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Short Title, Commencement, Interpretation And Extent

Volume 127: debated on Friday 12 February 1988

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'(1) This Act may be cited as the Consumer Arbitration Agreements Act 1988.
(2) This Act shall have effect in relation to contracts made on or after such day as the Secretary of State may by order made by statutory instrument appoint; and different days may be so appointed for different provisions and different purposes.
(3) In this Act "the Act of 1977" means the Unfair Contract Terms Act 1977.
(4) Sections 1 to 3, section (Power of court to disapply section 1 where no detriment to consumer) and section (Orders adding to the causes of action to which section 1 applies) above do not extend to Scotland, sections (Arbitration agreements: Scotland), (Power of court to disapply section (Arbitration agreements: Scotland) where no detriment to consumer) and (Construction of sections (Arbitration agreements: Scotland) and (Power of court to disapply section (Arbitration agreements: Scotland) where no detriment to consumer)) extend to Scotland only, and this Act, apart from sections (Arbitration agreements: Scotland), (Power of court to disapply section (Arbitration agreements: Scotland) where no detriment to consumer) and (Construction of sections (Arbitration agreements: Scotland) and (Power of court to disapply section (Arbitration agreements: Scotland) where no detriment to consumer)), extends to Northern Ireland.'.— [Mr. Pawsey.]

Brought up, read the First and Second time, and added to the Bill.

Bill, as amended, to be reported.

Bill, as amended, to be considered on Friday 15 April.

2.37 pm

On a point of order, Mr. Deputy Speaker. I wish it to be known that the objection to the Housing (Houses in Multiple Occupation) Bill came from one solitary Member, the Government Whip. I wish that to be recorded in the Official Report as 300 people have died in house fires.

Order. First, that is not a point of order. Secondly, the hon, Gentleman must not seek to make a speech to explain why he thinks that it is a point of order.