 million for psychiatric bridging finance to help move from large psychiatric hospitals to community care and £0·3 million for the provision of equipment in special care baby units as part of the perinatal mortality initiative. A block allocation of £24·5 million has been made to district health authorities, a 14 per cent. increase over their 1986–87 allocation. Allocations to individual authorities are as follows:—

£ million
Clwyd4·1
East Dyfed1·8
Gwent4·3
Gwynedd1·5
Mid Glamorgan4·7
Pembrokeshire0·9
Powys0·9
South Glamorgan2·2
West Glamorgan4·1

Milk Quotas

asked the Secretary of State for Wales if he will publish the figures for the amount of milk quotas sold by Welsh producers to producers outside Wales, the amount bought by Welsh producers from outside Wales, and the net loss or gain to Wales, since the scheme came into operation and differentiating between north and south Wales.

Movement of quota in and out of Wales as recorded by the Milk Marketing board during the period 1 April 1985 to 17 February 1987 has been as follows:

Million litres
North WalesSouth WalesAll Wales
In+4·84·0+8·8
Out-4·6-12·5-17·1
Net loss or gain+0·2-8·3-8·5
Loss as a percentage of total quota-0·8-0·54

Health Authorities

asked the Secretary of State for Wales if he will publish in the Official Report(a) a list of the constituencies served by each district health authority and (b) a list of the health authorities serving each constituency.

The only parliamentary constituency in Wales served by two district health authorities is that of Ceredigion and Pembroke, North, which is divided between East Dyfed and Pembrokeshire district health authorities. Otherwise, constituencies are contained entirely within health authorities, as follows:

District Health Authority and Constituency

Clwyd

  • Alyn and Deeside
  • Clwyd North West
  • Clwyd South West
  • Delyn
  • Wrexham

East Dyfed

  • Carmarthen
  • Ceredigion and Pembroke North (part)
  • Llanelli

Gwent

  • Blaenau Gwent
  • Islwyn
  • Monmouth
  • Newport East
  • Newport West
  • Torfaen

Gwynedd

  • Caernarfon
  • Conwy
  • Meirionnydd Nant Conwy
  • Ynys MÔn

Mid Glamorgan

  • Bridgend
  • Caerphilly
  • Cynon Valley
  • Merthyr Tydfil and Rhymney
  • Ogmore
  • Pontypridd
  • Rhondda

Pembrokeshire

  • Ceredigion and Pembroke North (part)
  • Pembroke

Powys

  • Brecon and Radnor
  • Montgomery

South Glamorgan

  • Cardiff Central
  • Cardiff North
  • Cardiff South and Penarth
  • Cardiff West
  • Vale of Glamorgan

West Glamorgan

  • Aberavon
  • Gower
  • Neath
  • Swansea East
  • Swansea West

M4 (Extension)

asked the Secretary of State for Wales if he has any plans to extend the M4 to Ceredigion; and if he will make a statement.

No, but the dualling of the A48 between the end of the M4 and Carmarthen will result in a greatly improved route as far as Carmarthen. Of the two schemes needed to complete this work we expect the Cross Hands/Llandarog bypass to be open to traffic later this year while "Roads in Wales 1985" envisages a start on the Nant-y-Caws/Coed Hirion bypass before the end of 1987.In addition, Dyfed county council as the local highway authority is drawing up proposals to improve the county roads between Carmarthen and Ceredigion. At the appropriate time, consideration will be given to the eligibility of such schemes for transport supplementary grant.

Scotland

Labour Statistics

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland what was the number of persons employed in the Irvine travel-to-work area ward by ward for the years 1976 to 1986.

The table gives the figures for April 1981, from the census of population small area statistics. Such information is not available for the other years specified.

Number of usual residents, aged 16 or over, who were working
Number
Cunninghame District Ward
Irvine West1,434
Irvine Townhead1,646
Irvine Vineburgh1,759
Irvine North1,818
Irvine Woodlands1,864
Dreghorn1,697
Broomlands1,628
Bourtreehill1,494
Girdle Toll765
Irvine Landward819
Kilwinning East2,186
Kilwinning South1,909
Kilwinning West2,339
Stevenston North1,894
Stevenston South1,918
Beith1,887
Dairy1,619
Garnock East1,815
Kilbirnie South1,670
Kilbirnie North1,597
Saltcoats East1,483
South Beach1,625
Saltcoats North1,598
Ardrossan South1,723
Ardrossan North1,895

Number

West Kilbride1,741
Largs South1,412
Largs North2,077
Fairlie, Skelmorlie and Cumbrae1,516

Renfrew District Ward

Lochwinnoch1,773

Rates

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland if he will publish in the Official Report the total amount of rebates paid in each regional authority area in Scotland to ratepayers who are eligible for relief on their rates bills under the legislation passed after the 1985 revaluation.

The information for 1985–86 and 1986–87 is set out in the table. Figures for each region for 1987–88 are not yet available. It is estimated that total rebates for Scotland for that year will amount to about £13·7 million.

£ Million
Authority1985–861986–87
Borders0·5630·413
Central0·9830·743
Dumfries and Galloway0·7740·613
Fife0·8100·578
Grampian2·3361·843
Highland0·5910·426
Lothian4·7463·328
Strathclyde11·4958·793
Tayside2·3211·870
Total24·61918·607

Speech Problems

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland what provision is available for the needs of languages disordered children in Scotland; how this compares with England; and if he will make a statement.

Where a child in Scotland has a language disorder which constitutes a learning difficulty giving rise to special educational needs of a pronounced, specific or continuing nature, the education authority in whose area the child resides is required to assess those needs and thereafter provide fully for them. The decision on precisely what provision to make is a matter for the education authority. The procedure for opening Records of Special Education Needs under Section 60 of the Education (Scotland) Act 1980 is similar to the process of statementing provided for in England by Section 7 of the Education Act 1981.

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland what is his estimate of the numbers of (a) preschool age children, (b) primary schoolchildren and (c) secondary schoolchildren, with a specific language disorder in (i) Scotland, (ii) the Strathclyde region and (iii) Glasgow district.

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland what provision there is for the rehabilitation of speech problems in road traffic accident victims in (a) Glasgow, (b) Strathclyde and (c) Scotland.

The provision of speech therapy services is a matter for individual health boards, but the Scottish Home and Health Department funds a Scottish centre of technology for the communication impaired, based at the Victoria infirmary, Glasgow, which has been officially opened today by the chairman of the Greater Glasgow health board. This centre reinforces local effort by providing a Scotland-wide specialist service involving assessment and provision of aids for people with speech problems, and advising professional staff and disseminating information about advances in this important field. There are now 339·4 (whole-time equivalent) speech therapists employed in the Scottish Health Service.

Chernobyl Disaster

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland if he will list the costs incurred by his Department following the Chernobyl accident on (a) compensation for farmers, (b) equipment purchased for monitoring contamination, (c) staff costs on monitoring and administration of compensation schemes and (d) staff costs on public information.

Compensation to farmers amounted to £1·4 million. Monitoring equipment was purchased at a cost of £32,000. In addition, expenditure of £324,000 was incurred on laboratory sampling and associated work. I regret it is not possible readily to identify the staff costs attributable to monitoring, administration of compensation and public information.

Torness

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland if it is his intention to place stocks of iodine tablets at Innerwick primary school, in view of its proximity to Torness power station.

The South of Scotland Electricity Board, as operator of Torness, is responsible for providing potassium iodate tablets as part of the emergency planning arrangements. Stocks are held by the police for issue in the area around Torness. It is for the board and the police to consider whether it would be appropriate to hold stocks at Innerwick primary school and if so to consult the education authority.

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland if he intends to make any alteration to the Torness emergency plan; and if he will extend the area covered by that plan in view of the recommendations made in the Layfield report on the Sizewell B inquiry.

These are matters for the South of Scotland Electricity Board as operators of the site and for Her Majesty's nuclear installations inspectorate of the Health and Safety Executive as licensing authority.

Fisheries Protection

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland what is the estimated remaining life of his Department's recently acquired Fokker F27–200 aircraft in terms of flying hours of Scottish fishery patrol conditions; how long he estimates that the aircraft will be able to remain in service with the workload described in his reply of 6 May, Official Report, column 446; and what recommendations have been received from (a) the manufacturer and (b) the Civil Aviation Authority on adjustment to the remaining life of the aircraft, in terms of flying hours, to take account of the type of service for which he intends to use it.

The advice obtained from expert sources indicate that the F27 will have a working life of at least 10 years when employed in the maritime environment, taking account of the cycles remaining and the utilisation envisaged by my Department, as stated in my answer of 5 May to the hon. Member at column 446.

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland if he will make a statement on the outcome of his consideration of tenders to operate his Department's aerial fishery protection patrols.

The continuance of the contract in respect of inshore aerial surveillance of Scottish fisheries from 1 September 1987, initially for three years, to be undertaken by the Cessna Titan was awarded to the existing contractor, Northair Aviation Ltd, on 2 April 1987. Consideration of the tenders in respect of offshore aerial surveillance is still under way and a decision is expected shortly.

Health Boards

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland if he will publish in the Official Report(a) a list of the constituencies served by each health board and (b) a list of the health hoards serving each constituency.

(a) Health Board and Constituency

Argyll and Clyde

Argyle and Bute

  • Dumbarton
  • Eastwood (see also Greater Glasgow)1
  • Greenock and Port Glasgow
  • Paisley North
  • Paisley South
  • Renfrew West and Inverclyde

Ayrshire and Arran

  • Ayr
  • Carrick, Cumnock and Doon Valley
  • Cunninghame North
  • Cunninghame South
  • Kilmarnock and Loudoun

Borders

  • Roxburgh and Berwickshire
  • Tweeddale, Ettrick and Lauderdale

Dumfries and Galloway

  • Dumfries
  • Galloway and Upper Nithsdale

Fife

  • Dunfermline East
  • Dunfermline West
  • Fife Central
  • Fife North East
  • Kirkcaldy

Forth Valley

  • Clackmannan
  • Falkirk East
  • Falkirk West
  • Stirling

Grampian

  • Aberdeen North
  • Aberdeen South
  • Banff and Buchan
  • Gordon
  • Kincardine and Deeside
  • Moray

Greater Glasgow

  • Clydebank and Milngavie
  • Eastwood (see also Argyll and Clyde)1
  • Glasgow Cathcart
  • Glasgow Central
  • Glasgow Garscadden
  • Glasgow Govan
  • Glasgow Hillhead
  • Glasgow Pollok
  • Glasgow Provan
  • Glasgow Rutherglen
  • Glasgow Shettleston
  • Glasgow Springburn
  • Monklands West (see also Lanarkshire)1
  • Strathkelvin and Bearsden

Highland

  • Caithness and Sutherland
  • Inverness, Nairn and Lochaber
  • Ross, Cromarty and Skye

Lanarkshire

  • Clydesdale
  • Cumbernauld and Kilsyth
  • East Kilbride
  • Hamilton
  • Monklands East
  • Monklands West (see also Greater Glasgow)1
  • Motherwell North
  • Motherwell South

Lothian

  • East Lothian
  • Edinburgh Central
  • Edinburgh East
  • Edinburgh Leith
  • Edinburgh Pentlands
  • Edinburgh South
  • Edinburgh West
  • Linlithgow
  • Livingston
  • Midlothian

Orkney

  • Orkney and Shetland (see also Shetland)1

Shetland

  • Orkney and Shetland (see also Orkney)1

Tayside

  • Angus East
  • Dundee East
  • Dundee West
  • Perth and Kinross
  • Tayside North

Western Isles

  • Western Isles
  • 1 Denotes split constituency.

(b) Constituency and Health Board

  • Aberdeen North—Grampian
  • Aberdeen South—Grampian
  • Angus East—Tayside
  • Argyll and Bute—Argyll and Clyde
  • Ayr—Ayrshire and Arran
  • Banff and Buchan—Grampian
  • Caithness and Sutherland—Highland
  • Carrick,Cumnock and Doon Valley—Ayrshire and Arran
  • Clackmannan—Forth Valley
  • Clydebank and Milngavie—Greater Glasgow
  • Clydesdale—Lanarkshire
  • Cumbernauld and Kilsyth—Lanarkshire
  • Cunninghame North—Ayrshire and Arran
  • Cunninghame South—Ayrshire and Arran
  • Dumbarton—Argyll and Clyde
  • Dumfries—Dumfries and Galloway
  • Dundee East—Tayside
  • Dundee West—Tayside
  • Dunfermline East—Fife
  • Dunfermline West—Fife
  • East Kilbride—Lanarkshire
  • East Lothian—Lothian
  • Eastwood—Greater Glasgow and Argyll and Clyde
  • Edinburgh Central—Lothian
  • Edinburgh West—Lothian
  • Edinburgh Leith—Lothian
  • Edinburgh Pentlands—Lothian
  • Edinburgh South—Lothian
  • Edinburgh West—Lothian
  • Falkirk East—Forth Valley
  • Falkirk West—Forth Valley
  • Fife Central—Fife
  • Fife North East—Fife
  • Galloway and Upper Nithsdale—Dumfries and Galloway
  • Glasgow Cathcart—Greater Glasgow
  • Glasgow Central—Greater Glasgow
  • Glasgow Garscadden—Greater Glasgow
  • Glasgow Govan—Greater Glasgow
  • Glasgow Hillhead—Greater Glasgow
  • Glasgow Maryhill—Greater Glasgow
  • Glasgow Pollok—Greater Glasgow
  • Glasgow Proven—Greater Glasgow
  • Glasgow Rutherglen—Greater Glasgow
  • Glasgow Shettleston—Greater Glasgow
  • Glasgow Springburn—Greater Glasgow
  • Gordon—Grampian
  • Greenock and Port Glasgow—Argyll and Clyde
  • Hamilton—Lanarkshire
  • Inverness, Nairn and Lochaber—Highland
  • Kilmarnock and Loudoun—Ayrshire and Arran
  • Kincardine and Deeside—Grampian
  • Kirkcaldy—Fife
  • Linlithgow—Lothian
  • Livingston—Lothian
  • Midlothian—Lothian
  • Monklands East—Lanarkshire
  • Monklands West—Greater Glasgow and Lanarkshire
  • Moray—Grampian
  • Motherwell North—Lanarkshire
  • Motherwell South—Lanarkshire
  • Orkney and Shetland—Orkney and Shetland
  • Paisley North—Argyll and Clyde
  • Paisley South—Argyll and Clyde
  • Perth and Kinross—Tayside
  • Renfrew West and Inverclyde—Argyll and Clyde
  • Ross, Cromarty and Skye—Highland
  • Roxburgh and Berwickshire—Borders
  • Stirling—Forth Valley
  • Strathkelvin and Bearsden—Greater Glasgow
  • Tayside North—Tayside
  • Tweeddale, Ettrick and Lauderdale—Borders
  • Western Isles—Western Isles

Farm And Horticultural Development Scheme

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland how many farmers have been required to pay all or part of any grant given to them under the farm and horticultural development scheme for failing to meet the required output.

It is not possible to separate the details for the farm and horitculture development scheme and the agriculture and horticulture development scheme. Both schemes contained provision for the payment of guidance premium to farmers whose approved development plans were estimated to give them 50 per cent. or more of gross output from beef or sheepmeat at the end of their plans. For the two schemes combined, the number of farmers in Scotland eligible for guidance premium is 5,745. Guidance premium as been recovered in 11 cases for failure to achieve the required output level at the end of the plans, and action is in progress in two further such cases.

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland how many farmers have failed to meet the required 50 per cent. of output from beef production required by the farm and horticultural development scheme for beef development in Scotland.

Central records are maintained only of cases where failure to achieve 50 per cent. of gross output from beef or sheepmeat gives rise to recovery of guidance premium. Recovery is not automatic: it arises only where my Department is satisfied that a claimant failed to pursue his approved development plan and knowingly gave undertakings which could not he honoured. No record is kept of cases which failed to achieve the required output level but which did not give rise to recovery action.

North Of Scotland Hydro Electric Board

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland what progress has been made by the North of Scotland Hydro Electric Board in following up the report on the board by the Monopolies and Mergers Commission published in October 1985; and if he will make a statement.

I have now received the second response of the NSHEB to the MMC report published in Autumn 1985. This decribes progress on steps taken by the board to meet the commission's conclusions. I have placed copies, in the Library.The board has responded in a constructive way to most of the MMC recommendations and good progress has been made since my statement to the House on 7 March 1986.I am particularly pleased to note the positive steps the board has taken in relation to the areas for priority action identified by the commission.The management services function has been expanded, manpower planning procedures have been developed, productivity monitoring procedures have been overhauled, and further work directed at establishing optimum manning levels is in hand. These initiatives are resulting in tighter control of manpower resources and their utilisation.In line with MMC recommendations, the board's corporate plan now includes a range of specific operational and financial targets which have been set and will be monitored by the board. The efficiency review committee has been strengthened, measures to reduce the costs of meter reading billing and collection have been implemented and a revised debt collection policy is being introduced. I hope soon to agree with the board a new set of cost reduction performance aims to begin in the current financial year.Good progress has been made in the development of management information systems designed to improve monitoring and guidance manuals have been issued over a range of activities—for example, planning, personnel and computer development.An assessment procedure for allocating priorities within the distribution system refurbishment programme has been developed and is being applied to all projects. The resources now being devoted to the programme represent a major commitment on the part of the board.Investment appraisal guidelines which take into account the commission's recommendations have been drafted and significant progress has been made towards developing a computer-based system covering both the financial and engineering aspects of project control.In response to other recommendations, the board has set in hand a review of tariff structure and work designed to improve its forecasting methodology.

My officials will be keeping in touch with the board on these and other areas in which action to implement the MMC's recommendations is continuing. I have asked the board for a final round-up report in about two years time.

I should like to thank the MMC for its report on the North of Scotland Hydro Electric Board. Its findings have been useful to the board in helping it to increase efficiency and reduce costs.

Countryside

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland if he has any plans to initiate a review of changes in the countryside in Scotland; and if he will make a statement.

My right hon. and learned Friend has decided to initiate a two-year research project to monitor change in landscape features in Scotland. The project will involve a full aerial photographic survey of the country, to be carried out by Planning and Mapping Ltd. It is hoped that the survey will make a valuable contribution to our understanding of the changes taking place in the countryside. The information provided will be of considerable value to researchers and will enable further monitoring and analysis to take place. It will also provide a better factual base on which to take decisions and make plans for the future.

Labour Statistics

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland if' he will list in the Official Report the number of job losses in each classification for each employment exchange in the city of Glasgow for each of the last eight years.

I regret that the information requested could be made available only at disproportionate cost.

asked the Secretary of State for Scotland (1) how many jobs have been created and how many lost in the Cumbernauld and Kilsyth constituency in each year since June 1979 in the food processing industry;(2) how many jobs have been created and how many lost in the Cumbernauld and Kilsyth constituency in each year since June 1979 in the clothing and textile industry;(3) how many jobs have been created and how many lost in the Cumbernauld and Kilsyth constituency in each year since June 1979 in the computer construction industry;(4) how many jobs have been created and how many lost in the Cumbernauld and Kilsyth constituency in each year since June 1979 in the construction industry;(5) how many jobs have been created and how many lost in the Cumbernauld and Kilsyth constituency in each year since June 1979 in the distribution industry;(6) how many jobs have been created and how many lost in the Cumbernauld and Kilsyth constituency in each year since June 1979 in the engineering industry;(7) how many jobs have been created and how many lost in the Cumbernauld and Kilsyth constituency in each year since June 1979.

[pursuant to his reply, 5 May 1987, c. 395]: Information on job gains and job losses in the Cumbernauld and Kilsyth constituency is not available. Information is available from the regional data system for those working in manufacturing plants with 11 or more employees in Cumbernauld new town. No reliable information is available from this source for plants with fewer than 11 employees. Figures by industry grouping from the RDS are given in the table.It is not possible to provide figures of gross job gains and losses as to do so would disclose information relating to individual businesses. For the same reason, it is not possible to distinguish computer construction within the engineering industry or food processing from textiles and clothing.As regards overall employment, the available information relates to Cumbernauld new town in the period 1979–87, and I would refer the hon. Member to the reply I gave on 13 May 1987.

Engineering (including computers)Food Processing/ Clothing and Textiles
1979–80-240-120
1980–81-610+10
1981–82-530-370
1982–83+100-110
1983–84-200-20
1984–85+190-20
1985–861+100
1 Figure omitted to avoid disclosure of information relating to individual businesses.

Employment

Job Creation

asked the Paymaster General how many places and at what public cost were provided in 1986 in the Telford travel-to-work area for (a) YTS and (b) community schemes.

It is not possible to provide the information in the precise form requested. The available information is shown in the table.

Telford Travel-to-Work, Area1
1986–872
YTS
Contracted places1,283
Public cost (£ million)312·73
Community programme
Filled places903
Public cost (£ million)41·8
1 Figures for the Telford-travel-to-work are for YTS are based on the Wrekin local authority district which includes Madsley, Wellington, Oakengates and Telford. Figures for the community programme are based on the jobcentre area which covers Bridgnorth, Madeley, Wellington and Telford.
2 Figures are not available for calendar years, thus the financial year has been quoted.
3 YTS is a training measure. The concept of net exchequer cost (the usual interpretation of "public cost") per filled place is not therefore appropriate. The gross cost per filled places is estimated to be £2,600 per annum. The £2·73 million public cost quoted has been obtained from an estimated average level of training.
4 The cost of £1·8 million quoted for the community programme is the net exchequer cost of the programme. This allows for benefit saving and flowbacks of tax and payments of the Exchequer.

Self-Employment

asked the Paymaster General (1) what are the actual numbers of self-employed in each constituency in the United Kingdom according to the most recent information or census;(2) pursuant to his reply,

Official Report, 31 March 1987, column 467 if he will list the self-employed in each constituency in the United Kingdom as a proportion of the total on the electoral roll according to the most recent information or census.

I am sending the hon. Member a copy of the information requested and will place a copy in the Library.

Community Programme

asked the Paymaster General what representations he has received concerning the funding by the Manpower Services Commission of community programme schemes in Bexley; and if he will make a statement.

I have received no representations concerning the funding by the Manpower Services Commission of community programme schemes in Bexley. The local area manpower board met on 6 March and approved the distribution of places for 1987–88.

Age and Duration Analysis of the Unemployed for Statistical Date 8 January 1987
Copeland Parliamentary Constituency
Males
Duration of Unemployment in weeksUnder 1717181920–2425–2930–3435–3940–4445–4950–5455–5960 and overTotal
One or less4411197411015452
Over 1 and up to 2020053131111119
Over 2 and up to 447132619854425189
Over 4 and up to 644631611867532378
Over 6 and up to 8623523151573451291
Over 8 and up to 13677947301722171010611199
Over 13 and up to 26152228261094431352719141713400
Over 26 and up to 391816760331811101316166215
Over 39 and up to 52031310322215211611201418195
Over 52 and up to 65026526101510753121102
Over 65 and up to 780117727147109612162128
Over 78 and up to 104015333192191877140137
Over 104 and up to 156003746423630192058810342
Over 156 and up to 2080001212620148711320140
Over 208 and up to 260000020171714111412190124
Over 260000014463336192831441252
Total Males40739687524358266234177154206285632,563
Females
Duration of Unemployment in weeksUnder 1717181920–2425–2930–3435–3940–4445–4950–5455–5960 and overTotal
One or less1433711024251043
Over 1 and up to 2010283101102019
Over 2 and up to 432139156554112066
Over 4 and up to 62353128822211049
Over 6 and up to 81122156945342054
Over 8 and up to 13810793725131386330142
Over 13 and up to 261919272367522419141012110297
Over 26 and up to 3908615333016131324100150
Over 39 and up to 52111583126196810680139
Over 52 and up to 6503631418636533070
Over 65 and up to 7804441910363649072
Over 78 and up to 1040042161542351110072
Over 104 and up to 1560015151395331018082
Over 156 and up to 2080000732284311040
Over 208 and up to 260000092311254027
Over 26000008683210814059
Total Females356683883132341308685728010901,381

Job Generation Ltd

asked the Paymaster General what representations he has received concerning the withdrawal of Manpower Services Commission funds from Job Generation Ltd.; and if he will make a statement.

The Job Generation Ltd. current community programme contract ends in June 1987 and the agency will not be renewed. The local MSC's community programme manager is currently seeking ways to redistribute these places amongst other providers within the Bexley area. This action should allow individual participants with a balance of time still outstanding to complete their 52 weeks on the programme.The hon. Member wrote to me on 31 March about Job Generation Ltd.; a reply will be sent very soon.

Benefit Claimants

asked the Paymaster General if he will give a detailed breakdown of unemployed claimants in the Copeland parliamentary constituency using the most recent figures, analysed by sex and by the age of the unemployed and the duration of unemployment.

The following information is in the Library. The figures relate to the numbers of unemployed claimants on 8 January 1987, the latest date for which an analysis of unemployment by age and duration is available.

Wages Inspectorate (Prosecutions)

asked the Paymaster General if, pursuant to his answer of 5 May, Official Report, columns 333–40, he will state how many court actions were taken by the Wages Inspectorate against employers in 1986, distinguishing between criminal prosecutions and claims for arrears, showing the number of successful actions together with the arrears assessed and the arrears paid; if he will provide a breakdown of the figures in tables 3 and 4 showing checks made on a routine basis and those arising from a complaint, distinguishing between visits and questionnaire checks; and if he will provide information showing the number of establishments found to be in breach of any obligation under the Wages Act and predecessor legislation, indicating the nature of the breach and distinguishing, as far as possible, by sector and region.

In 1986 the inspectorate took criminal prosecutions against three employers. All were successful.

Table A—Trades covered by wages councils and results of pay checks by type of check—1986
Workers whose pay was checkedWorkers underpaidArrears paidArrears waivedArrears not pursuedTotal arrears assessed
££££
Aerated waters
Routine checks by visit666
Routine checks not visited2,524
Complaints3214646
Totals3,21214646
Clothing manufacture
Routine checks by visit12,76635517,1829233,63021,735
Routine checks not visited1,684
Complaints2,93858740,2712,02431,84874,143
Totals17,38894257,4532,94735,47895,878
Boot and shoe repairing
Routine checks by visit428172,8414743213,636
Routine checks not visited71
Complaints19101,3101401,450
Totals518274,1514744615,086
Button manufacturing
Routine checks by visit160
Routine checks not visited
Complaints4
Totals164
Coffin furniture and cerement making
Routine checks by visit28
Routine checks not visited
Complaints312020
Totals3112020
Cotton waste reclamation
Routine checks by visit39—.
Routine checks not visited
Complaints
Totals39
Flax and hemp
Routine checks by visit34
Routine checks not visited
Complaints
Totals34

The total arrears assessed as due to the workers concerned was £1,996·66 and £811·94 was awarded by the courts. I understand that the sums due have not yet been paid in full in all cases. The arrangements for payment are, however, a matter for the court. No civil proceedings to recover arrears were taken by the inspectorate in 1986.

The breakdown requested of the relevant figures in tables 3 and 4 in the Official Report for 5 May, at columns 333–40, is given in tables A and B respectively. Routine postal questionnaire checks were restricted to the two retail trades and hairdressing. Where the employer's reply was not satisfactory or no reply was received, a visit was carried out. Such visits are included in the figures in the tables for routine checks by visit.

Tables C and D give the information requested about the nature of breaches of wages council legislation found in 1986.

Workers whose pay was checked

Workers underpaid

Arrears paid

Arrears waived

Arrears not pursued

Total arrears assessed

£

£

£

£

Fur

Routine checks by visit145
Routine checks not visited
Complaints83522522
Totals1533522522

General waste materials reclamation

Routine checks by visit1,40969696
Routine checks not visited26
Complaints6691,0512262121,489
Totals1,501151,1472262121,585

Hairdressing undertakings

Routine checks by visit5,22637537,6807,2742,65847,612
Routine checks not visited153
Complaints2,22073987,14019,96615,469122,575
Questionnaire checks not visited3,950
Totals11,5491,114124,82027,24018,127170,187

Hat, Cap and Millinery

Routine checks by visit607
Routine checks not visited
Complaints
Totals607

Lace finishing

Routine checks by visit22
Routine checks not visited
Complaints114343
Totals2314343

Laundry

Routine checks by visit1,843322,9251,1254,050
Routine checks not visited512
Complaints122342,7584,4817,239
Totals2,477665,6831,1254,48111,289

Linen and Cotton Handkerchief

Routine checks by visit15411515
Routine checks not visited
Complaints379600600
Totals19110615615

Made-up Textiles

Routine checks by visit463
Routine checks not visited
Complaints42157157
Totals4672157157

Ostrich and fancy feather

Routine checks by visit19214848
Routine checks not visited
Complaints
Totals19214848

Perambulator and invalid carriage

Routine checks by visit127
Routine checks not visited
Complaints
Totals127

Retail bespoke tailoring

Routine checks by visit1613348348

Workers whose pay was checked

Workers underpaid

Arrears paid

Arrears waived

Arrears not pursued

Total arrears assessed

£

£

£

£

Routine checks not visited13
Complaints1672,0021362,138
Totals190102,3501362,486

Rope, twine and net

Routine checks by visit189
Routine checks not visited
Complaints
Totals189

Sack and bag

Routine checks by visit48
Routine checks not visited
Complaints44263263
Totals524263

263

Toy manufacturing

Routine checks by visit4926201201
Routine checks not visited29
Complaints2317615301916
Totals544238163011,117

Retail non-food trades

Routine checks by visit16,4521,729173,01862,82734,131269,976
Routine checks not visited33,157
Complaints2,5221,053188,28236,82949,835274,946
Questionnaire checks not visited6,247
Totals58,3782,782361,30099,65683,966544,922

Retail food and allied trades

Routine checks by visit17,1002,628201,277101,16922,160324,606
Routine checks not visited30,947
Complaints3,4311,657222,52549,75077,5323,49,807
Questionnaire checks not visited6,803
Totals58,2814,285423,802150,91999,692674,413

Licensed non-residential

Routine checks by visit27,2731,665117,60234,41512,783164,800
Routine checks not visited17,564
Complaints3,861991152,37818,49533,622204,495
Totals48,6982,656269,98052,91046,405369,295

Licensed residential and restaurant

Routine checks by visit20,39773152,13124,3019,97886,410
Routine checks not visited18,706
Complaints10,3541,639174,8649,04129,953213,858
Totals49,4572,370226,99533,34239,931300,268

Unlicensed place of refreshment

Routine checks by visit6,02867849,57130,5586,54586,674
Routine checks not visited9,765
Complaints1,25654258,6538,30413,27180,228
Totals17,0491,220108,22438,86219,816166,902

Great Britain

Routine checks by visit112,4398,227654,935263,06692,2061,010,207
Routine checks not visited115,151
Complaints26,9217,306933,500144,635256,8001,334,935
Questionnaire checks not visited17,000
Totals271,51115,5331,588,435407,701349,0062,345,142

Tvei (Welsh Language)

asked the Paymaster General whether his Department was consulted concerning the Welsh Joint Education Committee's application to the Manpower Services Comission for a four-year £1 million Welsh-medium technical, vocational and educational initiative project in 1986.

No. Individual applications for assistance under the technical and vocational education initiative are dealt with by the Manpower Services Commission rather than by my Department.

Fashion Services For The Disabled

asked the Paymaster General if the Manpower Services Commission will provide long-term funding for Fashion Services for the Disabled, which provides help to disabled people within Bradford; and if he will make a statement.

Fashion Services for the Disabled is funded under the community programme at present. Projects supported under this programme are appraised annually both by the Manpower Services Commission and the local area manpower board to ensure that those which continue to receive support are the ones which best meet the needs of local long-term unemployed people as well as providing benefit to the community. Both the Manpower Services Commission and Bradford area manpower board felt the Fashion Services for the Disabled project no longer meets the needs of local long-term unemployed people and there are, therefore, no plans to renew it when its current contract ends in August 1987.

"Action For Cities"

asked the Paymaster General how much it cost to produce the booklet "Action for Cities"; how many copies have been printed; and at what cost.

YTS Accidents 1 January 1986 to 31 March 1987
PeriodAverage No. in TrainingFatalities1Accidents MajorMinor
Table (a)
1 January 1986 to 31 March 19863273,553nil60375
Table (b)
1 April 1986 to 30 June 19863261,5322368375
1 July 1986 to 30 September 19863334,927nil77266
1 October 1986 to 31 December 19863346,4004100509
1 January 1987 to 31 March 19873318,219270578
1 MSC accident figures for YTS have been compiled on a similar basis to those prepared by the Health and Safety Executive on employed persons. However, the MSC's figures will include a number of accidents during scheme time and accidents to trainees in educational establishments which may not have been reportable to the Health and Safety Executive had the individuals been employed.
2 Each of these figures includes one road traffic accident.
3 These figures are provisional and will be subject to change as further information becomes available.

asked the Paymaster General if he will list the provider, and the numbers of places offered, of each two-year YTS scheme in Coventry.

A list of YTS providers in the Coventry local authority district and the number of places offered by each is as follows:

The booklet "Action for Cities" was produced jointly by my Department and that of my hon. Friend the Minister for Housing, Urban Affairs and Construction. The total cost of production was £32,800, of which the cost of printing 25,000 copies was £25,600. These costs have been shared equally between the Department of Employment and the Department of the Environment.This is a minute proportion of the public expenditure on the Government programmes which the booklet explains in order to improve take-up of and participation in these programmes.

Yts

asked the Paymaster General if he will update the answer to the hon. Member for Huddersfield (Mr. Sheerman) Official Report, column 12, of 8 April 1986, regarding accidents to YTS trainees, to the latest available date.

The tables provide YTS accident figures for fatalities and major injuries for the latest available quarterly periods. Table (a) gives figures for the quarter 1 January 1986 to 31 March 1986. Table (b) gives figures for the quarters 1 April 1986 to 31 March 1987. It should be noted that the two tables cannot be directly compared in respect of major injuries. Up to 31 March 1986 major injuries were classified according to the severity criteria laid down in the Notification of Accidents and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations 1980. From 1 April 1986 major injuries are classified according to the severity criteria laid down in the Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations 1985. This has had the effect of reclassifying some accidents from the minor category into the major category.

ProviderPlaces offered
Alvis Ltd.10
Armstrong Engineering12
Coventry Area Health Authority33
Coventry Chamber of Commerce320
Coventry City Council (clerical)60
Coventry City Council (construction)30
Coventry and District Co-operative Society26

Provider

Places offered

Coventry City Education Department480
Coventry and Warwickshire Awards Trust125
Coventry Small Business Training Scheme12
Courtaulds plc18
Dunlop Ltd.55
GEC Ltd.90
Guy Associates56
Hotel and Catering Training Board52
Jaguar Cars Ltd.20
JHP Training1172
Lloyds British Training Services Ltd.98
Massey Ferguson Ltd.24
MGTS Training Services Ltd.268
Midland Link106
National Association for the Care and Settlement of Offenders—Coventry30
Rolls Royce Ltd.24
Peugeot Talbot plc49
Tetra Incorporated100
Wickman Bennet6
Post Office31
East Midlands Butchery30
Total2,237

1 Some of these places will be provided in Warwickshire.

The following list shows providers whose schemes in Coventry and Warwickshire are administered by the Manpower Services Commission large companies unit. It is not possible to separately identify schemes operating in Coventry.

Provider

Places Offered

Abbey National Building Society PLC1
Association of British Travel Agents12
Association of Merchants in Trading9
ARROW Training Associates5
Austin Rover Group Ltd.41
British Association of Professional Hairdressing Employers10
British Federation Home Care Providers4
British Holiday Homes and Parks Association3
British Home Stores PLC6
Builders Merchants Federation19
Boots Company PLC6
British Office Systems and Stationery Federation3
British Printing Industry Federation16
British Retail Florists Association10
Burgess4
Burton Group PLC7
C and A Modes2
Clothing and Allied Products Industry Training Board27
Construction Industry Training Board320
Debenhams PLC20
Department of Employment10
D.E.R.1
De Vere Hotels Ltd.13
Dewhurst7
Dixons Group PLC4
Electricity Council3
Electronic Rentals3
Essanelle4
Essex Leisure1
E. W. Holdings Ltd.1
Federation of Bakers1
Footballers Association Further Education and Vocational Training Society Ltd.12
Ford Motor Company2
Fosters Menswear4
Gateway Food Markets Ltd.6
GKN1
Glass Training Ltd.2
Granada Television Rentals4

Provider

Places Offered

Habitat2
Halifax Building Society2
Home Charm Group PLC18
IBM8
Lunn Poly8
Motor Agents Association50
Marks and Spencer PLC5
Midland Bank PLC8
Mothercare Ltd.4
National Institute of Hardware3
National Pony Society3
Owen, Owen10
Partco11
Plastics Processing Industry Training Board4
Remploy5
Rumbelows5
J. Sainsbury PLC13
Scaffolding GB1
Shoe Repair Industry Training Board4
W. H. Smith Do it All1
Standard Tyre & Exhaust Ltd.4
Stylo Barrett4
Tesco Stores Ltd.20
Trust House Forte5
Threshold20
Timpson Shoes3
Timpson Shoe repairs1
Trustee Savings Bank PLC2
Timber Trades Training Association6
Wolsely Centres Ltd.2
F. W. Woolworth PLC4
Yorkshire Bank PLC1
Total845

Personal Incomes

asked the Paymaster General what proportion of the population eligible for employment have an income below (a) £80, (b) £100 and (c) £120 per week.

The term "eligible for employment" does not have a sufficiently precise meaning to enable me to answer the hon. Member's question.

Minimum Earnings

asked the Paymaster General if he will make a statement on the Council of Europe's decency threshold in relation to minimum levels of earnings.

There is no such thing as a Council of Europe threshold for a minimum acceptable level of earnings. None has ever been endorsed either by any member state of the Council of Europe or by its Governmental Committee on the European Social Charter. Nor does the Charter refer to a percentage of average earnings which should be regarded as an acceptable minimum. Proposals frequently made by the Low Pay Unit and others for a wage minimum of 68 per cent. or any other percentage of average earnings do not therefore carry the authority of the Council of Europe or its members.In my opinion, all such proposals for a statutory minimum wage in this country would have the effect of raising the level of unemployment.

Nuclear Installations Inspectorate

asked the Paymaster General what representations he has received regarding the quality and quantity of staff employed by the Nuclear Installations Inspectorate.

[pursuant to his reply, 11 May 1987, c. 27]: The Select Committee on Energy, in its Second Report published last month, recommended that urgent attention be given "to ensuring that the Nuclear Installations Inspectorate can recruit and retain sufficient staff of sufficient quality to discharge all its responsibilities". I have had discussions with the chairman of the Health and Safety Commission, Her Majesty's chief inspector of nuclear installations and officials of the Health and Safety Executive concerning recruitment matters for the inspectorate. I have received no other representations on these matters during the last six months.The Health and Safety Commission will shortly launch a recruitment campaign for the inspectorate on the basis of increased salaries.

Agriculture, Fisheries And Food

Butter

asked the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food what is the current level of butter stocks in intervention storage following the recent distribution of butter.

The free food scheme, under which 13,623 tonnes of butter were released to charitable organisations, ended on 31 March 1987 when intervention stocks amounted to 222,810 tonnes.

Income Maintenance Scheme

asked the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food if he will now introduce an income maintenance scheme to guarantee to those farmers affected by radiation from the Chernobyl disaster that their level of income will be sustained at a level equivalent, in real terms, to their average income of the three years prior to the Chernobyl disaster, and that this will be guaranteed for however long their farming is affected by radiation consequences of Chernobyl.

In full consultation with the farmers' unions, the Government introduced three compensation schemes to assist sheep producers whose enterprises have suffered disruption from the movement and slaughter restrictions introduced in the wake of the Chernobyl incident. These schemes covered losses of variable premium and market price on lambs; losses in market price on all sheep which needed to be marked under the release scheme; and a third element, in the form of a headage payment, to assist in meeting the extra costs incurred by producers in retaining sheep on farms beyond their normal marketing dates. The second of these schemes, which is still in operation and has no termination date, was modified recently to provide for individual lot valuations.As a further step, we expect to be announcing shortly details of an additional compensation scheme reflecting the extra costs of handling sheep prior to release from the restricted areas.

These arrangements, and our efforts to ensure that producers' husbandry and marketing patterns are disrupted as little as possible, mean that a further scheme to guarantee returns at historic levels would be inappropriate.

Food Research

asked the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food if he will publish in the Official Report, in tabular form, details of all food research projects currently being sponsored by his Department giving details of the amount being spent on each project, the location at which the work is being undertaken and the name of the principal researchers involved.

The number of food research projects commissioned by my Ministry is of the order of several hundreds. Compilation of the comprehensive details requested requires the expenditure of considerable resources. Furthermore, many of the projects for the current financial year have not yet been finalised so that for these projects, all of the required information is not yet available.In the meantime, I have arranged for the Commission review report on food safety, containing (in appendix 2) the national programme of food research and development, published in 1985, to be placed in the Library of the House. This contains much of the information requested for the years 1984–85. We expect to publish the revised programme updated for the year 1986–87 later this year.

Nurseries

asked the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food what progress has been made towards the introduction of an approval scheme for nurseries.

I am pleased to announce the introduction with effect from 1 July of a voluntary scheme under which nurseries which maintain high standards will be able to qualify for approval by the Ministry. The scheme is directed at enterprises which produce plants (toher than vegetables) or bulbs for export. I hope that it can be developed so that approved premises would in future be subject of less intensive pre-export inspections. This would mean that lower charges would apply to the inspection of plants and bulbs grown on approved premises. The scope for reduced inspections will be considered in the late summer with a view to operating differential charges early in 1988 if the scheme proves practicable and effective.Approval will be given only to enterprises which meet very high standards of plant health, hygiene and management. The assessment of enterprises which apply for approval will cover pest and disease control, soil and crop management, facilities, management structure, tidiness and hygiene.A fee of £50 will be payable on application for approval under the scheme: the fee for growers registered in the Ministry's plant health propagation scheme will be £25.The Ministry's plant health and seeds inspectors will shortly be in contact with all exporters of bulbs and plants and will provide a leaflet explaining how the new scheme will operate.