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Written Answers

Volume 124: debated on Wednesday 16 December 1987

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Written Answers To Questions

Wednesday 16 December 1987

Scotland

National No-Smoking Day

To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland what will be the cost to public funds of National No-Smoking Day 1988.

The Scottish Health Education Group has allocated £10,000 towards the cost of National No-Smoking Day 1988.

Civil Defence

To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland if he will make extra resources available to enable health boards to stockpile medical supplies and equipment, as laid out in paragraph 3.14 of his Department's circular "Emergency Planning in the National Health Service: Health Service Civil Defence Planning", SHHD/DGM(1987)41.

The question of stockpiling medical supplies and equipment, including cost implications, is presently under review. This will be a long-term project, and it is not possible at this stage to quantify the level of resources which may be involved.

To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland if he will publish a list of all medical establishments which may be allocated to armed forces casualties after a nuclear attack in each of the health boards' areas; and if he will make a statement.

No medical establishments have been specifically designated for allocation to armed forces casualties after a nuclear attack. The Health Service will provide treatment for all casualties as far as is possible in the circumstances prevailing.

Payments by local authorities under Section 12 of the Social Work (Scotland) Act 1968
1983–841984–851985–86
Regional or Island Authority££ per '000 Population££ per'000 Population££ per 000 Population
Borders3,85238·062,68926·553,69136·29
Central7,33226·896,89825·2911,13540·87
Dumfries and Galloway4,38930·0319,198131·343,49623·85
Fife18,93655·241,155,2773,353·6137,467108·91
Grampian52,234105·6323,94548·1518,88237·72
Highland5,55228·324,42022·415,57228·05
Lothian47,40163·6447,25563·4742,42556·93
Strathclyde233,75098·09291,532122·83386,659163·93
Tayside10,08725·5412,79532·4413,60334·50
Orkney71837·321,01552·5551626·67
Shetland25,1541,072·4828,5251,211·587,620325·09
Western Isles5,047160·133,933125·033,723118·02
Scotland Total414,45280·471,597,482310·45534,789104·12

Sheltered Employment

To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland if he will detail (a) the total number of places in Scotland currently in operation under the Scottish Association for Mental Health sheltered placement scheme, (b) the number of new places to be made available in Scotland in the year 1988–89, (c) the number and proportion of places occupied by disabled people whose principal disability relates to a mental illness and (d) if he has any plans further to extend sheltered employment opportunities for people disabled by mental illness.

The information is as follows:

  • a. the Scottish Association for Mental Health has only recently been approved as a scheme sponsor and is not sponsoring any placements in the current year;
  • b. decisions on the level of central Government spending on the scheme in 1988/89 will be taken shortly, and I am not yet in a position to say how many new places will be made available in Scotland;
  • c. at present there are eight severely disabled people whose principal handicap is mental illness occupying sheltered placements in Scotland, representing some 2 per cent. of the total number of placements; and
  • d. the needs of the mentally ill will continue to be considered along with the other demands for sheltered employment opportunities.
  • Midwives

    To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland how many newly-qualified midwives went into practice in the National Health Service in Scotland in the years ended 30 September 1985, 30 September 1986 and 30 September 1987.

    Social Work Authorities

    To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland if he will list in the Official Report the figures for the last three years showing the level of expenditure incurred by each social work authority in Scotland on section 12 Social Work (Scotland) Act payments in monetary terms and per 1,000 head of population, each region.

    Information requested for the last three years for which figures are available is in the table.

    School Management

    To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland whether he will now announce Her Majesty's Government's conclusions on the school management proposals.

    An announcement of the Government's conclusions will be made shortly.

    Chief Inspector Of Prisons (Report)

    To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland whether he has received from Her Majesty's Chief Inspector of Prisons for Scotland his annual report for 1986 and individual reports on Dumfries prison, Noranside institution and Polmont institution.

    I have received Her Majesty's Chief Inspector of Prisons for Scotland's annual report for 1986 together with individual reports on his inspections of Dumfries prison, Noranside institution and Polmont institution. I have today placed copies of the reports, including my responses, in the Library, and I am sending a copy to the Members in whose constituencies the establishments are located; and to the chairman of the Scottish all-party penal affairs group and to other interested bodies. Copies may also be purchased from my Department.

    Payments by Local Authorities under section 12 of the Social Work (Scotland) Act 1968
    1978–79 £1979–80 £1980–81 £1981–82 £1982–83 £1983–84 £1984–85 £1985–86 £
    Regional or Island Authority
    Borders2,6722,7124,5094,1931,9773,8522,6893,691
    Central6,0228,1604,2266,2187,8367,3326,89811,135
    Dumfries and Galloway5,0936,0145,4634,0633,3204,38919,1983,496
    Fife8,6967,6088,50010,53614,87118,9361,155,27737,467
    Grampian14,76515,64815,27428,44631,24052,23423,94518,882
    Highland2,7446,3555,7106,2154,6125,5524,4205,572
    Lothian56,73642,22257,57252,88857,03847,40147,25542,425
    Strathclyde175,639188,292116,320216,097195,505233,750291,532386,659
    Tayside20,3737,7878,66816,85912,59910,08712,79513,603
    Orkney1676097989797181,015516
    Shetland4,9217,77437,00847,00939,48525,15428,5257,620
    Western Isles1,1201,1273,1812,9564,2085,0473,9333,723
    Scotland Total298,781293,866267,040396,278373,670414,4521,597,482534,789

    Fishing Industry

    To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland what proportion of the United Kingdom mackerel catch of the current year, to the most recent date for which figures are available, was (a) landed at Lerwick, (b) landed at Ullapool, (c) landed at Mallaig, (d) landed at Peterhead, (e) landed at Fraserburgh, (f) trans-shipped at Lerwick, (g) trans-shipped at Ullapool and (h) landed at a foreign EEC port.

    The information requested on the proportions of the United Kingdom mackerel catch, to the most recent date (10 December 1987) is as follows:

    Nhs (Commercial Contractors)

    To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland if the instructions given to the health boards about the use of commercial contractors in support services of the National Health Service also referred to the need to hold, in advance, discussions and consultations, with the unions representing the workers of each of those health boards.

    The practical guidance on competitive tendering issued to health boards and the Common Services Agency on 11 December by the Scottish Home and Health Department indicates that, where the board's employees running an in-house service wish to bid for a contract they should be given the same opportunities to do so and be subject to the same conditions as external contractors.

    Social Work (Scotland) Act

    To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland what has been the total expenditure by each regional social work department under section 12 of the Social Work (Scotland) Act in each of the last 10 years.

    Local authority returns relating to payments made since the reorganisation of local government were started only in 1978/79. Figures for this and subsequent years up to 1985/86 are in the table.

    Percentage of United Kingdom catch
    Totalof which trans-shipped
    per cent.per cent.
    Lerwick0·4
    Ullapool63·459·5
    Mallaig0
    Peterhead0·3
    Fraserburgh8·0
    Abroad13·6

    To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland what proportion of the United Kingdom herring catch for the current year, to the most recent date for which figures are available, was (a) landed at Lerwick, (b) landed at Ullapool, (c) landed at Mallaig, (d) landed at Peterhead, (e) landed at Fraserburgh, (f) trans-shipped at Lerwick, (g) trans-shipped at Ullapool and (h) landed at a foreign EEC port.

    The information requested on the proportions of the United Kingdom herring catch, to the most recent date (10 December 1987), is as follows:

    Percentages of United Kingdom catch
    Totalof which trans-shipped
    per cent.per cent.
    Lerwick40·738·4
    Ullapool10·08·4
    Mallaig0
    Peterhead18·512·3
    Fraserburgh8·2
    Abroad8·5

    Parole

    To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland what recent consideration he has given to reducing the minimum qualifying period for parole to that which applies in England and Wales; and if he will make a statement.

    [holding answer 14 December 1987]: I have no present plans to reduce the minimum qualifying period for parole. This is one of the matters on which I will await advice from the review of the parole system in Scotland, which, as previously announced, I intend to institute. I have now decided that the best means of doing this would be to set up such a review in the wider context of arrangements for modifying the effects of custodial sentences. I am delighted that Lord Kincraig has accepted my invitation to act as chairman of a review with the following terms of reference:-

    "To consider the present arrangements in Scotland for modifying the effect of custodial sentences and in particular:-
  • (a) the objectives of the parole system, and whether it should be retained in its present or in a modified form, including any changes which should be made to:-
  • (i) the current criteria for eligibility for parole;
  • (ii) the current criteria for remission;
  • (b) whether as an alternative or a supplement to the present arrangements, any different scheme might be introduced for the release of prisoners, for stated purposes, before the completion of the sentence ordained by the court;
  • (c) whether there should be any extension of the role of the judiciary in relation to the present parole or remission systems, or in relation to any alternative arrangements for the modification of the effects of custodial sentences;
  • (d) the role of the social work services in supervising convicted offenders released on licence;
  • (e) the current provisions for periods spent in custody on remand to be taken into account in the determination of sentences;
  • (f) whether or not powers should be conferred upon the courts to suspend sentences, or to ordain part-suspended sentences, in what circumstances and on what conditions;
  • (g) the conditions which should attach to parole, remission or any equivalent scheme;
  • (h) whether the conclusions reached in the context of determinate sentences have any relevance to current policy on life sentence prisoners;
  • (i) the overall resource implications and cost-effectiveness of the existing systems and of any modifications or alternatives which may be suggested;
  • and to make recommendations."
    The membership of the review, and arrangements for conveying evidence to it, will be announced later.

    Wales

    Education Reform

    To ask the Secretary of State for Wales what were the trends of the responses from Wales to the recent consultation over the education reform proposals.

    Several hundred responses to seven separate consultation documents were received. They expressed a wide variety of views which cannot be summarised in a few words. Copies of the principal responses from organisations are in the Library and the hon. Gentleman may wish to examine them and make his own assessment.

    Gwent Health Authority

    To ask the Secretary of State for Wales when the term of office of the chairman of the Gwent health authority expires.

    Nhs (Funds)

    To ask the Secretary of State for Wales how the additional financial resources, recently announced by him for the Health Service in Wales, will be allocated between each of the health authorities in Wales; and whether there are any restrictions on the use of these additional funds to make up for the non-funding of wage awards suffered by health authorities over the past two years.

    I announced on 4 December, at column 719, that, subject to parliamentary approval, I propose to provide £843·9 million for hospital and community health services in Wales in 1988–89. Excluding the administration costs of the artificial limb and appliance service, which will from 1 April 1988 be transferred to the Welsh Health Common Services Authority, £792·0 million will be provided for current purposes and £51·4 million for capital expenditure.For current spending this represents a cash increase of £46·5 million, or 6·2 per cent. over recurrent 1987–88 provision. £39·3 million will be made available to health authorities for their discretionary use, which represents a cash increase of 5·3 per cent. over their recurrent 1987–88 allocations. The balance of £7·2 million, together with a further £2 million previously earmarked for non-recurrent purposes, will be allocated for centrally financed developments. These developments, particularly the consultant expansion scheme and pyschiatric bridging finance will considerably assist authorities in meeting future service pressures.In addition to this extra current provision, authorities will be able to retain the cash released through their cost improvement programmes. Authorities will also be able to retain the income raised from charges for private treatment, which is expected to be in excess of £2 million next year. Health authorities are also being encouraged to develop other sources of income generation.Of the capital provision, £29·5 million will be made available to health authorities for their discretionary use. This amounts to an increase of 20·4 per cent. over 1987–88 capital allocations. Authorities will also be able to retain the receipts from the sale of surplus land and buildings and this is expected to generate a further £3·1 million in 1988–89.The current and capital allocations to individual health authorities for next year will be as shown in the table. These allocations do not take into account further sums which will be made available following decisions to be made on centrally funded developments for 1988–89. These will be announced shortly.

    Allocation (£ million)
    Current elementCapital element
    Clwyd96·1034·935
    East Dyfed60·2752·212
    Pembrokeshire22·7621·049
    Gwent115·3265·166
    Gwynedd58·1281·814
    Mid Glamorgan135·4555·653
    Powys27·1721·069
    South Glamorgan157·4392·711
    West Glamorgan100·1354·927
    There are no restrictions on the use of authorities' discretionary allocations, although all authorities are expected to take account of the policies and priorities for health services in Wales published by my Department in "Policies and Priorities for Health Services in Wales."I am also pleased to announce that a further £3·8 million will be made available for hospital and community health services in Wales in the current financial year. I shall be making a separate announcement about the distribution of these funds shortly. This additional provision brings the total cash increase for current spending on these services in 1987–88 to £750·5 million or 10·7 per cent. over 1986–87 provision. The additional money is being provided in recognition of the financial pressures which health authorities are facing at the present time and should help them to ensure that current levels of patient services are maintained without carrying forward a large burden of expenditure liabilities to 1988–89.

    Energy

    Disconnections

    To ask the Secretary of State for Energy if he has any proposals to monitor the number of disconnections of supply to gas consumers and electricity consumers following privatisation.

    Average fuel prices for households in the second quarter of 1987
    Pence per therm
    (i)(ii)(iii)(iv)
    Average revenue from sales of electricityAverage revenue from sales of gasAverage price of heating oilAverage price of petrol
    United Kingdom1147·743·132·3115·4
    United States of America133·834·533·645·5
    France2(236·8)2(78·0)50·4147·4
    Germany247·92(64·1)33·4111·3
    Japan2(338·3)2(142·6)54·4161·3
    1 Data for the United Kingdom are also available for the third quarter of 1987 as follows:
    (i)(ii)(iii)(iv)
    United Kingdom, 1987 Q33158·047·337·2115·7

    The numbers of disconnections made by both industries are monitored by their respective consumer councils.

    Fuel Prices

    To ask the Secretary of State for Energy what was the percentage increase for United Kingdom industrial fuel prices, coal, heavy fuel oil, gas and electricity, from 1970 to the latest available date, compared with the percentage increase in the producer price index of materials for the same period.

    The information requested is given in the table.

    Percentage increase in average United Kingdom industrial fuel prices, 1970–19861
    Per cent.
    Coal640
    Heavy fuel oil696
    Gas392
    Electricity452
    Producer price index of materials2371
    1 1986 is the latest full year for which data are available.
    2 The producer price index of materials is not available for years before 1974. The percentage given has therefore been based on the value of the former wholesale price index (excluding crude oil and carbonising coal) in 1970.

    Source: Energy Trends.

    To ask the Secretary of State for Energy (1) what were the latest available comparative domestic energy prices for (a) electricity, (b) gas, (c) heating oils, (d) coke and (e) petrol for the United Kingdom on a single unit basis, such as pence per therm; and what equivalent information he has for the United States of America, France, Germany and Japan;(2) if he will provide comparable information relating to current United Kingdom domestic fuel prices, fuel by fuel, on a single unit basis such as pence per therm.

    The latest available comparisons of energy prices, for the countries and fuels specified except coke, relate to the second quarter of 1987 and are as shown in the table. Figures for household coke are not available on a comparable basis. The latest comparable information relating to the United Kingdom is given in footnote 1 to the table.

    2 Quarterly data are not available. The figure show is the average for 1986, the latest period for which comparable data are available.

    3 Provisional. (Although there was no change in tariffs in 1987, this is higher than the figure for the second quarter shown in the above table because of the effect on average revenue of the seasonal pattern of demand.)

    Notes:

    (i) The prices shown above for electricity and gas are based on average revenue per unit consumed. In general these will differ from prices derived for a given level of annual consumption and type of tariff.

    (ii) International comparisons of energy prices are difficult to construct because of incompatibilities in the basic data. They require careful interpretation because of movements in exchange rates and variation in the timing of tariff revisions between countries. The above figures are based on exchange rates prevailing in the second quarter of 1987 (1986 for the figures given in parentheses).

    Source: "Energy Prices and Taxes", International Energy Agency (OECD).

    To ask the Secretary of State for Energy what was the percentage increase in United Kingdom domestic fuel prices, electricity, gas, heating oils, coke and petrol, from 1970 to the latest available date, compared with the increase in (a) the retail price index and (b) the fuel and light component of that index for the same period.

    The information is given in the table:

    Percentage increase in average
    United Kingdom domestic fuel prices; 1970–19861
    percentage
    Electricity568
    Gas381
    Heating Oils843
    Coal and coke2620
    Petrol and Oil432
    Fuel and light557
    Retail Price Index3422
    Source: Energy Trends.
    1 1986 is the latest full year for which data are available.
    2 The corresponding figure for coke is 628 per cent.
    3 Excluding fuels.

    Subsidies

    To ask the Secretary of State for Energy what subsidies have been paid to energy industries since 1970; and what contributions in terms of taxation and levies have been made by those industries to the Exchequer over the same period.

    The full range of data sought could be provided only at disproportionate cost. The publicly owned energy industries give details in their annual reports and accounts of the principal grants, taxes and levies in the areas for which my Department is responsible; and my Department's annual Brown Book gives taxes attributable to United Kingdom oil production. These documents are available in the Library of the House.

    Easington

    To ask the Secretary of State for Energy when he next intends to pay an official visit to the Easington constituency; and whether he will meet trades union representatives of the mining industry.

    I hope to visit Easington early in the new year. I will be happy to meet representatives of the mining unions at any time.

    Fast Reactors (Exhibition)

    To ask the Secretary of State for Energy if his Department has considered an application for an exhibition relating to fast reactors to be displayed in the Upper Waiting Hall.

    I understand that, under procedures agreed by the Services Committee, arrangements have been made with the authorities of the House for an exhibition to be held in the Upper Waiting Hall from 8 to 12 February inclusive.

    Nuclear Waste

    To ask the Secretary of State for Energy, pursuant to his reply to the hon. Member for Meirronnydd Nant Conwy (Dr. Thomas) Official Report, 2 November column 533, if he will place in the Library a copy of the notes exchanged between the Government of Japan and Her Majesty's Government on the provision of nuclear reprocessing technology, and give an indication of the likely financial benefit to the United Kingdom of this agreement.

    [holding answer 23 November 1987]: The United Kingdom's non-proliferation export obligations were fully met through the exchange of notes. The notes confirm that—

  • 1. any facility constructed using the transferred technology will be used exclusively for peaceful purposes;
  • 2. any such facility will be subject to measures of effective physical protection;
  • 3. nuclear material contained in any such facility will be placed under safeguards by the IAEA; and
  • 4. The transferred technology, and any equipment derived from the transferred technology, will not be transferred out of Japan without obtaining from the recipient Government the same assurances, and without the prior consent of the United Kingdom.
  • Information on individual contracts is commercially confidential.

    Plutonium

    To ask the Secretary of State for Energy whether he is now in a position to publish further information on plutonium in line with recommendation 13(b) of the Sizewell report.

    [pursuant to the reply 30 October 1987, c. 447–48]: I have today placed in the Libraries of both Houses copies of a document setting out information concerning the production of plutonium from United Kingdom civil reactors during 1986–87.

    Magnox Reactors

    To ask the Secretary of State for Energy (1) if he will update to 31 March 1987 the information on thermal energy generated and spent fuel discharged by each of the Central Electricity Generating Board Magnox reactors given in reply to the hon. Member for Meirionnydd Nant Conwy on 26 June 1987, Official Report, column 269;(2) if he will update to 31 March the information on the allocation of plutonium produced in the Central Electricity Generating Board and South of Scotland Electricity Board Magnox reactors given in reply to the hon. Member for Meirionnydd Nant Conwy on 21 July 1986,

    Official Report, columns 10–11.

    [pursuant to his reply 24 July 1987, c. 515–16]: I am advised by the Central Electricity Generating Board that the fuel discharged at Wylfa power station during the financial year 1986–87 was 60 tonnes of uranium and not 47 as previously stated.

    Education And Science

    Aids

    To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Science when he expects to issue to schools the video resource package on AIDS, which was commissioned in March.

    My right hon. Friend, together with my right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Wales, has today launched the joint DES/Welsh Office resource package for schools on AIDS, "Your Choice for Life". The package will be sent free to all secondary schools with pupils in the 14 to 16 age range, to sixth form colleges, to local education authorities and to institutions providing initial teacher training. Since the package necessarily refers to aspects of sexual behaviour, it will be for the governing bodies of individual maintained schools to decide how, and indeed whether, the package should be used with their pupils. I am arranging for a copy of the package to be placed in the Library of the House.

    Primary Schools

    To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Science when he will repond formally to the third report of the Education, Science and Arts Committee for the Session 1985–86, entitled "Achievement in Primary Schools."

    I have written to my right hon. Friend the Member for Aylesbury (Mr. Raison), the Chairman of the Committee, enclosing a memorandum, which I am publishing today, welcoming the importance which the Committee attaches to primary education and setting out my formal response to its report. Copies of the memorandum have been placed in the Library.

    Education Reform

    To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Science by which date applications must be received from Inner London councils wishing to opt out of the Inner London education authority under the provisions in the Education Reform Bill.

    Subject to Parliament's approval of the provisions in the Bill, councils wishing to opt out will have to submit applications by such a date as my right hon. Friend may direct. He has decided that applications from councils wishing to assume education responsibilities from 1 April 1990 should be submitted by not later than 31 December 1988. This deadline has been advanced from that proposed in the consultation paper, "The Organisation of Education in Inner London," in response to representations that it was desirable to provide as much time as possible for councils to prepare to become local education authorities, following Parliament's approval of any orders to that effect.

    Environment

    Rating Reform

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment what is his estimate of the total annual revenue which will be collected by Harrogate borough council from the community charge levied on individuals and from the business rate, as proposed in the Local Government Finance Bill; and what is the total revenue raised under the present system in the current financial year.

    In 1987–88 Harrogate borough council, on its own behalf, and on behalf of the authorities which precept on it, is thought to be raising £38·6 million from local ratepayers: £16·8 million from non-domestic and £21·8 million from domestic rates. Because authorities in the area are drawing from balances these figures are £2·2 million lower than is necessary to fund reported net expenditure.The illustrative figures for the full implementation of the community charge in Harrogate after withdrawal of the safety net assume a total revenue raised from community charges and business rates in Harrogate of £39·6 million; £16·3 million in non-domestic rates and £23·3 million in community charges. These figures assume that there is no contribution from balances.

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment if he will describe the manner in which parish councils will receive grants in respect of non-domestic rateable income under the community charge.

    Parish councils, like county and district councils, will meet their net expenditure requirements by drawing on a collection fund maintained by the district council. Into this fund will be paid the whole amount of revenue support grant and redistributed non-domestic rates allocated to the area, which will thus be available to set equally against the expenditure of all tiers of authority. I have sent my hon. Friend an information note for parish councils on how they will be financed under the new system: copies have also been placed in the Library.

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment what is his estimate of community charge preparation costs which local authorities are likely to incur in 1988–89.

    It is doubtful whether local authorities will need to incur significant expenditure in preparing for the community charge as early as 1988–89. To the extent that additional costs do arise, we believe that these can be accommodated within the RSG settlement.

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment if he will break down his estimated full year total additional cost to local authorities of the community charge system by class of authority.

    No such breakdown is available. We expect the cost, per person of collecting the community charge to be broadly the same as the cost per hereditament of collecting domestic rates.

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment if he will break down his estimate of full year total additional costs to local authorities of the community charge system showing separately staff costs, computing, premises and other costs and capital and revenue.

    It is not possible at this stage to disaggregate the broad estimates given in the explanatory and financial memorandum to the Local Government Finance Bill of additional costs to local authorities of implementing the community charge. The requirement for additional staff, computer facilities and premises will vary considerably between local authorities.

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment what representations he has received from organisations representing disabled people as to disabled people's future community charge liability.

    We have had representations from the Spastics Society, the Voluntary Organisations Personal Social Services Group, the Disabled Drivers Association (Bournemouth and District), the Disabled Income Group and the British Limbless Ex-Servicemens Association.

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment what plans he has further to publicise his proposals to reform local government finance.

    I and my Ministers will continue to make speeches pointing out that although the hon. Member has no desire to defend the status quo, he has not seen fit to propose an alternative to put in its place.

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment what representations have been received from the Police Federation about the future community charge liability of police officers and their dependants, and the future of police officers' rent and rates allowances.

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment what estimates he has made of the numbers of extra staff and their professional qualifications and grades that local authorities will need to employ to implement and run the community charge system.

    It will be for local authorities to decide the numbers of additional staff they require, their grading and appropriate qualifications.

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment whether he has yet had any discussions with the local authority associations, to the Local Government Training Board, or The Local Authorities' Conditions of Service Advisory Board about the staffing requirements for community charge registration and collection.

    Staffing is one of a number of issues which my officials will be discussing with the local authority associations in the run up to the introduction of the community charge.

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment what percentage of community charge cases he estimates are likely to result in increased workload for magistrates' courts on recovery of community charge debts.

    I have no reason to believe that the introduction of the community charge will significantly increase the workload of magistrates' courts.

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment if he still plans to publish before the Christmas recess updated figures on the effects of his proposed changes to local government finance, taking into account the updated tax-benefit model and other data.

    Consultative Council On Local Government Finance

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment whether he plans to hold meetings of the Consultative Council on Local Government Finance after 1 April 1990.

    Clause 77(4) of the Local Government Finance Bill will require the Secretary of State to consult representatives of local government before making a revenue support grant report. I shall be considering in due course what consultation arrangements will be appropriate after 1 April 1990.

    Unleaded Petrol

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment if he has received any representations from the tourist industry as to the problems which many European tourists face obtaining unleaded petrol in the United Kingdom.

    My right hon. Friend has received no recent representations.The British Tourist Authority is represented on the unleaded petrol group which I chair and which meets regularly to review progress on the introduction of unleaded petrol.With some 530 petrol stations selling unleaded petrol throughout the United Kingdom, tourists should not find it difficult to obtain unleaded petrol in most areas. Information on outlets selling unleaded petrol is available from tourist bodies and the motoring organisations.

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment if he has any further proposals to increase the use of unleaded petrol.

    Following the adoption of the "Luxembourg Package" on 3 December by the EC Council of Environment Ministers, we will now be able to require new cars to be capable of running on unleaded petrol. This we shall do from the earliest possible dates. Unleaded petrol already benefits from a favourable excise duty differential.

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment if he will list, using the latest available year in each case, information available to him on the proportion of petrol sold in each of the European Community countries represented by unleaded petrol.

    Information on the sale of unleaded petrol in Europe has been provided by the United Kingdom Petroleum Industry Association.The table gives data for the last full year for which information is available, and the association's estimates for the half year to June 1987.

    CountryUnleaded petrol sales as percentage of national total
    1986January to June 1987
    Belgiumneg.
    Denmark1229
    Federal Republic of Germany1122
    Franceneg.neg.
    Greeceneg.neg.
    Irelandneg.neg.
    Italyneg.neg.
    Luxembourgneg.
    Netherlandsneg.19
    Portugalneg.neg.
    Spainneg.neg.
    United Kingdomneg.neg.
    neg.=less than 0·5 per cent.—=no data.

    Small Business Tenancies

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment whether there has been any follow-up work since he consulted on the current working of part II of the Landlord and Tenant Act 1954, with particular reference to its affect on small business tenancies.

    My right hon. Friend is grateful that my hon. Friend raised this issue. I am pleased to announce that in response to widespread demand the Department has today published new guidance on the workings of the main business lettings legislation for England and Wales.Since the 1985 review of the Landlord and Tenant Act 1954, part II, with particular reference to small business tenancies, the Government have, as promised, been monitoring the legislation. In consequence, my Department has revised the existing booklet, with the aim of providing clear and concise guidance on the rights and obligations of landlords and tenants under the Act, and on those issues most frequently raised by tenants and landlords.The new leaflet, which is complementary to the booklet, briefly outlines the basic features of the legislation and highlights potential problem areas for landlords and tenants under the Act, particularly for small business men or business women involved in business lettings for the first time. The leaflet also indicates in diagrammatic form the statutory procedures which have to be followed.I am sure that these publications, which will be available free from citizens advice bureaux, small firms centres, local authorities and the Department's publications store at Ruislip, will be immensely useful both to those already engaged in business lettings, he they landlord or tenant, and to those just starting up in business. These publications are available in the House of Commons Library.

    Local Government Reform

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment what is the average cash figure paid by the highest paid 10 per cent. of households under the present system towards the cost of local services; what this figure is as a percentage of the average incomes; what is the average cash figure paid by the lowest paid 10 per cent. of households under the present figure towards the cost of local services; and what this figure is as a percentage of their average income.

    [holding answer 15 December 1987]:On average the 10 per cent. of households with the lowest net incomes are estimated to be liable to rates of about £240 (91½per cent. of net income) before rebates. The 10 per cent. of households with the highest net incomes are similarly estimated to be liable for rates of £480 (2¼per cent. of net income). On the basis of the rebate system which will be in operation from 1 April 1988 these figures fall to average cash payments of £90 (3½per cent. of net income) and £475 (2¼of net income) respectively.With full implementation of community charges at present spending levels, the equivalent figures net of rebates would be £70 (2¾per cent. of net income) for the 10 per cent. of households with the lowest net incomes and £435 (2 per cent. of net income) for the 10 per cent. of households with the highest net incomes.These figures relate only to the locally raised contribution to local services. The 10 per cent. of households with the highest incomes overall will contribute 16 times more to the cost of local services than the 10 per cent. of households with the lowest incomes once the contribution from national taxes is taken into account.

    Home Department

    Firearms

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) whether the Metropolitan police have carried out any further costing exercises on firearms and shotgun certificate fees since the last published figures for a similar exercise in 1981;(2) if he will list the respective costs or estimated costs to the Metropolitan police for the grant and renewal of both firearms and shotgun certificates under the most recent costing exercise on certificate fees.

    The most recent Metropolitan police assessment of costs incurred in granting or renewing firearm and shotgun certificates is for the period 1 April 1985 to 31 March 1986. These and estimated costs for 1986–87 and 1987–88, as calculated in November 1986, are as follows:

    1985–86 £1986–87 £1987–88 £
    Firearm certificate
    Issue65·1869·9274·71
    Renewal with increased number of firearms47·7751·2354·73
    Renewal without increased number of firearms39·1041·9244·76
    Shotgun certificate
    Issue30·6532·9735·38
    Renewal5·595·966·33

    Boundary Commission (Report)

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will publish in the Official Report the publication date for the recommendation of the Boundary Commission in Wales as it affects county council wards in West Glamorgan.

    The Local Government Boundary Commission for Wales is reviewing the electoral arrangements of a number of counties as part of the initial review of electoral arrangements in Wales. The timing of the publication of its recommendations is a matter for the commission. I understand, however, that the commission is expecting to publish its final recommendations for West Glamorgan early next year.

    Prisoners (Statistics)

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many prisoners convicted of murder are held in custody at the present time.

    On 30 September 1987, the latest date for which figures are readily available, it is estimated that 1,850 prisoners were serving life sentences for murder in prison department establishments in England and Wales. Detainees during Her Majesty's pleasure and persons sentenced to custody for life are included.

    Pornography And Crime

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether the findings of the Home Office and National Association of Chief Police Officers investigation on the links between pornography and violent crime are available; and if he will make a statement.

    Over a period of three months earlier this year the police, at my right hon. Friend's request, noted any evidence of a link between the commission of sexual offences and the consumption of pornography. Forty-eight instances came to light where the perpetrator of a sexual offence was known to have looked at pornographic material at some time before the commission of the offence. No causal connection was identified in any of these cases. The exercise showed how difficult it is to obtain conclusive evidence either way about a link between pornography and sexual offences.

    Electoral Registers

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will ensure that arrangements be improved for electoral registration officers to provide hon. Members whose constituency boundaries have been changed with copies of the electoral register for the constituency in which they were elected.

    The Representations of the People Regulations 1986 require the electoral registration officer for each district to supply to the hon. Member concerned as much of the district's register as relates to his constituency, so as to ensure that the hon. Member has the complete register for that constituency. The draft 1988 register for each constituency should now be available, but if the hon. Member still has not got it perhaps he will let me know.

    Passport Office

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will give details of the number of complaints received by the passport office in London for 1987, 1986 and 1985 where the passport office has lost original birth certificates.

    I regret that the information requested is not available. In the comparatively rare instances when birth certificates submitted in support of passport applications go astray within the passport offices, replacements are provided at no cost to the applicant.

    False Passports

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will give details of the number of false passports recorded during the last 12 months and the previous 12 months.

    In 1986, the only complete year for which figures are available, the passport department recorded 173 cases where standard British passports had been fraudulently altered in various ways, and nine cases involving counterfeit documents. In the period to 11 December 1987, 183 such alterations and 15 counterfeits were recorded.

    Aids

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether he intends to introduce legislation making it a criminal offence to transmit HIV infection deliberately, knowingly or carelessly.

    The criminal law already applies, for example, where the infection is transmitted by biting. The question of wider legislation raises difficult issues, which we are considering.

    Prisoners (Compassionate Release)

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he has completed his review, in the light of the case of James Godfried, of the practice of considering requests for early release from prison on compassionate grounds; and if he will make a statement.

    Yes. I am placing in the Libraries of both Houses a copy of my letter of 15 December to my hon. Friend setting out the main conclusions of the review.

    Prison Accommodation

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what the certified normal accommodation of the prison system is expected to be by 1 January 1990.

    [holding answer 12 November 1987]: By 1 January 1990 the certified normal accommodation is expected to be 45,000.

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many additional prison places are expected to be provided (a) in new prisons and (b) in existing prisons, by 1 January 1990.

    [holding answer 12 November 1987]: From the start of the building programme in 1983 to 1 January 1990 an additional 7,321 prison places are expected to be provided, 3,512 in new prisons, and 3,809 in existing prisons.In the period 13 November 1987 to 1 January 1990 the figures are 1,984 places in new prisons and 413 places in existing prisons.

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department in which existing prisons additional prison places are expected to be provided by 1 January 1990, and what is the timetable for their coming into use.

    [holding answer 12 November 1987]: The information requested is as follows:From 13 November 1987 to 1 January 1990 it is expected that a further 413 places will be provided at the following establishments.

    Prison building programme net accommodation gains at existing prisons
    Name/Region198719881989
    Midland
    Birmingham8
    North
    Lindholme250
    Northallerton15
    South East
    Kingston8
    Lewes16
    Norwich RC60
    South West
    Channings Wood56
    TOTALS2508776
    In addition, from the beginning of the programme in 1983 to 13 November 1987, 3,396 places have already been provided, making an overall total to 1 January 1990 of 3,809. Work on refurbishment schemes to improve living standards, access to sanitation and facilities is being undertaken at about 100 establishments by 1995, but not all of these will provide extra accommodation.

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what will be the total capital cost at current prices of the 26 new prisons which have been or are to be built between 1983 and 1995.

    [holding answer 12 November 1987]: The estimated total capital cost at current prices is £870 million.

    Overseas Development

    Women

    To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs how much of the aid funds for specific rural and agricultural projects in African countries is used to support projects orientated towards women.

    Most aid projects benefit both women and men. Aid for African agriculture is likely to benefit women particularly because the majority of African farmers are women.We are trying to orient a number of existing projects so that they meet the particular needs of women more fully and are seeking to select new projects which meet this criterion. Changes in this direction will take time.

    United Nations Children's Fund (Exhibition)

    To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs if his Department has considered an application for an exhibition relating to the United Nations Children's Fund to be displayed in the Upper Waiting Hall.

    I understand that, under procedures agreed by the Services Committee, arrangements have been made with the authorities of the House for the exhibition to be held in the Upper Waiting Hall from 25 to 29 January 1988.

    Ethiopia

    To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs if he will make a statement on the assistance currently being given by Her Majesty's Government to help alleviate the famine in Ethiopia.

    I refer my hon. Friend to the answer that I gave to my right hon. Friend the Member for Selby (Mr. Alison) on 17 November at columns 480–81 and to the answer I gave to the hon. Member for Monklands, West (Mr. Clarke) on 26 November at column 263. Since then I have announced a £2 million contribution by the British Government to the Ethiopian appeal launched by the Disasters Emergency Committee. This brings to about £25 million the Government's help this year with famine relief in Ethiopia.

    To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what ongoing aid in excess of Her Majesty's Government's recent contributions to the Disaster Emergency Committee's appeal is programmed to meet the long-term Ethiopian need.

    In the absence of reasonable prospects that the aid would be effective, Her Majesty's Government have no present plans to provide long-term financial assistance to Ethiopia from the bilateral aid programme. We will, however, continue to respond for humanitarian reasons to emergency needs, for which commitments in 1987 now total over £25 million. In addition, we maintain a programme of technical cooperation and have provided funds for rehabilitation following the 1984–85 famine; expenditure on these activities taken together came to about £2·5 million in 1986.

    Commonwealth Distance Education Initiative

    To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what progress has been made in the Commonwealth distance education initiative.

    As agreed by Heads of Government at their meeting in Vancouver, the Commonwealth Secretariat will now establish a working group to develop the financial and organisational framework of a distance education network. There is much work to be done and we expect to play a full part in the working group's deliberations.

    Transport

    Commuter Services

    To ask the Secretary of State for Transport whether he will estimate the amount of PSO grant to British Rail that has been spent on commuter services in London and the south-east in each of the last five years.

    The PSO grant requirement for British Rail's Network South-east services since 1983 has been as follows:

    £ million
    1987–88 prices
    YearNumber
    19831330
    1984–85317
    1985–86272
    1986–87214
    1987–882232
    1 Only calendar year figure available.
    2 Forecast.

    Headphones

    To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what plans he has to introduce restrictions on the use of headphones (a) in moving vehicles and (b) bicycles.

    There are no plans to do so. Legislation places on drivers and cyclists the responsibility of driving or cycling with due care and attention at all times. A road user who fails to do so as a result of distraction or lack of concentration because of the use of headphones is liable to prosecution.

    London Traffic

    To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what assessment he has made of the impact of road accidents on the ability of traffic to travel on the roads of London; whether he routinely monitors the impact of additional accidents in London on traffic flow in London; and if he will make a statement on recent accidents in London and their impact on traffic movements.

    Many roads in London carry very heavy volumes of traffic. Accidents inevitably cause disruption. The effect of accidents and other incidents is monitored by the police who are responsible for dealing with the immediate consequences. The Department and other highway authorities in London maintain regular contact with the police whose views are an important element in the planning of road improvement schemes and traffic control and surveillance systems.

    London Underground

    To ask the Secretary of State for Transport if he will list the occasions and locations when he has (a) visited stations and (b) travelled by train on the London Underground system in the course of his official duties over the last five years.

    No. My right hon. Friend and I make such visits as the occasion demands.

    London Regional Transport

    To ask the Secretary of State for Transport if he will make a statement on his long-term policy with respect of central Government funding of London Regional Transport.

    London Regional Transport requires a high level of capital investment to modernise and increase the capacity of its services. It is our policy fully to fund that investment to the extent that it cannot be funded out of revenues and other internal resources or by attracting private capital.

    Drink-Related Accidents

    To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what has been the number of (a) deaths and (b) serious injuries in drink-related motor accidents at (i) Christmas time and (ii) throughout the year for each year since 1960.

    Train Accidents

    To ask the Secretary of State for Transport if he will give for British Rail for each year since 1979 the location of each train accident resulting in a fatality or fatalities.

    The location of all train accidents involving passenger fatalities in the period 1979–86 is given in table 8 of the Department's "Report on Railway Safety for 1986", a copy of which is in the Library. During the same period a total of 33 railway staff and contractors died in train accidents, together with 45 "other persons", mostly the occupants of road vehicles involved in train accidents at level crossings. The location of these latter accidents is given in the published annual reports on railway safety. The location of all the accidents involving railway staff is not given in the reports. If the hon. Member will confirm that he requires the information, I shall write to him.

    Heathrow (Sewage Works)

    To ask the Secretary of State for Transport when he expects to receive a report on the removal of the sewage works at London Heathrow, Perry Oaks site; and whether he will list the steps to be taken before the building of terminal 5 on the cleared site.

    A study commissioned jointly by BAA plc and the Thames water authority reported in July last year that the release of the Perry Oaks site was technically feasible but recommended further technical trials to determine the optimum method. Copies of the report are in the Library. I understand that the investigation of a range of options is continuing. Any proposal for the construction of a fifth terminal on the site would require planning permission.

    Airports (Expenditure Allocations)

    To ask the Secretary of State for Transport if he will now announce the 1988–89 capital expenditure allocations for municipal airports and public airport companies.

    We have today approved capital expenditure allocations totalling £22 million. Among the major schemes for which provision has been made are:

    Birmingham

    Further development of terminal and apron capacity;

    Bournemouth

    Navigational equipment improvements;

    Bristol

    Apron and terminal extension and improvements;

    East Midlands

    Improvements in cargo handling capacity and facilities: further terminal extension;

    Humberside

    Terminal improvements;

    Leeds/Bradford

    Terminal completion (1st phase);

    Luton

    Runway resurfacing and lighting improvements, improvements to present terminal to increase capacity;

    Manchester

    Further development of existing terminal apron and taxiway capacity; domestic module; land purchase associated with second terminal;

    Newcastle

    Improved runway lighting; apron extension;

    Norwich

    New terminal building completion;

    Teesside

    Improved radar facilities.

    Some additional allocations may be made during the course of next year.

    In addition to expenditure authorised under our approvals, public airport companies are also free to invest their undistributed internal resources. These are estimated to exceed £40 million.

    Stansted Airport (Noise)

    To ask the Secretary of State for Transport if he is able to announce his proposals for amended noise preferential routes for aircraft taking off from Stansted.

    We are committed to taking various measures to mitigate noise disturbance at Stansted as air traffic builds up, including the use of noise preferential routes.My noble Friend the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State with responsibility for aviation and shipping has today sent a consultation paper to my hon. Friend, other hon. Members with constituencies near Stansted, local authorities and the Airport Consultative Committee seeking their views on proposals for additional departure routes which have been developed in consultation with National Air Traffic Services.Our proposals will concentrate aircraft taking off on a small number of specified routes designed to avoid, so far as is possible, major built-up areas. Once they are fixed, we expect the routes to remain so indefinitely, so that people will know where aircraft noise may be experienced.

    My noble Friend is seeking comments by 29 January and expects to announce his decisions about the new route structure during February. The new routes would come into effect next summer.

    Attorney-General

    Crown Prosecution Service

    To ask the Attorney-General if he will make a statement about changes proposed in the Crown Prosecution Service for determining whether charges should be brought against public figures and children.

    The Crown Prosecution Service has no plans for changes in its approach to dealing with charges brought against public figures and children. The service has always sought to ensure that cases which involve legal complexity or public sensitivity are dealt with at an appropriate level.

    Prime Minister

    National Health Service

    To ask the Prime Minister what representations she has received about the state of the National Health Service; if she will list those members of the medical profession who have made such representations directly to her; what her response has been; and if she will make a statement.

    I have received a number of such representations, including from members of the medical profession. I have pointed out that the resources for the Health Service have increased substantially since 1979, and the amount of care we have been able to provide through the Health Service has also risen. We shall continue to seek the most cost-effective use of National Health Service resources so that the maximum number of patients can be treated.

    National Finance

    Unleaded Petrol

    To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer if he will consider a further reduction in the duty on unleaded petrol in order to encourage its greater use.

    The duty differential in favour of unleaded petrol is reviewed each year in the run-up to the Budget, and Customs and Excise have recently concluded a consultation exercise. Decisions on excise duty rates are matters for my right hon. Friend the Chancellor of the Exchequer's Budget judgment.

    Privatisation

    To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer how many employees have been in enterprises transferred from the public to the private sector in the United Kingdom since May 1979.

    Around 655,000 employees have been in enterprises transferred from the public to the private sector in the United Kingdom since May 1979.

    Petroleum Revenue Tax

    To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer if he intends to introduce legislation to amend the rules for the claiming and allowance of petroleum revenue tax relief for field expenditure incurred by oil companies before the end of a chargeable period where the special safeguard relief provision reduces or cancels petroleum revenue tax payable.

    No. I asked the Inland Revenue to carry out a review of the interaction between the timing of claims for PRT expenditure relief and the special safeguard relief which can reduce or cancel a company's PRT liability during a number of chargeable periods once a field reaches payback (the net profit period as defined in section 111 of the Finance Act 1981). In respect of these periods it can be advantageous for a company not to claim relief for field expenditure in time for it to be allowed in the assessment for the chargeable period in which it was incurred. The expenditure is then available to be claimed against PRT liability for a later chargeable period. The safeguard relief was introduced as a special overriding relief designed to ensure that PRT—calculated after taking account of all other available reliefs and allowances—does not reduce a participator's return on capital in any chargeable period (up to a prescribed time limit) to 15 per cent. or less. It was not originally intended that further benefit should be available by deferring field expenditure claims so that expenditure incurred before the end of a chargeable period where PRT is reduced or cancelled by safeguard is claimed and allowed against profits of a later chargeable period.Nevertheless, the Government have decided, in the light of representations received during the review and in the current situation in the oil market, not to bring forward legislation in next year's Finance Bill to prevent extra relief from being obtained by means of deferring expenditure claims. The Inland Revenue has a choice over the timing of assessments which could also be exercised to counteract the benefit of deferring expenditure claims, but it will not use this power in these special circumstances to defer assessments for periods from payback where safeguard relief reduces or cancels liability. This decision in relation to safeguard does not have any application to the timing of assessments in other circumstances.

    The Arts

    Museums And Galleries

    To ask the Minister for the Arts whether he will announce his allocations of funding for museums and galleries during the next three years; and if he will make a statement.

    Following my announcement on 5 November, at columns 848–50, of a three-year settlement of the arts budget, I can now announce my allocations to individual museums and galleries for the period from April 1988 to March 1991.Overall provision for museums and galleries will be £157 million in 1988–89, £160 million in 1989–90 and £164 million in 1990–91. These figures are substantially higher than the £125·6 million which appears in the relevant estimates for the present year, for two reasons. First, there is a substantial increase, rising from over £11 million in 1988–89 to almost £12 million in 1990–91, in the planned provision for museums and galleries out of the settlement I announced on 5 November; secondly, the total includes transfers of funding to the museums and galleries and the Museums and Galleries Commission in respect of services, including superannuation and the services of the Treasury Solicitor, for which the institutions will in future pay directly from their running costs, and property rates and certain rents which have been included in the provisions for building and maintenance work. The combined effect of these changes is to give a clearer picture of the total resources which the institutions as a group are receiving from central Government through the arts programme.Subject to parliamentary approval of Supply Estimates at the appropriate time, I propose that the allocations to specific institutions shall be as indicated in the following table. Excluding transfers, these figures amount to an increase of 15.9 per cent. for the three-year period as a whole. They are intended to give museums and galleries a firm base on which to plan their future activities and development. By providing the largest increase in the first year, they are intended to encourage early action to strengthen the institutions' management and financial position. Apart from the figures for building and maintenance in the second and third years, referred to in the table, the figures will not be reviewed in the course of the 1988–89 expenditure surveys unless the situation changes substantially in ways that cannot be foreseen today. The Government will consider in 1988 what provision to make for the last year of that survey, that is for 1991–92; and similarly in 1989 what provision to make for 1992–93, with a view to a rolling three-year programme.Provision for running costs is being increased to take account of particular needs. Each institution will receive increases over and above the forward planning figures notified first in the spring of this year. I am, in particular, providing increased grants for the Tate gallery to help with the costs of the gallery in Liverpool which is to open next year; for the Imperial war museum for the costs of fitting out the new galleries which will result from its major redevelopment scheme; and for the National gallery for the running costs of the new Sainsbury wing which is due to open in the final year of the period.Within my allocation for running costs, I have earmarked a total of £0.57 million to help the institutions through training and in other ways to improve their management and marketing. I have also made provision within my grant-in-aid to the Museums and Galleries Commission, which I announced on 5 November, to enable the commission to assist other museums and galleries in the same way.I have given careful thought to the question of purchase grants and decided that I must give a higher priority to the other, more pressing needs which the institutions have represented to me and which are reflected in my allocations for running costs and building and maintenance. Purchase grants will therefore remain in cash terms at their present levels for the time being.My allocations to the individual institutions include for the first time provision within their grant-in-aid for building and maintenance. The building and maintenance programme for most of the institutions which is at present managed by the Property Services Agency and carried on its Vote will, as I announced in July 1986, become the responsibility of the individual institutions from 1 April next; provision for it will be made in the Office of Arts and Libraries' Vote. My allocations for this purpose will total £48·47 million in 1988–89. This includes the increase of £6 million which I announced on 5 November would be devoted to strengthening the building and maintenance programme. I hope that the institutions will be able as a result to tackle their priority maintenance tasks and get the new system off to a good start. For 1989–90 and 1990–91 I have decided to allocate to individual institutions the bulk of the money for building and maintenance, but to keep for future allocation a margin of 25 to 30 per cent. of the total. The allocation of the margin, amounting to over £12 million in 1989–90 and nearly £15 million in 1990–91, will depend partly upon the plans which the institutions bring forward and the extent to which they can raise money for these from other sources.The national museums and galleries make a splendid contribution to conserving and displaying our national heritage. With the provisions I am making for the next three years and with the incentive which these provide to strengthen their financial position, I am confident that they will continue to do so, and that the institutions will welcome the firm basis which these allocations provide for their future planning and development.

    £ million
    Museums and Galleries1988–8911989–9011990–91
    British Museum
    Running costs15·66516·13216·594
    Building programme7·5805·7006·000
    Purchase grant1·4001·4001·400
    Sub Total24·64523·23223·994
    British Museum (Natural History)
    Running costs15·37015·77216·242
    Building programme6·7405·8005·600
    Purchase grant0·1900·1900·190
    Sub Total22·30021·76222·032
    Imperial War Museum
    Running costs6·3186·5156·129
    Building programme6·5202·7001·700
    Purchase grant0·1000·1000·100
    Sub Total12·9389·3157·929
    National Gallery
    Running costs5·2335·4066·208
    Building programme3·4903·3002·900
    Purchase grant2·7502·7502·750
    Sub Total11·47311·45611·858
    National Maritime Museum
    Running costs5·5305·6785·791
    Building programme2·5102·5002·000
    Purchase grant0·2050·2050·205
    Sub Total8·2458·3837·996
    National Museums and Galleries on Merseyside
    Running costs6·7806·9967·169
    Building programme2·6902·5002·400
    Purchase grant0·7500·7500·750
    Sub Total10·22010·24610·319

    Museums and Galleries

    1988–89

    1

    1989–90

    1

    1990–91

    National Portrait Gallery

    Running costs1·9962·0202·072
    Building programme3·0201·5001·500
    Purchase grant0·3100·3100·310
    Sub Total5·3263·8303·882

    Science Museum

    Running costs11·04711·37411·652
    Building programme5·2103·4003·500
    Purchase grant0·3750·3750·375
    Sub Total16·63215·14915·527

    Tale Gallery

    Running costs6·3006·5866·766
    Building programme2·7802·8002·900
    Purchase grant1·8151·8151·815
    Sub Total10·89511·20111·481

    Victoria and Albert Museum

    Running costs12·90013·31513·716
    Building programme7·4805·4005·400
    Purchase grant1·1451·1451·145
    Sub Total21·52519·86020·261

    Wallace Collection

    Running costs1·1491·1861·217
    Building programme0·4490·4000·400
    Purchase grant
    Sub Total1·5981·5861·617
    To be allocated later for building and maintenance work12·10014·700

    Running costs, including provision for building and maintenance

    Greater Manchester Museum of Science and Industry1·4731·5161·552
    Museum of London2·7762·8552·923
    Sir John Soane's Museum0·2750·2950·305
    Sub Total4·5244·6664·780
    Museums and Galleries Commission6·4816·6966·877
    Research and Support Services0·5000·5000·500
    Total157·302159·982163·753

    1 Individual provisions for the building programme in these two years will be increased when the full allocation is made.

    Reviewing Committee (Report)

    To ask the Minister for the Arts whether he is able to announce the publication date of the report of the Reviewing Committee on the Export of Works of Arts for the year ended 30 June.

    I have today presented the 33rd report of the Reviewing Committee on the Export of Works of Art for 1986–87. Copies have been placed in the Libraries of Parliament.

    Defence

    Exercise Firemen's Revenge

    To ask the Secretary of State for Defence (1) on whose authority the decision to hold the fourth battalion of the Parachute Regiment's exercise Firemen's Revenge on civilian property in an urban area was made; and what plans there are to hold further fighting in built-up area exercises on civilian property in urban areas;(2) if he will make a statement on the aims of, and lessons learned from, the fourth battalion of the Parachute Regiment's exercise Firemen's Revenge.

    Exercise Firemen's Revenge, which was designed to train members of the fourth battalion of the Parachute Regiment in fighting in built-up areas, was authorised by Headquarters North West District and took place at a derelict warehouse in Oldham on 19 and 20 June. The exercise was held with the full approval of the owners and of the local civil authorities, representatives of which were present during the exercise. Firemen's Revenge provided good military training value and demonstrated the importance of the full co-operation of the local civil authorities to the success of exercises of this sort. There are no further specific proposals to hold such exercises, but the Army will continue to look for suitable opportunities for training of this kind when it can be done without undue public inconvenience.

    Aids

    To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what contingency plans his Department has made in the event of an AIDS epidemic among members of Her Majesty's forces; and if he will make a statement.

    There is no indication that an epidemic among service personnel is likely. However, each service has a hospital which is designated as an AIDS reception centre. Patients will be treated in accordance with normal medical and nursing procedures.

    Chemical Weapons

    To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what the current imbalance is in chemical weapons between NATO and the Warsaw pact.

    The Soviet Union commands the world's largest and most sophisticated chemical warfare capability. It has produced and stockpiled a wide variety of chemical agents and munitions and has a massive tonnage of nerve agents alone. No chemical weapons are declared to NATO, but by comparison the United States possesses a limited and aging retaliatory capability, which it plans to modernise. Given the overwhelming Soviet superiority, the Government place the highest priority on the negotiation of a comprehensive and verifiable worldwide ban on chemical weapons.

    Alarm

    To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what is the approximate estimated increase in the purchase price of the air-launched anti-radiation missile caused by the problems with its motor; if there will be an inquiry into the causes of this increase in costs and if British Aerospace will be meeting this additional cost.

    The increase in the purchase price of ALARM caused by problems with the rocket motor is substantial. British Aerospace is meeting a significant part of the additional costs and the programme is continuing at no financial risk to the Department. Precise details of this arrangement are a commercial matter between the Department and BAe. I do not propose to hold any further inquiry into the causes of the increase in cost.

    International Military Services

    To ask the Secretary of State for Defence if the International Military Services office in Teheran is still open.

    To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what rent is paid for the International Military Services office in Teheran; and to whom.

    Overseas Territories (British Troops)

    To ask the Secretary of State for Defence if he will list the countries in which Britain currently has troops.

    The countries and dependencies in which there is a British military presence are as follows:

    • Ascension Island
    • Belize
    • British Indian Ocean Territory (Diego Garcia)
    • Brunei
    • Canada
    • Cyprus
    • Falkland Islands (including South Georgia)
    • Federal Republic of Germany (including Berlin)
    • Gibraltar
    • Hong Kong
    • Norway Sardinia
    The list excludes loan service and seconded personnel serving in a number of countries and dependencies throughout the world, and those in NATO appointments.

    Trade And Industry

    South Africa

    77.

    To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster what are the latest figures Mailable to him on the investment of British companies in the Republic of South Africa.

    I refer the hon. Member to the information published in British Business (3 July 1987). A copy of this is available in the House of Commons' Library.

    Barnsley

    To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster if, in the light of the evidence published by Barnsley metropolitan district council of the dispropor-tionate fall in employment in its area, he will now extend to Barnsley development area status.

    Electronics

    To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster by how much the percentage of Britain's domestic market met by imports of electronics changed between 1979 and June 1987; and what was the comparable figure in the average, best and worst performing Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development country.

    Fifty-two per cent. of the United Kingdom's home demand for electronics was met by imports in 1979. This compares with 70 per cent. in the year ended 31 March 1987, the latest period for which figures are available.Comparable data for other OECD countries are not available.

    Estate Agents Act 1979

    To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster if he will carry out a general review into the working and effectiveness of the Estate Agents Act 1979.

    Mergers (Control Procedures)

    To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster when he will publish the report on the review of merger control procedures.

    My right hon. and noble Friend expects to publish the outcome of the review in the new year.

    Textiles (Turkey)

    To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster what is the total percentage duty payable on exports to Turkey of a tonne of synthetic filament yarn; if he will give a breakdown of the figure by basic tariff, housing fund, municipal tax, customs charges, stamp duty, import premium and wharf dues; and if he will publish the comparable figures in each case faced by similar exports from Turkey to the United Kingdom.

    All imports to Turkey are currently subject to the following:

    Municipal tax — 15 per cent. of applicable import duty
    Customs charges (including stamp tax)—2 per cent. approximately of cif value
    Stamp duty—8 per cent. of cif value
    Import premium—6 per cent. of cif value
    Wharf dues—5 per cent. of the sum of the cif value plus import duty, municipal tax and stamp tax on customs declarations.
    There is no single rate of duty applicable to the goods specified in the question. Import duties levied on synthetic filament yarn range from 5 to 40 per cent. Goods covered under 51·01 (yarn made of man-made continuous fibres, suitable for weaving, [except polyamide and polyester-based yarns of over 600 denier size]) are additionally subject to a housing fund surcharge of $50 per tonne.The equivalent Turkish goods may be imported into the United Kingdom free of all import duties.

    To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster what is the total percentage duty payable on exports to Turkey of one kilogram of cotton cloth; if he will give a breakdown of the figure by basic tariff, housing fund, municipal tax, customs charges, stamp duty, import premium and wharf dues; and what are the comparable figures in each case faced by similar exports from Turkey to the United Kingdom.

    Municipal tax — 15 per cent. of applicable import duty
    Customs charges (including stamp tax)—2 per cent. approximately of cif value
    Stamp duty—8 per cent. of cif value
    Import premium—6 per cent. of cif value
    Wharf dues—5 per cent. of the sum of the cif value plus import duty, municipal tax and stamp tax on customs declarations.
    In addition, imports into Turkey of cotton cloth are liable to:

    Import duty
  • (a) Not fashioned—20 per cent. cif or
  • (b) Fashioned—30 per cent. cif and
  • Housing fund—US$2 per kg.

    The equivalent Turkish goods may be imported to the United Kingdom free of all import duties.

    To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster what is the total percentage duty payable on exports to Turkey of one tonne of synthetic staple fibre; if he will give a breakdown of the figure by basic tariff, housing fund, municipal tax, customs charges, stamp duty, import premium and wharf dues; and what is the comparable figure in each case faced by similar exports from Turkey to the United Kingdom.

    All imports to Turkey are currently subject to the following:

    Municipal tax — 15 per cent. of applicable import duty.
    Customs charges (including stamp tax)—2 per cent. approximately of cif value.
    Stamp duty—8 per cent. of cif value.
    Import premium—6 per cent. of cif value.
    Wharf dues—5 per cent. of the sum of the cif value plus import duty, municipal tax and stamp tax on customs declarations.
    In addition, imports into Turkey of synthetic staple fibre are liable to:

    Import duty—8 per cent. cif.
    Housing fund—US$50 per tonne.

    The equivalent Turkish goods may be imported to the United Kingdom free of all import duties.

    To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster what is the total percentage duty payable on exports to Turkey of wool cloth; if he will give a breakdown of the figure by basic tariff, housing fund, municipal tax, customs charges, stamp duty, import premium and wharf dues; and what are the comparable figures in each case faced by similar exports from Turkey to the United Kingdom.

    All imports to Turkey are currently subject to the following:

    Municipal tax — 15 per cent. of applicable import duty.
    Customs charges (including stamp tax)—2 per cent. approximately of cif value.
    Stamp duty—8 per cent. of cif value.
    Import premium—6 per cent. of cif value.
    Wharf dues — 5 per cent. of the sum of the cif value plus import duty, municipal tax and stamp tax on customs declarations.
    In addition, imports into Turkey of wool cloth are liable to:

    Import duty—20 per cent. cif.
    Housing fund—US$10 per kg.

    The equivalent Turkish goods may be imported to the United Kingdom free of all import duties.

    To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster what is the total percentage duty payable on exports to Turkey of knitted wool outerware; if he will give a breakdown of the figure by basic tariff, housing fund, municipal tax, customs charges, stamp duty, import premium and wharf dues; and what are the comparable figures in each case faced by similar exports to the United Kingdom.

    All imports to Turkey are currently subject to the following:

    Municipal tax — 15 per cent. of applicable import duty.
    Customs charges (including stamp tax)—2 per cent. approximately of cif value.
    Stamp duty—8 per cent. of cif value.
    Import premium—6 per cent. of cif value.
    Wharf dues—5 per cent. of the sum of the cif value plus import duty, municipal tax and stamp tax on customs declarations.
    In addition, imports into Turkey of Knitted Wool Outerware are liable to:

    Import duty—40 per cent. cif.
    Housing fund—Nil.

    The equivalent Turkish goods may be imported to the United Kingdom free of all import duties.

    To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster what is the total percentage duty payable on exports to Turkey of spun synthetic yarn; if he will give a breakdown of the figure by basic tariff, housing fund, municipal tax, customs charges, stamp duty, import premium and wharf dues; and what are the comparable figures in each case faced by similar exports from Turkey to the United Kingdom.

    All imports to Turkey are currently subject to the following:

    Municipal tax — 15 per cent. of applicable import duty.
    Customs charges (including Stamp tax)—2 per cent. approximately of cif value.
    Stamp duty—8 per cent. of cif value.
    Import premium—6 per cent. of cif value.
    Wharf dues—5 per cent. of the sum of the cif value plus import duty, municipal tax and stamp tax on customs declarations.
    In addition, spun synthetic yarn imported into Turkey is subject to an import duty of either 8 per cent. or 30 per cent. depending on the definition, and a housing fund surcharge of $50 per tonne.The equivalent Turkish goods may be imported to the United Kingdom free of all import duties.

    Credit Cards

    To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster if he has any figures on the number of non-payments of debts incurred through the use of credit cards; and if he will make a statement.

    No. The credit statistics published by my Department do not identify numbers of individuals encountering debt problems incurred through the use of credit cards. However, I understand that from figures produced by the major credit card companies that about 1 per cent. of their customers encounter long-term difficulties in repayment.

    Doorstep Selling

    To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster when he will introduce regulations to implement the European Community directive on doorstep selling.

    The Consumer Protection (Cancellation of Contracts concluded away from Business Premises) Regulations 1987 were laid before Parliament today. They provide for a seven-day cooling-off period during which consumers have the right to cancel a contract for goods or services entered into during an unsolicited visit by a trader to their home or place of work. The regulations apply, with some exceptions, to cash and credit contracts worth more than £35. They will come into force on 1 July 1988.

    Unfair Trade Unit

    To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster what is the budget of the unfair trade unit; how many staff are employed by this unit; and what is its publicity budget.

    [holding answer 14 December 1987]: The unfair trade unit is concerned with complaints about unfairly traded imports and currently employs nine staff. Its total budget for the 1987–88 financial year is £179,000. The cost of its publicity activities, which include briefings by members of the unit and the distribution of an information pack, are met from the unit's budget or the departmental budget as appropriate.

    To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster how many cases the unfair trade unit dealt with in the last 12 months; how many of these cases have involved the European Community Commission; and how many of these cases have resulted in representations being made to foreign Governments by (a) the European Community Commission and (b) Her Majesty's Government.

    [holding answer 14 December 1987]: Anti-dumping and countervailing action are the responsibility of the European Commission.In the last 12 months the unfair trade unit has been involved in 32 anti-dumping cases under investigation by the Commission and has responded to more than 60 inquiries about the possibility of taking anti-dumping action or countering other unfair practices.

    To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster how many staff were employed to examine and advise on hidden trade barriers prior to the establishment of the unfair trade unit.

    [holding answer 14 December 1987]: Examining and advising on hidden trade barriers affecting British exports remains one of the responsibilities of the overseas trade divisions. Their staffing level was not affected by the establishment of the unfair trade unit, which deals with unfairly traded imports.

    To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster whether the unfair trade unit has published any of its findings.

    [holding answer 14 December 1987]: The results of anti-dumping investigations are published in British Business and, where appropriate, Ministers announce the result of cases taken up bilaterally.

    Inner City Task Force

    To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster if he will publish a table for each inner city task

    Task force area—North Kensington
    AgePopulationSEGPopulationSocial ClassPopulation
    0–41,7211850I670
    5–91,56421,670II3,290
    10–141,8873240IIIN2,590
    153934390HIM2,290
    16–191,7615·11,660IV2,240
    20–242,5425·2260V920
    25–292,50762,180Armed Forces910
    30–342,23172,200Retired 11,350
    35–391,7078340Retired 23,100
    40–441,58292,590Retired 31,860
    45–491,418102,400
    50–541,487111,690
    55–591,47212900
    60–641,083130
    65–691,0961410
    70–748921510
    75–796841640
    80–85339171,180
    85+211
    Tenure—Housing by household
    TotalPurpose flatSeparate entranceSelf containedNon self containedNon permanent
    Owner occupied freehold64323477117260
    Owner occupied leasehold77315723437390
    Council etc.3,9313,347399156290
    Housing association3,1311,644433985690
    Rent and business12011100
    By employment120160621620
    Other rented unfurnished8021162325601260
    Other rented furnished1,160441875553740
    Employment
    Number
    Total economic active13,488
    Working11,294
    Not working2,194
    Task force area—Coventry
    AgePopulationSEGPopulationSocial ClassPopulation
    0–43,1241210I180
    5–92,80921,330II1,420
    10–143,160380IIIN1,650
    155294290HIM3,850
    16–192,4635·1870IV4,120
    20–243,4215·2190V1,770
    25–292,6476980Armed Forces1,390
    30–341,9857730Retired 11,530
    35–391,6078870Retired 25,010
    40–441,61997,990Retired 33,320
    45–491,557107,090
    50–541,646114,110
    55–591,690121,340
    60–641,631130

    force area, drawn from 1981 census figures, showing the total population broken down by the usual census categories for age, social class, employment, housing, tenure, socio-economic group, together with a statement of any estimates of change since 1981 made by his Department.

    [pursuant to his reply, 14 December 1987, c. 333]: The information requested is as follows, based on 1981 census figures. It is not possible to give an estimate of change since 1981. However, it should be noted that the data reflect local authority wards as at 1981, and some of these boundaries have since changed.

    Age

    Population

    SEG

    Population

    Social Class

    Population

    65–691,392140
    70–741,1581520
    75–798471640
    80–85439171,650
    85+263

    Tenure—Housing by household

    Total

    Purpose flat

    Separate entrance

    Self contained

    Non self contained

    Non permanent

    Owner occupied freehold5,492195,416352210
    Owner occupied leasehold16756110104
    Council etc.3,4761,6631,79319115
    Housing association6722583822930
    Rent and business13112000
    By employment77370400
    Other rented unfurnished7123259573120
    Other rented furnished46921681621370

    Employment

    Number

    Total economic active14,302
    Working10,850
    Not working3,452

    Task force area—Nottingham

    Age

    Population

    SEG

    Population

    Social Class

    Population

    0–41,8211400I210
    5–91,7202790II1,540
    10–142,014350IIIN1,600
    154064250IIIM2,730
    16–191,8255·1700IV2,740
    20–242,9265·2180V1,330
    Armed
    25–291,96861,490Forces910
    30–341,4837460Retired 11,860
    35–391,0938530Retired 23,060
    40–441,21295,000Retired 32,800
    45–491,227104,390
    50–541,350111,940
    55–591,374121,210
    60–641,130130
    65–691,091140
    70–741,011150
    75–797021640
    80–85435171,160
    85+320

    Tenure—Housing by household

    Total

    Purpose flat

    Separate entrance

    Self contained

    Non self contained

    Non permanent

    Owner occupied freehold3,630213,51862290
    Owner occupied leasehold17936134450
    Council etc.3,0791,8101,22117481
    Housing association419253266170
    Rent and business32030010
    By employment70463210
    Other rented unfurnished1,42071,260117360
    Other rented furnished1,00783173443380

    Employment

    Number

    Total economic active11,538
    Working8,982
    Not working2,556

    Task force area—Moss Side, Manchester

    Age

    Population

    SEG

    Population

    Social Class

    Population

    0–42,2991280I430
    5–92,13421,030II1,870
    10–142,7673110IIIN2,100
    155864710IIIM3,030
    16–192,8395·11,400IV3,180
    20–244,8915·230V1,740
    25–292,86962,000Armed Forces1,510
    30–341,89171,080Retired 11,790
    35–391,5758620Retired 24,240
    40–441,68495,540Retired 34,860
    45–491,641103,930
    50–541,763112,880
    55–591,707121,320
    60–641,364130
    65–691,209140
    70–741,0601550
    75–797001640
    80–85464171,400
    85+254

    Tenure—Housing by household

    Total

    Purpose flat

    Separate entrance

    Self contained

    Non self contained

    Non permanent

    Owner occupied freehold1,651401,57520160
    Owner occupied leasehold1,0971229492150
    Council etc.7,5984,5702,9299182
    Housing association2711211331340
    Rent and business28026200
    By employment13119107230
    Other rented unfurnished6476249658310
    Other rented furnished9971512142763560

    Employment

    Number

    Total economic active14,966
    Working11,237
    Not working3,729

    Task force area—Spitalfields

    Age

    Population

    SEG

    Population

    Social Class

    Population

    0–41,5991180I60
    5–91,30021,200II1,040
    10–141,181310IIIN1,370
    15235480IIIM2,000
    16–191,2115·1470IV3,060
    20–242,1105·250V1,140
    25–291,52861,130Armed Forces1,040
    30–349977860Retired 11,140
    35–398648370Retired 22,580
    40–441,28993,170Retired 31,490
    45–491,408103,690
    50–541,478111,770
    55–591,293121,790
    60–641,139130
    65–691,086140
    70–74937150
    75–79679160
    80–85342171,250
    85+184

    Tenure—Housing by household

    Total

    Purpose flat

    Separate entrance

    Self contained

    Non self contained

    Non permanent

    Owner occupied freehold1531510417170
    Owner occupied leasehold130425720110
    Council etc.5,2164,666455593635
    Housing association4565554144160
    Rent and business24320100

    Total

    Purpose flat

    Separate entrance

    Self contained

    Non self contained

    Non permanent

    By employment1378140880
    Other rented unfurnished81924329331201
    Other rented furnished39399331631620

    Employment

    Number

    Total economic active10,372
    Working8,493
    Not working1,879

    Task force area—Chapel Town, Leeds

    Age

    Population

    SEG

    Population

    Social Class

    Population

    0–44,38611,620I660
    5–94,29122,350II4,190
    10–145,242390IIIN4,800
    151,11541,360IIIM7,180
    16–193,7595·13,380IV6,410
    20–246,6105·2240V3,220
    25–294,93464,360Armed Forces2,440
    30–343,97171,850Retired 13,750
    35–392,97881,430Retired 28,310
    40–443,224912,800Retired 315,420
    45–493,278109,360
    50–543,461116,380
    55–593,464122,330
    60–642,944130
    65–693,070140
    70–742,7031550
    75–791,963160
    80–841,133173,400
    85+666

    Tenure—Housing by household

    Total

    Purpose flat

    Separate entrance

    Self contained

    Non self contained

    Non permanent

    Owner occupied freehold8,382558,173109451
    Owner occupied leasehold413902902851
    Council etc.10,5073,4896,469521280
    Housing association1,089395551129140
    Rent and business34232000
    By employment16836122820
    Other rented unfurnished1,978341,664231490
    Other rented furnished1,850446676814580

    Employment

    Number

    Total economic active29,583
    Working23,671
    Not working5,912

    Task force area—Handsworth, Birmingham

    Age

    Population

    SEG

    Population

    Social Class

    Population

    0–45,3551260I240
    5–95,11021,740II1,910
    10–146,1523140IIIN2,680
    151,1054320IIIM5,870
    16–194,7225·11,080IV6,620
    20–245,0855·270V2,570
    25–293,95362,200Armed Forces3,630
    30–342,9497960Retired 12,340
    35–392,39681,150Retired 28,350
    40–442,915914,920Retired 33,580
    45–492,9011012,390
    50–542,942116,140
    55–592,598122,040
    60–642,170130
    65–691,815140

    Age

    Population

    SEG

    Population

    Social Class

    Population

    70–741,3551530
    75–791,0501630
    80–85582174,430
    85+360

    Tenure—Housing by household

    Total

    Purpose flat

    Separate entrance

    Self contained

    Non self contained

    Non permanent

    Owner occupied freehold6,369256,147139581
    Owner occupied leasehold2,163822,02641140
    Council etc.4,0601,1252,770147181
    Housing association1,570169896478270
    Rent and business18017100
    By employment1379119810
    Other rented unfurnished1,23080935157580
    Other rented furnished967202693503280

    Employment

    Number

    Total economic active23,656
    Working17,139
    Not working6,517

    Task force area—Doncaster

    Age

    Population

    SEG

    Population

    Social Class

    Population

    0–43,57611,270I530
    5–93,68422,910II3,670
    10–144,5993300IIIN4,450
    151,0014970IIIM8,570
    16–194,3665·12,540IV6,470
    20–245,1735·2230V2,940
    25–294,29562,730Armed Forces1,470
    30–344,0007960Retired 14,280
    35–393,11682,680Retired 29,710
    40–443,115918,390Retired 36,200
    45–493,2501010,020
    50–543,601113,260
    55–594,085122,370
    60–643,46613100
    65–693,199140
    70–742,54415120
    75–791,83216290
    80–851,066171,160
    85+588

    Tenure—Housing by household

    Total

    Purpose flat

    Separate entrance

    Self contained

    Non self contained

    Non permanent

    Owner occupied freehold12,293412,192663189
    Owner occupied leasehold2001318232129
    Council etc.6,5681,2565,2842081
    Housing association1708779400
    Rent and business39038100
    By employment3406328600
    Other rented unfurnished2,234402,0071454221
    Other rented furnished1,226345940635823

    Employment

    Number

    Total economic active28,049
    Working24,081
    Not working3,968

    Task force area—Rochdale

    Age

    Population

    SEG

    Population

    Social Class

    Population

    0–43,98711,550I390
    5–93,80423,180II3,160

    Age

    Population

    SEG

    Population

    Social Class

    Population

    10–144,4823150IIIN3,460
    158264640IIIM6,070
    16–193,4625·11,640IV6,280
    20–244,0885·2330V2,620
    25–293,58063,150Armed Forces1.080
    30–343,2987600Retired 13,860
    35–392,65382,290Retired 26,470
    40–442,721910,960Retired 34,120
    45–492,6471010,970
    50–542,766114,770
    55–593,012121,860
    60–642,3581340
    65–692,506140
    70–742,2281530
    75–791,59