Skip to main content

South Africa

Volume 130: debated on Wednesday 30 March 1988

The text on this page has been created from Hansard archive content, it may contain typographical errors.

21.

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what initiatives Her Majesty's Government have taken since 1979 about the repeated South African invasions of Angolan territory, the illegal occupation of Namibia and the repression of black South Africans.

We have been active throughout in urging the withdrawal of South African troops from Angola. As a member of the contact group, we have also been closely involved in negotiations for Namibian independence. We have repeatedly called for an early end to apartheid, and sought to encourage dialogue between all South Africans across the racial divide.

23.

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what representations he has made to the Government of South Africa concerning the administration of justice in South Africa.

32.

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs if he will list all the initiatives taken since 1979 by Her Majesty's Government, alone or with member nations of the United Nations or European Community, regarding (a) apartheid in South Africa, (b) the illegal occupation of Namibia by South Africa, (c) the repeated violation of the territory of Angola by South African troops and (d) the funding of mercenary troops in Mozambique.

We have taken every opportunity bilaterally, with European Community partners, the Commonwealth and through the United Nations to urge on the South African Government the need to end apartheid, to implement the United Nation plan for Namibian independence, to withdraw from Angola, and to pursue a peaceful policy towards her neighbours. We shall continue to do so.

47.

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what recent assessment he has made of the benefits to the United Kingdom of maintaining normal diplomatic relationships with South Africa; and if he will make a statement.

Without diplomatic relations it would not be possible for us to influence the South African Government or to maintain contact with a wide range of opinion in South Africa including many members of the parliamentary and extra-parliamentary opposition, the Churches and trades unions. We use our contacts with the South African Government to seek to persuade them of the need for peaceful but fundamental change, to allow the United Nation plan for Namibian independence to go ahead, and to withdraw from Angola.

61.

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs when he next intends to meet the South African ambassador in London; and if he will make a statement on the recent contacts between his Department and representatives of the South African Government following the decision on the Sharpeville Six of 18 March.

My right hon. and learned Friend has no present plans to meet the South African ambassador. On the "Sharpeville Six", I have nothing to add to what I told the House on 16 and 17 March.

66.

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what representations he has made to the South African Government regarding the new restrictions imposed upon certain organisations.

My right hon. and learned Friend issued a statement on 24 February condemning these restrictions, following which I summoned the South African ambassador for the same purpose on 25 February. Her Majesty's ambassador at Cape Town has also made plain our views to the South African Government.