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Long-Term Unemployment

Volume 124: debated on Tuesday 15 December 1987

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41.

To ask the Secretary of State for Employment what regional variations there are in the rate of reduction of long-term unemployment.

The table shows the number of unemployed claimants who have been unemployed for over one year at 9 October 1986 and at 8 October 1987, together with the change over the year, expressed numerically and as a percentage.

Claimants unemployed for over one year

Region

October 1986

October 1987

Change

Percentage Change

South East283,303242,732-40,571-14·3
East Anglia28,22323,584-4,639-16·4
South West68,84357,563-11,280-16·4
West Midlands161,417136,272-25,145-15·6
East Midlands80,91769,755-11,162-13·8
Yorkshire & Humberside130,122118,711-11,411-8·8
North West199,305172,359-26,946-13-5
Northern105,18890,520-14,668-13·9
Wales73,04359,671-13,372-18·3
Scotland146,394136,185-10,209-7·0
Northern Ireland64,25164,8846331·0
United Kingdom1,341,0061,172,236-168,770-12·6

53.

To ask the Secretary of State for Employment if he will make a statement on the reduction in the number of long-term unemployed since January 1987.

On 8 October 1987 the number of long-term unemployed claimants in the United Kingdom was 1,172,236, a fall of 162,194 since January 1987. The change will be affected by seasonal factors.

Employees in Employment in the Manufacturing industries
(a) Great Britain(b) Scotland
Number of employeesNet change in number of employees since June of previous yearNumber of employeesNet change in number of employees since June of previous year
June of each year
19747,722683
19757,351-371645-38
19767,118-233615-30
19777,172+54622+7
19787,138-34611-11
19797,107-31604-7
19806,801-306564-40
19816,099-702510-54
19825,751-348477-33
19835,418-333444-33
19845,302-116434-10
19855,258-44430-4
19865,137-121410-20
19875,071-66398-12
Some of the decrease in the figures will be the result of the reclassification of jobs such as industrial cleaning, catering, computer services, and road haulage, previously done by manufacturers' own employees and now done by subcontractors. This developing feature of our economy has the effect of exaggerating the extent of the move from manufacturing to service sector employment.